Janet Nikolovski, PhD

Associate Director, Science & Innovation
Wellness & Prevention Inc., a Johnson & Johnson company




Strategic Microbursts:
Maximizing Energy
Throughout the Day
What fuels people to
make and sustain
change?

Motivation

“Why does ______ matter to you?”
Energy
The concepts of energy
and strategic recovery
93% of employees
interested in increasing
their energy levels
throughout the day
58% are extremely
interested
Source: Wellness & Prevention research, N=3,047
Energy food and beverage products
constitute a $24 billion industry,
growing by >15%/yr in US alone,
projected to grow 20% over next 5yrs in
North America
Soucre: Euromonitor International 02 Dec 2011. Prime Positioning Focus: Energy Boosting.
TIME
vs.
ENERGY
“I don’t
have time”
Total Company 1 (New Balance) Respondents: N=344
Total Company 2 (Lake Nona) Respondents: N=33
Total Company 3 (W&P) Respondents: N=100

EMA: N=20, internal study
Average Energy Levels throughout the Work Day
Q. How would you rate the level of energy you typically experience in each of the different situations listed below?
Percentage of participants who reported who reported high energy level (8-10 out of 10)
Typical Daily Energy Rhythm
*Simulated Data
Energy:

The capacity to do work.

The feeling of vitality, vigor, or zest, along
with a perceived capacity to initiate and
sustain activity (physical or mental).
Spiritual

Mental
Emotional
Physical
Force
Focus
Quality
Quantity
Human Energy
Strategic Recovery (in all dimensions)

Energy expenditure must be balanced with energy recovery.
Sport as a Living Laboratory of High Performance
If recovery could happen through
small bits of rest (or disengagement),
could there be equal gain through
intentional activities (intentional
investing of energy), such as small
bits of motion?

(or along any of the other dimensions)
The power of an energy
microburst


Impact of a Microburst

Impact of a Microburst

Impact of a Microburst


Impact of a Microburst
Brain after sitting quietly Brain after 20 minute walk
Research/scan compliments of
Dr. Chuck Hillman, University of Illinois
AVERAGE COMPOSITE OF 20
STUDENT BRAINS TAKING THE
SAME TEST
Impact of a Single Microburst
• Microburst of physical activity (10 min)
– Improved vigor, fatigue, total mood
1
– Boost self control
2
– Improved cognition, creativity, problem
solving
3
• Engaging in short bouts does have
additive effect
– Aerobic fitness
4
, weight loss
5


1. Hansen C et al. (2001). Exercise Duration and Mood State: How Much is Enough to Feel Better? Health Psychology; 20(4): 267-275.
2. Verburgh L et al. (2013). Physical Exercise and Executive Functions in Preadolescent Children, Adolescents and Young Adults: A Meta-Analysis. British Journal of Sports Medicine, epub March
2013.
3. Ratey J & Loehr J (2011). The Positive Impact of Physical Activity on Cognition During Adulthood: A Review of Underlying Mechanisms, Evidence and Recommendations. Reviews in the
Neurosciences; 22(2): 171-185.
4. Schmidt W et al. (2001). Effects of Long Versus Short Bout Exercise on Fitness and Weight Loss in Overweight Females. Journal of the American College of Nutrition; 20(5): 494-501. and
Woolf-May K et al. (1999). The Efficacy of Accumulated Short Bouts Versus Single Daily Bouts of Brisk Walking in Improving Aerobic Fitness and Blood Lipid Profiles. Health Education Research;
14(6): 803-815. and DeBusk R et al. (1990). Training Effects of Long Versus Short Bouts of Exercise in Healthy Subjects. The American Journal of Cardiology; 15(65): 1010-1013. and Loprinzi P &
Cardinal B (2013). Association Between Biologic Outcomes and Objectively Measured Physical Activity Accumulated in ≥10-Minute Bouts and <10-Minute Bouts. American Journal of Health
Promotion; 27(3): 143-151.
5. Schmidt W et al. (2001). Effects of Long Versus Short Bout Exercise on Fitness and Weight Loss in Overweight Females. Journal of the American College of Nutrition; 20(5): 494-501.
• All cause mortality rates of those who spend 6 hrs/day sitting (vs. 3 or
fewer) were
– 34% higher for women
– 17% higher for men
• Even if they worked out
Over 14 years and 123,000 people - American Cancer Society Study (Patel)
Case Study:
New Balance,
an Organization in MOTION
TM
Typical daily energy rhythm

