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Conforme a la Ley
Departamento de Educación de Puerto Rico

NOTIFICACIÓN DE POLÍTICA PÚBLICA

El Departamento de Educación no discrimina por razón de raza, color, género,


nacimiento, origen nacional, condición social, ideas políticas o religiosas, edad o
impedimento en sus actividades, servicios educativos y oportunidades de empleo.

NOTA ACLARATORIA

Para propósitos de carácter legal en relación con la Ley de Derechos Civiles de 1964,
el uso de los términos maestro, director, supervisor, estudiante y cualquier otro que
pueda hacer referencia a ambos géneros, incluye tanto al masculino como al femenino.
NOTA ACLARATORIA

La información contenida en este folleto se publica en acuerdo con el Departamento de


Educación de Puerto Rico como apoyo a las labores que se realizan en el salón de clase
cuya intención es el éxito académico de los estudiantes. Los ejemplos presentados son
sólo una muestra que ejemplifica la forma y el estilo de las Pruebas Puertorriqueñas de
Aprovechamiento Académico. En ningún momento se intenta cubrir la totalidad de las
expectativas que forman parte de la evaluación ni de algún modo sustituir o limitar la
enseñanza con lo que aquí se presenta. Reiteramos que este folleto informativo es sólo una
muestra y que pudiera no incluir todos los tipos de pregunta utilizados en las PPAA.

EXPLANATORY NOTE

The content of this Information Booklet is published in agreement with the Puerto Rico
Department of Education to support classroom instruction and the academic success of all
students. The examples presented are only a sample that illustrates the form and the style
of the Pruebas Puertorriqueñas de Aprovechamiento Académico (PPAA). These
Information Booklets do not attempt to cover the totality of the expectations that should
be taught in the classroom and will be measured by the PPAA. We reiterate that this
Information Booklet is only a sample and does not include all the types of questions
utilized in the PPAA.
INTRODUCTION

The Pruebas Puertorriqueñas de Aprovechamiento Académico (PPAA) are totally new items
that evaluate the expectations specific to each grade level and the demands of global education.
The revised Content Standards and Grade-Level Expectations are part of a transformation of the
education system.

Purpose

The purpose of this Information Booklet is to familiarize educators, parents, and students in
Puerto Rico with the new PPAA English tests that will be administered beginning April 2009.
The booklet provides helpful explanations and sample test material that will enable
educators, parents, and students to get a comprehensive grasp of the exam (PPAA). This
information will be helpful to school personnel as they work together to integrate the content
standards and grade-level expectations into their daily lesson plans and classroom teaching. Most
importantly, this information booklet will provide educators, parents, and students with
additional insight into the fundamental framework of what is to be taught and learned in the
Puerto Rico school system.

New Content Standards and Expectations

During 2007-2008, the content standards and grade-level expectations established in


2000 were revised through an instructional process in which Puerto Rican teachers and
evaluation specialists worked arduously.
The resulting content standards, as well as the grade-level expectations are an improved
guide to teaching Puerto Rican students in the 21st century and preparing them to be successful
in a competitive global world community. Learning expectations are now defined clearly for
each grade and with rigor. The content standards and grade-level expectations of learning
establish measurable and clear criteria that constitute goals for all students. In brief, the content
standards and grade-level expectations describe what each student should know and be able to
do. It is expected that upon completing the school year, each student will possess the knowledge
and skills identified as important for the grade in which he or she is enrolled.

© 2008 All1
Rights Reserved Grade 11 English PPAA Information Booklet
The content standards and grade-level expectations are delineated in such a way that they
encourage interrelationships among the curriculum, textbooks and other materials, classroom
instruction, and academic tests that measure progress.

Pruebas Puertorriqueñas de Aprovechamiento Académico (PPAA)

The new PPAA meets the requirements of the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB).
These new tests provide educators with a better measure of overall student achievement.
Each test is composed of multiple-choice and constructed-response items. In the past, PPAA
tests were composed exclusively of multiple-choice items.
The new document (Content Standards and Grade-Level Expectations) and test blueprints
are expected to result in an improved alignment, the degree to which assessments of what
students know and can do are in agreement with content standards and grade-level expectations.
Test blueprints (describing what the tests measure) were created to reflect the new
document. Constructed-response test items have been added to the multiple-choice format to
better measure some expectations and student performance.
Puerto Rico is using a model of alignment developed by Norman Webb of the University
of Wisconsin. Test content is being written using three Depth-of-Knowledge (DOK) levels that
are defined by Webb¹:

DOK 1- Recall and Reproduction


DOK 2 - Skills and Concepts/Basic Reasoning
DOK 3 - Strategic Thinking/Complex Reasoning

Consistency between the cognitive demands of content standards and grade-level


expectations and the cognitive demands of the PPAA assessments is emphasized.

