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Companion Planting with Taoism Influenced Life Skills

By Harsharan Kaur Sokhi | I.D 2149 4061 | EDF2303

Education for Sustainable Tai Chi Background Development


An ancient Chinese exercise Soft, slow, and meditative movements A set of continuous Evenly paced Carefully choreographed Natural body shifts (Lu, 2008) About balance in movement and as a way of life. Body's center of gravity Equilibrium between opposing forces in life (Chen & Sherman, 2002).

Education for Sustainable Companion Planting Background Development


Gardening methodology Depends on nature vs. insecticides Maintain healthy crops Organic soil (Cait, 1998) Beneficial and harmful planting combinations Non-chemical pest control Factors: Plant scent Chemical secretions from roots Gases from the fruits of a plant enable some surrounding plants to thrive and cause other surrounding plants to perish.
(Allardice, 1994)

Education for Sustainable Guideline 1: Development


Education for Sustainable Development
(Beames, Higgins & Nicol, 2012) Children will learn: Global Implications: Pesticides are a dangerous chemical substances that pollute the air and soil Pesticides are harmful to crops Pesticides are harmful to the ecosystem of crops Companion planting is a natural solution protecting crop

Education for Sustainable Guideline 1: Development


Education for Sustainable Development
(Beames, Higgins & Nicol, 2012) Children will learn: Ethic of care: Caring for communities as ecosystems including crop, insects and humans Learning about interconnectedness Willingness to trust and critique: Through research conducted as part of various curriculum outcomes

Education for Sustainable Guideline 1: Development


Education for Sustainable Development
(Beames, Higgins & Nicol, 2012) Curriculum outcomes: Biological sciences Design and Creativity Literacy Humanities Information and Communication Technology Interpersonal development Thinking Process

Education for Sustainable Guideline 1: Development


Education for Sustainable Development
(Beames, Higgins & Nicol, 2012) Children will learn: Multi-sensory outdoor learning: using touch, smell, sight and sound (Sandberg, 2009): Grass field surrounded by features of nature: cave, waterfall, forest, rocks, river Creating their own companion garden from design to planting. Engaging in Tai Chi (full body) Intellectually stimulating State of deep concentration

Education for Sustainable Guideline 2: Development


Learning Through Local Landscapes
(Beames, Higgins & Nicol, 2012) Children will learn: School Grounds Basketball sized field Story of the land: Free exploring of features of nature e.g. walks, kayaking, Companion garden planting and maintenance activities Nurturing ecosystem in companion garden to achieve a balance and sustainability Tai-chi classes to literally feel balance

Education for Sustainable Guideline 3: Development


Harnessing Student Curiosity
(Beames, Higgins & Nicol, 2012) Student driven content: Research and Investigation: Nature of pesticide and farming Effect on ecosystems and bio-diversity Companion planting options Select planting options Design their own garden Combine plant options with design

Education for Sustainable Guideline 3: Development


Harnessing Student Curiosity
(Beames, Higgins & Nicol, 2012) Experiential outdoor learning: Companion Garden hands on: Mapping out design over garden Preparing the soil digging, fertilizing Replanting from pot to soil Planting seedlings Watering Deadheading Weeding Multi-sensory stimulation

Education for Sustainable Guideline 3: Development


Harnessing Student Curiosity
(Beames, Higgins & Nicol, 2012) Experiential outdoor learning: Observing successful growth of their crop: Through companion plants Without use of pesticides Playing in the naturalised outdoor space Students learning how to learn (Peker & Dolan, 2012): Research and investigations Use explicit project-related terminology

Education for Sustainable Guideline 3: Development


Harnessing Student Curiosity
(Beames, Higgins & Nicol, 2012) It is through experience that learning occurs, giving students the chance to create links between what they have previously learned with new information about the naturalised space, tai chi, companion planting and the sustainability concept (Fontichiaro, 2010).

Education for Sustainable Guideline 4: Development


Enabling Students to Take Responsibilities
(Beames, Higgins & Nicol, 2012) Student responsibilities: Planting and maintaining garden Nurture healthily produce of fruits, herbs and vegetables Student decisions: Designing the companion garden visually through diagrams, or using lists (Peker & Dolan, 2012) Researching and choosing the plants Creating a budget

Education for Sustainable Guideline 4: Development


Enabling Students to Take Responsibilities
(Beames, Higgins & Nicol, 2012) Students need to consider this key decision making process (Cook, 2013): 1. Define the problem: Determining its urgency (how quickly do you have to decide?), the people it affects and the level of threat involved. 2. Scan the options: How have similar situations been handled in the past? 3. Implement the solution: The specific tasks, time frame and who will carry them out 4. Assess the impact: Did the development of the companion garden it have any unintended consequences, positive or negative?