Typical daily energy rhythm
35%
46%
26%
21%
23%
61%
10%
20%
30%
40%
50%
60%
70%
80%
At home before
workday begins
At beginning of
typical workday
Middle of
typical workday
Towards end of
typical workday
At home after
workday is over
On days off/
weekends
&

R
e
p
o
r
t
i
n
g

H
i
g
h

E
n
e
r
g
y

(
8
-
1
0
)

Pre-wave
Base - Total New Balance Respondents: Pre Wave (344), Post Wave (239)
Q4. How would you rate the level of energy you typically experience in each of the different situations listed below?
Percentage of participants who reported who reported high energy level (8-10 out of 10)
Energy Level Throughout The Day


Base - Total New Balance Respondents: Pre Wave (344), Post Wave (239)
Q4. How would you rate the level of energy you typically experience in each of the different situations listed below?
Percentage of participants pre-wave and post-wave who reported high energy level (8-10 out of 10)
More people report higher energy levels – especially
in the middle of the workday
15.2
15.9
15.2
14
14.5
15
15.5
16
16.5
New Balance New Balance
Pre Post
Extrinsic Intrinsic
Scores represent sum of means for three questions for extrinsic and three questions for intrinsic. For intrinsic 1) Satisfaction from taking on interesting challenges 2) satisfaction experience when
successful at difficult tasks and 3) pleasure from learning new things For extrinsic 1) allows me to earn money 2) income it provides and 3) provides security
Base - Total New Balance Respondents: Pre Wave (342), Post Wave (237)
Q2. Please indicate to what extent each of the following items corresponds to reasons you are presently involved in your work. “1” = does not correspond at all . . . “7” = corresponds exactly
Sum of
Means
The Effects on Motivation
Which activities boost energy? Which drain?

Which activities boost energy? Which drain?

Which activities boost energy? Which drain?

Which activities boost energy? Which drain?
Myth: health is all-or-nothing.
What stories do we tell ourselves?
“I don’t
have time”
“no time to
spend hours at
the gym each
week
“I broke my diet,
might as well eat the
whole plate”
Too many things to do
Other things are
more important and
come first
I’ll start tomorrow
What if… we changed the conversation?
HEALTH ENERGY
ACTION
MOTIVATION ENERGY
MOTIVATION
Building a self-perpetuating cycle
Energy
Action
Action
Microburst
Case Study:
energizing moms
Could we bring the Energy For Performance
experience into people’s homes and to their
families, using a self directed format with
mom/women serving as the conduits?




Partner: Moms In Motion
4
8

Moms In Motion is a nation-wide fitness, social and philanthropic community that believes fitness is one of
the most powerful ways to change lives. When mom takes care of herself first, she is at her best in all her
roles.

MIM provides the resources, educational tools, products and services to moms combining the virtual,
technological world with the physical world, through on-the-ground fitness groups in communities around the
globe.

Our brand understands that moms are
the leaders of the household and
forever changes the lives of families
and communities with tremendous
stickiness and customer loyalty
because of the camaraderie,
friendships and understanding that
moms appreciate and value.
Our Moms in Training
5 Teams, 124 women
various fitness levels (beginner to experienced)
Pittsford, NY
Canandaigua, NY
Elk Grove, CA
Westlake Village, CA
Rockland, NY
Average weight = 149.7 lbs.
Average BMI = 25.1
(25 to 29.99 is Overweight)
0
10
20
30
40
50
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
#

m
e
m
b
e
r
s

Self reported fitness level
18-34
35-49
50 and
over
Household members
Working situation Age
<6 yr old
6-12 yr old
13-17 yr old
18+ or none
no work
outside home
<15hrs/wk
15-29 hrs
30+ hrs
MIM Pilot Structure
Training begins: 10 week curriculum
• Weekly team meetings
• Facilitated by Team Lead
• Online, self directed eCourse Modules discussed each week
• Support Kits/Products
• Modules complemented by products that help support and put into
practice topic areas
• Mobile App and Energy Tracker
• App facilitated self-directed fitness training and ritual building
• Tracker surveyed energy levels throughout the day
My Ultimate Mission Statement:
“be the best me I can be”
“be a positive role model”
“be happy; be healthy”
“be more present”
“for my family, friends, myself”
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
%

