WILKES-BARRE, PA $1.

00 Sunday, June 24, 2012
Supplement
features PA,
WA graduates
>>INSIDE
Flagpole installed
for Fallen Heroes
memorial event.
>> PAGE 3
A first for Pittston
on the way to
former LaFratte’s.
>> PAGE 5
Graduates
honored
Preparing
the tribute
Coming soon
to Main St.
COUPON SAVINGS INSIDE WORTH $461.80
BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE SUNDAY DISPATCH
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My friends Dan – whom
everybody calls “Giz” – and
Kathy Conte are celebrating
their 40th wedding anniversary
this year. I know because I was
at their wedding … in a round
about way.
The story actually begins a
couple of weeks earlier in the
wee hours of the morning of
June 23, 1972, when a lady
named Agnes – many would
say she was no lady – came
visiting.
Swelled by heavy rains from
Tropical Storm Agnes, the
Susquehanna River began spill-
ing over levees and flooding
Wyoming Valley at 4 a.m. that
morning and by day’s end we
all had added a new word to our
vocabulary: inundate.
I was 22 years old and al-
ready a five-year veteran of the
Sunday Dispatch. But as the
boss, Bill “Pidge” Watson,
mobilized the staff to cover
what would be the biggest story
of our lives, I soon started to
feel like Cinderella.
While every staff member
who could handle a camera was
sent in one direction or another
– Pidge himself grabbed his
trusty Speed Graphic and was
headed to the skies with his
buddy George Bone taking him
up in his private plane – the
role for Eddie Ackerman was to
stay behind at the office and
make sure things kept rolling.
That mostly meant designing
and pasting up ads and laying
out pages. And, oh yes, answer-
ing the phones.
What it didn’t mean was
having fun.
That was for the others. And,
man, was it a long day waiting
for them to return.
When the waters receded, I
spent several days traipsing
through the mud on the West
Side writing post-flood human
interest stories which, while
rewarding, lacked the drama
everyone else got to experience
in the heat of the action.
But that changed the Sat-
urday morning when we got a
tip that President Richard Nix-
on was coming to town to view
the flood damage.
Getting photos of the presi-
dent right here in Wyoming
Valley was paramount but the
challenge was that no one knew
exactly where he’d be or when.
Remember, this was less than
10 years after the assassination
of JFK, and the Secret Service
was not about to release the
president’s precise itinerary.
Again, the boss got the staff
together, but this time he also
handed a camera to me.
Our chief photographer, Ken
Feeney, was assigned to the
Avoca airport; others were sent
here and there in anticipation of
possible presidential stops and I
was told to start my search at
Wilkes College because some-
one said he might stop there. I
had attended Wilkes and was
familiar with the campus.
I found no Richard Nixon at
the college but heard he might
be at a temporary trailer park in
Kingston and, sure enough, I
caught up with him. There was
a mob of people outside a trail-
er as Nixon exited and all I
could do was hold the single-
lens reflex camera high above
my head and shoot blindly. This
was long before digital cameras
with display screens. Turns out
I got some good photos but not
as good as ones I was about to
get.
As I headed back to the of-
fice on Wyoming Avenue, po-
lice stopped traffic and allowed
the Nixon motorcade to pull out
a few hundred yards ahead of
me. I was still that same dis-
tance behind when we rolled
into Forty Fort and I noticed the
motorcade angle over to the
curb.
Right across the street from
where the Nixon limo parked, a
bride was exiting a church.
“Oh my God,” I said aloud as
I screeched to a stop, “he’s
going to kiss the bride.”
We used film back then and I
was fortunate to have a few
shots remaining in my camera,
which I grabbed just before
breaking into a sprint toward
the church.
By the time I arrived, the
bride and groom were on the
top step just outside the church
door and that’s when I realized
it was my friends Giz and
Kathy. I had been invited to
their wedding but was forced to
decline because I had to work.
And there I was, working.
Nixon joined them on the top
step and, again, I had to shoot
between, above, and around the
throng of people in front of me.
I wound up getting some dan-
dies and one ran on the front
page of the Dispatch the next
day and later in several flood
publications. One of my shots
of Nixon is on a wall at Coop-
er’s Seafood Restaurant.
Years later I was reliving the
moment with another friend,
Joseph “Moe” Mullarkey, who
was Giz’s best man that day.
“I’ll never forget it,” Moe
said, “I walked out of the
church and said to myself,
‘Hey, a guy in a Richard Nixon
mask.’ I came this close to
pulling his nose.”
Now, that would have been a
photo.
Ed Ackerman, optimist
eackerman@psdispatch.com
The day the president kissed the bride
Flagpole installed.............................................3
Cefalo Center ....................................................4
Coming to Main Street ....................................5
PA School Board...............................................7
Local Chatter ....................................................8
Matters of Faith ...............................................10
Editorial /Cartoon ...........................................14
Maria Heck........................................................15
Nutrition............................................................15
Peeking into the Past .....................................19
Town News ......................................................34
Sports ..............................................................43
Obituaries........................................................53
Weddings ......................................................... 1B
Birthdays.........................................................3B
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VOL. 66, NO. 20
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It’s a towering tribute.
A50-foot flagpole was installedon
the grounds of the Greater Pittston
Chamber of Commerce in prepara-
tion for the dedication of the Home-
town Heroes Memorial on July 1.
“Seeing our vision become a real-
ity is very gratifying,” said Greater
Pittston Chamber of Commerce
President Charlie Adonizio. “After a
year and a half of planning, it’s excit-
ing to see everyone’s hard work pay
off. The support has been over-
whelming.”
State Rep. Mike Carroll, D-Avoca,
who was on hand to present the
chamber with a $1,000 check from
his campaign funds, said he was hon-
ored to be part of the project.
“It’s something to really be proud
of. Everybody got on board and the
community came together to make
this happen,” Carroll said.
The hollow aluminum flagpole
came inthree parts. The first part was
anchored five feet into the ground.
The second and third pieces were
connected on the ground and a crane
hoisted the pole up and attached it to
the piece anchored into the ground.
The memorial will be dedicatedLt.
Col. Richard Berrettini, First Lt. Jef-
frey DePrimo, Cpl. Dale Kridlo, Pa.
State Trooper Joshua Miller and Po-
lice Officer Rodney Pocceschi, who
all lost their lives while in the line of
duty. It’s also dedicated to Capt. T.J.
Hromisin, who was critically injured
in Iraq.
The community with gather at 2
p.m. on Sunday, July1, at the Greater
Pittston Chamber of Commerce
Building at 104 Kennedy Boulevard
for a ceremony dedicating the me-
morial. Afterwards there will be an
all-American picnic on the nearby
grounds of the Greater Pittston YM-
CA, which will feature hot dogs,
hamburgers, lemonade and apple
pie.
Carroll said it’s local history in the
making.
“This flagpole will outlive us all,”
Carroll said. “It will be the center-
Pole positioned
TONY CALLAIO PHOTOS / FOR THE SUNDAY DISPATCH
The new 50' flag pole its on Kennedy Blvd. at the home
of the Greater Pittston Chamber of Commerce.
