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WORKSHOP

THE HALO EFFECT

Presented By: Yamna


Hasan
Roll No: 20154

Course Supervisor: Dr. Yahya


Noori
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Activity
How you perceive them???

Microsoft Office
PowerPoint Presentation
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THE HALO EFFECT

THE SCIENCE OF
ATTRACTION

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WHAT IS
THE HALO EFFECT?

The halo effect is a type of cognitive


bias in which our overall impression of
a person influences how we feel and
think about his or her character.

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The research into the halo effect shows
that a person's positive qualities,
physical appearance, and general
attractiveness affects how we judge
their character

The better they look and behave, the


better a person we judge them to be.

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One great example of the halo effect in
action is our overall impression of
celebrities.

Since we perceive them as attractive,


successful, and often likable, we also
tend to see them as intelligent, kind,
and funny.

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The History

Psychologist Edward Thorndike first


coined the term in a 1920 paper titled
"The Constant Error in Psychological
Ratings."
In the experiment described in the
paper, Thorndike asked the
commanding officers in the military to
evaluate a variety of qualities in their
subordinate soldiers.
These characteristics included such
things as leadership, physical
appearance, intelligence, loyalty, and
dependability. Page 11
Several different studies have found
that when we rate people as good-
looking, we also tend to believe that
they have positive personality traits
and that they are more intelligent.

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On the contrary

The devils horns effect

The effect isn't just limited to the halo


of saintliness, either; other
researchers have found a sort of devil-
horns effect in which a general
negative impression of a person makes
us judge their character negatively.

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Some Daily Life
Examples of The
Halo Effect

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At Classroom Setting

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"In the classroom, teachers are subject to the
halo effect rating error when evaluating their
students.

For example, a teacher who sees a well-


behaved student might tend to assume this
student is also bright, diligent, and engaged
before that teacher has objectively evaluated
the student's capacity in these areas. When
these types of halo effects occur, they can
affect students' approval ratings in certain
areas of functioning and can even affect
students' grades."

(Rasmussen, Encyclopedia of Educational Psychology, Volume 1, 2008)

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At Workplaces

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In Brand Marketing or
Advertisments

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Conclusion

Human beings naturally make these


perceptual adjustmentsup with a
halo, down with hornswithout even
realizing it. And it shouldn't be
surprising that our brains use this
cognitive shortcut. It makes living in a
complicated world somehow easier if
we can just paint people and things
with the broad brush of "good" or
"bad," which is why the halo effect
persists in humanity today.

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Recommendations

Being aware of the halo effect, however,


does not make it easy to avoid its
influence on our perceptions and
decisions.

But still, the next time you trying to


evaluate another person, think twice
before judging that how your overall
impressions of an individual might
influence your evaluations of other
characteristics.

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Thank
You Page 22