R
e
s
p
o
n
d
a
n
t
s

family
set example, inspire
me
kids
friends
fitness, health
happy
fullfilled, present
work
Benefits Scorecard MID (5-6 weeks) END (10 weeks)
FITNESS
Time to run mile Directional decrease Decrease
Weight Decrease Decrease (50% participants lost weight)
Perception of fitness n/a Increase (was high at start)
ENERGY
Across typical day Increase (22% in evenings) Increase (max up by 34% in evenings)
Across day (EMA) Increase (18% in evenings) Increase (max 25% in evenings)
Perceived change n/a Increase (75% reporting higher)
Vitality (SF36) Increase (by 8.8pts) Increase (by 12pts)
Vigor-Activity (POMS) n/a Increase
QUALITY OF LIFE/HEALTH
Quality of Life n/a Increase
Quality of Health n/a Increase
PURPOSE
Investing energy into what matters n/a Increase
Have clear feeling of purpose/
more closely connected
n/a
Increase
Statistically significant change (p<0.05) No statistical difference (p>0.05) n/a not tested
Wide Range of Benefits Observed
Source: Wellness & Prevention proprietary research, n=124. Data self-reported.
Note questionnaires
Benefits Scorecard
(continued)
MID (5-6 weeks) END (10 weeks)
STRESS & MOOD
Stress (PSS) n/a Decrease
Mood (POMS) Depression-Dejection n/a Decrease
Mood (POMS) Tension-Anxiety n/a Decrease
Mood (POMS) Vigor-Activity n/a Increase
Mood (POMS) Confusion-Bewilderment n/a Decrease
Mood (POMS) Fatigue-Inertia n/a Decrease
SLEEP
Quality, Feel Rested n/a Increase
hours n/a Increase (18min avg; 1 hr for those whose sleep improved)
BEHAVIORS
Physical activity n/a No change
Diet n/a No change
Frequency eating/snacking n/a Time decreased (more snacking)
Frequency sitting n/a Time decreased (less sitting)
Frequency (multitasking) n/a Decrease
Frequency (time to be grateful) n/a Increase
Frequency (7-9hrs quality sleep) n/a Increase
Frequency (eat smaller portion sizes) n/a Increase
Set aside time for me n/a Increase
Statistically significant change (p<0.05) No statistical difference (p>0.05) n/a not tested
Source: Wellness & Prevention proprietary research, n=124. Source: Wellness & Prevention proprietary research, n=124. Data self-reported.
Benefits Scorecard
(continued)
MID (5-6 weeks) END (10 weeks)
MOTIVATION to…
Manage my energy n/a Increase
Manage my stress n/a Increase
Take care of myself n/a Increase
Be physically active n/a Increase
Eat healthy n/a Increase
Take care of my family n/a No change (high at start)
Satisfaction with…
Ability to focus and concentrate n/a Increase
Self confidence n/a Increase
Living a fulfilling life n/a Increase
Feeling happy n/a Increase
Being engaged with family n/a Increase
Statistically significant change (p<0.05) No statistical difference (p>0.05) n/a not tested
After they finished the program…
…88% of MIM pilot members
reported they will continue to work on their
energy management.
Source: Wellness & Prevention proprietary research, n=124. Source: Wellness & Prevention proprietary research, n=124. Data self-reported.
“I think this (energy pilot) has connected members more, gave them more to talk about, added additional
value. ”
“[This energy program] has strengthened our bond. Opened the door to be honest and open with each
other. They understand the greater purpose of why we come together beyond just training for a fitness
event e.g. being a role model to our children.”
“We have all enjoyed the personal journeys we've gone through as part of the pilot program. We have
decided to continue meeting for the next three months.”
“This morning one of the moms said her daughter (3yrs old) made her own pink bracket and said she's a
MIM. She said she wants to go running.”
Stories from our moms…
“MIM has changed her life and her family.”
“So yesterday I went to the meeting about the Johnson & Johnson energy program …I wanted to tell you
what an unbelievable program MIM is and I am so grateful that you started this for moms.”
“My 5th grader ran with me this week for a mile and is ready to go again! Her teacher even called to tell me
she wrote an assignment in school about how I inspire her to run and workout!!”
“Really positive feedback from husbands; loved the camaraderie.”
“At the risk of sounding cheesy, I can honestly say that today’s MIMs activities were among the most
enjoyable, life-affirming times I’ve had in my life. Thank you, my True, Dear Friends!!!”
The science of energy management
Summary
Summary
• Some key drivers of change
– being mission-driven
– having a target goal
– social support
– energy focus
Recovery and the Microburst:
small intentional activities, across the different
dimensions, to regain energy