Greater Pittston Chamber Board President Charles
Adonizio (left) discusses strategy with Mike Haddock
and Rob Scarantino on how to raise the new flag pole
with State Rep. Mike Carroll looking on.
Mike Haddock gets a hand froma friend Paul Savaki-
nas as the top of the new flag pole is put in place.
Flag pole installed as tribute to fallen officers, GIs
By JOE HEALEY
jhealey@psdispatch.com
HOMETOWN HEROES MEMORI AL
“This flagpole will outlive
us all. It will be the center-
piece of Greater Pittston
for decades to come.”
Mike Carroll
State representative
See POLE, Page 9
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Despite the name, the Cefalo
Alumni Athletic Center is not
open to alumni.
Nor anymember of thecommu-
nity.
The PittstonArea School Board
discussed the center at its monthly
meeting on Tuesday night.
PittstonArearaisedmuchof the
$450,000for the thenstate-of-the-
art fieldhouse
that opened in
1999 from
alumni and
community do-
nations.
Superintend-
ent GeorgeCos-
grove said since
a major national
gym chain opened in the Pittston
Area, interest in using the facility
has dwindled.
“We were getting very little re-
sponsefromthecommunity,”Cos-
grove said. “One of the reasons
listedwas Planet Fitness. Somany
people were joining there and no-
body came to ours.”
Cosgrove said public use was
stopped in 2011. Previously, the
center wastobeopentoall Pittston
Area residents. Use of the facility
was free, but proof of residency
was required.
PAgrad John Poli, who nowat-
tends Lock Haven University, ad-
dressed the board and asked that
the facility be open for the public.
The center’s namesake, Jimmy
Cefalo, returnedtoopenthecenter
under an umbrella of hoopla. The
center hada fitness center director
anda wellness coach, whichwas a
community based employee, but
that position was eliminated, Cos-
grove said.
“We couldn’t get anybody to
show up,” said assistant superin-
tendent Jack Lussi.
The Cefalo center includes a
2,700-square-foot weight room,
meeting rooms, a trainer’s room, a
locker roomand coach’s office.
At the time, Pittston Area’s ath-
letic director said the district was
going all out for the facility.
“We were originallygoingtodo
something half the size of this,”
Pittston Area Athletic Director
Charlie Turco said in 2001. “But
wefiguredifwe’regoingtodothis,
we might as well go all the way.”
Cosgrove said he would reexa-
minetheopeningthefacilitytothe
public.
Also, board member John Do-
nahue suggested the district start a
spring girls’ lacrosse program.
He said high schools such as
Coughlin, Lake-LehmanandDal-
las arestartingor havestartedsuch
programs.
“With girls’ soccer in the spring
moving to the fall, there’s a lot of
interest inanewspringsport,”Do-
nahue said.
He said grants and scholarships
from national lacrosse organiza-
tions are available.
The board agreed to look into
starting a program.
PA’s Cefalo Alumni Center not open to alumni, public
JOE HEALEY
jhealey@psdispatch.com
Cosgrove
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Craving tuna tataki?
Have a hankering for a dragon
roll?
What about a plate of sashimi?
Looknofurther thandowntown
Pittston this fall as plans are in the
works to bring an Asian fusion/
sushi restaurant to the former La-
Fratte’s eatery on North Main
Street.
The restaurant will be run by
friends of theowners of BluWasbi
in Dickson City and Kyoto in
Clarks Summit, but thebusinesses
are not affiliated, said Mike Lom-
bardo of the Pittston Redevelop-
ment Authority.
“Theyknoweachother well and
they’reworkingwitheachother on
the concept,” Lombardo said. The
family, whose name he didn’t
know, plans to live above the eat-
ery.
Lombardosaidtherestaurant, to
be called Fuji, is expected to open
in September after extensive reno-
vations are complete.
Lombardo said it’s a “huge
score” for the downtown.
“This adds to the pallet that
we’re tryingtocreate downthere,”
hesaid. “We’retryingtoget anchor
tenants on each of the blocks and
this will create a great footprint.”
LaFratte’s Restaurant closed its
doorsinJanuary, but therestaurant
has a half-century of tradition on
MainStreet andspent just about 20
years in its final Main Street loca-
tion.
The building is owned by the
Gilchrist Brothers and is part of
larger development plans for that
area. The Gilbroproject is the pro-
posed construction of an office
and retail building at the corner of
WilliamandMainbythe Gilchrist
brothers and SamFalcone.
Lombardo said parking won’t
be anissue, either. There’s parking
across the street at the municipal
lot near Rite Aid and there are
plans for 80 spaces behind the
building in the lot that formerly
housed the St. John the Baptist fa-
cility.
The business will likely be get-
ting some assistance fromthe Re-
development Authority. Lombar-
do said a $5,000 façade enhance-
ment grant would help the new
owners.
CI TY I SSUES
Downtown Pittston in the raw?
TONY CALLAIO/FOR THE SUNDAY DISPATCH
The Former
LaFratte's
Restaurant on
North Main
Street in Pitt-
ston will soon
become Fuji,
an Asian fu-
sion/sushi
restaurant, a
first of its kind
for Pittston.
Sushi restaurant planned
for former LaFratte’s eatery
JOE HEALEY
jhealey@psdispatch.com
The city’s new operations coordinator
was given additional responsibilities at
Wednesday night’s monthly council meet-
ing.
David Allen Hines will also spearhead
the zoning/code enforcement office. He’s
been on the job since last month when
council hired him.
“I wanted to get back to government,”
Hines said, discussing his return to mu-
nicipal administration. “I have almost 20
years of government experience.”
Hines, 40, of Kingston, came back to
the Wyoming Valley after a 10-year stint
in Washington, D.C., as deputy director of
the Office of Budget and Planning for the
Government of the District of Columbia.
“Due to divorce and wanting to live
near my three young children who reside
with their mother in Wilkes-Barre Town-
ship, I returned to the area after nearly a
decade in Washington, D.C. and I have
beenpleasedtojointhe PittstonCityman-
agement team,” Hines said in an email. “I
am an area native, and except for the 10
years in D.C., I was born, raised, and edu-
cated in northeastern Pennsylvania.”
At the age of 22, Hines ran for Luzerne
County Commissioner in 1995. Despite a
great deal of support and fund raising, he
was defeated by Democratic party heavy-
weights Frank Crossin and Tom Makow-
ski.
Hines said he likes the direction Pitt-
ston is taking.
“Pittston is the city that’s that trying to
do things and I’m really impressed with
that,” Hines said. “I’m pleased with
what’s going on here, especially in the
downtown. There’s a world of difference
between the downtown 10 years ago and
the downtown now. It’s a wonderful op-
portunity and I’m pleased to be a part of
it.”
Hines’ salary is $35,000 a year.
Joe Moskovitz, the city manager, said
Hines will be an asset to Pittston.