¹ Webb, Norman L. Web Alignment Tool (WAT) Training Manual


(Washington, DC: Council of Chief State School Officers, 2005).

© 2008 All2
Rights Reserved Grade 11 English PPAA Information Booklet
ORGANIZATION OF THE INFORMATION BOOKLETS
Each grade within the subject area is presented as a separate Information Booklet to provide
helpful general information, as well as show enough specific sample items and passages in
listening, reading, and writing to give educators a good sense of the English assessment. The
booklet for each grade level contains some information that is unique to the required
expectations of the subject. However, all booklets include the following information, which is
considered critical for all subject-area PPAA tests:

 an overview of the subject within the context of the PPAA


 the reasons the content standards and grade-level expectations are critical to student
learning and success
 the content standards and grade-level expectations that are measured by the PPAA
 sample items that show some of the ways expectations are assessed
 sample constructed-response test items (short-answer and extended-response) and the
scoring rubrics
 additional information to help educators understand how content standards and grade-
level expectations are assessed on the PPAA

It is recommended that you read and study the booklets for a grade above and a grade
below the grade you are teaching. For example, seventh-grade English teachers should review
the sixth-grade Information Booklet as well as the eighth-grade Information Booklet. You will be
able to develop a broader perspective of the English assessment than if you study only the
seventh-grade Information Booklet.

© 2008 All3
Rights Reserved Grade 11 English PPAA Information Booklet
Overview of the English as a Second Language PPAA

Objective of the English PPAA Information Booklet

The objective of this Information Booklet is to assist educators in understanding the new
English Prueba Puertorriqueña de Approbechamiento Académico (PPAA) designed to measure
Puerto Rico’s revised content standards and grade-level expectations for English language
learners (ELLs) in grades 3-8 and 11. The booklet describes the layout of the listening, reading,
and writing sections of the English PPAA for grade 11 and provides sample test selections and
items.

General Information Regarding the English PPAA

The Puerto Rico Department of Education (PRDE) developed the PPAA to fulfill the
requirements of the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB). NCLB mandates that the
academic progress of ELLs in grades 3-8 and one high school grade be evaluated through a state-
administered measure of English language proficiency in listening, reading, and writing. The
English PPAA developed to measure Puerto Rico’s new content standards and grade-level
expectations will be administered beginning in April 2009.
The English PPAA is comprised of the following:
• ELLs in grades 3-8 and 11 are assessed in the areas of listening, reading, and writing
using a multiple-choice format. The reading section of the test also includes new
constructed-response items that require students to answer open-ended questions in their
own words.
The goal of the English PPAA is to assist schools in helping ELLs to acquire English language
proficiency.
Facets of the listening/speaking expectations that are concerned with speaking English
are not measured by the written PPAA. Speaking can only be assessed by evaluating the actual
oral communication of the individual student.

© 2008 All4
Rights Reserved Grade 11 English PPAA Information Booklet
The Test Development Process

The PRDE directly involved educators and test experts throughout the English PPAA
development process. Committees of Puerto Rican educators help create listening, reading, and
writing selections and test items. In addition, large-scale field tests are conducted.
Committees of educators review new items before field testing.
In order to replenish the PPAA item banks, committees of Puerto Rican educators
annually hold review sessions before field-testing to provide feedback on newly created items.

Test Results

The English PPAA results include individual proficiency-level ratings for each of the
listening, reading, and writing domains assessed. These results are used to determine if the
NCLB annual measurable achievement objectives have been met.

Test Layout

Grades 3-8,11

Section 1: Multiple-choice 15 points


Listening
Section 2: Multiple-choice 25 points
Reading Constructed response
Section 3: Multiple-choice 20 points
Writing

© 2008 All5
Rights Reserved Grade 11 English PPAA Information Booklet
English PPAA Assessment Model

The English PPAA is designed to measure student performance at the grade level
assessed. For example, an English PPAA grade 11 reading selection is written at a difficulty
level appropriate for ELLs who are in the spring of their eleventh-grade year. Student
performance is linked to the grade-level expectations outlined in the English content standards.