Make Health and Wellness More Achievable
extra

Energy Tracker
Custom built tool to monitor energy levels throughout the day
• 90% of participants in our
pilot used the tracker
• 78% used it for more than
the required 2 days
• Users report simply being
more aware of their energy
has made a difference in
their behaviors
7
One a scale from 0 to 10, what is your energy
level RIGHT NOW? (0=lowest energy;
10=highest energy] Text HELP for help.
Consumer Energy Ethnography
Understand how consumers define energy and what they do
to enhance their energy throughout the day
6 segments of consumers studied:
• moms w/< 6mos babies (good
sleepers; bad sleepers)
• diabetics (Prediabetes; Type 2 - recently
put on insulin; Type 2 - in control; Type 2 - not
in control)
• allergy sufferers with sinus/nasal
congestion as a stated symptom
• Gen Y’ers
• Retirees
• Shift workers

Workbook
Nutrition
Products
Sensory Products
and rituals
Behavioral/ritual
support tools
Diagnostic/Feedback
Obesity Issues 2014

Monday, June 9
Why are We Fat?
John Peters, Ph.D., Associate Professor and Chief Strategy Officer,
Anschutz Health and Wellness Center
University of Colorado Denver
The Biology of Obesity
Dr. Daniel H. Bessesen, Professor of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology,
Metabolism and Diabetes, School of Medicine;
Associate Director, Anschutz Health and Wellness Center
University of Colorado Denver
Transformative Weight Loss: Mindset and Purpose
Dr. Holly Wyatt, Associate Professor in the Department of Medicine,
Division of Endocrinology, Metabolism and Diabetes
University of Colorado Denver
Weight loss program participant TBD
The Big Debate: Food or Physical Activity?
James O. Hill, Ph.D
John Peters, Ph.D
Metabolic Flexibility and Obesity
Bret Goodpaster, Ph.D. Professor, Metabolic Disease
Program, Sanford/Burnham Medical Research Institute and
Associate Professor of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology and
Metabolism
University of Pittsburgh
Food for Thought on Evaluating Research
The Importance of Critical Thinking
Trevor Butterworth, Editor-at-Large, STATS.org
George Mason University

Keeping Track of Fake Science
Jeffrey Beall, Associate Professor, Scholarly Initiatives Librarian,
Auraria Library
University of Colorado

Tuesday, June 10
Physical Activity and Brain Function
Marc Cornier, M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine,
Division of Endocrinology, Metabolism and Diabetes
University of Colorado
Strategic Microbursts: Maximizing Energy Through the Day
Janet Nikolovski, Ph.D., Associate Director, Science &
Innovation, Wellness & Prevention, Inc.
Johnson & Johnson
The New Science of Sedentariness
James Levine, M.D., Ph.D., Department of Endocrinology
Mayo Clinic
Small Steps and Nudges
Brian Wansink, Ph.D., Author and Director, Food & Brand Lab
Cornell University
Journalism Practice: Brainstorming Ideas
Linda Streitfeld, Director of Programs
National Press Foundation
Wednesday, June 11
Impact of Sugar Taxes
Christopher Snowdon, Director of Lifestyle Economics
Institute of Economic Affairs
Industry Initiative and Opportunity
Steve Hilton, Vice President, Government Relations
McDonald’s Corporation
Rhona Applebaum, Vice President, Chief Science &
Health Officer
The Coca Cola Company
Lunch and Journalism Practice Discussion:
Delivering the Best Ideas
Linda Streitfeld, Director of Programs
National Press Foundation
New Ideas and Research from the Anschutz Health &
Wellness Center
James O. Hill, Ph.D
John Peters, Ph.D
Tuesday’s agenda timing
9:15 - 10:30 am
Strategic Movement Throughout the Workday
Janet Nikolovski, Ph.D., Associate Director, Science & Innovation, Wellness &
Prevention, Inc. Johnson & Johnson
10:15 - 10:30 am
Break

10:30 - 11:45 am
Physical Activity and Brain Function
Marc Cornier, M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine,
Division of Endocrinology, Metabolism and Diabetes
University of Colorado
11:45 am – 1:00 pm
Lunch
1:00 – 2:15 pm
The New Science of Sedentariness
James Levine, M.D., Ph.D., Department of Endocrinology
Mayo Clinic
2:15 – 2:30 pm
Break
2:30 – 3:45 pm
Small Steps and Nudges
Brian Wansink, Ph.D., Author and Director, Food & Brand Lab
Cornell University
3:45 – 4:00 pm
Stretch Break
4:00 – 5:15 pm
Journalism Practice: Brainstorming Ideas
Linda Streitfeld, Director of Programs
National Press Foundation


Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful