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Pasos para instalar Mac en PC

Hacer una Hackintosh es algo muy complicado, de chiripasos yo logre instalarlo en una maquina virtual y siempre tenia problemas con el audio y todo eso, segn creo que lo hize con "Kalyway" osea seria "Mac OS X Leopard Kalyway" que no es el verdadero Mac Os, sino uno modificado para que funcione en otra Pc, es igual que el "iAtkos" que tambin es un Mac Os modificado, pero si lo quieres hacer con el original pesa algo de 7GB y un poco mas, y es (.dmg) y sera algo complicado que lo conviertas a (.iso) y este funcione correctamente en una Pc, asi que lo mejor sera que te consigas un "iAtkos" o "Kalyway" muy bueno, aparte tendrs que modificar la Bios para que funcione.... Y otra cosa es que Mac Os trabaja solo con Intel, si tuviste la oportunidad de ver por dentro una Macbook o Imac, veras que todo es Intel, asi que la posibilidad de que lo hagas con un disco original queda nula, "iAtkos" y "Kalyway" tambin es para intel, pero por hay vi que tambin sacaron para AMD. Ojala y puedas hacer la hackintosh, pero mucho mejor hubiese querido que toda tu Pc sea Intel.

REQUERIMIENTOS
--Pendrive 8gb formateado fat o fat32. --560Ti series is only supported in Lion and Mountain Lion The older cards in the 8000, 9000, and 200 series usually work with Mac OS X out of the box, meaning that you don't have to install any extra drivers or kexts to enable full graphics support. If you're not so lucky, you may have to install NVEnabler, a graphics kext available in Multibeast 3.7.2 (which you can download from tonymacx86's download archives). If you're looking for something a bit newer and more powerful, most of the cards in the NVIDIA 400, 500, or 600 series work with Mac OS X. In fact, the NVIDIA GTX 680 is the most powerful graphics card that you can buy for a Hackintosh (OS X does not support the unique dual-GPU design of the higher-end GTX 690). However, the 500 series is only supported in Lion and Mountain Lion, while the 600 series is only supported in Mountain Lion and version 10.7.5 of Lion. If you're running Mac OS X Snow Leopard, install the official drivers from NVIDIA to enable graphic support for the 400 series (some 400-series cards work out of the box, but this is less common). If you're running Lion with a 400 or 500-series card, install OpenCL Enabler in Multibeast 4. If you're running Mountain Lion with a 400-series card, install OpenCL Enabler in Multibeast 5. If you're running Mountain Lion with a 500 or

600 series card, the graphics should already work by default without any drivers, though you still need to install OpenCL Enabler if you want OpenCL. As always, these drivers are hit and miss. If you need CUDA support, there are some official CUDA drivers for Mac OS X as well. When installing OS X Mountain Lion on a Hackintosh with a 600series graphics card, you will have to use the boot flag "GraphicsEnabler=No" (without quotation marks) to turn off GraphicsEnabler, a standard Hackintosh feature designed to improve graphics support. This is because 600-series graphics cards no longer require GraphicsEnabler. Some low-end NVIDIA cards have serious compatibility issues with OS X Mountain Lion, including the GT 430, GTS 450, GTX 550 Ti, GT 620, and GT 630. While these problems were temporarily fixed in version 10.8.1 of Mountain Lion, they have started to happen again in version 10.8.2. For now, avoid these graphics card models if you can. If you're looking to buy the cheapest graphics card possible for your Hackintosh, consider buying an Intel processor that uses an integrated Intel HD 3000 graphics card. Alternatively, if you want to buy a separate graphics card for your Hackintosh, you can buy an old NVIDIA graphics card from the NVIDIA 8000, 9000, or 200 series. If you want a reliable, mid-end graphics card that will work out of the box with Mac OS X, you can buy a mid-end NVIDIA graphics card in the 500 or 600 series. Alternatively, you could always choose something in the AMD Radeon 5000 or 6000 series (but not the 6900 series). If you want the most powerful graphics card possible, you might want to consider buying a graphics card in the higher end of NVIDIA's 500 series or 600 series. If you're just interested in Mac OS X for some light web browsing or checking your email, then you might not even need a separate ("discrete") graphics card at all. To many people, the built-in graphics card on their processor or motherboard will be enough. Unfortunately, Mac OS X may not necessarily agree. Supported by Mac OS X Intel HD 3000 Intel HD 4000 Having compatible hardware in a Hackintosh (a PC running Mac OS X) makes the difference between success and failure. If you're interested in installing Mac OS X on your PC, it's important to know what hardware is compatible and what isn't. Hackintosh compatibility varies, depending on whether your computer was self-built or prebuilt, and whether it's a desktop PC or a laptop. (If you don't know what hardware your current computer has, use a program like CPU-Z.) LAST UPDATED: December 9, 2012

This article will help you determine whether your current PC can run Mac OS X. However, if you're looking to build an entirely new computer for Hackintoshing, the easiest route is always to follow tonymacx86's CustoMac build recommendations, or our own list of cheap Hackintosh builds. If you don't want to build your own computer, check out our 2012 laptop buying guide, or our overview of the Dell XPS 8300 (which is pretty much the only well-documented, prebuilt desktop Hackintosh).

Self-Built Computers
Motherboard: If your computer's motherboard was designed for Intel processors,
and was manufactured in 2010-2012, there is a pretty good chance that it will work with Mac OS X. Motherboards made before 2010 are a lot trickier to work with, and may not be worth the effort. Brand-wise, motherboards made by Gigabyte are the best-supported, since they're the only boards that work by default with the CPU power management service built into Mac OS X. Most Gigabyte motherboards have DSDT files available in the DSDT section of tonymacx86, which is immensely helpful. DSDT files are configuration files that make Mac OS X to work with your specific motherboard (the DSDT for one motherboard will not work with another motherboard). And the newest Gigabyte motherboards, which use UEFI instead of BIOS, don't even need a DSDT file. If you don't have a Gigabyte motherboard, check out tonymacx86's DSDT section to see if they have a DSDT for your motherboard anyways. If tonymacx86 doesn't have the right DSDT file, consider patching your own DSDT file with DSDT Editor (*). If your non-Gigabyte motherboard uses UEFI, it won't need a DSDT file; however, it will still need a patched BIOS file to work fully. Whether you have a Gigabyte motherboard or a non-Gigabyte motherboard, be sure to search Google for specific Hackintoshing instructions on your particular motherboard. For example, if you have a Asus P8Z68-V LX Motherboard, then search "P8Z68-V LX hackintosh" on Google. Besides Gigabyte, ASUS is the second most popular motherboard brand for Hackintoshes, so you can often find a lot of Hackintoshing guides about ASUS boards on Google. You might also find Hackintoshing guides on motherboards from other brands, but they are far less common than guides for Gigabyte and ASUS boards. If there is no patched BIOS currently available for your motherboard, extract a file copy of your motherboard's current BIOS by using DPCIManager (follow Steps 2-4 of this guide for more details). You can then request your BIOS file to be patched by posting a linking to the un-patched BIOS file in this thread on tonymacx86 (registration required).

* How to make your own DSDT with DSDT Editor

DSDTs are configuration files that tell Mac OS X how to use your Hackintosh's motherboard, without the need for extra kexts and drivers. A DSDT will make it a lot easier to enable sleep mode on your Hackintosh, and it will also fix any bootup problems related to your CPU. The newest Gigabyte motherboards no longer require DSDT files. And older Gigabyte motherboards have DSDT files available in tonymacx86's DSDT database. However, if you own a non-Gigabyte motherboard, you usually have to make your own DSDT. Editing DSDTs is extremely complicated, but you can automate this editing process by applying a patch with DSDT Editor instead.

Requirements

DSDT Editor: Self-explanatory; this is a tool for editing DSDTs. You can make very advanced edits with DSDT Editor, but for this tutorial, we'll just be using the "Patch" function.

The main editor windows allows the user to open a DSL file or extract the DSDT from IOReg. It has some useful resources, like syntax highlighting, navigation tree and some options that came with the text editor component it uses, like regex matching, auto completion, jump to pair, etc.

The patcher window parses a script-like language representing the patches. The user can preview the modifications before applying them. This "language" allows us to write dynamic patches that can be applied in various situations. More specific commands can be written as they become necessary. For now these are the implemented commands (which can be stacked separated by ";") Quote (estos son los commandos): syntax: into <type> <property1> <property_argument1> [<property2> <property_argument2> ... <propertyN> <property_argumentN>] <action> begin [action_argument] end (will be applied to the first occurrence) into_all <type> <property1> <property_argument1> [<property2> <property_argument2> ... <propertyN> <property_argumentN>] <action> begin [action_argument] end (will be applied to all occurrences) where type: DefinitionBlock, Scope, Method, Device, Processor, ThermalZone, All property: label -- first argument for the constructor of selected type name_adr -- Name (_ADR) value name_hid -- Name (_HID) value code_regex -- regular expression to match the code of the selected type (not other types inside of it) code_regex_not -- regular expression NOT to match the code of the selected type (not other types inside of it) parent_label -- parent label parent_type -- parent type parent_adr -- parent _ADR value parent_hid -- parent _HID value action: insert <code> -- inserts the provided code to the type set_label <new_label> -- sets the label replace_matched <code> -- replaces the matched code for the property with the provided code. Regex groups are inserted with %1, %2, ... up to %9 replaceall_matched <code> -- same as replace_matched but will affect all matches remove_matched -- removes the matched code removeall_matched -- removes all the ocurrencies of the matched code

remove_entry -- removes the entry and all children nodes replace_content -- replaces the content of the object (everything inside its main brackets) store_%8 -- stores the matched group 1 into %8 store_%9 -- stores the matched group 1 into %9 note: replacer will always consider the last provided value Changes in latest release:

fixed bug which caused data loss if number of open and close brackets don't match fixed compile window to work with new IASL versions updated IASL to 20120420

Download: (last updated on 17/May/2012) Mac OS: DSDTEditor_Mac.zip Linux and Windows: DSDTEditor_Linux_Windows.zip

A Hackintosh with Mac OS X Snow Leopard or Lion installed: DSDT Editor is a Mac app, so you have to install Mac OS X on your Hackintosh beforehand. If your Hackintosh isn't fully set up yet, you can boot Mac OS X with iBoot, Unibeast, or some other temporary solution for now.

A patch for your Hackintosh's motherboard: http://olarila.com/forum/packs.php A patch is a text file that contains the necessary DSDT edits for your motherboard. Patches are motherboard-specific; a patch for one motherboard model won't work with any other motherboards. You can download a patch for your specific motherboard from olarila.com (you need to register on olarila.com to view and download the patches).

In this tutorial, you will use DSDT Editor to extract an unedited DSDT straight from your Hackintosh's motherboard. Then, you will create a new, edited DSDT with the patch file that you downloaded. In some ways, patching your own DSDT is more convenient than using a pre-edited DSDT from tonymacx86; unlike pre-edited DSDTs, patches will work with any BIOS version of your motherboard.

Process
1. Open DSDT Editor, and go to File->'Extract DSDT' from the menu bar.

This will create an unedited copy of your motherboard's DSDT. If you get an error at this step, check /Extra in your main hard drive and make sure that there isn't already a file called "DSDT.aml" inside it. If so, delete that file, or move it somewhere else. Once you've successfully extracted an unedited DSDT from your motherboard, go to the next step, where we edit the file by using a patch. 2. Go to Patch->Open from the menu bar. In the window that pops up, choose the patch that you downloaded from Olarila.

Another window (named "Patch") will pop up. Click "Apply" to apply the changes in the patch to your unedited DSDT.

3. Go to IASL->Compile. This will create a new DSDT that includes the edits in the patch, and it checks that file for errors. If everything went right, you should get 0 errors.

4. Go to IASL->'Save AML as'. A save window will pop up. Name your new DSDT as "DSDT.aml", and save the file in /Extra of your hard drive.

Once you've saved your DSDT to /Extra, you're done. Reboot, and your Hackintosh will now be running with a DSDT. Congratulations!

How to set up an ASUS Hackintosh


t's always recommended that you use a Gigabyte-brand motherboard when building a Hackintosh. Compatibility-wise, they're always the easiest to work with. However, not everybody has the opportunity to use a Gigabyte motherboard. If your computer uses an ASUS motherboard, you can still turn it into a Hackintosh. There are just a few extra steps that you'll have to perform. Right now, there are two different types of motherboards on the market: the ones that use BIOS, and the ones that use UEFI. These are interfaces for managing motherboard settings. What you have to do to install Mac OS X on your computer depends on whether your motherboard uses BIOS or UEFI. In general, all new ASUS motherboards use UEFI. For the moment, this guide only addresses the installation process for these new motherboards. To check whether your ASUS motherboard uses BIOS or UEFI, press the delete key when your computer boots. You will enter the settings for the motherboard. If the settings screen has few colors and requires you to use the arrow keys on your keyboard to navigate, it's BIOS. If the screen is colorful and allows you to use your mouse cursor to navigate, it's UEFI.