Test Administration

The English PPAA test administration manual includes information to help test
administrators and students understand the structure and purpose of the test. Students are
informed that they will encounter questions with varying levels of difficulty depending on how
much English they know. They are encouraged to do their best and choose the answers they
think are correct.

Test Content

This section contains sample listening, reading, and writing test selections and items
aligned with the content standard and grade-level expectations they are designed to measure.
Multiple-choice and constructed-response items are written at various Depth-of-Knowledge
(DOK) levels.

DOK 1 DOK 2 DOK 3


Recall and Reproduction Skills and Concepts Strategic Thinking

recall information such as a engagement of mental reasoning, planning, using


fact, definition, or simple processing beyond recall or evidence, and a higher level of
procedure; or performance of reproduction; more than one thinking than previous levels;
a simple process or procedure step more complex, abstract

© 2008 All6
Rights Reserved Grade 11 English PPAA Information Booklet
• The test includes a variety of narrative and informational selections related to listening,
reading, and writing.
• Test selections span a variety of purposes such as literary appreciation, subject-area
instruction, as well as everyday, practical themes.
• The test is designed to be both age and grade-level appropriate.

© 2008 All7
Rights Reserved Grade 11 English PPAA Information Booklet
Grade 11 English PPAA Listening/Speaking Information
Grade 11 English PPAA Listening/Speaking Content Standard
The Grade 11 English PPAA listening/speaking section measures the following content standard
and grade-level expectations:

The student uses the English language to interpret oral input, construct meaning, interact
with confidence both verbally and nonverbally, and express ideas effectively in a variety of
personal, social, and academic contexts.

Content Standard: Listening/Speaking


Listens and responds during a read aloud, presentation, or performance from a
variety of literature, periods, genres, and styles to analyze character
L/S.11.1
development and setting, and to distinguish the characteristics of tone, voice,
and mood; makes connections to text.
Listens and responds to synthesize, explain, describe, support, and discuss
L/S.11.2
information; answers and formulates closed and open-ended questions.
Expectation

Uses appropriate language structure to analyze and state opinions in discussions


L/S.11.3 and presentations, to problem solve, and to explain a process integrating
comparison and contrast statements.
Expresses thoughts and opinions to discuss current events, concepts, themes,
characters, plot, and conflict resolution; makes predictions and inferences, as
L/S.11.4
well as draws conclusions from listening to a variety of texts, performances,
and multimedia sources; listens to sort and prioritize information.
Analyzes the main idea or topic and important details from learned concepts or
L/S.11.5 readings from a variety of persuasive texts; summarizes, explains, clarifies, and
discusses effectiveness of text, performance, speech, or literature.

© 2008 All8
Rights Reserved Grade 11 English PPAA Information Booklet
For the Grade 11 listening section:
• students will listen to scripts of recorded English text and then respond to comprehension
questions presented in a multiple-choice format

• students will be assessed on their ability to understand spoken English

• test items for this grade level will consist of four answer choices

• texts may include the following combinations: sentences, short paragraphs, or passages

• longer selections may include up to approximately 375 words

© 2008 All9
Rights Reserved Grade 11 English PPAA Information Booklet
Sample Grade 11 English PPAA Listening Passages and Items.

(Narrator): Listen to the following question and the sentences that follow. Choose the sentence
that is the best response to the question. Mark the letter of the correct answer on your answer
sheet.
(Woman): Cindy, have you ever been to the zoo?
(Narrator): Mark the letter of the correct answer on your answer sheet.

1 A Yes, you can find many different animals at the zoo.


B Yes, my cousin has told me great things about the zoo.
C* Yes, I have gone to the zoo several times this year.
D Yes, a friend has visited zoos in several cities this year.

L/S 11.3

(Narrator): Listen to the following question and the sentences that follow. Choose the sentence
that is the best response to the question. Mark the letter of the correct answer on your answer
sheet.
(Man): What do you think of Juanita’s idea?
(Narrator): Mark the letter of the correct answer on your answer sheet.

2 A I have a very good idea.


B* I think Juanita had a great idea.
C An idea is a useful thought.
D Your idea sounds like it could work.

L/S 11.3

© 2008 All
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Rights Reserved Grade 11 English PPAA Information Booklet
(Narrator): In this part of the test, you will listen to a short paragraph. Afterwards, listen to and
answer the questions. Mark the correct answers on your answer sheet.

(Man): Okay class, today you are going to work together in groups of four. First, we are going to
go around the room and each person will count off to be either a 1, 2, 3, or 4. After everyone has
been assigned a number, we are going to group ourselves together. All the ones will sit together,
then the twos, threes, and fours. Let’s begin counting off.