“The city is very proud to be able to im-
prove its administrative resources,” Mos-
kovitz said. “For the first time in city his-
tory, we have two managers with master’s
degrees in public administration. It repre-
sents the city is looking to professionalize
it services with career public mangers.”
Another item that drew Hines to Pitt-
ston was the administration’s desire to
beef up code enforcement and zoning.
“I’ve spent a lot of time doing that in
Edwardsville so Pittston was a good fit,”
he said.
Two items he’s dealing with in his new
role as code/zoning officer were brought
up by angry residents Wednesday night: a
dilapidated house on Center Street and a
feral cat problem on Searle Street.
“We’re working to fix those problems,”
he said.
Previously, Hines served as borough
administrator for Edwardsville from1996
to 2010 and served on Kingston Council
from1993 to 1996.
He receiveda bachelor’s degree inpolit-
ical science from Wilkes University and
master’s degree in public administration
fromMarywood University. He is a mem-
ber of the board of directors of St. Luke’s
United Church of Christ in Wilkes-Barre.
City’s operations manager to handle zoning/code issues
By JOE HEALEY
jhealey@psdispatch.com
JOE HEALEY/THE SUNDAY DISPATCH
Pittston's new oper-
ations coordinator
David Hines is shown
with Pittston City Man-
ager Joe Moskovitz.
Two issues he's deal-
ing with were brought
up by angry residents
at Wednesday night's
council meeting: a
dilapidated house on
Center Street and a
feral cat problemon
Searle Street.
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They’re pumping again at
Johns Service Station, aka the
Gas Guy, on William Street.
In March, unable to compete
with the Turkey Hills and Uni-
Marts, Pete Beczek, who leases
the property from Guy Sviatko,
closed down the pumps. He con-
tinued servicing vehicles, but,
worried that wouldn’t be
enough, he considered closing
altogether and looking for anoth-
er job.
Beczek said the busi-
ness model – a service
garage with manned
pumps – is tough to
keep going. “Older peo-
ple like this type of
business, but locally
owned service stations
and gas stations are go-
ing away. There’s the la-
bor cost and the credit
card company gets its cut. You’re
luckytoaverage10cents a gallon
profit over the course of a year
depending on the price.”
Beczek said a franchised con-
venience store can operate on
three to five cent per gallon prof-
it margin. “They’re low-balling
the price, practically giving it
away to get people in their
stores.”
Beczek doesn’t fault the cus-
tomers who swipe their cards
and pump their own gas at the
convenience islands for eight to
10 cents less than he could sell it.
“It’s understandable,” he said. “A
lot of people want the best price.”
Enter John Vilchock. Vil-
chock had managed a gas station
in Old Forge for 12 years, but al-
ways wanted to run his own busi-
ness. When he heard Beczek had
closed the pumps and that the
small store attachedtothe garage
was empty, he suggested that
Beczek lease himthe pumps and
store. Beczek agreed.
Vilchock’s first day was
Wednesday. NowVilchock is of-
fering gas prices competitive
with the franchises. He is also
pumping, cleaning windshields,
checking tire pressure
and opening a conve-
nience store.
“It’s old-fashionedser-
vice,” Vilchock said.
“And we’ll be getting a
sign that says just that.”
Vilchock said the
store, which will be up
and running in a week or
so, will sell lottery tick-
ets, cigarettes, coffee,
snacks, fountain drinks, hot
breakfast sandwiches, and cold
deli sandwiches.
Tentative hours for the pump
island and store are 6 a.m. to 7
p.m. Monday through Friday,
and 6 a.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday and
Sunday. Vilchock calls the store
Nicky’s Express Mart. He ex-
pects to employ five including
himself and his wife Wendy.
Beczek has leased Johns for
five years, but he workedthere as
a mechanic for 25years andhas a
following. He said the business,
which has been around since the
1950s, was originally owned by
Charlie Champi, who was also
known as Charlie Johns, so it
was known as Johns’ Service
Station. When Guy Sviatko
bought the business, he nick-
named it “Gas Guy.”
Other locally owned service
stations which still man pump is-
lands include Dileo’s and Slebo-
da’s in Wyoming, West Side Au-
to in West Pittston, Vensky’s on
Main Street Pittston, Galli’s on
the Pittston Bypass and Henry’s
in Dupont. Laurel Street Sunoco
pumps gas, but does not have
service bays.
FIGHTING TO STAY ALIVE
They’re pumping again on William St.
JACK SMILES/FOR THE SUNDAY DISPATCH
Pete Beczek, left, and John Vilchock at Gas Guy service station on William St., Pittston.
JACK SMILES
jsmiles@psdispatch.com
Beczek: a
service
garage with
manned
pumps is
tough to keep
going.
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said.
The district transferred its own
cyber services to Seneca Valley
School District. If a student uti-
lizes the in-house service, one
can still participate in sports, still
go to the prom, dances and par-
ticipate in extra curricular activ-
ities.
But many students use alter-
nate schools.
“If we were running a business
and we lost a customer, the first
thing we would do is find out
why we lost that customer,”
Sciandra said.
The board agreed to research
the issue.
our district,” Sciandra said. “We
need to find out why did they
leave us and how can we get
them back.”
Cosgrove said there are a va-
riety of reasons students and par-
ents opt for cyber and charter
schools. He said some students
have difficulty succeeding in tra-
ditional brick and mortar
schools. Also, some are involved
in activities, such as figure skat-
ing or acting, that preclude them
from taking a traditional sched-
ule.
“Some feel that they’ll be
more successful in a technologi-
cally driven system rather than a
traditional system,” Cosgrove
this board when we had zero
smart boards. We have come a
hell of a long way in the last five
years or so.”
When put to a vote, Linskey
voted no and Guariglia, Scian-
dra, Kelly, John Donahue, Ri-
chard Gorzkowski and Bruce
Knick and all voted to eliminate
the position. Kent Bratlee and
Marilyn Starna abstained.
In other business, the board
discussed charter and cyber
schools and what can be done to
bring back students that have left
the district.
Sciandra asked what the dis-
trict does when a student an-
nounces they’re going to a cyber
or charter school.
Superintendent George Cos-
grove there is not much the dis-
trict can do.
“It’s basically as if they were
transferring to another school
district,” Cosgrove said. “But it’s
costing us hundreds of thou-
sands of dollars a year.”
Sciandra suggested a study
commission be formed to exam-
ine the issue closer.
“There’s a big opportunity to
bring these students back into
write technology curriculum in
this district and I’m much more
concerned that he’s doing that
than making sure you can re-
ceive files on your iPad.”
Sciandra said that before he
took his seat on the board, he
quizzed 25 different people what
items he should address as a
board member.
“All 25 people
came back to me
withtechnology,” he
said.
But Linskey
praised the work
Kupetz has done.
“I was sitting on
this board when we
were paying hun-
dreds of thousands
of dollars to Intella-
com,” he said. Intel-
lacom has been
linked to corruption
investigations in
Luzerne County,
but no charges have ever been
filed against its owner, Anthony
Trombetta.