For ASUS motherboards that use UEFI


Unlike old motherboards that use BIOS, motherboards that use UEFI don't need a DSDT file to work with Mac OS X anymore. In fact, if you own a Gigabyte motherboard with UEFI, sleep mode and CPU power management in Mac OS X work by default.

However, ASUS motherboards handle CPU power management differently from Gigabyte motherboards. By default, the CPU power management system in Mac OS X won't work with the system built into ASUS motherboards. Sleep mode doesn't work normally, either. This problem can be fixed, though. All you need to do is install a patched ("unlocked") version of the UEFI. NOTE: For the purposes of the tutorials, I will be referring to the patched UEFI as a "BIOS file" for the remainder of the section. I apologize in advance for any conclusion over the unclear wording.

Step 1: Install OS X Mountain Lion on your computer. For details, follow Steps 1-6
of our standard Mountain Lion installation guide.

Step 2: After the initial installation of Mountain Lion, restart your computer. Keep
your Unibeast boot USB drive plugged in. At the boot screen, you'll see an icon for the hard drive where you installed Mountain Lion. Select it (use the arrow keys on your computer) and press "Enter". This will boot you into Mac OS X.

Step 3: Download the appropriate patched BIOS file for your motherboard from
samisnake's BIOS Repo. http://biosrepo.wordpress.com/asus/

If there is no patched BIOS currently available for your motherboard, extract a file copy of your motherboard's current BIOS by using DPCIManager (follow Steps 2-4 of this guide for more details). You can then request your BIOS file to be patched by posting a linking to the un-patched BIOS file in this thread on tonymacx86 (registration required). Step 3.1. Download DPCIManager from http://sourceforge.net/projects/dpcimanager/ Step 3.2. Open DCPI, press Misc

Step 3.3. Press Write Rom to disk. This will extract your current bios, and save it to your hard drive. For the file name, save it as your boards model, then bios version. eg. ASUS P8H77-MLE-0906 Step 3.4. Upload the extracted rom to a filehost, and paste the link in this post. Use something like sendspace.com When the rom has been added to this post, ill get round to modding it for you, and will reply with the finished rom. When you have the modded rom, move to Step 5. Step 3.5. When you have the modified rom, Press Flash rom from disk

Select the MODIFIED rom which I sent to you.

Wait while it flashes the new rom. Check the log to see whether the flashing was successful. If your board isnt supported by flashrom, or flashing failed, youll see that mentioned in the log. Step 3.6. Shutdown pc and clear cmos. Then turn on pc, go into the bios and make sure to set needed bios settings eg. AHCI, boot order etc. This has been tested on Asus Z77 and H77 boards so far, with success. However, this can be risky business, so take that into consideration. Your board is your responsibility. This method should work for Intel 1155 boards too. CreditsSJ_UnderWater PJALM the King Flashrom devs The solution provided in DPCIManager is based on open-source software.

Step 4: Get a second USB drive and reformat it to use the FAT32 (or just FAT) file
system. You can do this through Disk Utility.

Once the USB drive has been reformatted to use the FAT32 file system, copy the downloaded patched BIOS file into the base of the USB drive.

Step 5: Install the patched BIOS file on your motherboard. Many of the normal ways
to install a BIOS file on an ASUS motherboard do not work with patched files. Instead, you have to use "ASUS USB BIOS Flashback", a feature included on most "Z77" ASUS motherboards that use UEFI. This feature allows you to install a BIOS file directly through the motherboard itself. Simply plug the USB drive into the white USB port in the back of the motherboard, and then press the "BIOS" button next to that USB port. The button will then start to flash. Once the button stops flashing, your motherboard will have the new BIOS installed.

NOTE: Some ASUS motherboards, including "H77" and "B75" models, do not include the USB BIOS Flashback feature. If this is the case, you will have to install the patched BIOS with DPCIManager instead. Read this guide for more details (ignore Step 3-4 if you already have the BIOS file).

Step 6: Boot into Mac OS X. Keep your Unibeast boot USB drive plugged in. At the
boot screen, you'll see an icon for the hard drive where you installed Mountain Lion. Select it (use the arrow keys on your computer) and press "Enter".

Step 7: Download Multibeast from tonymacx86. Then, install UserDSDT-- no actual


DSDT file required! The patched BIOS takes care of everything.

Conclusion: And that's all there is to it! Your Hackintosh will now be able to boot
normally, without the help of your Unibeast boot USB drive. After installing UserDSDT

or Easybeast, you still have to enable audio and ethernet separately with Multibeast. Check out our guide to Multibeast for more information. (a continuacion)

How to use Multibeast 5: a comprehensive guide for Mountain Lion


Recently, tonymacx86 released Multibeast 5, a version of Multibeast customized specifically for OS X Mountain Lion, Apple's newest version of Mac OS X. The layout of Multibeast has been revamped, and many incompatible and outdated options have been removed. Even so, opening Multibeast can be an intimidating experience for anybody new to Hackintoshes. This guide is here to help.

Multibeast, by tonymacx86, is a essentially an installer bundled with a lot of kext files for Hackintoshes. When you're setting up Mac OS X, it can be a huge time saver. By using Multibeast, you don't have to find, download, and install every single kext file that your Hackintosh needs, one by one. Multibeast has it all. However, the problem with Multibeast's all-in-one method is that there are simply too many options to make sense of. In this guide, I'm going to explain the function of several important options in Multibeast. NOTE: You have to register on tonymacx86.com to download Multibeast and related apps. After installing anything in Multibeast, you should reboot your Hackintosh to see if the changes worked.

Easybeast/UserDSDT/DSDT-Free Installation
These options are the cornerstone of the tonymacx86 method; installing either of these two packages will enable Mac OS X to boot from the hard drive of your Hackintosh, without any extra assistance.

UserDSDT or DSDT-Free Installation is the better method of the two. On most motherboards made before 2012, it only works if your motherboard has a DSDT file available. DSDT files are configuration files that customize Mac OS X to work with your specific motherboard. If your motherboard has a DSDT file available in the DSDT section of tonymacx86, use it. To install UserDSDT on Mac OS X this way, you first have to download the appropriate DSDT file, rename the file "DSDT.aml" (without quotation marks), and place it on the desktop of Mac OS X. Then you can run Multibeast. When installing UserDSDT with a DSDT file, make sure that your motherboard has the right BIOS version, or the DSDT file won't work. For example, a DSDT file for version F4 won't work if your motherboard has version F1. Read this to learn how to update your BIOS version (**). However, if you have a newer Gigabyte-brand motherboard that uses UEFI instead of BIOS, you don't need a DSDT file. You can just install UserDSDT in Multibeast without doing anything else beforehand. If you have a non-Gigabyte motherboard that uses UEFI, it's the same deal, except that you will have to install a patched version of your motherboard BIOS in addition to UserDSDT. Easybeast Installation is similar to UserDSDT, except it tries to remove the need for a DSDT file by installing some extra kext files. If your motherboard doesn't have a DSDT file available for it and isn't a motherboard with UEFI, try installing Easybeast instead. Easybeast will break sleep mode and speedstepping (CPU power management).

** How to update your BIOS on a Gigabyte motherboard Oftentimes, the DSDT section of tonymacx86 will only offer DSDT files for certain BIOS versions. If you checked your BIOS version, and you don't have a compatible version, then you'll have to update. This is known as flashing your BIOS, which sounds intimidating, but it's really not. In fact, flashing is as easy as installing most Windows programs, once you get used to the blue and yellow pages of the BIOS. First, you need to download the BIOS update file for your specific BIOS version. If you haven't installed Windows on your Hackintosh yet, then you can do this from a separate computer (it needs to be a Windows PC, unfortunately). If you have a Gigabyte motherboard, simply Google the model name of your motherboard; the official Gigabyte page for your motherboard should be the first result. In the official Gigabyte page, click on the "Downloads" tab and select "BIOS" for download type. For example, this is the BIOS download page for my motherboard (a Gigabyte P67A-D3-B3). You'll download a .exe file. Run it; it will prompt your for installation location.

Just choose any random location that you can remember. The .exe file will extract two files: a BIOS updater (called FLASHSPI.EXE), and a BIOS update file (which should look something like "p67ad3b3.f5"). Ignore the updater; it's outdated and pretty much useless. Put the file on a USB drive that has been formatted with the FAT or FAT32 file system. Then plug the drive into the computer whose BIOS you want to update. Boot into the BIOS (you need to press the Delete key at bootup to open the BIOS for Gigabyte motherboards). At the bottom of the BIOS screen, you will see something named along the lines of "Q-Flash Utility". This is a tool for updating BIOS software. On Gigabyte motherboards, press F8 to start Q-Flash. Q-Flash should detect

the update file on your USB drive. Select that file and press the enter key. After a short update process, your BIOS will be updated.

Once the update process is done, you can reboot and begin your installation of Mac OS X, this time with a supported BIOS version.

Drivers & Bootloaders -> Drivers -> Audio


All of the motherboards recommended by tonymacx86 use Realtek Audio. To enable sound on these motherboards, you'll want to install the Realtek ALC8xx kexts. Luckily, the Realtek ALC8xx section of Multibeast 5 is pretty straightforward.

All you need to know is the audio codec of your motherboard. You can find your audio codec by Googling the model of your motherboard. The first Google result will be the motherboard's official product page. The audio codec is usually found under the "Specifications" section, or some other similarly-named section. For example, my Hackintosh has a Gigabyte GA-P67A-D3-B3 motherboard. According to the official product page, this motherboard uses the Realtek 889 codec. Once you've found your audio codec, choose the corresponding option in Multibeast. Each codec as two different possible setups: one for Hackintoshes that use a DSDT file, and one for Hackintoshes that don't. On my own Hackintosh, I used a DSDT file, so I would choose ALC889 under the "With DSDT" section to enable audio. If you have a motherboard that doesn't use the Realtek audio codec (or it has an unsupported codec version), you'll have to go with the VoodooHDA kexts. VoodooHDA enables sound for a wide variety of motherboards, but it's not very reliable. Install just one of the versions and reboot to see if it works well for you. If not, remove the kext by going to /System/Library/Extensions in your hard drive and deleting VoodooHDA.kext. Then try another version.

Drivers & Bootloaders -> Drivers -> Disk


Almost all hard drives should work with Mac OS X by default, but you still might encounter glitches here and there. These kexts fix hard drive-related problems. For example, on some Hackintoshes, your hard drives will show up as orange external drives on your desktop. Install IOAHCI Block Storage Injector to fix that (this kext should be unnecessary if you install UserDSDT).

You can also install TRIM Enabler to enable TRIM in Mac OS X, which is a critical feature for SSD drives. OS X Mountain Lion version 10.8.0 requires a different patch to enable TRIM than Mountain Lion version 10.8.1 (and higher), so install whichever patch is right for your computer.

Drivers & Bootloaders -> Drivers -> Graphics


All of these patches enable graphics support on various graphics cards, so that the cards can display at full resolution. In Mac OS X, some cards work out of the box, without the need for extra drivers. This is generally true for most older NVIDIA graphics cards, as well as for most AMD Radeon HD graphics cards in the 6600 and 6800 series. Intel's 2nd-generation "Sandy Bridge" processors are compatible with their 3rdgeneration "Ivy Bridge" motherboards. The same is true the other way around: Ivy Bridge processors are also compatible with Sandy Bridge motherboards. However, building your Hackintosh with these mixed configurations prevents your processor's integrated graphics from working properly in Mac OS X. Install Intel Graphics Patch for Mixed Configurations to fix this problem. Remember, only HD 3000 and HD 4000 graphics work in Mac OS X.

The NVIDIA Fermi patches are version-specific, meaning that you have to install a new patch every time you update to a new version of Mac OS X. 10.8.x OpenCL Patch works for pretty much any graphics card in NVIDIA's 400, 500, and 600 series. The 10.8.0+ OpenCL Patch under the ">2GB OpenCL Patch" section does the same thing, except it works for NVIDIA cards with 2 GB or more of video RAM. NVIDIA also offers official graphics drivers for Mountain Lion, which do the same thing as the Multibeast patches. For some graphics cards, the drivers will also fix graphics glitches in Mac OS X. However, OpenCL does not currently work on the newest version of the official NVIDIA drivers, version 304.00.00f20. To enable OpenCL while using these drivers, you must install the NVIDIA Retail patch.

Drivers & Bootloaders -> Drivers>Miscellaneous/System


The Miscellaneous and System sections contain kexts that fix random issues in Mac OS X. In Multibeast 5, the difference between these two sections is very unclear, so I've included explanations for both sections.

NullCPUPowerManagement (NCPM) fixes boot errors caused by Apple's CPU power management service. These errors happen on Hackintoshes that aren't using UserDSDT.