3 What are you supposed to do after you have been assigned a number?

A go around the room and find a person who is a 1, 2, 3, or 4


B write your number on a sheet of paper
C* form a group with other people who have your same number
D begin to count off 1, 2, 3, or 4

L/S.11.2

4 Why does the teacher use the strategy of numbering the students from 1 through 4?

A So the students can practice forming class teams of 4.


B* He wants the students to form several working groups.
C He wants the students to go around the room.
D So the students can learn to assign themselves numbers.

L/S. 11.3

© 2008 All
11
Rights Reserved Grade 11 English PPAA Information Booklet
Listen to the following story about air pollution.

(Man):

Air pollution is an important concern facing the world today. A major cause of air
pollution is the burning of fossil fuels. This type of fuel is used to power our businesses, homes,
and cars. However, airplanes, automobiles, trucks, and buses pollute the air more than the
emissions from businesses or homes.

Several industries are actively working to reduce the air pollution caused by our
transportation needs. For example, airline engineers have analyzed their planes to come up
with ways to make them more fuel efficient. The engineers found that by adding special tips to
airplane wings, fuel consumption can be reduced by 5%. As a result, almost all airlines have
added the wing tips to their airline fleets.

The automotive industry is also addressing the issue of air pollution caused by passenger
cars and trucks. Most major automakers have begun the production of engines that run on
electricity instead of fuel. They also make hybrid vehicles which use both electricity and fuel.
Although most automobiles on the road only get 20 miles per gallon, the hybrid car averages 40-
50 miles per gallon!

As part of their corporate responsibility, these industries are taking on the challenge of
reducing air pollution.

© 2008 All
12
Rights Reserved Grade 11 English PPAA Information Booklet
5 Why did the author write this 7 What would be a good title for this
passage? passage?

A* The author wants to explain ways A “Air Pollution: A Possible Concern


that industries are trying to reduce air for Industries”
pollution.
B* “Air Pollution: Concerns Drive
B The author wants people to change Industry Decisions”
their driving and flying habits.
C “Air Pollution Effects on Homes and
C The author believes everyone should Businesses”
drive electric vehicles.
D “Air Pollution Caused by Fossil
D The author wants to inform industry Fuel”
officials of the importance of
reducing air pollution.
L/S.11.5

L/S.11.4

8 What is the tone of this passage?

6 What is this passage mainly about?


A modest
B judgmental
A how automakers are developing
hybrid and electric cars to reduce air C* persuasive
pollution
D impatient
B* ways that some industries are
working to reduce the air pollution
L/S.11.1
caused by motor vehicles

C how airplane engineers have


discovered a way to reduce airplane
fuel consumption by 5%

D ways that some industries are


working to reduce air pollution
caused by homes

L/S.11.5
Grade 11 English PPAA Reading Information
Grade 11 English PPAA Reading Content Standards
The Grade 11 English PPAA reading section measures the following content standard and grade-
level expectations:

The student uses reading strategies, literary analysis, and critical thinking skills to
construct meaning and develop an understanding as well as an appreciation of a variety of
genres of both fiction and nonfiction.

Content Standard: Reading

Examines context clues, uses reference sources and vocabulary expansion


R.11.1 strategies to assess word meaning; analyzes the meaning of unfamiliar words and
applies the new meaning to context; identifies Greek and Latin root words.
Analyzes character development; infers the setting in fiction and nonfiction;
Expectation

R.11.2
classifies point of view.
Classifies parts of the plot, establishes cause and effect, makes connections,
R.11.3 predictions, and inferences in a variety of texts; draws conclusions; analyzes and
compares and contrasts conflicts and resolutions across texts.
Distinguishes between fact and opinion, infers, and supports the main idea in a
R.11.4
variety of texts; analyzes the theme.
Uses elements of poetry and plays to analyze, interpret, and compare and contrast
R.11.5
genre, imagery, figurative language, and symbolism.
For the Grade 11 reading section:
• students will read a variety of narrative and informative selections accompanied by
comprehension questions presented in a multiple-choice format

• test items for this grade level will consist of four answer choices

• photographs or artwork may be included to enhance comprehension

• reading selections for Grade 11 will be approximately 350-425 words

Each reading selection may also include a constructed-response item in which students will
answer an open-ended question in their own words. Student responses will be holistically scored
using the following rubric:
SHORT-ANSWER READING RUBRIC

Responses can be written in Spanish, English, or a combination of languages. Language and


writing conventions are not considered when assigning a score to a short-answer item measuring
English reading comprehension.

