Está en la página 1de 30

CSULB May 22, 2006 1

Amplitude Modulation
Wei Li

weili@ieee.org
CSULB May 22, 2006 2
Content
What is Modulation
Amplitude Modulation (AM)
Demodulation of AM signals
Calculation and Examples
Summary
CSULB May 22, 2006 3
What is Modulation
Modulation
In the modulation process, some characteristic
of a high-frequency carrier signal (bandpass), is
changed according to the instantaneous
amplitude of the information (baseband) signal.
Why Modulation
Suitable for signal transmission (distanceetc)
Multiple signals transmitted on the same channel
Capacitive or inductive devices require high
frequency AC input (carrier) to operate.
Stability and noise rejection
CSULB May 22, 2006 4
About Modulation
Application Examples
broadcasting of both audio
and video signals.
Mobile radio communications,
such as cell phone.
Basic Modulation Types
Amplitude Modulation: changes the amplitude.
Frequency Modulation: changes the frequency.
Phase Modulation: changes the phase.
CSULB May 22, 2006 5
AM Modulation/Demodulation
Modulator Demodulator
Baseband Signal
with frequency
f
m

(Modulating Signal)

Bandpass Signal
with frequency
f
c

(Modulated Signal)

Channel
Original Signal
with frequency
f
m
Source Sink
f
c
>> f
m
Voice: 300-3400Hz GSM Cell phone: 900/1800MHz
CSULB May 22, 2006 6
Amplitude Modulation
The amplitude of high-carrier signal is
varied according to the instantaneous
amplitude of the modulating message
signal m(t).
Carrier Signal: or
Modulating Message Signal: or
The AM Signal:
cos(2 ) cos( )
( ) : cos(2 ) cos( )
( ) [ ( )]cos(2 )
c c
m m
AM c c
f t t
m t f t t
s t A m t f t
t e
t e
t = +
CSULB May 22, 2006 7
*
AM Signal Math Expression
*
Mathematical expression for AM: time domain

expanding this produces:




In the frequency domain this gives:
( ) (1 cos ) cos
AM m c
S t k t t e e = +
( ) cos cos cos c c
AM m
S t t k t t e e e = +
| | ) cos( ) cos( cos cos : using
2
1
B A B A B A + + =
2 2
( ) cos cos( ) cos( ) c c c
k k
AM m m
S t t t t e e e e e = + + +
frequency
k/2
k/2
Carrier, A=1.
upper sideband
lower
sideband
Amplitude
f
c
f
c
-f
m
f
c
+f
m
CSULB May 22, 2006 8
AM Power Frequency Spectrum
AM Power frequency spectrum obtained by
squaring the amplitude:






Total power for AM:





.
2 2
2
2
4 4
1
2
k k
A
k
= + +
= +
freq
k
2
/4
k
2
/4
Carrier, A
2
=1
2
= 1
Power
f
c
f
c
-f
m
f
c
+f
m
CSULB May 22, 2006 9
Amplitude Modulation
The AM signal is generated using a
multiplier.
All info is carried in the amplitude of
the carrier, AM carrier signal has
time-varying envelope.
In frequency domain the AM
waveform are the lower-side
frequency/band (f
c
- f
m
), the carrier
frequency f
c
, the upper-side
frequency/band (f
c
+ f
m
).
CSULB May 22, 2006 10
AM Modulation Example
The information signal is usually not a single
frequency but a range of frequencies (band). For
example, frequencies from 20Hz to 15KHz. If we
use a carrier of 1.4MHz, what will be the AM
spectrum?
In frequency domain the AM waveform are the
lower-side frequency/band (f
c
- f
m
), the carrier
frequency f
c
, the upper-side frequency/band (f
c
+
f
m
). Bandwidth: 2x(25K-20)Hz.
frequency
1.4 MHz
1,385,000Hz to
1,399,980Hz
1,400,020Hz to
1,415,000Hz
f
c

CSULB May 22, 2006 11
Modulation Index of AM Signal
m
c
A
k
A
=
) 2 cos( ) ( t f A t m
m m
t =
Carrier Signal: cos(2 ) DC:
c C
f t A t
For a sinusoidal message signal
Modulation Index is defined as:
Modulated Signal:

( ) [ cos(2 )]cos(2 )
[1 cos(2 )]cos(2 )
AM c m m c
c m c
S t A A f t f t
A k f t f t
t t
t t
= +
= +
Modulation index k is a measure of the extent to
which a carrier voltage is varied by the modulating
signal. When k=0 no modulation, when k=1 100%
modulation, when k>1 over modulation.
CSULB May 22, 2006 12
Modulation Index of AM Signal
CSULB May 22, 2006 13
Modulation Index of AM Signal
CSULB May 22, 2006 14
Modulation Index of AM Signal
CSULB May 22, 2006 15
Modulation Depth
Ac
Am
2Amax
2Amin
2A
max
= maximum peak-to-peak of waveform
2A
min
= minimum peak-to-peak of waveform
This may be shown to equal
m
C
A
k
A
=
as follows:
2 2 2
max C m
A = A + A
2 2 2
min C m
A = A A
max min max min
max min
2 2
2 2
m
C C
A A A A A
k
A A A A

= = =
+
CSULB May 22, 2006 16
High Percentage Modulation
It is important to use as high percentage of
modulation as possible (k=1) while ensuring
that over modulation (k>1) does not occur.
The sidebands contain the information and
have maximum power at 100% modulation.
Useful equation

P
t
= P
c
(1 + k
2
/2)

P
t
=Total transmitted power (sidebands and
carrier)
P
c
= Carrier power
CSULB May 22, 2006 17
Example
Determine the maximum sideband power if the
carrier output is 1 kW and calculate the total
maximum transmitted power.