Installing NCPM breaks sleep mode and speed-stepping (CPU power management). This kext is installed by default when you run Easybeast. The FakeSMC Plugins are a set of plugins that enable system-monitoring apps to read your Hackintosh's CPU temperature and GPU temperature. However, the NVIDIA GeForce Plugin causes kernel panics if your Hackintosh uses a graphics card from the NVIDIA 600 series. Installing USB 3.0 - 3rd Party supposedly enables USB 3.0 support on Hackintoshes, but it's a hit-and-miss feature: it works for some people, and causes booting errors for others. So if you're setting up a Hackintosh, don't count on USB 3.0 support. If you're using an older mouse or keyboard that doesn't connect to your Hackintosh with a USB port, install PS/2 Keyboard/Mice. If your Hackintosh is having problems with booting because your BIOS settings keep resetting every time you reboot, try installing ElliottForceLegacyRTC and EvOreboot. If you're experiencing this issue on Mac OS X Lion, install AppleRTC Patch for CMOS Reset. All of this stuff is installed by default in Easybeast, and AppleRTC Patch is installed by default in UserDSDT. If your Hackintosh uses an older LGA1156 motherboard and the USB ports aren't working properly, try installing Legacy USB Support. LGA1156 motherboards are the ones that support the first generation of Intel Core processors. Patched Apple Intel CPU Power Management is an alternative to NullCPUPowerManagement. It does the same thing as NCPM, except it doesn't break sleep mode or speed-stepping. However, these patches are version-specific, so every time you update Mac OS X, you'll have to install a new version of the patch. Mac OS X Lion 10.7.4 removed support for X58 motherboards, making Hackintoshes that use these motherboards unable to boot without help in Mountain Lion, even after installing UserDSDT or Easybeast. 10.6.8 Rollback for ASUS X58 System fixes these booting problems. Also, many motherboards (not just X58) encountered booting problems in OS X Mountain Lion version 10.8.2 due to driver incompatibilities. If your Hackintosh cannot boot normally after updating to version 10.8.2, boot into Mac OS X with the help of your Unibeast USB drive (or whatever installer USB drive you used), and install 10.8.1 Rollback.

Drivers & Bootloaders -> Kexts & Enablers -> Network


These kexts should enable connecting to the internet on your Hackintosh, via an Ethernet

cord. To find out which kext you need to install, you need to know what ethernet controller your motherboard has.

Every mid-end to high-end Gigabyte motherboard that's supported by tonymacx86 has the 8100 series of controllers. However, different manufacturers use different controllers; for example, some ASUS motherboards also use the 8100 series, while other ASUS motherboards use the 82500 series. Check what controller your motherboard uses by Googling its name (or model number) to find the official manufacturer webpage for it. Most manufacturers list the ethernet controller of a motherboard under the "Specifications" section of its official page. If your motherboard uses the Realtek 8100 series of Ethernet controllers, try installing the Realtek - AppleRTL8169Ethernet first. If not, try installing Lnx2Mac's Realtek driver, which works better for some people. Shailua's ethernet kext works on motherboards with an Atheros AR8100 series ethernet controller, and hnak's ethernet kext works on motherboards with an Intel 82500 series ethernet controller.

Customization -> Boot Options


Most of the options in the Boot Options section make edits to org.Chameleon.boot.plist, a settings file that configures how your Hackintosh boots. You can make all these changes manually. Check out our list of common boot options for more details.

If your Hackintosh isn't booting from the hard drive properly, or you're getting verifications errors in the Mac App Store, changing your PCI Root ID with PCI Root ID Fix may be able to solve the issue. This option does the same thing as using the PCIRootUID=1 boot flag.

If your Hackintosh's bootscreen automatically loads Mac OS X instead of giving you the option to choose your own hard drive, install Instant Menu.

Customization -> System Definitions


System Definitions pretend that your Hackintosh is a real Mac. The Mac Pro (3,1) system definition is installed by default with UserDSDT and Easybeast.

Occasionally, a certain System Definition will make your Hackintosh run a lot slower than it should. Geekbench is a good benchmark to compare your Hackintosh against other Hackintoshes and Macs (the free trial lasts forever). If you feel that your Geekbench score is unusually slow compared to Hackintoshes or Macs with similar hardware, try installing a different System Definition. Generally, any system definition will work. The only exceptions are the the Mac Pro (4,1) and Mac Pro (5,1) system definitions, which cause booting problems. If you insist on installing either of these two system definitions, be sure to remove AppleTyMCEDriver.kext and AppleGraphicsPowerManagement.kext from /System/Library/Extensions beforehand (the system definitions mess up these two kexts). If you want to enable the built-in HD3000 graphics of your Intel Sandy Bridge processor, the built-in HD4000 graphics of your Intel Ivy Bridge processor, or AirPlay mirroring, then you should install the Mac mini system definition.

Graphics card (sigue de la parte Motherboard): Besides the


motherboard, this is probably the most important part of your build. Mac OS X does not usually work with the built-in ("integrated") graphics on any motherboard or CPU. You need to have a separate graphics card for your computer. The only exception to this rule are the built-in graphics cards of Intel Sandy Bridge processors and Intel Ivy Bridge processors; you can check the CPU section below for more info. Older graphics cards (like the NVIDIA 8800GT and AMD Radeon 5770) will usually work with Mac OS X "out of the box", without the need for any extra drivers or modifications. As far as newer graphics cards go, most cards in the AMD Radeon 6600 and 6800 series will work in Mac OS X out of the box, as well. Some cards in the NVIDIA 400 series also work out of the box, but most of them require you to install OpenCL Enabler in Multibeast (for Lion and Mountain Lion), or the official NVIDIA drivers (for Snow Leopard). Cards from the NVIDIA 500 series only work with Mac OS X Lion and Mountain Lion,

while cards from the 600 series only work with Lion version 10.7.5 and Mountain Lion. To enable graphics support for the 500 series in Mac OS X Lion, you have to install OpenCL Enabler in Multibeast. In OS X Mountain Lion, the 500 series and 600 series work out of the box, though not always (so you may have to install OpenCL Enabler anyways). The AMD 6900 series and 7000 series of graphics cards aren't supported yet. Additionally, ATI CrossfireX and NVIDIA SLI, which allow you to run two separate graphics cards as a single graphics card on Windows, do not work on a Hackintosh. Mac OS X will always recognize double-card setups as two separate graphics card. It's important to note that Mac OS X is very picky about graphics cards; the manufacturer of the card matters just as much as the card's model. For example, a Gigabyte Radeon 5770 graphics card might work better than a Sapphire Radeon 5770 graphics card. And before buying a specific card, always check Google first; for example, if you want to check the compatibility of a Sapphire Radeon HD 6850, search "Sapphire 6850 hackintosh" on Google. It's easy and saves you a lot of trouble.

CPU: Almost any 2010-2012 Intel CPU will work with Mac OS X. AMD CPUs are
barely supported, and therefore not recommended. Older Intel CPUs can usually run Mac OS X Snow Leopard, but many don't work with Mac OS X Lion or OS X Mountain Lion. Lion and Mountain Lion are 64-bit operating systems (x86-64), so they're incompatible with the 32-bit architecture (x86) that older CPUs use. The Sandy Bridge generation of Intel Core processors include built-in graphics cards. (Sandy Bridge processors are the processors with a model number in the 2000's, such as the Core i5-2500.) These built-in graphics cards work with Lion and Mountain Lion (but not Snow Leopard), and come in two versions: HD 2000 and HD 3000. Unfortunately, only HD 3000 graphics are officially supported. HD 2000 sort of works, but it doesn't have graphics acceleration, so it's not recommended. Intel's newest Ivy Bridge processors are supported by Mac OS X 10.7.5 and all versions of OS X Mountain Lion. (Ivy Bridge processors have a model number in the 3000's, such as the Core i5-3450.) Ivy Bridge is not supported by Mac OS X Snow Leopard; while you can still technically install Snow Leopard, CPU power management does not work. The integrated HD 4000 graphics on some Ivy Bridge processors works with OS X Mountain Lion and Mac OS X Lion (version 10.7.5 and above). HD 2500 graphics aren't supported. P.S. Intel Sandy Bridge processors don't work very well with Mac OS X Snow Leopard version 10.6.8. I recommend that you update to version 10.6.7 instead. You can still update to Mac OS X Lion from 10.6.7 (Mountain Lion requires 10.6.8, but you might be able to circumvent this requirement by spoofing your system version). For more detailed information, check out our guide on Hackintosh CPUs.

And the rest: Most WiFi adapters and WiFi cards don't work with Mac OS X.
Using a wired internet connection with a Ethernet cord is preferred. If you need WiFi, check out MacBreaker's list of natively-supported WiFi adapters. While most Bluetooth adapters technically work with Mac OS X, a large majority will break sleep mode. If you want to use a wireless mouse that needs Bluetooth (such as the Apple Magic Mouse), but you also want to use sleep mode, check out our list of recommended Bluetooth adapters. Most hard drives should work fine, though there are occasional exceptions. Hard drives with 4096 byte sectors (instead of normal 512 byte sectors) have problems booting Mac OS X, and need a rather complicated Terminal fix. This issue is most common in Western Digital Caviar Green hard drives. Seagate hard drives are generally problem-free in this regard. Just about every solid state drive (SSD) will work with Mac OS X by default. However, some SSDs don't have built-in garbage collection services, so you'll need to enable TRIM in Mac OS X by yourself. Additionally, some optical drives may prevent Mac OS X from sleeping. If you want a safe choice, buy a from a confirmed DVD drive series like Sony Optiarc. Hackintoshes can read and write Blu-ray discs with a Blu-ray drive, but you can't play Blu-ray movies because they don't support Mac OS X. If a webcam claims to be compatible with Mac OS X, then it's likely that it will work for Hackintoshes too. (Note that most webcams will not need drivers to run on OS X.) The same goes for any other peripherals, such as mice and keyboards: most of them work, but you can never know for sure until you've tried it. To check the compatibility of specific peripherals, be sure to check with Google. For instance, if you want to know whether the D-Link DBT-120 is compatible with Mac OS X, search "DBT-120 hackintosh" on Google.

1.- Instalar snow leopard OSX en la pc (lo que se llama Hackingtosh)


Gua para crear tu propia Hackintosh con Snow Leopard
El hardware para la Hackintosh
Esta es una lista de los componentes de hardware que necesitars para poder armar tu Hackintosh:

Un gabinete ATX con fuente de poder de 500W. Una tarjeta madre (Motherboard) GIGABYTE GA-EP45-UD3P Intel P45 ATX Un procesador Intel Core 2 Quad 3.0GHz LGA 775 95W Quad-Core Processor Una tarjeta de video GeForce 9800 GTX+ 512MB 256-bit GDDR3 PCI Express 2.0 x16 Dos tarjetas de memoria RAM Patriot Extreme Performance 4GB (2 x 2GB) DDR2 800 (PC2 6400) Dual Channel Kit Desktop Memory x 2 (para un total de 8GB) Un disco duro Western Digital Caviar Green WD10EADS de 1 Terabyte SATA 3.0Gb/s 3.5 Un quemador de CD/DVD con conexin SATA Una tarheta de red 10/ 100/ 1000/ 2000Mbps PCI Copper Gigabit

Otras cosas que vas a necesitar para construir tu Hackintosh:


Una memoria USB de al menos 8GB Una copia de Snow Leopard Otra Mac o una Hackintosh, esto es solamente para hacer algunas cosas en la terminal, as que si tienes un amigo con una Mac pdele que te la preste por una hora.

Paso 1: prepara tu memoria USB


Ahora vamos a instalar Snow Leopard en tu PC desde la memoria USB, en lugar de hacerlo desde el DVD de instalacin, esto es debido a que es necesario personalizar algunas cosas para poder ejecutar el instalador en tu PC, lo que vamos a personalizar es la manera en que se carga este instalador, ms especficamente vamos a cargar un Bootloader personalizado. Entonces primero lo primero: Es necesario formatear la memoria USB y despus gire convierte el disco de Snow Leopard en una imagen en el escritorio de una Mac, he aqu cmo hacerlo: 1. Abre la aplicain Utilidad de discos (Disk Utility) en la Mac que te han prestado (esta aplicacin est en /Applications/Utilities/Disk Utility) 2. Particiona y formatea la memoria USB: Inserta la memoria USB, despus de un segundo se mostrar en la barra lateral de la Utilidad de discos, (1), has clic sobre ella, entonces (2), has clic en Particiones. (3) Elegir una particin en el esquema del volumen, (4) darle un nombre (Hackintosh) y selecciona Mac OS Plus (mayus./minus., con registro), ahora algo muy importante, (5) has clic en el botn opciones, y marca la opcin que dice Tabla de particiones GUID, una vez que hayas hecho todo lo anterior (6) has clic en Aplicar.

3. Has una imagen del DVD de instalacin de Snow Leopard en tu disco duro : para ello inserta en la Mac prestada el DVD de Snow Leopard y cuando aparezca en la barra lateral de la Utilidad de disco, (1) has clic en l, despus (2) has clic en el botn nueva imagen luego elige donde guardar, te recomiendo usar el escritorio, para finalizar haz clic en Guardar y ve al bao o a tomar alguna bebida fria porque esto tomar algn tiempo, cuando termine pasa al siguiente paso.

4. Restaura la imagen de Snow Leopard desde tu disco duro a tu memoria USB: Ahora desde la misma aplicacin de Utilidad de discos, (1) haz click en la memoria USB que llamamos Hackintosh, (2) has clic en restaurar. (3) Arrastra y suelta la imagen creada del DVD de instalacin Mac OS X Install DVD.dmg de la barra lateral al campo que dice Fuente, despus (4) arrastra y suelta la memoria USB desde la barra lateral hasta el campo que dice Destino. Ahora simplemente (5) has click en el botn restaurar y escribe la contrasea cuando te la pida (la contrasea de administradro de la Mac que te prestaron), este proceso tomar unos minutos.