“I was sitting on this board
when our computer labs didn’t
work,” he said. “I was sitting on
“THIS GENTLEMAN IS helping to write
technology curriculum in this district
and I’m much more concerned that he’s
doing that, than making sure you can
receive files on your iPad.”
Robert Linskey
Pittston Area School Board member
“I PURCHASED AN iPad six months ago
with the idea that I wanted to have his
paper sent to me on my iPad. It’s 2012,
and they’re doing that everywhere else
but not Pittston Area.”
Charles Sciandra
Pittston Area School Board member
The elimination of Pittston
Area’s technology coordinator
caused a debate at Tuesday’s
monthly school board meeting.
James Kupetz, who was in the
position, will be put in a math
position in the high school.
Board president Tony Guari-
glia suggested making the move.
“It’s a change in the philoso-
phy of the board in regards to the
direction of technology,” he said.
Board member Bob Linskey
took issue with the change.
“This is the board microma-
naging operations of the school
district,” Linskey said. “Our job
is to appoint a superintendent to
run the school
district.”
Linskey said
technology in the
district will suffer
because of the
change and a re-
cent elimination
of a Classroom of
the Future coach
because of bud-
getary reasons.
“We are going
to leave this dis-
trict in a disaster if
you do something
like this,” Linskey
said. “What are you going to do
with technology?”
When asked if the board has a
plan to fill the position with an-
other person or a company, Gua-
riglia said the board will look at
all options.
Board member Joseph Kelly
voted in favor of the change.
“Our technology department
needs some work,” he said.
As an example, Board Mem-
ber Charles Sciandra pointed to
large stack of papers in front of
him.
“I purchased an iPad six
months ago with the idea that I
wanted to have his paper sent to
me on my iPad,” he said and he
picked the stack of paperwork
and thumped it down. “It’s 2012,
and they’re doing that every-
where else but not Pittston Ar-
ea.”
Linskey shot back.
“This gentleman is helping to
PI TTSTON AREA
School board tackles tech issues
By JOE HEALEY
jhealey@psdispatch.com
The district transferred
its own cyber services
to Seneca Valley School
District. If a student
utilizes the in-house
service, one can still
participate in sports,
still go to the prom,
dances and participate
in extra curricular activ-
ities.
Phone: 696-3580 • www.FIREandICEonTobyCreek.com • RT 309, Trucksville - Just North of Sheetz
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LOCALCHATTER
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What are you chattin’ about? Call 602-0177 or email sd@psdispatch.com and let us know.
Margaret Boyt of Searle Street
in Pittston reports that Aaron
Boyt, of Pittston, may have the
first red tomato of the year. Aa-
ron is pictured with his tomato
and his puppy, Waffles.
***
Receives academic award
The Pennsylvania State Uni-
versity (York Campus) recently
presented the President Sparks
Award for academic excellence
to Andrew J. Patterson, son of
Rick and Mary Beth (Stedina)
Patterson, of Shrewsbury. Rick
Patterson is a former resident of
Duryea and Mary Beth Patterson
is a former resident of Throop.
The President Sparks award is
presented annually to those un-
dergraduate candidates who
have earned 4.0 (A) cumulative
grade-point average based on at
least 36 graded Penn State cred-
its. Andrew was the lone recip-
ient of the President Sparks
award at this year’s award cere-
mony.
Patterson will transfer this fall
to the Pennsylvania State Uni-
versity (University Park Cam-
pus) majoring in Public Rela-
tions. He will be joined by his
sister, Kelsey, who will attend
the Pennsylvania State Universi-
ty (University Park Campus) as a
freshman majoring in English.
Andrew and Kelsey are the
grandchildren of Stanley and
Bernice Patterson of Duryea and
John and Catherine Stedina of
Throop.
Graduates from
Wilmington
Kelly Slavoski, a 2002 gradu-
ate of Seton Catholic High
School and a 2006 graduate of
Elizabethtown College, recently
graduated from Wilmington
University with a Masters in
Education. Slavoski maintained
a 3.96 GPA throughout her
course of graduate studies.
She is the daughter of Joe and
Ann Marie Walsh, of Pittston,
and the daughter-in-law of Bill
and Dale Slavoski, of Shaver-
town. She resides in Rehoboth
Beach, Delaware, with her hus-
band, Jason.
Named to dean’s list
Maria Boris, of Avoca, was
among the students added to The
University of Scranton Dean’s
List for the fall 2011semester af-
ter publication of the list in Janu-
ary of 2012.
Boris is a senior middle level
teacher education major in the
University’s Panuska College of
Professional Studies.
The dean’s list recognizes stu-
dents for academic excellence
during the 2011 fall semester. A
student must have a grade point
average of 3.5 or better with a
minimum number of credit
hours to make the Dean’s List.
Sisters graduate
Aubre Mary Mayorowski,
Old Forge, graduated on May 19
at the 86th annual commence-
ment ceremony at Misericordia
University with a Bachelor of
Arts in English and a certificate
in Secondary Education. She ob-
tained the dean’s list with a GPA
First ripe tomato reported on Searle Street
Charlie Adonizio, left, and Leo Sperrazza, right, each won gold medals for wine making at the
2012 WineMaker Conference at Cornell University.
They are pictured with editor Chris Colby of WineMaker Magazine.
Adonizio also won two bronze medals.
Their wine brings gold medals
Andrew Patterson
Aubre Mayorowski Galen Mayorowski
See LOCAL CHATTER, Page 20
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1097 Wyoming Ave
Forty Fort • 718-1501
Mon-Fri 7:30-6 • Sat 8-1
300 Pierce St.
Kingston • 283-1504
Mon-Fri 8-5 • Sat 8-1
NEW LOCATION
MOTORCYCLE MONDAYS
At The Kingston Location
Offering Inspections & Oil Changes - By Appt. Only
4-O’Connell St., Pittston • 655-2412
Pittston Animal Hospital
HOURS:
8 a.m. - 8 p.m.
Mon. - Fri.
Also Open
Weekends
And Holidays
(Subject To Doctor Availability)
Dr. I. H. Kathio
piece of Greater Pittston for dec-
ades to come.”
Adonizio stressed all the work
was done by volunteers, includ-
ing the flagpole installers, Rob
Scarantino of Northeast Signs
and Mike Hadduck of Grand
Rental Station.
Adonizo explained the origin
of the project at a recent Cham-
ber of Commerce gathering.
He said after Kridlo was killed
in Afghanistan, the mayor or-
dered all flags in the city to be
flown at half staff.
“We couldn’t comply with the
mayor’s request because we
didn’t have a flagpole,” Adonizo
said.
Adonizio noted that the new
Hometown Heroes Memorial
will be the seventh memorial on
Kennedy Boulevard.