SCORE CRITERIA

Full Reading Comprehension – A thorough understanding of the reading concept


has been demonstrated. The student’s response is correct and complete and
2 provides evidence of higher-order thinking related to the question/task. Details in
the response are clear, accurate, and text-based.

Partial Reading Comprehension – Partial understanding of the reading concept has


been demonstrated. The student’s response provides some information that is text-
1 based and accurate. However, the response is not complete and may not provide
clear evidence of higher-order thinking related to the question/task.

Little or No Reading Comprehension – The student’s response demonstrates very


0 little or no understanding of the reading concept being assessed. The response is
inaccurate or unrelated to the question/task.
Sample Grade 11 English PPAA Reading Passages and Items
The Job Hunt

Isabel has decided to look for a summer job. She will be a junior in high school next
year, and wants to begin saving money for college. Last weekend, she looked through the
classified section of several newspapers and circled two jobs:

Stockers Kiddie Funland


Brand name shoe store Teens needed to help
$12.65/Hr children on and off of
(Less than 20 Hrs/Wk) the rides at Funland.

Sunny Steakhouse Mother’s Helpers


Now hiring servers. Babysitters wanted,
Night shifts only. part-time, no more than
Apply in person. 20 hrs/wk

On Monday morning, when she sat down and really thought about it, Isabel decided the
shoe store job interested her most. She figured that stocking shelves in a shoe store will not be
too demanding. In fact, it might be fun because she loves shoes!
Tuesday, she went downtown to the shoe store to apply for the job. The manager asked
her to complete the following application.
Student Job Application
(Last Name) (First Name)  (Middle Initial) 

 
Address: (Street)  (City)  (State)  (Zip)  (Phone)

Are you over 18 years of age?      Yes ___     No ___       If “no,” date of birth: 

School:                                              Last grade completed:         School phone number:

What job are you are applying for:                                                                             

Part­time _____     Full­time _____
Days and hours you are available for work:

Mon __ Tue __ Wed __ Thurs __ Fri __ Sat __ Sun __  Weekday hours:  ___ to ___ 

Weekend hours:  Sat ___ to ___;  Sun ___ to ___
Work Experience 
Last job held: 

Company:                                                          
Address:                                                                        Supervisor: 

Phone:
Dates worked   From:   Month                Year                To:    Month                Year
List additional work experience and qualifications:

I promise that all the information I have given in this application is true. 

Signature:                                                                                                               Date:
9 Read this sentence from the passage. 11 Read the following chart of events
from the story.
“She figures that stocking shelves in a
I. Isabel reads newspaper 
shoe store will not be too demanding.” ads for jobs.
II. Isabel is asked to fill out an 
What does stocking mean in this application.
III. Isabel decides to look for a 
sentence?
job.
IV. Isabel thinks about which 
A analyzing for sale job interests her most.
B providing information
C* supplying products Which is the correct order?
D expanding the size
A III, II, I, IV
R.11.1 B II, I, IV, III
C I, II, III, IV
D* III, I, II, IV
l0 Based on the passage, which word best
describes Isabel? R.11.3

A* responsible l2 Why does the company want Isabel to


B sensitive sign the application?
C friendly
D confused A They want to see her handwriting.

B* They want her to guarantee the


R.11.2 information is true.

C They want to see if she can work


during the summer.

D They want proof she will come to


work on time.

R.11.4
Sample Constructed-Response Item

Based on the passage, what kind of student do you imagine Isabel is? Give two reasons
why you feel this way.

Use specific details from the passage to support your answer.

R.11.3

Full Credit Response is a complete, well-developed explanation of what kind of student


Isabel is and two reasons why she is that way. The response is supported by
relevant, text-based information.

Partial Credit Response is a vague explanation of what kind of student Isabel is. One reason
is included. The response may or may not include relevant, text-based
information.

No Credit Response is inaccurate or unrelated to the question/task.


Swimming Surprise

1 Jennifer and Alicia swam in the clear waters where Guanajibo River in Mayagüez flows
into the Caribbean Sea. They’d come here today because they’d heard they might spot a manatee
or two. Jennifer had watched manatees before, but Alicia had never even seen one. She’d had
doubts about coming, although a part of her very much wanted to. She had always been nervous
around strange dogs, and now she was going to swim with strange fish?

2 “I’ve heard them called “sea cows,” Alicia had said to Jennifer before they had arrived
today.