Ahora tenemos que hacer unas modificaciones para poder arrancar el instalador desde la unidad USB, para esto se requiere algo de trabajo desde la Terminal de Mac OS X, y esto es lo qie puedes resultar un poco difcil para algunos usuarios, pero si de plano no tienes ni idea de como usar la terminal te recomiendo que consigas un amigo que s sepa y le pidas ayuda, ahora veamos los pasos. 1. Asegrate de que tu memoria USB an est conectada y abre la Terminal (/Utilities/Terminal) y escribe el siguiente comando:
diskutil list

Ah vamos a ver cual es el identificador de la unidad USB, deben ser 2 identificadores, uno para la particin GUID y otro para la particin HFS, copia esos nombres que los vamos a neecsitar ms adelante 2. Ahora ve a la pgina de Chameleon y descarga la ltima versin de Chameleon, una vez descargado descomprmelo y ponlo en un lugar accesible como el escritorio. 3. Ahora en Terminal ve a la carpeta i386 que est dentro de la carpeta de Chameleon.
cd /Users/tu nombre/Desktop/Chameleon-2.0-RC2-r640-bin/i386/

4. Una vez dentro del folder debes de ejecutar los siguientes comandos desde la terminal (el identificador en negritas reemplazalo por uno de los identificadores

que copiaste en el paso 1).


sudo fdisk -f boot0 -u -y /dev/rdisk2

Despus repite la accin pero cambia el nombre del identificador por el otro que copiaste en el paso 1
sudo dd if=boot1h of=/dev/rdisk2s2

5. Ahora vamos a colocar el Bootloader personalizado en la memoria USB, para eso descrgalo de netkas.org y descomprmelo en un lugar accesible, despus vamos a copiar el Bootloader a la memoria USB usando la Terminal, en este caso es necesario usar la Terminal y no el Finder, para eso usa un comando similar al siguiente, cambiando por las rutas que usas:
sudo cp /Users/adam/Desktop/boot /Volumes/Hackintosh

6. Ahora el ltimo paso para terminar de preparar la memoria USB, descarga este archivo con extras descomprmelo y copialo y pgalo dentro de la memoria USB.

Paso 2: configura el BIOS


Antes de que puedas arrancar la PC o instalar Mac OS X en tu Hackintosh, tienes que hacer algunos pequeos ajustes en tu BIOS. En lugar de escribir el paso a paso de todos los cambios que necesitas hacer, aqu tienes las fotos de las pantallas de BIOS correspondientes en el orden que salieron, adems tienen algunas notas. Simplemente haz clic en las imgenes y asegrate de que la configuracin del BIOS coincida con la de las fotos:

Paso 3: instala Snow Leopard


Si has llegado hasta aqu es porque ya has hecho la parte ms difcil, ahora es momento de instalar el Snow Leopard, que-a diferencia de lo que hemos hecho hasta ahora, es muy fcil. Asegrate de que has establecido la prioridad de inicio en la BIOS para arrancar desde tu unidad de disco USB, simplemente conecta la unidad USB preparada en tu Hackintosh y enciende la PC. Aqu tienes un video de como instalar Snow Leopard: http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=2SXVsyeKSvs

Requisitos para poder crear tu Hackingtosh con Mac OS X Lion


Necesitas tener previamente una Hackintosh con Snow Leopard instalado, aqu tienes una gua para instalar primero Snow Leopard en tu PC, adicionalmente necesitas lo siguiente:

8 GB de espacio libre el disco duro de los cuales 4GB deben estar libres para /Applications Una cuenta en la Mac App Store + $360 pesos para comprar Mac OS X Lion ($29.99 dlares) Acceso a internet para descargar ms de 4GB de Mac OS X Lion de la App Store. Un procesador de 64 bits Intel Core 2 o superior (Core i3, Core i5, Core i7, etctera). Definicin de sistema Mac Pro 3,1 y la ltima versin de Chimera Bootloader de MultiBeast

An no tienes Snow Leopard para instalarlo? entonces debes conseguir el DVD de Snow Leopard, lo puedes comprar en Amazon y para instalarlo en tu PC puedes seguir esta gua que usa iBoot + MultiBeast para instalar Snow Leopard.

Paso 1: Compra Mac OS X desde la Mac App Store


1. Inicia tu Hackintosh con Snow Leopard. 2. Descarga Mac OS X Lion directamente desde el Mac App Store, cuando termine la descarga se abrir automticamente, la descarga tarda bastante tiempo, as que no te desesperes.

Paso 2: Prepara la particin del instalador


1. Inicia nuevamente tu Hackintosh en tu instalacin de Mac OS X Snow Leopard existente. 2. Abre la aplicacin Utilidad de disco localizada en /Applications/Utilities/Disk Utility. 3. Selecciona el disco duro que contiene Snow Leopard de la columna de la izquierda. 4. Elige la pestaa de particin y presiona el botn + para agregar una nueva particin.

5. Nombra a la segunda particin como Installer y dale un espacio de 8 GB, finalmente haz clic en Aplicar

6. Haz clic en la particin.

7. Cierra la utilidad de disco.

Paso 3: xMove
1. Descarga xMove. 2. Haz doble clic en xMove y elige la particin llamada Installer como destino. Advertencia: No selecciones la particin donde tienes instalado Snow Leopard actualmente como el destino.

3. No interrumpas el proceso que nos llevar unos minutos. Cuando haya terminado, tendrs una particin secundaria en el disco que contiene el instalador de Mac OS X Lion.

Paso 4: Inicia Installer e instala Mac OS X Lion


1. Reinicia tu Hackintosh y el la pantalla de inicio Chimera elige Installer. 2. Esto har que inicies directamente en el instalador de Mac OS X. 3. Instala Mac OS X Lion sobre la instalacin existente de Mac OS X Snow Leopard o en otra particin vaca. Si has instalado Lion directamente sobre la instalacin existente de Snow Leopard, entonces pasa al paso 5.

Paso 5: Multibeast
MultiBeast es una herramienta todo-en-uno diseada para habilitar el arranque desde el disco duro, e instalar soporte para audio, red y grficos. Contiene dos soluciones completamente diferentes post-instalacin que son UserDSDT y EasyBeast. Adems, incluye utilidades del sistema para la reconstruccin de los cachs y reparacin de los permisos, adems de una coleccin de controladores, gestores de arranque y software de configuracin muy til.

Elige una de las siguientes opciones: UserDSDT es una solucin para aquellos que tienen su propio DSDT pre-editado. para ello coloca el archivo DSDT.aml en el escritorio antes de instalar, el audio, grficos y de red tendrn que ser activados por separado. Echa un vistazo a la base de datos DSDT para descargar el DSDT pre-editado de tu tarjeta madre (Motherboard). EasyBeast es una solucin libre de DSDT para cualquier sistema con procesador Core2/Core i. Aqu se instalan todos los elementos esenciales para permitir que tu sistema arranque desde el disco duro, el audio, grficos y tarjeta red tendrn que ser activados por separado. 1. En la pantalla de arranque de Chimera, elige el disco donde has instalado recientemente Lion 2. Completa la instalacin y el proceso de registro 3. Cuando ests en el escritorio ejecuta la aplicacin MultiBeast 4. Si t tienes un DSDT pre-editado, colcalo en tu escritorio y elige UserDSDT 5. Si no entonces elige EasyBeast 6. Selecciona System Utilities 7. Reinicia tu Hackintosh con Mac OS X Lion Tambin puedes utilizar MultiBeast para instalar los controladores adicionales y permitir a ethernet, sonido, grficos, etctera funcionar correctamente. Asegrate de leer la documentacin aportada en MultiBeast Features.pdf sobre cada opcin. Ambos UserDSDT y EasyBeast instalan el gestor de arranque por defecto adecuado, por lo que no tendrs que comprobar esa opcin. 8. Opcionalmente puedes eliminar la particin Installer con la Utilidad de disco. Felicidades, si has llegado hasta aqu con xito ya tienes instalado Mac OS X Lion en tu PC, ya puedes disfrutar de lo nuevo de Mac OS X, si tienes dudas comentarios adicionales o contribuciones a la gua no dudes en decirlo en los comentarios.

Run OS X Mountain Lion 10.8 on a PC (Hackintosh/OSx86)


Read more at http://gadgetunit.com/2012/12/28/tutorial-run-os-x-mountain-lion-10-8-ona-pc-hackintoshosx86/#toI0t6q8eEWIow9u.99

Requirements
Here are the requirements: 1. A copy of Mac OS X - This can be in the form of an existing hackintosh, a virtual machine within Windows or Linux, or even a regular Mac. If you dont have any of these things, then find someone who can help you out for a while. I prefer using a virtual machine (I prepared my USB drive with VMware Workstation under Windows 7). Using an already working copy of Mac OS X either in a VM or a native hackintosh install is HIGHLY recommended, and youll see why in part 6. 2. A 8GB USB flash drive (or larger) - Well be copying the files to the drive appropriately, so make sure that you have a flash drive with enough storage space (8GB or larger). 3. A copy of Mountain Lion 10.8 GM - If you dont have a Mac Developer Account, then youll find torrents of 10.8 around the web. 4. 30-60 minutes of time - Depending on how tech-savvy you are, this may be quick, or it may take a while. 5. An SSD or HDD to install 10.8 to - For me, I used a 20GB partition on a 64GB SSD to install 10.8 to. 6. THIS file - This ZIP file contains everything that you need to get your flash drive properly prepared. Read more at http://gadgetunit.com/2012/12/28/tutorial-run-os-x-mountain-lion-10-8-ona-pc-hackintoshosx86/#toI0t6q8eEWIow9u.99

Requirements
Here are the requirements:

1. A copy of Mac OS X - This can be in the form of an existing hackintosh, a virtual machine within Windows or Linux, or even a regular Mac. If you dont have any of these things, then find someone who can help you out for a while. I prefer using a virtual machine (I prepared my USB drive with VMware Workstation under Windows 7). Using an already working copy of Mac OS X either in a VM or a native hackintosh install is HIGHLY recommended, and youll see why in part 6. 2. A 8GB USB flash drive (or larger) - Well be copying the files to the drive appropriately, so make sure that you have a flash drive with enough storage space (8GB or larger). 3. A copy of Mountain Lion 10.8 GM - If you dont have a Mac Developer Account, then youll find torrents of 10.8 around the web. 4. 30-60 minutes of time - Depending on how tech-savvy you are, this may be quick, or it may take a while. 5. An SSD or HDD to install 10.8 to - For me, I used a 20GB partition on a 64GB SSD to install 10.8 to. 6. THIS file - This ZIP file contains everything that you need to get your flash drive properly prepared. Note: The file for number 6 contains the following:

FakeSMC.kext NullCPUPowerManagement.kext OSInstall OSInstall.mpkg Chameleon_2.1svn_r1820_trunk_10.8.pkg

The first 2 .kext files will fix most kernel panics that you might experience while booting. The 2 OSInstall files will allow you to install 10.8 onto an MBR-partitioned drive. OSInstall came from 10.7.3, and OSInstall.mpkg was modified by me to work properly. Lastly, the Chameleon package is the bootloader that well be using, and has been specifically compiled for use with 10.8.

Part 1 Preparing your SSD or HDD


If youre in Windows 7, you can easily make a new partition on an SSD or HDD via the Disk Management program. 1. 2. 3. 4. Start>Run (or Windows key on your keyboard plus R). diskmgmt.msc (press enter after typing that) Find your drive, right-click on it, and go to Shrink Volume. Wait for it to calculate the amount of space you can make your partition, and enter in your amount (for an exact GB amount, multiple your desired amount of GB times 1024, so a 20GB partition would be 20480MB). 5. Let it make your partition. It will show up as unallocated space. 6. Format the new unallocated space as NTFS and give it a label (mine was ML).

7. Done!

Part 2 Formatting your USB drive


Make sure to backup the files that are already on your USB flash drive via Disk Utility in Mac OS X: 1. 2. 3. 4. Open up Disk Utility. Click on your USB drive in the left sidebar. Click on the Erase tab in the middle. Choose Mac OS X Extended (Journaled) as the format, and give your drive a label (like ML USB). 5. Click on the Erase button. 6. Done! 7. Leave Disk Utility open, as youll need it later.