Education for Sustainable Guideline 5: Development


Building Community Partnerships
(Beames, Higgins & Nicol, 2012) Students learn by working with: Fellow students (multi-cultural composite) Parents (young adults and older) Teachers Active citizen examples Local farmers and gardeners Outdoor plant retailer specialists e,g, Bunnings Warehouse They enhance students understand of scientific ideas by confirming them, provide daily life examples and analyse, referring to others results. This helps them verify the validity of their experimental approaches and interpretations (Peker & Dolan, 2012).

Education for Sustainable Guideline 5: Development


Building Community Partnerships
(Beames, Higgins & Nicol, 2012) The thinking and behaviour stemming from the culture and physical environment, within which social interactions occur, influence what the student learns to be expected and customary (Browning, 2008). It enables students to gain a deeper understanding of themselves and their world (Browning, 2008). Teachers aim to make knowledge intellectually more accessible to students by providing daily life explanations, using analogies (Peker & Dolan, 2012). Teachers working with students to establish a common understanding of relevant terms, concepts, practices and terminology (Peker & Dolan, 2012).

Education for Sustainable Guideline 5: Development


Building Community Partnerships
(Beames, Higgins & Nicol, 2012) Applying the social cognitive theory , interactions with people from different age groups and cultural diversities allows them to develop their (Burney, 2008): Self-beliefs, Academic skills, Self-regulation abilities and behaviour, In a social environment By engaging with other people.

Education for Sustainable Guideline 6: Development


Administration and Risk Management
(Beames, Higgins & Nicol, 2012) Teachers implement (Ward, 2008; Young & Herring, 2006): Risk Management Plan Risk assessment e.g. Life jacket when kayaking Gumboots in forest Gloves when gardening Sunscreen and hat for sun protection Safe activities and unsafe activities Land surveyor Blanket consent form Emergency action plan Outing checklist Incident monitoring

Education for Sustainable Guideline 6: Development


Administration and Risk Management
(Beames, Higgins & Nicol, 2012) Teachers implement: Not trying to completely avoid risks Calculated risks are essential to learning Children are far more vulnerable if they don't know what happens when they try new things (Ward, 2008). Risk involves intellect and emotions, mind and body.

Education for Sustainable Guideline 6: Development


Administration and Risk Management
(Beames, Higgins & Nicol, 2012) Moving past comfort zone by taking risks, is the foundation of (Sarah, 2007): Creative expression: Risk showing of making your work public. Leadership: Making unpopular decisions. Success in any form: Begins by having the courage to start something and follow it through Social progress: Society advances because some people state that which is unpopular but important.

Education for Sustainable Guideline 7: Development


Supervising People Outdoors
(Beames, Higgins & Nicol, 2012) Teacher supervision outdoors: Children, Parent helpers, School guests including local farmers, gardeners and outdoor retail specialists (Schilling, 1998; Neide, 1996; Kern & Wakeford, 2007): Create a safe outdoor play environment Being positive Being accessible and approachable Being explicit with all instructions Organize student activities Being safe, sensible and responsible On task and listening to instructions Verbal and non-verbal feedback

Education for Sustainable Guideline 7: Development


Supervising People Outdoors
(Beames, Higgins & Nicol, 2012) Teacher supervision outdoors: Interaction of children with nature features/garden: Plants and Insects Soil Water Rocks External factors e.g. strangers, weather conditions

Education for Sustainable Guideline 7: Development


Supervising People Outdoors
(Beames, Higgins & Nicol, 2012) Teacher supervision outdoors: Provision of relevant equipment: Explicit instruction on dressing Tools for companion garden Safety equipment

Education for Sustainable Guideline 7: Development


Supervising People Outdoors
(Beames, Higgins & Nicol, 2012) Teacher supervision outdoors: Maintaining contact and control: Taking the roll pre and post activity Meeting points based on strict schedule Sign in sheets located in nature features Name, Day, Time Grouping students Each member with allocated duty Report back against deadline and criteria

Education for Sustainable Guideline 8: Development


Learning Through Experience
(Beames, Higgins & Nicol, 2012) Student educational journey: Hands on experience and movement, from design of companion garden to execution and maintenance of it, and learning about balance through tai chi philosophy and classes: Left brain and right brain stimulation Optimal learning Body Shifts Motivation stimulated through active movement Heightened energy levels (Jensen, 2000; Stevens-Smith, 2004;

Education for Sustainable Guideline 8: Development


Learning Through Experience
(Beames, Higgins & Nicol, 2012) Children acquire knowledge through meaningful exploration and discovery (Papier, 2006). Meaning gained from experience: Impact of pesticide on: Quality of produce Quality of air Health of crop ecosystems and bio-diversity Benefits of Companion Planting to sustainability Understanding the value of balance Linking Tai Chi to Companion Planting Linking balance and sustainability

Education for Sustainable Guideline 8: Development


Learning Through Experience
(Beames, Higgins & Nicol, 2012) Authentic learning context: Realistic context of companion garden Tackling genuine issue: Pesticide and sustainability

Education for Sustainable Development

Thank You

Education for Sustainable References Development


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