3 “I can see that,” Jennifer had answered, “but I think they look like baby hippos. They are
really cute and almost cuddly looking. You’ll see.”

4 Now that they were actually in the water and searching, Alicia felt a little nervous. What
if the manatees did attack them? No, she thought, Jennifer says they’re very gentle creatures.

5 Alicia and Jennifer put on their swimming masks and gazed into the water. Just ahead,
three large manatees skimmed the shallow bottom, evidently searching for something green to
eat. Before she could put her mouth on her snorkel to breathe underwater, Jennifer saw the
manatees slowly swim up and break the surface.
6 “They are adorable,” Alicia whispered to her friend.

7 “Awfully wrinkly, though, aren’t they?” Jennifer remarked.

8 The girls slowly swam closer to the manatees, taking care not to break the water’s surface
with splashy kicking. The manatees didn’t seem to mind the girls’ presence at all.

9 “They’re not afraid,” Alicia said quietly.

10“ No, lots of swimmers come here. They are used to it,” Jennifer told her. “If you listen
very carefully, the chirping noises they make are almost audible. They sound as cute as they
look.”
11 Two of the manatees slowly dove back into the water, and this time Alicia followed,
simply diving into the shallow water with her mask on and holding her breath. She watched in
wonder as the two creatures once more skimmed the river floor and then slowly rose to the
surface. She did the same, taking in a breath as she rose through the surface of the water.

12 Jennifer came up beside her, and they again watched the close by manatees slowly move
away.

13 “They are so calm and graceful!” Alicia said.

14 “Yes. Did you know that fishermen on boats used to think they might be mermaids?”
Jennifer questioned.
15 “No,” Alicia answered. “That’s really neat. Although I can’t imagine how they thought
these cute, wrinkly creatures could be sleek and mysterious mermaids.”

16 “They didn’t see them up close, obviously,” Jennifer finally answered.

17 “Well, I’m glad I have,” Alicia concluded.


13 Read this sentence from the story. 15 In this story, what conflict does Alicia
“If you listen very carefully, the chirping feel?
noises they make are almost audible.”
A* a conflict between her fear of the
manatees and her fascination
What does audible mean?
with them

B a conflict between wanting to


A* able to be heard
swim with Jennifer and not wanting to
B water splashing swim with the manatees
C a chirping noise
C a conflict between her dislike of
D breathing sounds the manatees and the love she has for
swimming

R.11.1 D a conflict between her friendship


with Jennifer and her fear of the
manatees in the river

14 What mood is created by the R.11.3


description of the setting in
paragraph 11?

16 Based on the story, what most likely


A a cold and barren mood caused ancient fishermen to think
B a playful mood manatees were mermaids?
C* a peaceful and harmonious mood
D a gloomy mood A their large and wrinkly bodies
B* their slow and graceful
R.11.2 movements
C the sounds they make
D their distance from the boats

R.11.3
17 Based on the passage, what will Alicia
most likely do in the future?

A watch manatees at an aquarium


B study about mermaids at the
library
C* want to swim with manatees
again
D study about manatees at the
library

R.11.4

18 In paragraph 14, what causes Jennifer


to tell Alicia that fishermen used to
think manatees were mermaids?

A Jennifer sometimes thinks they are


mermaids.
B She sees one that looks just like a
mermaid.
C She has seen paintings of mermaids
before.
D* Alicia has commented on how
graceful they are.

R.11.5
19 Read this sentence from the passage.

“I can see that,” Jennifer had answered,


“but
I think they look like baby hippos.”

What style of figurative language is


used in this sentence?

A hyperbole
B alliteration
C* simile
D irony

R.11.5
Sample Constructed-Response Item

In the very last line of the story, Alicia says, “Well, I’m glad I have.”

1. What does she mean by this?


2. Has she changed since the beginning of the story?
3. How did she feel at first?

Use specific details from the passage to support your answers.

R.11.2

Full Credit Response is a complete, well-developed answer to all three questions. The
response is supported by relevant, text-based information.

Partial Credit Response is a fairly well developed answer to one or two of the questions.
Response may be supported by some relevant, text-based information.

No credit Response is inaccurate or unrelated to the question/task.


Grade 11 English PPAA Writing and Application of the
Writing Standard in the Classroom
Grade 11 English PPAA Writing Content Standards
The Grade 11 English PPAA writing section measures the following content standard and grade-
level expectations:

The student effectively communicates to a variety of audiences in all forms of writing


through the use of the writing process, proper grammar, and age-appropriate expressive
vocabulary.

Content Standard: Writing


Analyzes and selects appropriate words to convey meaning; incorporates
W.11.1
transitions, correct grammar, syntax, and style.
Determines the purpose of writing; analyzes and constructs organizational
W.11.2
Expectation

patterns to connect ideas; writes narrative, expository, and persuasive essays.


Applies figurative language and develops voice to produce different styles of
W.11.3
poems.
Compares and contrasts two forms of writing on similar topics to write a critical
W.11.4
essay.
Applies editing marks, self-correcting methods, and reference sources to revise
W.11.5 and edit; analyzes, organizes, and verifies information to write and revise;
completes a final draft using the writing process.

English PPAA writing section:


• students will respond to a variety of questions presented in a multiple-choice format

• test items for this grade level will consist of four answer choices
Sample Grade 11 English PPAA Writing Items

(1) The Taíno tribe-people, the Spaniards, and the African, all contributed to Puerto
Rico’s heritage. (2) Taíno legends were passed down orally. (3) These stories were based on
Taíno beliefs. (4) Tribal folklore frequently referred to the forces of nature that would descend in
the form of a hurricane and destroy their crops and shelter. (5) When writing to the King and
Queen of Spain, the Spaniards used Taíno words to describe the island and the Taíno’s social and
cultural norms. (6) Some of these words were, cacíque (leader of the tribe), bohío (a native
thatched hut) and casabe (a kind of bread).

20 Which of the following best replaces 21 This paragraph was written in


the word “legends” in sentence 2? order to ─
A customs
B manners A teach readers the meaning of Taíno
C* myths words such as casabe and bohío.
D habits B* help develop awareness of the
Taino’s legacy in Puerto Rico.
W.11.1 C tell an interesting story about
legends.
D acknowledge the Taíno, Spaniard,
and African influence on Puerto
Rico.

W. 11.2
Use the following letter to answer questions 22 and 23.

(1) Dear Mrs. González,


(2) Our class realy enjoyed the visit to the observatory. (3) Thank you for the guided tour
and the opportunity to look through the telescope. (4) We learned a lot about astronomy
during our trip.
(5) Cordial regards,

(6) Mildred Soto

22 Which of the following shows sentence 2 correctly edited?

A Our class realy enjoyed the visit to the observatory.


sp
B* Our class realy enjoyed the visit to the observatory.

C Our class realy enjoyed the visit to the observatory.


ing
ing
D Our class realy enjoy^ed the visit to the observatory.

W. 11.5

23 Which of the following expresses the same meaning as the word “opportunity” in
sentence 3?

A* chance
B learn
C travel
D wander

W. 11.1
Use the following paragraph to answer questions 24 and 25.

(1) Last week, our class studied the importance of eating a balanced diet. (2) We learned that
we should strive to include more fresh fruits and vegetables in our meals. (3) We should
reduce the amount of sweets and processed foods that we eat. (4) Today, we made posters to
share this knowledge with the school and hung them in the cafeteria.

24 Why did the author write this paragraph?

A to persuade readers to study food


B to teach readers how to make posters
C* to explain which foods are best for us
D to inform readers about cafeteria food

W.11.2

25 Based on the paragraph, which transitional word or phrase could be added at the
beginning of sentence 3?

A However,
B By going on a diet,
C* In order to be healthy,
D Although,

W.11.1
Use the following paragraph to answer questions 26 and 27.

(1) One summer, when I was fourteen, I spent many, long, hot afternoons with my
grandmother. (2) She and I cut hundreds of pieces of cloth. (3) Then, we sewed the pieces
of cloth together. (4) One day before school started, she rewarded me with an
unforgettable souvenir of our summer. (5) It was the exquisite bedspread we had
collaborated on.

26 Which of the following best replaces the word “exquisite” in sentence 5?

A impossible
B repetitious
C created
D* beautiful

W.11.1

27 Which of the following best combines sentences 2 and 3?

A* She and I cut hundreds of pieces of cloth and then we sewed them together.
B She and I cut hundreds of pieces of cloth; but then sewed them together.
C She and I cut hundreds of pieces of cloth then, we sewed the pieces of cloth together.
D She and I cut hundreds of pieces of cloth because then we sewed the cloth together.

W.11.2
Use the following paragraph to answer questions 28 and 29.

(1) Aguadilla is a wonderful place to visit. (2) For example they have the first ice
skating rink ever built in the Caribbean. (3) They also have a first-rate water park and
beaches with crystal clear water.