Part 3 Preparing your USB drive with 10.8


This part is the most time consuming. Using a USB 3.0 flash drive will help things out quite a bit. 1. Mount the DMG for Mountain Lion (will be called Mac OS X Install ESD on your desktop). 2. Show hidden files in Finder by running the following command in Terminal: defaults write com.apple.finder AppleShowAllFiles TRUE 3. Reload Finder by running the following command in Terminal: killall Finder 4. Run the following command in Terminal to mount BaseSystem.dmg within the 10.8 DMG: open /Volumes/Mac\ OS\ X\ Install\ ESD/BaseSystem.dmg 5. Switch back to Disk Utility. 6. Click on your flash drive in the left sidebar. 7. Click on the Restore button in the middle area. 8. For the source, drag Mac OS X Base System from your desktop into the empty Source box. 9. For the destination, drag your USB drive from your desktop into the empty Destination box. 10. Make sure that Erase destination is checked. 11. Click on Restore. This process will take anywhere from 5 to 10 minutes depending on the speed of your flash drive. 12. When its finished, youll end up with 2 Mac OS X Base System drives on your desktop. Figure out which one is your USB copy (you can right-click > Get Info and use the capacity as an indicator), and open it up. 13. Once youve opened up Mac OS X Base System (the one thats your flash drive), go to /System/Installation. 14. Youll see a symlink for Packages. Remove it. 15. Create a folder called Packages.

16. Open up a window of the original Mac OS X Install ESD drive and copy everything within Packages to the empty Packages folder on your USB drive. 17. Done! 10.8 is now installed onto your USB drive. Now, we need to modify some of the files on it so that it will properly bootup on a PC.

Part 4 Adding the fixed 10.8 files to the USB drive


Now, we need to modify some of the files on your USB drive so that it will properly bootup on your PC. 1. Extract the contents of ML_GM_OSx86_Files.zip to your Mac OS X desktop. 2. Copy the 2 .kext files to /System/Library/Extensions on your flash drive. 3. Copy the OSInstall file to /System/Library/PrivateFrameworks/Install.framework/Frameworks/OSInstall.fra mework/Versions/A/, overwriting the file thats already there. 4. Copy the OSInstall.mpkg file to /System/Installation/Packages/, overwriting the file thats already there. 5. Run the Chameleon installation package. Make sure to install this package to your flash drive, and customize the installation so that you have an SMBIOS that best relates to the CPU thats on your computer (leave the default options checked; just check your SMBIOS). 6. Copy mach_kernel from the root of the Mac OS X Install ESD volume and paste it into the root of your flash drive. 7. Lastly, copy the Chameleon installation package to the root of your flash drive. Youll need this in part 8. 8. Done!

Part 5 Installing 10.8 from your USB drive


Time for the fun stuff! Well now boot from your USB drive and install 10.8 onto the partition that you made in part 1. 1. Boot from your USB drive. 2. Once in Chameleon, highlight your flash drive and add -v to the end, then push enter. Youll see a lot of text fly by. 3. Once you get into the installer (assuming your computer didnt freeze, restart itself, or get a kernel panic, in which case youll take a picture of the lines on your screenshot and leave it in the comments below), choose your partition to install 10.8 to. Please note that youll need to go to Utilities > Disk Utility and format your partition to HFS+ (Mac OS Extended (Journaled)). 4. The installation process will take about 5 to 15 minutes, depending on the speed of both your USB drive and your SSD or HDD. 5. When finished, boot back into your already working copy of Mac OS X.

Part 6 Preparing the installed copy of 10.8

Now, well have to add a couple of files to your fresh install of 10.8. You can use some Terminal commands to copy the files over, which Ill cover now. 1. Boot from your USB installation drive. 2. In the Utilities menu, go to Terminal. 3. Run the following command: cp -R /System/Library/Extensions/NullCPUPowerManagement.kext /Volumes/NAME_OF_10.8_INSTALLATION_DRIVE/System/Library/Extensio ns/ 4. Run the following command: cp -R /System/Library/Extensions/FakeSMC.kext /Volumes/NAME_OF_10.8_INSTALLATION_DRIVE/System/Library/Extensio ns/ 5. Run the following command: reboot 6. You should now be able to boot back into your install copy of 10.8. Now, install Chameleon as in part 4. As the destination drive, choose your 10.8 installation drive. 7. Done!

Part 7 Booting 10.8!


Now that everything is finally prepared, you can go ahead and boot into Mountain Lion. 1. Boot from your USB drive again. 2. Once in Chameleon, highlight your partition that has 10.8 installed. Add -v to it and push enter. Youll see a lot of text fly by. 3. Youll eventually get to the setup screens for 10.8. Go through that process to setup 10.8. 4. Done!

Finished!
Youve successfully prepared a 10.8 flash drive and have installed 10.8 onto your computer. Depending on your hardware configuration, youll most likely need to hunt down various drivers to get different components to work the way they should, such as your audio card, video card, and more. tonymacx86s MultiBeast software contains a lot of common drivers for most machines and is worth a look at. If youre experiencing any trouble, leave your comment below and Ill try and help you out. Read more at http://gadgetunit.com/2012/12/28/tutorial-run-os-x-mountain-lion-10-8-ona-pc-hackintoshosx86/#toI0t6q8eEWIow9u.99

OTRO METODO

Requirements:

A compatible computer: Not every computer will work with Mac OS X, even with the help of tools like Unibeast and Multibeast. Be sure to read the Hackintosh compatibility guide very carefully, to check whether or not your computer qualifies. The hardware requirements for OS X Mountain Lion are essentially identical to those for Mac OS X Lion; AMD processors and older 32-bit Intel processors (such as Pentium M) are not supported. Unibeast (Free): Unibeast is a Mac program that modifies the official OS X Mountain Lion installer, and writes it onto a USB drive. You can then use this Unibeast USB drive to run the Mountain Lion installer on a PC. Unibeast works with Mac OS X Snow Leopard and newer; registration on tonymacx86.com is required to download Unibeast. A Hackintosh with Snow Leopard/Lion already installed, a real Mac, or a Mac OS X virtual machine: Unibeast is a Mac app, so you need a computer with Mac OS X to run it. You could use a real Mac, if you own one. Alternatively, you could install Mac OS X Snow Leopard on your PC, and then follow this guide to update your PC to Mountain Lion (if your computer uses an Ivy Bridge processor, be sure to use iBoot for Ivy Bridge). As one last option, you could install Snow Leopard on a virtual machine, and run Unibeast on there instead. Be sure to install the Virtualbox Extension Pack to view USB drives from your virtual machine. This method will probably not work if your computer uses an Ivy Bridge processor (though I haven't personally confirmed this).

OS X Mountain Lion ($20): The method used by this guide requires that you have a copy of the Mountain Lion installer app ($20) from the Mac App Store. Though the Mac App Store is included in Mac OS X 10.6.6 and newer, you have to be running 10.6.8 to download Mountain Lion. (you might be able to circumvent this requirement by spoofing your system version).

An empty USB drive (8 GB or larger): The USB drive used for Unibeast must be at least 8 GB in size. Since Unibeast will erase all of the files on your USB drive, make sure to back up its contents first. You can reuse this USB drive for normal stuff after you finish installing Mountain Lion. Multibeast (Free): Multibeast is a collection of kext files that your Hackintosh will need to run properly, after the initial installation. Download it onto a USB drive. Be sure to download the newest version 5 of Multibeast, not the older versions 3 or 4 (which are for Snow Leopard and Lion, respectively).

1. Format your USB drive for Unibeast


Plug your USB drive into Mac OS X, and open Disk Utility (located in the Utilities folder in the Applications folder). Select the USB drive in the sidebar of Disk Utility, go to the "Partition" tab of Disk Utility, and create a new partition layout with 1 partition. Set the format to "Mac OS Extended (Journaled)". Name the new partition whatever you want.

Click the "Options" button before applying your new partition layout. It should be set to "Master Boot Record" by default. Keep it that way. Then click "Apply".

2. Run Unibeast
Download Unibeast and run it. Make sure that the OS X Mountain Lion installation app from the Mac App Store is inside your "Applications" folder of Mac OS X.

Select your USB drive as the installation destination (mine is named "Cheeseburger").

Click through the pages in the Unibeast installer, until you reach the following selection page with two options: "Legacy USB Support" and "Laptop Support". Select the first option if you use a first-generation Intel Core processor; these are Intel Core processors with 3-digit model numbers, such as the Intel Core i7-960 or i7-875K. Select the second option as well if you're installing Mountain Lion on a laptop. If neither of these options apply to you, you can simply skip this page by clicking "Continue".

You'll come up to the installation progress bar. Chances are, Unibeast will look like it's stuck at the "Running package scripts" stage. Don't panic! This is normal-- during the "Running package scripts" stage, the progress bar is counting the number of files copied, but Unibeast is copying some really big files, so it takes forever for the number of copied files to increase.

Though Unibeast is supposed to only take 10-15 minutes to run, it may take up to an hour, depending on how fast your USB drive is.

3. Settings up the parts of your PC


I covered these steps in my Snow Leopard guide, but they're worth mentioning again: unplug all USB-connected devices from your computer before you begin the setup (except your keyboard and mouse). A faulty external USB hard drive can cause your Hackintosh bootloader to give you EBIOS errors on startup. Also, open up your computer and unplug any extra internal hard drives that your computer has, besides the hard drive that you're installing OS X on. (Just unplug the hard drive SATA cables from your motherboard.) Open up your computer, and make sure that the SATA cables for your hard drive and your DVD/Bluray drive are plugged into the 3GB/s SATA ports on your motherboard, not the 6GB/s SATA ports (these should be labeled on the motherboard). On Gigabyte motherboards, the 3GB/s ports are blue while the 6 GB/s ports are white. The 6 GB/s SATA ports simply don't work well with OS X. NOTE: If your computer is more than 2 years old, it probably won't have any 6GB/s SATA ports.

Unplug all USB-connected devices from your computer before you begin the setup (except your keyboard and mouse). A faulty external USB hard drive can cause your Hackintosh bootloader to give you EBIOS errors on startup. Also, unplug any extra internal hard drives that your computer has, besides the hard drive that you're installing OS X on. (Just unplug the hard drive SATA cables from your motherboard.) NOTE: If you already have Windows installed on another internal hard drive in your computer, you will have to enable AHCI for Windows before installing Mac OS X. Otherwise, Windows won't boot afterwards. Also, after installing Mac OS X, you should also sync your clock on Windows with Mac OS X.

4. Setting up your motherboard's BIOS


The BIOS is basically a settings page for your motherboard. To enter the BIOS on my own computer's Gigabyte P67A-D3-B3 motherboard, I have to press the delete key when it boots (before the operating system starts). Different manufacturers set different keys for opening the BIOS. NOTE: If you have a newer Gigabyte motherboard that uses the UEFI interface instead of BIOS, check out our guide for setting up the UEFI instead. (BUSCAR PASO 4.1)

If your Hackintosh already has Mac OS X Snow Leopard or Lion installed, the only thing you'll need to change in the BIOS is the "Boot Device", so that USB drives have highest priority. If your Hackintosh doesn't have Snow Leopard or Lion installed yet, you have to change a few extra BIOS settings. Before starting, it's best just to reset all of your BIOS settings to their factory defaults. On Gigabyte motherboards, you can reset your BIOS settings to their default by selecting "Load Optimized Defaults" on the main page of the BIOS. Once your BIOS is running on its defaults, you need to change these three settings: Boot Device - Change the boot device of your computer so that "USB-HDD" is first. You need to do this for Unibeast to work. After you finish installing Mac OS X, you should change this setting back to default, so that "Hard Disk" is the first boot device (this optional, but it will speed up your boot times).

HPET - Change this to 64-bit.

SATA Control Mode (your BIOS might call this a different name) - This will probably already be set to "SATA", "IDE", or "RAID". Change it to "AHCI". Mac OS X only works with AHCI.

Keep in mind that the BIOS on most motherboards do not support using a mouse, so you'll probably have to navigate through the BIOS with the arrow keys on your keyboard. Press "Enter" to change a selected option in the BIOS. On my Gigabyte motherboard, I have to press F10 to save my changes.

4.1 To enter the UEFI on a Gigabyte motherboard, press the delete key when your
computer boots (before the operating system starts). Different manufacturers set different keys for opening the UEFI. You will enter the "3D BIOS", a feature exclusive to Gigabyte motherboards. From here, you can choose which specific part of your motherboard that you want to manage.

However, the 3D BIOS is kind of annoying to use. Instead, click on the "Advanced" section in your UEFI instead (UEFI allows you to use your mouse cursor). This will lead you to a more standard-looking settings page.

Before starting, it's best just to reset all of your UEFI settings to their factory defaults. On Gigabyte motherboards, you can reset your UEFI settings to their default by pressing the "F7" key. Once your UEFI is running on its defaults, you will have to change the following settings: Boot Option Priorities - Change "Boot Option #1" to your USB drive. You need to do this for Unibeast to work. However, Mac OS X cannot boot if you set the boot option to anything that starts with "UEFI". Instead, you must select the boot option that starts with "P0". Also, after you finish installing Mac OS X, you should change this setting back to default, so that hard disks are the first boot option (this optional, but it will speed up your boot times later on).

xHCI Mode - Change this to "Auto". This setting is usually set to "Smart Auto", which doesn't work.

xHCI Hand-off / EHCI Hand-off - Make sure both of these settings are enabled.

Even though the UEFI supports using a mouse, it'll probably be easier to navigate through the UEFI with the arrow keys on your keyboard. Press "Enter" to change a selected option in the UEFI. On a Gigabyte motherboard, press F10 to save my changes.

5. Boot into Unibeast


Restart your Hackintosh, and plug in your Unibeast USB drive. If things go well, your computer will boot from the USB drive instead of booting from your normal hard disk. You will then be able to view the Unibeast menu.

If you do not manage to reach the Unibeast menu, check your motherboard's BIOS settings to make sure that the changes you made in Step 4 were properly applied. If they were, but you still cannot boot from the Unibeast USB drive, unplug your USB drive, and go back to Step 1. Reformat your USB drive with Disk Utility and try again. If all else fails, try using a different USB drive for Unibeast. At the Unibeast menu, select the name of your Unibeast USB drive, by using the left/right arrow keys on your keyboard, and then press the enter key (or return key) to start the OS X Mountain Lion installer.

In the worst case scenarios, instead of loading the Mac OS X installer, you may end up at a dark gray screen that tells you to restart your computer (a kernel panic), or you may end up with a small crossed-out sign (a loading error). If you get a kernel panic/loading error (or if the Mac OS X installer simply won't start within 10 minutes), you'll need to enter some boot flags. To enter boot flags, manually restart your computer by pressing your computer's power button. Then, once you've booted back into the Unibeast menu, try 5.1 typing any necessary boot flags before pressing the enter/return key. Check out this list of 5.2 common boot flags for reference ( PCIRootUID=0 and -x are two popular boot flags). NOTE: If your Hackintosh uses a graphics card from the Radeon HD 6800 series,

you will be stuck at a blank white screen with a mouse cursor when you try to launch the OS X Mountain Lion installer. To fix this, you have to remove the 6800series graphics card from your computer motherboard, and run the OS X Mountain Lion installer with the integrated graphics on your CPU (or a different graphics card). You can reattach the 6800-series card after you finish installing Mountain Lion. This tip may also apply to the NVIDIA GT 430, GTS 450, GTX 550 Ti, GT 620, and GT 630, which all have serious compatibility issues with the Mountain Lion installer.

5.1 typing any necessary boot flags


How to set boot options for iBoot, Chimera, or Chameleon
Starting up Mac OS X for the first time on your Hackintosh can be a very tricky process, which often requires you to set special boot options through the use of boot flags. For those of you who don't know, boot flags are "arguments" (pieces of data that you enter) to change the way that your bootloader runs. The bootloader is the program that boots Mac OS X. Boot flags can set the boot options for iBoot, Chimera, Chameleon, and any other boot CD or bootloader for Hackintoshes. Read past the break to learn how to use boot flags. There are two ways to apply a boot flag: either by typing it into the bootloader before starting up Mac OS X, or by typing it into org.Chameleon.boot.plist, the settings file used by the bootloader. When your Hackintosh is in a tough situation and can't boot properly, you'll have to type boot flags straight from the Hackintosh's bootscreen itself. To enter boot flags into the bootloader from the bootscreen, just start typing. Once you think you've got the right boot flags, press Enter.

Once you've managed to boot into your Hackintosh, you can make those boot flags permanent, so that they'll automatically be entered into the bootloader every time you start Mac OS X. To do so, go to /Extra in your hard drive and open the file "org.Chameleon.boot.plist" with TextEdit. Under the <key>Kernel Flags</key> sections, enter any boot flags that you think you'll need.

That's all you need to do to apply a boot flag for your Hackintosh. If you need help finding the right boot flags for your Hackintosh, check out my 5.2 list of common boot flags.

5.2 list of common boot flags.

Common boot options for Chimera, Chameleon, iBoot, and Unibeast


If your Hackintosh can't boot, changing your boot options with boot flags may be your last chance at getting Mac OS X to start (paso 5.1 anterior). If you don't know, "boot flags" are options that change the way that your bootloader (the program that boots Mac OS X) runs at startup. Read past the break for list of common boot flags for iBoot, Unibeast, Chimera, Chameleon, and more.

-v
The mother of all boot flags. Entering -v into the bootloader turns on verbose mode, which is absolutely critical for fixing any Hackintosh issue. Verbose mode displays every single process that takes place during your bootup of Mac OS X. It can be rather intimidating, as it will display hundreds of lines of commands during the bootup process. However, if your Hackintosh isn't booting, then verbose mode should freeze at the exact point where the bootup process is tripping up. Take a photo of what verbose mode says before the bootup freezes. You can then post that photo on a Hackintosh forum to look for help, or try to use the results of verbose mode to guess what your problem is by yourself.

-x
Turns on safe mode. Mac OS X in safe mode ignores all kext files and boot settings except those which are absolutely necessary to booting the system. Safe mode is useful if you're trying to run the Mac OS X installer on a PC that's not fully compatible with Mac OS X. Also, if you accidentally installed a kext file that's messing up your Hackintosh, booting into safe mode may work around the problem. In safe mode, you can then remove the offending kext from /Extra/Extensions in your main hard drive (if you're running Mac OS X Snow Leopard), or /System/Library/Extensions (if you're running Mac OS X Lion or Mountain Lion).

-F

If you've entered some extra boot flags into org.Chameleon.boot.plist, but they're messing up your Hackintosh's bootloader, enter the -F boot flag to ignore them.

-f
Ignores kext caches during bootup on Mac OS X Snow Leopard. If you did not install a kext properly (usually because you forgot to run System Utilities in Multibeast after installing a new kext), your kext cache will be damaged, and Mac OS X might become unbootable unless you use this boot flag. The kext cache was replaced by the kernel cache in Mac OS X Lion, so theoretically, the -f boot flag should no longer work; however, this boot flag can still help some Hackintoshes boot (for reasons unknown).

UseKernelCache=Yes
Mac OS X Lion and Mountain Lion can use the kernel cache to install kexts, allowing Mac OS X to boot faster. However, the kernel cache is turned off by default, and you have to enable it by using the boot flag "UseKernelCache=Yes" (without quotation marks). Installing Easybeast or UserDSDT with Multibeast will automatically turn the kernel cache on for you. If Mac OS X is booting extremely slow on your Hackintosh, the kernel cache might be malfunctioning, and you can turn it off with "UseKernelCache=No" (without quotation marks). Turning off the kernel cache is equivalent to using the "-f" bootflag in Snow Leopard.

PCIRootUID=1
Some Hackintoshes will only boot when their "PCI Root ID" is set to 0. This usually happens with Hackintoshes that use a AMD Radeon graphics card. Other times, a Hackintosh will only boot when its "PCI Root ID" is set to 1. In some cases, the boot flag "PCIRootUID=1" will also fix Mac App Store verification errors.

npci=x2000 npci=x3000
If your verbose mode bootup of Mac OS X Lion or Mountain is freezing at [PCI Configuration Begin], enter the npci=0x3000 boot flag to fix it. This flag is applied by default when you install Easybeast or UserDSDT with Multibeast. The boot flag npci=x2000 does the same thing, except that it only works for Lion.

arch=i386
Forces Mac OS X to boot into 32-bit mode. Sometimes, your CPU or graphics card won't be fully supported in OS X unless you boot into 32-bit mode. Unlike in Windows, booting the 32-bit kernel for Mac OS X does not limit your total amount of RAM to 4 GB, and you can still run 64-bit applications. However, single applications cannot use up more than 4 GB of RAM, so this is a disadvantage if you do professional video editing, or something else that takes up a lot of RAM. This boot flag no longer works in OS X Mountain Lion.

arch=x86_64
Allows Mac OS X to boot into 64-bit mode. This boot flag is usually unnecessary, as Mac OS X Snow Leopard (and all versions beyond it) will boot into 64-bit mode by default.

-force64
Forces Mac OS X to boot into 64-bit mode. This is usually required to boot AMD Hackintoshes, especially on Hackintoshes with AMD's newer six-core processors. Interestingly, you can use the -force64 boot flag and the arch=i386 at the same time (I'm not sure what this will do, though).

cpus=1
This boot flag limits Mac OS X to using one core of your CPU. This boot flag is often necessary to launch the Mac OS X Snow Leopard installation DVD on a Hackintosh with an unsupported processor (ahem, AMD processors). However, you shouldn't have to use this boot flag once you've installed the legacy kernel.

busratio=20
The 20 is replaced with your CPU's bus ratio. This boot flag is usually used when you're installing Mac OS X Snow Leopard on a processor that's not supported (once again, AMD processors). Snow Leopard supports more processors than it used to, so this boot flag isn't as common as before. You can find a list of busratios for 2010-model Intel processors here. You can also find your busratio manually.

mach_kernel
This boot flag locates the kernel ("mach_kernel"), an important boot file for Mac OS X. If your Hackintosh's verbose mode says that it can't find mach_kernel for some reason, entering this boot flag will help the bootloader find it (the kernel is usually found at the very base of the OS X file system). If you actually moved your kernel to somewhere else in your hard drive, change "mach_kernel" to wherever the kernel is located. For example, if the kernel is in the Extra folder of your main hard drive, enter the boot flag "/Extra/mach_kernel" (without quotation marks).

GraphicsEnabler=No
This turns Graphics Enabler off/on (you can set "No" to "Yes"). Graphics Enabler is a feature that helps Mac OS X work better with your graphics card, so it's turned on by default when you set up your Hackintosh with Multibeast. However, when used with certain graphics cards (especially AMD Radeon cards), Graphics Enabler may make Mac OS X unable to boot, or cause the graphics in Mac OS X to display incorrectly. If this is the case, try entering "GraphicsEnabler=No" (without quotations) instead. Turning GraphicsEnabler off will break DVD Player, as well as Geekbench, most games, most video editors, and certain other apps. Graphics cards from NVIDIA's 600 series no longer require GraphicsEnabler to work with Mac OS X; in that case, turning off

GraphicsEnabler won't cause any negative effects.

debug=0x100 debug=0x144
Turns on debug mode. If you use either of these boot flags, and Mac OS X gets a kernel panic (which is the Mac version of the blue screen of death), you'll see a debug screen full of code instead of a generic "You need to restart your computer" message.

darkwake=0
The DarkWake feature in Mac OS X Lion and Mountain Lion allows you to wake up certain parts of your Mac from sleep, while leaving other parts in sleep mode. Unfortunately, this feature often messes up sleep on Hackintoshes. Enter this bootflag to turn it off (enter darkwake=1 to turn it on, if turning it off doesn't do the trick). Additionally, if your verbose bootup is freezing at a bunch of commands that mention "SleepEnabler.kext", entering darkwake=0 should be able to turn SleepEnabler.kext off. (Once you boot into OS X, be sure to remove SleepEnabler.kext completely by deleting it from either /Extra/Extensions or /System/Library/Extensions in your hard drive.)

6. Install Mountain Lion


Continue, and you will eventually come up to a page that asks you for a "destination" for your Mac install. Select the hard drive that you want to install OS X Mountain Lion on, and continue.

If you're installing Mountain Lion on an empty hard drive, the hard drive selection box will be blank. You'll have to erase that hard drive with Disk Utility first (check out 6.1 Step 4 of our Snow Leopard installation guide for more details) 6.1. Otherwise, select the hard drive you want to install OS X Mountain Lion on, and click "Install". Mountain Lion will now install itself. This will take at least 30 minutes. Restart. If your Hackintosh already had Mac OS X Snow Leopard or Lion installed beforehand, you can unplug the Unibeast USB drive. Otherwise, keep the USB drive plugged in. At the boot screen, you'll see an icon for the hard drive where you installed Mountain Lion. Select it (use the arrow keys on your computer) and press "Enter". Mountain Lion will boot. Mission accomplished!

Once again, if you get a kernel panic/loading error when you try to boot your new Mountain Lion installation (or if the installation simply won't start within 10 minutes), you'll need to enter some boot flags. To enter boot flags, manually restart your computer by pressing your computer's power button. Then, once you've booted back into the Unibeast menu, try type any necessary boot flags before pressing the enter/return key. Check out this list of common boot flags for reference ( PCIRootUID=0 and -x are two popular boot flags).

6.1 Installing OSX


Normally, the installation screen will be loaded within a few minutes (5-10 minutes for me). You will eventually come up to a page that asks you for a "destination" for your

Mac install. Oh no, the page is blank! We'll have to fix that. To do this, start up Disk Utility (located under the Utilities menu in the top bar).

You need to use Disk Utility to erase your hard drive so that OS X can install itself on it. In the sidebar of Disk Utility, choose your computer's hard drive and erase it by using the "Erase" tab (the Format should be set to "Mac OS Extended (Journaled)". If you want, you can then partition the hard disk by using Disk Utility's Partition tab (OS X cannot boot from a partition that's larger than 1 TB in size, so if you have a 2 TB hard drive, you will have to partition it).

On the installation page for Mac OSX, the hard disk/disk partition should now be showing up. Select it and continue to the Install Summary page. Install Mac OS X.

The process takes me 20-30 minutes. Once done, the computer will reboot. Place iBoot back in the DVD drive. This time, instead of ejecting iBoot and inserting the Snow Leopard DVD, use your keyboard's arrow keys to select your hard drive with Snow

Leopard installed, from the iBoot menu. Press the enter/return key to boot the hard drive. If the installation doesn't boot within 30 minutes, try entering boot flags again (you may have to enter different boot flags this time).

7. Post-Installation: Updating and Multibeast Multibeast


The retail DVDs for Mac OS X install either OS X 10.6.0 or 10.6.3. Upgrading to 10.6.6 will get you the Mac App Store, which is necessary to download Mac OS X Lion. If you want to download OS X Mountain Lion, you will need to upgrade to 10.6.8. It's worth mentioning here that updating to 10.6.8 can be a major pain. Hackintoshes that have the newest generation of Intel processors (Sandy Bridge) get a kernel panic when they try to upgrade. If you wish to update to 10.6.8, be sure to use tonymacx86's UpdateHelper tool. If you only want to download Lion from the Mac App Store, simply update to OS X 10.6.6 or 10.6.7, which are completely painfree in comparison. Pretend that you want to update to 10.6.7. You probably won't have internet on your Hackintosh yet, so just use another computer to download it from here (or just Google "10.6.7 Combo Update"). After you've finished downloading the 10.6.7 combo update from Apple (it'll take a while), copy it onto a USB drive. Also, download Multibeast and

copy it onto the USB drive. Then plug the drive into your Hackintosh. Run the 10.6.7 update. When it finishes installing, DON'T REBOOT. Multibeast is a collection of kext files that you'll need to install for your Hackintoshes to have sound, internet, a high resolution screen, and more. Different Hackintosh builds require different Multibeast setups, though most setups are very similar. Find out what Multibeast options you need to install. If you have a Gigabyte GA-P67A-D3-B3 motherboard like me, check out my own Multibeast setup. If you're just updating your Hackintosh from Mac OS X Snow Leopard or Lion, you don't have to reinstall UserDSDT, Easybeast, or Chimera in Multibeast after installing OS X Mountain Lion. Mac OS X treats Mountain Lion as just another update-- this generally means that the only things you have to reinstall in Multibeast are audio kexts and ethernet kexts. You might also have to reinstall miscellaneous kexts, such as TRIM Enabler (for SSDs).

To run Multibeast in OS X Mountain Lion, you need to go the "Security" section of System Preferences in Mac OS X, and turn off the silly "Gatekeeper" option. After running Multibeast, you'll also probably want to change your BIOS settings back to

normal (from Step 4). Once that's done with, you should be running a fully functional copy of OS X Mountain Lion on your PC. Congratulations!

How to use Multibeast 4: a comprehensive guide for Lion


Opening Multibeast can be an intimidating experience for anybody who's unfamiliar with Hackintoshing. There's definitely a learning curve; to first-timers, Multibeast's menus are filled with nothing but long lists of kexts with unnecessarily long names and indecipherable descriptions. This guide is here to help. Read past the break to learn how to make Multibeast work for your Hackintosh. Multibeast, by tonymacx86, is a essentially an installer bundled with a lot of kext files for Hackintoshes. When you're setting up Mac OS X, it can be a huge time saver. By using Multibeast, you don't have to find, download, and install every single kext file that your Hackintosh needs, one by one. Multibeast has it all. However, the problem with Multibeast's all-in-one method is that there are simply too many options to make sense of. In this guide, I'm going to explain the function of several important options in Multibeast. NOTE: You have to register on tonymacx86.com to download Multibeast and related apps. After installing anything in Multibeast, you should reboot your Hackintosh to see if the chang

Easybeast/UserDSDT
These two options are the cornerstone of the tonymacx86 method; installing either of these two packages will enable Mac OS X to boot from the hard drive of your Hackintosh, without any extra assistance.es worked.

UserDSDT or DSDT-Free Installation is the better method of the two. On most motherboards made before 2012, it only works if your motherboard has a DSDT file available. DSDT files are configuration files that customize Mac OS X to work with your specific motherboard. If your motherboard has a DSDT file available in the DSDT section of tonymacx86, use it. To install UserDSDT on Mac OS X this way, you first have to download the appropriate DSDT file, rename the file "DSDT.aml" (without quotation marks), and place it on the desktop of Mac OS X. Then you can run Multibeast. When installing UserDSDT with a DSDT file, make sure that your motherboard has the right BIOS version, or the DSDT file won't work. For example, a DSDT file for version F4 won't work if your motherboard has version F1. Read this to learn how to update your BIOS version. However, if you have a newer Gigabyte-brand motherboard that uses UEFI instead of BIOS, you don't need a DSDT file. You can just install UserDSDT in Multibeast without doing anything else beforehand. If you have a non-Gigabyte motherboard that uses UEFI, it's the same deal, except that you will have to install a patched version of your motherboard BIOS in addition to UserDSDT. Easybeast Install is similar to UserDSDT, except it tries to remove the need for a DSDT file by installing some extra kext files. If your motherboard doesn't have a DSDT file available for it and isn't a motherboard with UEFI, try installing Easybeast instead. Easybeast will break sleep mode and speedstepping (CPU power management).

Drivers & Bootloaders -> Kexts & Enablers -> Audio


All of the motherboards recommended by tonymacx86 use Realtek Audio. To enable sound on these motherboards, you'll want to install the Realtek ALC8xx kexts. Luckily, the Realtek ALC8xx section of Multibeast is pretty straightforward.

All you need to know is the audio codec of your motherboard. You can find your audio codec by Googling the model of your motherboard. The first Google result will be the motherboard's official product page. The audio codec is usually found under the "Specifications" section, or some other similarly-named section. For example, my Hackintosh has a Gigabyte GA-P67A-D3-B3 motherboard. According to the official product page, this motherboard uses the Realtek 889 codec. Once you've found your audio codec, choose the corresponding option in Multibeast. Each codec as two different possible setups: one for Hackintoshes that use a DSDT file, and one for Hackintoshes that don't. On my own Hackintosh, I used a DSDT file, so I would choose ALC889 under the "With DSDT" section to enable audio. If you have a motherboard that doesn't use the Realtek audio codec (or it has an unsupported codec version), you'll have to go with the VoodooHDA kexts. VoodooHDA enables sound for a wide variety of motherboards, but it's not very reliable. Install just one of the versions and reboot to see if it works well for you. If not, remove the kext by going to /System/Library/Extensions in your hard drive and deleting VoodooHDA.kext. Then try another version.

Drivers & Bootloaders -> Kexts & Enablers -> Disk


These kexts fix problems related to hard drives.

For example, on some Hackintoshes, your hard drives will show up as orange external drives on your desktop. Install IOAHCIBlockStorageInjector to fix that (this kext should be unnecessary if you install UserDSDT). In the Mac OS X Lion version of Multibeast, you can also install TRIM Enabler to enable TRIM in Mac OS X, which is a critical feature for SSD drives. TRIM Enabler is a version specific patch, meaning that you may have to install a new version of it every time you update Mac OS X.

Drivers & Bootloaders -> Kexts & Enablers -> Graphics


The following graphics card patches are version-specific, meaning that you have to install a new patch every time you update to a new version of Mac OS X.

The patches called ATI 48xx Support add Mac OS X support to AMD Radeon 4800 cards. (The AMD Radeon 5000 and 6000 series usually support Mac OS X natively.) The NVIDIA 4xx/5xx Support patches enable OpenCL for the NVIDIA 400 and 500 series in Mac OS X Lion (older NVIDIA cards support OpenCL natively). They will also enable full resolution or graphics acceleration on your graphics card. These patches are version-specific, meaning that you have to install a new patch every time you update to a new version of Mac OS X. If your Hackintosh uses a graphics card with 2 GB or more of video RAM, you must update to Mac OS X 10.7.5 and install the 10.7.5 >2GB OpenCL Patch. Versions of Mac OS X older than 10.7.5 do not support these graphics cards properly. P.S. NVIDIA also offers official graphics drivers for Mac OS X Lion, but nowadays, most people use OpenCL Enabler. Never install both of these things at the same time; they conflict with each other and will break your graphics.

Drivers & Bootloaders -> Drivers>Miscellaneous/System


The Miscellaneous and System sections contain kexts that fix random issues in Mac OS X. In Multibeast, the difference between these two sections is very unclear, so I've included explanations for both sections.

NullCPUPowerManagement (NCPM) fixes boot errors caused by Apple's CPU power management service. These errors happen on Hackintoshes that aren't using UserDSDT. Installing NCPM breaks sleep mode and speed-stepping (CPU power management). This kext is installed by default when you run Easybeast. The FakeSMC Plugins are a set of plugins that enable system-monitoring apps to read your Hackintosh's CPU temperature and GPU temperature. Installing USB 3.0 - 3rd Party supposedly enables USB 3.0 support on Hackintoshes, but it's a hit-and-miss feature: it works for some people, and causes booting errors for others. So if you're setting up a Hackintosh, don't count on USB 3.0 support. If you're using an older mouse or keyboard that doesn't connect to your Hackintosh with a USB port, install PS/2 Keyboard/Mice. If your Hackintosh is having problems with booting because your BIOS settings keep resetting every time you reboot, try installing ElliottForceLegacyRTC and EvOreboot. If you're experiencing this issue on Mac OS X Lion, install AppleRTC Patch for CMOS Reset. All of this stuff is installed by default in Easybeast, and AppleRTC Patch is installed by default in UserDSDT. If your Hackintosh uses an older LGA1156 motherboard and the USB ports aren't working properly, try installing Legacy USB Support. LGA1156 motherboards are the ones that support the first generation of Intel Core processors. Patched Apple Intel CPU Power Management is an alternative to NullCPUPowerManagement. It does the same thing as NCPM, except it doesn't break sleep mode or speed-stepping. However, these patches are version-specific, so every time you update Mac OS X, you'll have to install a new version of the patch.

Mac OS X Lion 10.7.4 removed support for X58 motherboards, making Hackintoshes that use these motherboards unable to boot without help in Mountain Lion, even after installing UserDSDT or Easybeast. 10.6.8 Rollback for ASUS X58 System fixes these booting problems.

Drivers & Bootloaders -> Kexts & Enablers -> Network


These kexts should enable connecting to the internet on your Hackintosh, via an Ethernet cord. To find out which kext you need to install, you need to know what ethernet controller your motherboard has.

Every mid-end to high-end Gigabyte motherboard that's supported by tonymacx86 has the 8100 series of controllers. However, different manufacturers use different controllers; for example, some ASUS motherboards also use the 8100 series, while other ASUS motherboards use the 82500 series. Check what controller your motherboard uses by Googling its name (or model number) to find the official manufacturer webpage for it. Most manufacturers list the ethernet controller of a motherboard under the "Specifications" section of its official page. If your motherboard uses the Realtek 8100 series of Ethernet controllers, try installing the Realtek - AppleRTL8169Ethernet first. If not, try installing Lnx2Mac's Realtek driver, which works better for some people. Shailua's ethernet kext works on motherboards with an Atheros AR8100 series ethernet controller, and hnak's ethernet kext works on motherboards with an Intel 82500 series ethernet controller.

Customization -> Boot Options


Most of the options in the Boot Options section make edits to org.Chameleon.boot.plist, a settings file that configures how your Hackintosh boots. You can make all these changes manually. Check out our list of common boot options for more details.

The Apple Boot Screen options determine whether your Hackintosh boots the 32-bit kernel or the 64-bit kernel. Unlike in Windows, booting the 32-bit kernel for Mac OS X does not limit your total amount of RAM to 4 GB, and you can still run 64-bit applications. However, individual applications cannot use up more than 4 GB of RAM, so this is a disadvantage if you do professional video editing, or something else that takes up a whole lot of RAM. If your Hackintosh isn't booting from the hard drive properly, or you're getting verifications errors in the Mac App Store, changing your PCI Root ID with PCI Root ID Fix may be able to solve the issue. If your Hackintosh's bootscreen automatically loads Mac OS X instead of giving you the option to choose your own hard drive, install Instant Menu. PCI Configuration Fix is installed automatically when you install Easybeast, UserDSDT, or either of the Apple Boot Screens. This fixes a common booting issue in Mac OS X Snow Leopard 10.6.8 and all versions of Mac OS X Lion.

Customization -> System Definitions


System Definitions pretend that your Hackintosh is a real Mac. The Mac Pro (3,1) system definition is installed by default with UserDSDT and Easybeast.

Occasionally, a certain System Definition will make your Hackintosh run a lot slower than it should. Geekbench is a good benchmark to compare your Hackintosh against other Hackintoshes and Macs (the free trial lasts forever). It's particularly useful because it lets you compare your score to the Geekbench scores of other computers. If you feel that your Geekbench score is unusually slow compared to Hackintoshes or Macs with similar hardware, try installing a different System Definition. Generally, any system definition will work. The only exceptions are the the Mac Pro (4,1) and Mac Pro (5,1) system definitions, which cause booting problems. If you insist on installing either of these two system definitions, be sure to remove AppleTyMCEDriver.kext and AppleGraphicsPowerManagement.kext from /System/Library/Extensions beforehand (the system definitions mess up these two kexts). If you need to enable the built-in HD3000 graphics of your Intel Sandy Bridge processor, then install the Mac mini system definition or the MacBook Pro 8,1.

Customization -> SSDT Options

If you're running Mac OS X Lion 10.7.4 with an Intel i5 or i7 processor in the Sandy Bridge generation, you have to install a SSDT file. Pick a SSDT based on whether your processor is an i5 model or an i7 model, and whether it has been overclocked (if you don't know whether your processor has been overclocked, then it hasn't). Sandy Bridge processors have model numbers in the 2000's (for example, the Intel Core i5-2500). Without a SSDT, your processor will run at a much slower speed than normal. This problem only happens in Mac OS X 10.7.4, and doesn't affect Intel i3 processors, or the Intel Core i5-2400.

How to use Multibeast 5: a comprehensive guide for Mountain Lion


Recently, tonymacx86 released Multibeast 5, a version of Multibeast customized specifically for OS X Mountain Lion, Apple's newest version of Mac OS X. The layout of Multibeast has been revamped, and many incompatible and outdated options have

been removed. Even so, opening Multibeast can be an intimidating experience for anybody new to Hackintoshes. This guide is here to help. Multibeast, by tonymacx86, is a essentially an installer bundled with a lot of kext files for Hackintoshes. When you're setting up Mac OS X, it can be a huge time saver. By using Multibeast, you don't have to find, download, and install every single kext file that your Hackintosh needs, one by one. Multibeast has it all. However, the problem with Multibeast's all-in-one method is that there are simply too many options to make sense of. In this guide, I'm going to explain the function of several important options in Multibeast. NOTE: You have to register on tonymacx86.com to download Multibeast and related apps. After installing anything in Multibeast, you should reboot your Hackintosh to see if the changes worked.

Easybeast/UserDSDT/DSDT-Free Installation
These options are the cornerstone of the tonymacx86 method; installing either of these two packages will enable Mac OS X to boot from the hard drive of your Hackintosh, without any extra assistance.

UserDSDT or DSDT-Free Installation is the better method of the two. On most motherboards made before 2012, it only works if your motherboard has a DSDT file available. DSDT files are configuration files that customize Mac OS X to work with your specific motherboard. If your motherboard has a DSDT file available in the DSDT section of tonymacx86, use it. To install UserDSDT on Mac OS X this way, you first have to download the appropriate DSDT file, rename the file "DSDT.aml" (without quotation marks), and place it on the desktop of Mac OS X. Then you can run Multibeast. When installing UserDSDT with a DSDT file, make sure that your motherboard has the right BIOS version, or the DSDT file won't work. For example, a DSDT file for version

F4 won't work if your motherboard has version F1. Read this to learn how to update your BIOS version. However, if you have a newer Gigabyte-brand motherboard that uses UEFI instead of BIOS, you don't need a DSDT file. You can just install UserDSDT in Multibeast without doing anything else beforehand. If you have a non-Gigabyte motherboard that uses UEFI, it's the same deal, except that you will have to install a patched version of your motherboard BIOS in addition to UserDSDT. Easybeast Installation is similar to UserDSDT, except it tries to remove the need for a DSDT file by installing some extra kext files. If your motherboard doesn't have a DSDT file available for it and isn't a motherboard with UEFI, try installing Easybeast instead. Easybeast will break sleep mode and speedstepping (CPU power management).

Drivers & Bootloaders -> Drivers -> Audio


All of the motherboards recommended by tonymacx86 use Realtek Audio. To enable sound on these motherboards, you'll want to install the Realtek ALC8xx kexts. Luckily, the Realtek ALC8xx section of Multibeast 5 is pretty straightforward.

All you need to know is the audio codec of your motherboard. You can find your audio codec by Googling the model of your motherboard. The first Google result will be the motherboard's official product page. The audio codec is usually found under the "Specifications" section, or some other similarly-named section. For example, my Hackintosh has a Gigabyte GA-P67A-D3-B3 motherboard. According to the official product page, this motherboard uses the Realtek 889 codec. Once you've found your audio codec, choose the corresponding option in Multibeast. Each codec as two different possible setups: one for Hackintoshes that use a DSDT file, and one for Hackintoshes that don't. On my own Hackintosh, I used a DSDT file, so I would choose ALC889 under the "With DSDT" section to enable audio. If you have a motherboard that doesn't use the Realtek audio codec (or it has an unsupported codec version), you'll have to go with the VoodooHDA kexts. VoodooHDA enables sound for a wide variety of motherboards, but it's not very reliable. Install just one of the versions and reboot to see if it works well for you. If not, remove the kext by going to /System/Library/Extensions in your hard drive and deleting VoodooHDA.kext. Then try another version.

Drivers & Bootloaders -> Drivers -> Disk


Almost all hard drives should work with Mac OS X by default, but you still might encounter glitches here and there. These kexts fix hard drive-related problems. For example, on some Hackintoshes, your hard drives will show up as orange external drives on your desktop. Install IOAHCI Block Storage Injector to fix that (this kext should be unnecessary if you install UserDSDT). You can also install TRIM Enabler to enable TRIM in Mac OS X, which is a critical feature for SSD drives. OS X Mountain Lion version 10.8.0 requires a different patch to enable TRIM than Mountain Lion version 10.8.1 (and higher), so install whichever patch is right for your computer.

Drivers & Bootloaders -> Drivers -> Graphics


All of these patches enable graphics support on various graphics cards, so that the cards can display at full resolution. In Mac OS X, some cards work out of the box, without the need for extra drivers. This is generally true for most older NVIDIA graphics cards, as well as for most AMD Radeon HD graphics cards in the 6600 and 6800 series. Intel's 2nd-generation "Sandy Bridge" processors are compatible with their 3rdgeneration "Ivy Bridge" motherboards. The same is true the other way around: Ivy Bridge processors are also compatible with Sandy Bridge motherboards. However, building your Hackintosh with these mixed configurations prevents your processor's integrated graphics from working properly in Mac OS X. Install Intel Graphics Patch for Mixed Configurations to fix this problem. Remember, only HD 3000 and HD 4000 graphics work in Mac OS X.

The NVIDIA Fermi patches are version-specific, meaning that you have to install a new patch every time you update to a new version of Mac OS X. 10.8.x OpenCL Patch works for pretty much any graphics card in NVIDIA's 400, 500, and 600 series. The 10.8.0+ OpenCL Patch under the ">2GB OpenCL Patch" section does the same thing, except it works for NVIDIA cards with 2 GB or more of video RAM. NVIDIA also offers official graphics drivers for Mountain Lion, which do the same thing as the Multibeast patches. For some graphics cards, the drivers will also fix graphics glitches in Mac OS X. However, OpenCL does not currently work on the newest version of the official NVIDIA drivers, version 304.00.00f20. To enable OpenCL while using these drivers, you must install the NVIDIA Retail patch.

Drivers & Bootloaders -> Drivers>Miscellaneous/System


The Miscellaneous and System sections contain kexts that fix random issues in Mac OS X. In Multibeast 5, the difference between these two sections is very unclear, so I've included explanations for both sections.

NullCPUPowerManagement (NCPM) fixes boot errors caused by Apple's CPU power management service. These errors happen on Hackintoshes that aren't using UserDSDT. Installing NCPM breaks sleep mode and speed-stepping (CPU power management). This kext is installed by default when you run Easybeast. The FakeSMC Plugins are a set of plugins that enable system-monitoring apps to read your Hackintosh's CPU temperature and GPU temperature. However, the NVIDIA GeForce Plugin causes kernel panics if your Hackintosh uses a graphics card from the NVIDIA 600 series. Installing USB 3.0 - 3rd Party supposedly enables USB 3.0 support on Hackintoshes, but it's a hit-and-miss feature: it works for some people, and causes booting errors for others. So if you're setting up a Hackintosh, don't count on USB 3.0 support. If you're using an older mouse or keyboard that doesn't connect to your Hackintosh with a USB port, install PS/2 Keyboard/Mice. If your Hackintosh is having problems with booting because your BIOS settings keep resetting every time you reboot, try installing ElliottForceLegacyRTC and EvOreboot. If you're experiencing this issue on Mac OS X Lion, install AppleRTC Patch for CMOS Reset. All of this stuff is installed by default in Easybeast, and AppleRTC Patch is installed by default in UserDSDT. If your Hackintosh uses an older LGA1156 motherboard and the USB ports aren't working properly, try installing Legacy USB Support. LGA1156 motherboards are the ones that support the first generation of Intel Core processors. Patched Apple Intel CPU Power Management is an alternative to NullCPUPowerManagement. It does the same thing as NCPM, except it doesn't break

sleep mode or speed-stepping. However, these patches are version-specific, so every time you update Mac OS X, you'll have to install a new version of the patch. Mac OS X Lion 10.7.4 removed support for X58 motherboards, making Hackintoshes that use these motherboards unable to boot without help in Mountain Lion, even after installing UserDSDT or Easybeast. 10.6.8 Rollback for ASUS X58 System fixes these booting problems. Also, many motherboards (not just X58) encountered booting problems in OS X Mountain Lion version 10.8.2 due to driver incompatibilities. If your Hackintosh cannot boot normally after updating to version 10.8.2, boot into Mac OS X with the help of your Unibeast USB drive (or whatever installer USB drive you used), and install 10.8.1 Rollback.

Drivers & Bootloaders -> Kexts & Enablers -> Network


These kexts should enable connecting to the internet on your Hackintosh, via an Ethernet cord. To find out which kext you need to install, you need to know what ethernet controller your motherboard has.

Every mid-end to high-end Gigabyte motherboard that's supported by tonymacx86 has the 8100 series of controllers. However, different manufacturers use different controllers; for example, some ASUS motherboards also use the 8100 series, while other ASUS motherboards use the 82500 series. Check what controller your motherboard uses by Googling its name (or model number) to find the official manufacturer webpage for it. Most manufacturers list the ethernet controller of a motherboard under the "Specifications" section of its official page. If your motherboard uses the Realtek 8100 series of Ethernet controllers, try installing the Realtek - AppleRTL8169Ethernet first. If not, try installing Lnx2Mac's Realtek driver, which works better for some people. Shailua's ethernet kext works on motherboards with an Atheros AR8100 series ethernet controller, and hnak's ethernet kext works on motherboards with an Intel 82500 series ethernet controller.

Customization -> Boot Options


Most of the options in the Boot Options section make edits to org.Chameleon.boot.plist, a settings file that configures how your Hackintosh boots. You can make all these changes manually. Check out our list of common boot options for more details.

If your Hackintosh isn't booting from the hard drive properly, or you're getting verifications errors in the Mac App Store, changing your PCI Root ID with PCI Root ID Fix may be able to solve the issue. This option does the same thing as using the PCIRootUID=1 boot flag. If your Hackintosh's bootscreen automatically loads Mac OS X instead of giving you the option to choose your own hard drive, install Instant Menu.

Customization -> System Definitions


System Definitions pretend that your Hackintosh is a real Mac. The Mac Pro (3,1) system definition is installed by default with UserDSDT and Easybeast.

Occasionally, a certain System Definition will make your Hackintosh run a lot slower than it should. Geekbench is a good benchmark to compare your Hackintosh against other Hackintoshes and Macs (the free trial lasts forever). If you feel that your Geekbench score is unusually slow compared to Hackintoshes or Macs with similar hardware, try installing a different System Definition. Generally, any system definition will work. The only exceptions are the the Mac Pro

(4,1) and Mac Pro (5,1) system definitions, which cause booting problems. If you insist on installing either of these two system definitions, be sure to remove AppleTyMCEDriver.kext and AppleGraphicsPowerManagement.kext from /System/Library/Extensions beforehand (the system definitions mess up these two kexts). If you want to enable the built-in HD3000 graphics of your Intel Sandy Bridge processor, the built-in HD4000 graphics of your Intel Ivy Bridge processor, or AirPlay mirroring, then you should install the Mac mini system definition.

Using iBoot to run your Snow Leopard Installation DVD


You will need to burn iBoot onto a CD. On Windows 7 and Mac OS X, burning capabilities are built-in to the operating system-- just insert an empty CD into your DVD/Bluray drive, right-click on the iBoot file, and burn it. If you're using Windows XP or Vista, you will need to use a program such as ImgBurn. It's time to begin. Turn off your soon-to-be Hackintosh. Insert iBoot into the DVD/Bluray drive, and boot the computer. You should come up to a screen with the tonymacx86 apple on top. Don't do anything yet.

Take out the iBoot CD from your DVD/Bluray drive (the iBoot menu will remain on the screen), and put in your OS X installation disk. Then press "F5" to refresh the iBoot menu, so that it can detect the new installation disk. Once iBoot detects the disk, press the enter/return key on your keyboard to start up the OS X installation. (This could take a while.)

In the worst case scenarios, instead of loading the Mac OS X installer, you may end up at a dark gray screen that tells you to restart your computer (a kernel panic), or you may end up with a small crossed-out sign (a loading error). If you get a kernel panic/loading error (or if the Mac OS X installer simply won't start within 30 minutes), you'll need to enter some boot flags. To enter boot flags, first put iBoot back into your Bluray/DVD drive and manually restart your computer by pressing your computer's power button. Then, once you're reinserted the Snow Leopard install DVD and pressed F5 to refresh the iBoot menu, try typing any necessary boot flags before pressing the enter/return key. Check out this list of common boot flags for reference (PCIRootUID=1 -v -x is one popular combination of boot flags).