Max sideband power occurs when k = 1. At this
percentage modulation each side frequency is
of the carrier amplitude. Since power is
proportional to the square of the voltage, each
has of the carrier power. x 1kW = 250W
Total sideband power = 2 x 250 = 500W. Total
transmitted power = 1kW + 500W = 1.5kW
CSULB May 22, 2006 18
Demodulation of AM Signals

Demodulation extracting the baseband message from
the carrier.

There are 2 main methods of AM Demodulation:

Envelope or non-coherent detection or demodulation.
Synchronised or coherent demodulation.
CSULB May 22, 2006 19
Envelope/Diode AM Detector
If the modulation depth is > 1, the distortion below occurs
K>1
CSULB May 22, 2006 20
Synchronous or Coherent
Demodulation
This is relatively more complex and more expensive. The
Local Oscillator (LO) must be synchronised or coherent, i.e.
at the same frequency and in phase with the carrier in the
AM input signal.
CSULB May 22, 2006 21
Synchronous or Coherent
Demodulation
If the AM input contains carrier frequency, the LO or
synchronous carrier may be derived from the AM input.
CSULB May 22, 2006 22
Synchronous or Coherent
Demodulation
If we assume zero path delay between the modulator and
demodulator, then the ideal LO signal is cos(e
c
t).
Analysing this for a AM input =
( ) ( ) ( ) t t m + V
c DC
cos
CSULB May 22, 2006 23
Coherent Detection
V
X
= AM input x LO
( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) t t t m + V
c c DC
cos cos -
( ) ( ) ( ) t t m + V
c DC
2
cos
( ) ( ) ( )
|
.
|

\
|
t + t m + V
c DC
2 cos
2
1
2
1
=
( )
( )
( )
( )
cos 2 co
2
s 2
2 2 2
D C C
c x
D
c
V =
m t
V
m t
V
+ t + + t
=
=
Note the AM input has been 'split into two' red part' has
moved or shifted up to higher frequency:
( )
( ) ( )
cos 2 cos 2
2
c DC c
m t
t +V t
| |
|
\ .
and blue part shifted down to baseband:

( )
2 2
DC
m t
V
+
Assume zero path delay between the modulator and demodulator:
CSULB May 22, 2006 24
Coherent Detection
CSULB May 22, 2006 25
Diode v.s Coherent
1. Diode-: Unable to follow fast-modulation
properly
2. Diode-: Power is absorbed from the tuned
circuit by the diode circuit.
3. Diode-: Distortion produced is not acceptable
for some communications.
4. Diode+: Obviously simple, low cost.
5. Coherent+: Low Distortion
6. Coherent+: Greater ability to follow fast-
modulation.
7. Coherent+: The ability to provide power gain
8. Coherent-: Complex and expensive
CSULB May 22, 2006 26
Exercises: Draw the Spectrums
a) cos(e
c
t)cos(e
1
t)
from cosAcosB= 1/2[cos(A-B)+cos(A+B)]
we get: cos(e
c
t)cos(e
1
t)=1/2[cos(e
c
-e
1
)t + cos(e
c
+e
1
)t]
Hence the spectrum of this is:




b) cos
2
et
from cos
2
A=1/2[1+cos2A]
we get: cos
2
et=1/2[1+cos2et]
The spectrum is thus:
e
c
-e
1
e
c
+e
1
1/2
1/2
frequency
amplitude
1/2
freq
2e
1/2
DC=0Hz
CSULB May 22, 2006 27
Example
Suppose you have a portable (for example you carry it in your ' back
pack') AM transmitter which needs to transmit an average power of 10
Watts in each sideband when modulation depth k = 0.3. Assume that
the transmitter is powered by a 12 Volt battery. The total power will be
2 2
4 4
T c c c
k k
P = P +P +P
where
2
10 Watts
4
c
k
P =
( )
( )
2 2
4 10
40
444.44 Watts
0.3
c
P = =
k
=
Hence, total power P
T
= 444.44 + 10 + 10 = 464.44 Watts.
Hence, battery current (assuming ideal transmitter) = Power / Volts =
464.44
Amps
12
=
A large and heavy 12 Volt battery!!!!
Suppose we could remove one sideband and the carrier, power transmitted
would be 10 Watts, i.e. 0.833 amps from a 12 Volt battery, which is more
reasonable for a portable radio transmitter. (Single Side Band)
CSULB May 22, 2006 28
AM Transmitter and Receiver
( ) ( ) ( )
( ) ( )
( ) ( ) ( )
[ cos ]cos
1 cos cos
1 kcos cos
AM C m m c
m
C m c
C
C m c
S t = A +A t t
A
A + t t
A
A + t t
| |
=
|
\ .
=
CSULB May 22, 2006 29
AM Transmitter and Receiver
CSULB May 22, 2006 30
Summary
Next Class.
DSB, SSB, VSB
FM, PM
Modulation, Amplitude Modulation
Modulation Index, Modulation Depth
Demodulation of AM signals
Calculation and Examples
Math: AM Time domain+Frequency domain
Calculation: AM Power, AM Demodulation