28 Which sentence below should be added after sentence 1?

A Aguadilla is a place I’d like to visit someday.


B* There are several interesting things to do there.
C It is really worth taking a trip to visit.
D People who live in Aguadilla are very nice.

W.11.2

29 Which of the following shows sentence 2 correctly edited?


sp
A For example they have the first ice skating rink ever built in the Caribbean.

B* For example
^ ^^ , they have the first ice skating rink ever built in the Caribbean.

C For example they have the first ice skating rink ever built in the Caribbean

D For example they have the first ice skating rink ever built in the Caribbean.

W. 11.5
30 Read the following sentence.
sp
The Internet provides people with the ability to research information and efficiently
communicate with each other worldwide.

What is the correct way to show that you do not accept the change using editing marks?

A Put “ability” in quotation marks to show it’s correct


B Underline “ability” three times
C* Write “stet” above “ability”
D Write “ignore” above “ability”

W. 11.5
(1) Have you ever noticed how people have preferences even among they’re daily chores.
(2) Of all the household chores that people do, washing the dishes is one of the most avoided.
(3) Most people would prefer to cook, do the laundry, wash the car, water the plants, and even
work in the garden. (4) But nobody wants to dip their hands in sudsy water and clean off the dirt
and grease from the dinner dishes. (5) This is why inventors came up with dishwashers. (6) Just
load the dishes in the dishwasher, add the dish washing liquid, press some buttons and after an
hour, you have clean dishes!

31 Which of the following corrects the errors found in sentence 1?

A Have you ever noticed how people have preferences even among their daily shores?
B* Have you ever noticed how people have preferences even among their daily chores?
C Have you ever noticed when people have preferences even among they’re daily
chores?
D Have you ever noticed why people have preferences even among they’re daily
chores?

W.11.5

32 Which of the following best replaces the word “sudsy” in sentence 4?

A smoothly
B* soapy
C slippery
D soiled

W.11.1
Application of the Writing Standard in the Classroom:

• the writing must be in English and the criteria for a successful piece of
writing will be grade-level appropriate

• some misspellings, especially in the use of advanced vocabulary are


considered acceptable

• the extended response will be evaluated as a whole using the 4-point focused
holistic scoring rubric explained on the following page.
EXTENDED-RESPONSE WRITING RUBRIC

Instructions: Read the prompt and organize your ideas on the following page. Then, write your
final essay in the space marked “Final Copy” on your answer sheet.

SCORE CRITERIA

The ideas in the response are well developed and elaborated using examples, reasons,
and/or evidence. The content is focused on the task, logical, and well organized. Word
choice is appropriate and appealing. Good sentence structure is used, and correct
4
English grammar and language mechanics are clearly evident. Content and language
errors are minor and do not affect readability of the response. Overall quality of the
response is consistently high.

The ideas in the response are adequate and partially developed with examples,
reasons, and/or evidence. There is adequate focus in the content, and order and
structure are present. Word choice is satisfactory and conveys the intended message.
3
Sentence structure is adequate, and use of correct English grammar and language
mechanics are acceptable. Errors in language are noticeable but do not affect
readability. Overall quality of the response is reasonable.

There are problems with the focus of the response, and ideas are minimally developed
and elaborated. The response may lack clear organization or structure. Word choice is
simplistic, vague, and/or unimaginative. There is a lack of control in sentence
2
structure, with errors such as run-ons and fragments evident. Errors in English
grammar and language mechanics may be distracting and interfere with readability.
Overall quality is inconsistent.

The response lacks focus on the task or a central idea, and simple ideas lack
development. There is no logical direction or organizational structure to the response.
1 Word choice is very limited and vague. There are many errors and/or little variety in
sentence structure. English grammar and language mechanics are of poor quality, with
numerous errors that significantly diminish readability. Overall quality is poor.

The response is unrelated to the question/task .There is very little demonstration or


control of the English language. A score of 0 is given to responses that are written in a
0
language other than English or that are merely copies or translations of the
question/task.
Sample Grade 11 English Writing Prompt

PROMPT:

In an essay, compare and contrast two teachers that you have had. Be sure to explain both
the similarities and differences between the two teachers.

As you begin writing, remember to:

 Organize your ideas clearly so that it is easier to write your essay


 Use specific details, examples, or evidence to make your essay more interesting
 Maintain focus on the topic or theme of your essay
 Use correct spelling, grammar, punctuation, and capitalization
 Write your final essay
Notes