He said on the entrance ramp
at the north end, there’s the Coal
Miners statue, erected with
funds from Bicentennial events
in 1976; a little park called the
Sam Miceli Veterans Memorial
Park; the Firemen’s Memorial in
honor of Pittston firefighters Le-
onard Insalaco and John Lom-
bardo who lost their lives bat-
tling a Main Street fire in 1993;
the Water Street Bridge which
was renamed the Firefighters
Memorial Bridge in honor of In-
salaco and Lombardo; the Pitt-
ston Post Office will soon be re-
named in honor of Miller; and at
the southern end a statue of
Christopher Columbus who is
credited as the founder of the
new world.
“Athoroughfare named after a
hero, with seven memorials to
heroes,” Adonizio said. “And it’s
all under a mile long.”
Pole
Continued fromPage 3
Saint John’s Lodge #233 is
sponsoring its second annual bus
trip to Resorts Casino in Atlantic
City, Saturday July 28. Donation
is $40 and includes $25 in free
slot play (must be 21 to receive
the free play offer), movies down
and back, raffle and much more.
Photo ID required or use your
Resorts Player Card.
The bus will leave Wyoming
Valley Mall near Sears Automo-
tive promptly at 7:30 a.m. and
Atlantic City at 7 p.m. Reserva-
tions are a must. Payment is due
with reservation.
Call Vince Tedeschi at 371-
9940.
Atlantic City bus
trip planned July 28
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MATTERS OF FAITH
email items for this page to sd@psdispatch.com; fax to 602-0183
On Sunday, July 1 at 2 p.m.,
there will be a special closing
Mass for Saint Rocco’s Church
with a special ceremony of lock-
ing the doors.
Mrs. Ida Bartoli and Mr. Ches-
ter Montante will perform this
special ceremony.
Following the Mass, there will
be a procession with the Blessed
Sacrament to Our Lady of Mt.
Carmel Church.
The procession will start from
St. Rocco’s Church, West Oak
Street, South Main Street, Broad
Street and at our Lady of Mt.
Carmel Church.
The benediction with the
Blessed Sacrament will con-
clude this religious service.
Following the service, a light
reception will be held in the
Church Hall.
Beginning Sunday, July 8, the
9:30 a.m. Mass fromSt. Rocco’s
Church will be moved to Our La-
dy of Mt. Carmel Church.
STRAWBERRY SOCIAL
A Strawberry Social will be
held June 30 from 4 to 7 p.m. at
St. Peter’s Evangelical Lutheran
Church, Rock St., Hughestown.
Take outs will be at 3:30 p.m.
Tickets are $5 for adults and $3
for children under 10. Tickets in-
cludes shortcake and beverage.
Also available will be wimpies,
hot dogs with hot dog sauce or
sauerkraut and a variety of sal-
ads. For tickets call Pam at 655-
0043 or 313-2829 or Lois at 654-
4948.
PEDIATRIC CLINIC
The Care and Concern Pediat-
ric Health Clinic, located in the
former Seton Catholic School
building on William Street in
Pittston, will be open the first
and third Thursday of each
month.
Free healthcare is providedfor
infants through age 11.
Registration is from 4:30 to
5:30 p.m.
Participants should bring your
child’s immunization records
with them.
Parents or guardians must be
present to have their child exam-
ined. All services are free and
confidential.
The clinic is sponsored by the
Care and Concern ministries of
the Parish Community of St.
John the Evangelist, Msgr. John
Bendik, Pastor.
For more information call
855-6035.
REFORMED
PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH OF WYOMING
VALLEY
1700 Wyoming Avenue, Forty-
Fort
Pastor Rev. R.F. Dymond
Morning Worship: 10:30 a.m.
Bible School: 11:45 a.m.
Wednesday evening prayer
service: 6:30 p.m. every other
Wednesday
Visitors are welcome.
For additional informationcall
570-693-1918.
BENNETT PRESBYTERIAN
501 Bennett Street, Luzerne
Everyone is welcome.
The church is handicap acces-
sible.
BETHEL UNITED
METHODIST
532Main St.
Avoca
(570) 457-2566
Pastor Sharon Dietz (570)
282-0104
Sunday – Worship Service -
11:15 a.m.
Communion first Sunday of
each month – non perishable
food items will be collected this
day.
Mondays – Bible study – 6
p.m. alternating each week with
Brick UM Church, Duryea.
1st Thursday of each month –
food give-away 4 to 6 p.m. for
needy of Avoca and Duryea.
Non-perishable food items
and monetary donations are ac-
cepted at this time.
If you have a prayer request,
call Pastor Dietz who will activa-
te prayer chain.
BRICK UNITED
METHODIST
935 Foote Ave., Duryea
(570)457-4424
Pastor Sharon Dietz (570)
282-0104
Sunday Worship Service 9:45
a.m. Sunday School – 10:15 a.m.
during morning Worship
Services for ages 3-12
Communion first Sunday of
each month – non perishable
Closing Mass next Sunday at St. Rocco’s
The traditional Novena to St. Maria Goretti
will begin on Wednesday, June 27, at St. Maria
Goretti Church, Laflin, with Novena prayers be-
ing offered after each Mass.
The Feast Day of St. Maria Goretti is Friday,
July 6. Mass will be celebrated at 5:30 p.m. All
eleven-year old boys and girls are invited to
meet in the Parish Center at 5 p.m. on that day.
Immediately before the ceremony, one boy and
one girl will be selected by lottery to crown St.
Maria. All of these children will participate in
the offertory procession, bringing forward, not
only the gifts for the Mass, but, live roses signi-
fying the prayers and petitions of all parishion-
ers and participants pleading for the interces-
sion of St. Maria Goretti.
Following Holy Communion, the children
will bestow a special blessing on all who attend
the ceremony. The children will bless the con-
gregation through the intercession of another
eleven-year old, St. Maria Goretti.
Novena to St. Maria Goretti set
See FAITH, Page 11
Girard J. Mecadon
Attorney
At Law
363 Laurel Street • Pittston
654 - 5030 www.mecadonlaw.com
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Rev. StevenPaul Roth, a native
of Pittston, was ordained a priest
on June 9 at Cathedral of Mary
Our Queen, Baltimore, Mary-
land.
Agraduation of Seton Cathol-
ic High School, he is a son of
Stan and Nancy Roth, of Pitt-
ston. He has a sister, Marie.
He holds a Bachelor’s degree
in Philosophy and Theology as
well as a Master’s degree in
counseling both from The Uni-
versity of Scranton. He holds de-
grees in Sacred Theology and a
Master of Divinity, both fromSt.
Mary’s Seminary and Universi-
ty, Baltimore, MD.
Rev. Rothcelebrateda Mass of
Thanksgiving on Sunday, June
17 at St. John the Evangelist
Church, Pittston. A reception
hosted by the Altar and Rosary
and Holy Name Societies, was
heldafter Mass inthe Setoncafe-
teria on Church Street, Pittston.
Pittston native is
ordained in Maryland
Rev. Steven Roth
food items will be collected this
day.
Mondays – Bible study – 6
p.m. alternating each week with
Bethel UM Church, Avoca.
Miracle of Awareness – coffee
time – 6 p.m. meeting 7 p.m.
Thursday – New beginnings
meeting 7 p.m. Third Thursday
of each month – United Metho-
dist Women – 6:30 p.m.
CHRISTIAN AND
MISSIONARY
ALLIANCE CHURCH
Luzerne Ave. and Parke Street
West Pittston
Christ’s Community Clothes
Closet will offer summer hours
for the months of June and July.
The closet will open on
Wednesday from6 to 8 p.m. Peo-
ple with emergency needs can
call the church office at 654-
2500 for special appointments.
The closet accepts gently used
clothing and share it with the
community without cost.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Rev. James H. Breese, pastor,
Water Street, Pittston
The First Baptist Church, Wa-
ter St., Pittston, is running a bus
trip to Sight and Sound in Lan-
caster to see the production, Jo-
nah on September 15.
The trip includes dinner at
Good&Plentyandthe show. Re-
freshments will also be served
on the bus.
The cost of the trip is Adults
(age 19 and older) $108, Teens
(ages 13 to18) $78, and Children
(ages 3 to 12) $56.
A non-refundable deposit of
$30 is required to hold a seat and
the balance due by June 30. Seat-
ing is limited, so please reserve a
seat on the bus today!
To make a reservation or for
more information, please con-
tact Cindy Hrobuchak, 780-
7712, or by e-mail,morn-
star54@live.com.
Rev. James H. Breese is the
pastor of First Baptist Church.
For more information, please
contact the churchoffice at (570)
654-0283.
The church will hold a Sunday
School Open House, Schools
Out Sunday School’s In, on Sat-
urday, June 23 from 11 a.m. to 2
p.m. Children and teens are en-
couraged to attend, along with
their parents to see howexciting,
fun and beneficial Sunday
School can be. Refreshments
will be provided.
For more information, please
contact the churchoffice at (570)
654-0283.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL
UCC
500 Luzerne Avenue
West Pittston
Rev. Joan Mitchell, Pastor
Sanctuary is handicapped ac-
cessible.
Sunday at 11 a.m. Morning
Worship Service
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH
14 Broad Street Pittston
Sunday Worship 9:15 a.m.
with Rev. William N. Lukesh.
FIRST UNITED
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
West Pittston
Rev. James Thyren
654-8121
June 24 – 11 a.m. Worship;
12:05p.m. choir rehearsal; 1p.m.
Historical Tour of West Pittston
Churches
July 1 – 11 a.m. Worship; 2
p.m. Church picnic at Camp
Lackawanna
Services are being held at St.
Cecilia’s Roman Catholic
Church on 1700 Wyoming Ave,
Exeter as we recover from the
flood of September 2011.
There is parking on Wyoming
Avenue and in the lot behind the
church.
FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Wyoming Ave., West Pittston
FULL GOSPEL CHAPEL
Avoca
Adult Sunday School, 9:30;
Sunday morning worship at
10:30 a.m.
Wednesday evening Bible
study and prayer service at 7:00.
The churchalsohosts the Rose
of Sharon Church with Rev. Vin-
cente Torres on Sunday after-
noon at 3:00 p.m. for the Hispan-
ic community.
GLENDALE GOSPEL
CHURCH
105 Church Drive
Glendale/Pittston Township
Sunday Service 10:45 a.m.
HARDING CHURCH
OF CHRIST
RR 1 Box 187A, Falls
Sunday services: 10:00 a.m.
Sunday School and 11:00 a.m.
Church Service.
Call 388-6534 www.harding-
churchofchrist.org
HOLY MOTHER OF
SORROWS PNCC
212 Wyoming Avenue, Dupont
Rev. Zbigniew Dawid, Pastor
Sunday Masses
8:00 a.m. Traditional Mass
10:30 a.m. Traditional High
Mass
Daily Mass
9:00 a.m. Monday through
Saturday
On Saturday, July 14 the an-
nual outdoor Chicken BBQ will
take place at the church grounds.
You can purchase tickets from
any YMS of R member. Also
you can pick them up at the rec-
tory.
INDEPENDENT BIBLE
CHURCH
328 Main Street, Duryea, PA
18642. (570) 451-0346 Home/
Office. JLaCava@TheBible-
Church.org
INKERMAN
PRESBYTERIAN
Main St., Inkerman
Services: Sundays, 8:30 a.m.
LANGCLIFFE
PRESBYTERIAN
1001 Main St Avoca
Sunday worship 11:15 a.m.
The Langcliffe Church is
handicapped accessible. Nurs-
ery is provided for children dur-
ing worship.
MOOSIC ALLIANCE
CHURCH
608 Rocky Glen Road, Moosic
Pastor: Doug Jensen 457-
6020
maccma2@verizon.net
Sunday morning Sunday
School for all ages at 9:30 a.m.
Sunday morning Worship at
10:45 a.m.
Prayer meeting, Wednesdays
at 7:00 p.m.
Celebrate Recovery Ministry,
Thursdays at 7:30 p.m.
OBLATES OF ST. JOSEPH
Highway 315, Pittston
Masses are held daily in the
seminary chapel at 7 a.m. (Mon-
day – Friday) and on Saturday
mornings at 8 a.m. There are no
weekend Masses.
Confessions are heard daily
from9 a.m. - noon and from3 to
6 p.m.
Office hours are Monday –
Friday: 9:30 a.m. – 5 p.m., eve-
nings and weekends by appoint-
ment. Office phone number is
654-7542. You can now contact
the Oblates on Facebook:
www.Facebook.com/OBLATE-
SOFSTJOSEPH or on Twitter
@OblatesStJoseph
Every Wednesday evening
Mass is celebrated at 7 p.m. in
conjunction with the Novena to
St. Joseph &St. Joseph Marello.
Novena prayers and the blessing
of the first-class relic of St. Jo-
seph Marello, Founder of the
Oblates of Saint Joseph Congre-
gation, immediately follow the
Mass.
All are welcome.
Tune into Catholic Radio 750
AM.
The radio studio is located in
the seminary building and is
broadcast daily from dawn to
dusk. For more information
about this station, contact Ed
Niewinski at 287-4670.
The Outdoor Chicken Bar-
B-Q Dinner is Sunday, August
26, on the seminary grounds.
Volunteers are asked to be pre-
sent for this important meeting
Altar Servers Day is being
planned for the end of this
month, Friday, June 29, at the
seminary.
The day-long event is open to
all young people who are altar
servers in any parish in the Dio-
cese of Scranton. The event is
FREE, just need to register by
calling 654-7542, e-mail: osj-
seminary@comcast.net.
For more news and informa-
tion about the Oblates of Saint
Joseph locally and around the
world, go to our web-
site:www.oblates-stjoseph.com
ST. JOSEPH MARELLO
PARISH
OUR LADY OF
MT. CARMEL
ST. ROCCO’S
Pittston
Weekend Masses: At Our La-
dy of Mt. Carmel Church, on
Saturday at 4:00 and 7:00 p.m.
and on Sunday at 8:00 and 11:00
a.m. At St. Rocco Church, on
Saturday at 5:30 p.m. and on
Sunday at 9:30 a.m.
St. Joseph Marello Parish Ba-
zaar will be held on Friday, July
13, Saturday, July14 and Sunday,
July 15 on the church grounds
William Street, Pittston. A fes-
tival planning meeting will be
held on Monday June 25 at 7:00
p.m. in the Church Center. The
Bazaar tickets and Raffle tickets
were mailed to you. Please send
your returns as soon as possible.
Thank you We need volunteers.
Send your name and offer your
talents and time to our Annual
Bazaar. We need you.
Anyone wishing to donate a
Specialty Basket, can bring it to
the Rectory during office hours.
Join with your family members
and pick a theme. Let the kids
help pick out items and put them
together.
Every job at the bazaar is im-
portant. There is endless num-
bers of positions to fill. Please
consider yourself as beingasked.
Faith
Continued from Page 10
See FAITH, Page 12
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(THE OLD FASHIONED SHOE STORE)
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REAL ESTATE
Shavertown 696-3801
Deanna
Farrell
(570) 696-0894
Market Analysis is always free. Call for appointment.
144 Crystal Creek Rd., FranklinTwp.
$599,900
More than an Estate, this Architectural Beauty
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If you have experience, great.
If you don’t, don’t worry, you
will have it by the end of the pic-
nic in any job you wish to help at.
Someone will always be there to
answer any questions you may
have about the task at hand. We
always welcome anyone willing
to sacrifice their time and tal-
ents.
St. Joseph Marello Parish Raf-
fle is now underway. Buy your
tickets now for a chance to win
2012 Chevrolet Cruz or $20,000.
Donations are $20.00 each
and only 2,000 tickets to be sold.
Seller of the winning ticket re-
ceives $500.00.
For tickets to buy or sell call
Connie Toole at 655-3681, Frank
Sciabacucchi 655-6125, Pena
Hansen-332-5989, or the rectory
office-654-6902.
An Altar and Rosary Bus Trip
will be held on August 19. The
bus will be leaving the Park &
Ride on Oak St., Pittston Twp. at
9:15 a.m. and returning between
7:30-8:00 p.m.
Cost is $63 which includes the
play “They’re Playing Our
Song,” dinner and stop in Tan-
nersville.
Payment due by July 1. Call
654-2876 for details.
Boys and girls who are altar
servers in their parishes are invit-
ed to a free special day for all Al-
tar Servers on Friday, June 29,
from10 a.m. – 3 p.m.
It will be held on the grounds
of St. Joseph’s Oblate Seminary,
Laflin, and hosted by the Oblates
of St. Joseph Religious Commu-
nity. Registration begins at 10
a.m.
If you are interested in partici-
pating contact the Oblates Semi-
nary Office at 654-7542 or email
them at: osjseminary@com-
cast.net before June 25. Pastors
and parents are welcome
First Holy Communion Pho-
tos can be ordered by going on
the web to: www.prin-
troom,com/pro/pricephotos;
click on the “St. Joseph Marello
Communion 2012” link enter the
password “Pittston” and fill out
the on-line order form.
St. Joseph Marello Catholic
Kid’s Camp focuses on Catholic
activities and learning: games,
crafts, singing, basic cooking in-
struction and life skills (for older
children only) and other fun ac-
tivities.
The Camp is for all children of
St. Joseph Marello Parish Com-
munity age 6-16.
All activities will be age ap-
propriate, but it will also allow
children to interact with each
other (ex. older children could
help with teaching younger ones
and getting them involved).
Registration forms are availa-
ble at the entrance of the Church-
es.
Registration closes on June
30.
Anyone wishing to donate
fresh flowers in memory of a
loved one may bring them to the
church on Saturday morning.
Anyone interested in renting
the Parish Banquet Hall or Meet-
ing Room should call Christine
Silinskie, hall manager at 704-
8861 for details and/or a tour of
the facility.
CORPUS CHRISTI PARISH
Luzerne Ave., West Pittston
Daily Mass
7:30 a.m. at Immaculate Con-
ception; 8:30 a.m. at Holy Re-
deemer
Weekend Masses
Saturday 4:00 p.m. at Immac-
ulate Conception
5:00 p.m. at Holy Redeemer
Sunday 7:30 a.m. at Immacu-
late Conception
9:00 a.m. at Holy Redeemer
10:30a.m. at Immaculate Con-
ception Confession
3:00-3:30 p.m. at Immaculate
Conception
4:00-4:30 p.m. at Holy Re-
deemer
The Parish Bazaar is Fri, Sat,
Sun, June 29, 30, and July 1 at
Holy Redeemer Church
grounds.
OUR LADY OF THE
EUCHARIST PARISH
535 N Main Street, Pittston
Parish Website
www.eucharist-pittston.org.
Mass Schedule
Saturday Vigil: 4 p.m.
Sunday: 8:30 a.m. and 10:30
a.m.
Daily Mass: 8 a.m.
Confessions: Saturday from
3:30 p.m. to 3:45 p.m. and by ap-
pointment
Our annual Cluster Vacation
Bible School runs this week,
Monday through Friday from 9
a.m. to noon.
Congratulations to new altar
servers: Chase Duffy, Ben Fre-
derick, Abby Lazecki and Ken-
dall Tigue. New servers are al-
ways welcome. Contact Sister
Mary Ann to make arrange-
Bishop Joseph Bambera visits students who volunteered for flood cleanup during a break at Our
Lady of the Eucharist Parish in Pittston.
Faith
Continued from Page 11
See FAITH, Page 13
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Summer Tent Sale!
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ments for rehearsal time.
Thank you tothe youngadults,
adult chaperones and numerous
parishioners from the cluster
parishes who came together with
students and teachers from
Scranton Prep to serve those in
West Pittstonwhoare still suffer-
ing the effects of the flood. A
special thank you goes to Marie
Donnelly who spearheaded this
service project. Thanks also to
Patrick Leonard who assisted
with this project and with the
work of the Pittston Catholic
Youth Group.
Thursday of this week is the
116th anniversary of the Twin
Shafts Disaster where 58 men,
32 of whomwere parishioners of
St. Mary, Help of Christians lost
their lives. The 8:00 a.m. Mass at
Our Lady of the Eucharist will
be offered for the victims of this
disaster.
Yoga Classes are on hiatus un-
til fall.
On Saturday, June 30, at 10:00
a.m. in Saint Peter’s Cathedral,
Scranton, Most ReverendJoseph
C. Bambera, D.D., J.C.L., Bish-
op of Scranton, will ordain the
following men to the Order of
the Priesthood: Rev. Mr. Alex
Roche and Rev. Mr. Jeffrey D.
Tudgay. All of the faithful in the
Diocese of Scranton are invited
and encouraged to participate in
this solemn Mass. Please pray
for these men as they prepare to
receive the Sacrament of Holy
Orders.
Doctor Peg Hogan will speak
on the free exercise of religion
guaranteed by the Bill of Rights
on Tuesday, June 26, at 7 p.m. in
St. John the Evangelist Church
Hall (basement of church). Her
presentation is in conjunction
with the Bishops’ of the United
States fortnight for freedom
which concludes on July 4.
Father Richard Cirba will lead
the congregation in a Holy Hour
to revere and respect Religious
Freedom on Sunday, July 1, at
3:00 p.m. in St. John the Evange-
list Church. The Blessed Sacra-
ment will be exposed for adora-
tion. There will be time for med-
itation on the scriptures, for
praying the rosary, concluding
with Benediction. All are en-
couraged to attend in anticipa-
tion of the celebration of our na-
tion’s anniversary of freedom,
the fourth of July.
On Saturday, September 15,
The Most Reverend Bishop Jo-
seph C. Bambera, D.D., J.C.L.
Bishop of Scranton will lead his
first pilgrimage as Diocesan
Bishop to the Basilica of the Na-
tional Shrine of the Immaculate
Conception, Washington, DC.
The day will include opportuni-
ties for public as well as private
prayer, confession, touring the
National Shrine as well as the
Campus of The Catholic Univer-
sity of America concluding with
Mass. Bus fare: $40.00 per per-
son made payable to Our Lady of
the Eucharist. To assure bus
transportation it is requested by
the bus company to hold strictly
to a deadline of July10 for reser-
vations. To make your reserva-
tion contact the parish office at
654-0263.
On the first Friday of each
month Communion is brought to
those who are unable to partici-
pate in Sunday Mass because of
age or health. The Sacrament of
the Anointing of the Sick is cele-
brated with anyone seriously ill,
anticipating a serious operation,
or quite elderly. Please notify the
parish office of anyone desiring
these Sacraments, as well as any-
one in the hospital or a nursing
home.
PRINCE OF PEACE PARISH
Old Forge
St. Mary’s Church, Lawrence
Street, Saturday Vigil 4 p.m.
Sunday, Mass 8 and 10 a.m.
St. Lawrence Church, Main
Street, Saturday Vigil 5:30 p.m.
Sunday Mass 11:15 a.m.
SACRED HEART OF JESUS
Lackawanna Ave., Dupont
This week’s mass schedule is
Monday through Friday at 7
a.m., Saturday at 7:30 a.m. and 4
p.m. and Sunday at 8:30 a.m. and
10:30 a.m.
The annual parish picnic will
be held on August 2, 3 and 4 on
the parish grounds. Donations of
non-perishable food items and
paper goods are beingsought (no
super-size items). Containers
have been placed in the church
lobby.
You may also leave them on
the back porch of the rectory.
Please label them "Food Buck-
ets". Deadline for donations is
July 8.
Donations are also being
sought for the stands such as
dolls, household items, games
and toys, etc. Be sure that the
items are new. You can also do-
nate a themed basket or items/
monetary donations for a theme
basket. There is no limit to your
design. If you have any ques-
tions, contact Ann Marie Pad-
dock, 654-0897or the rectoryof-
fice, 654-3713. Items may be left
on the rear porch of the rectory.
Kitchen help is needed during
the picnic from 4 p.m. to mid-
night. Please call the rectory,
654-3713 to volunteer.
ST. BARBARA PARISH
28 Memorial Avenue, Exeter
Office Hours: Monday – Fri-
day 9:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.
Evenings, by appointment.
Phone: 654-2103
Remember for the summer
months, no evening Mass on
Monday and Tuesday nights.
Each evening the novenas will
still be recited with the reception
of HolyCommunionimmediate-
ly following Benediction of the
Blessed Sacrament at 6:30 p.m.
on Monday and Tuesday nights.
The Christian Women’s Orga-
nization is sponsoring an Italian
Basket for the Bazaar. Anyone
wishing to donate items for the
basket can drop them off at the
rectory between 9 a.m. and 2
p.m. Monday through Friday.
The last dayfor donations will be
Thursday, July 12.
The Golden Age Club will
meet on Thursday, June 28 at
1:30 p.m. at the Parish Center.
Hostesses are: Theresa Blasav-
age, Etta Chiampi and Netta
Deeb.
Bazaar Meeting: Monday,
Faith
Continued from Page 12
See FAITH, Page 16
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Suppose they opened a state-of-the-art
weight room for the public to use for a
nominal fee and nobody came.
That’s what happened at Pittston Area.
The district came up with a plan to set
aside hours for the public to use the Jim-
my Cefalo Alumni facility.
That required the district to pay some-
one to be there to monitor. It turned out
that the monitor was lonely.
Hardly anyone took advantage of the
weight facility and the board suspended
the public hours.
It was a great idea on paper, though not
in practice.
To the district’s credit, it tried.
And to the district’s credit, it does open
facilities to the public. Charley Trippi sta-
dium is open during the day and lots of
folks use it to walk or jog.
There is a nice three-quarter mile trail
around the perimeter of the Martin Mattei
Campus that is well used too. So are the
tennis courts at the same location.
On the West Side, Wyoming Area’s
Jake Sobeski Stadiumis also open during
the day and evening for walkers and jog-
gers.
It’s nice toknowthese facilities are used
bythe public withveryfewproblems such
as vandalism.
What the
public wants
The Pittston Area school board is set to vote on the 2012/13
school budget at 6 p.m. on Tuesday, June 26. The preliminary
budget has a 2.8% tax increase and was approved 8 to 0.
However, I went to the regular meeting and inquired as to
whether the board asked the teachers union for concessions.
I was told they asked and the union agreed to concessions.
Nowthe questionis will the 2.8%hike be decreased, increasedor
stay the same?
I hope it will be eliminated in its entirety, but I have to temper
my hope with the fact that, at the same meeting, the board voted
9-0 to transfer a board member’s wife to a full-time position. So
much for the anti-nepotism members.
As you know I’ve told the folks, who along with me do not
intendtopayour school taxes this fall, that we have towait for the
budget to be passed.
What can we do now? Go to the meeting and we’ll all see what
happens. You don’t have to sign, speak or anything else. Just
show up and your presence will be deafening!
Remember they are counting on the apathy to continue.
I can’t dothis alone. Usuallyother thanboardmembers, teach-
ers, Act 93 folks and some maintenance people, the public turn-
out is about 10. I’ll knowwho is interested in joining a school tax
boycott bythe turnout. If it’s the same10-12, I’ll have toreconsid-
er and think about surrendering.
Taxpayers, it’s our time to show up, be seen and counted.
If you need information, please call me at 954-0092 anytime.
Frank Sciabacucchi
Pittston Twp.
Asks PA taxpayers to attend school board meetings
OUROPINION
This week marked the 40th anniversary
of the Flood of 1972. The anniversary was
a fairly big deal in Wilkes-Barre and the
lower west side area of the valley as it
should have been.
Here the anniversary passed without
much notice.
Why?
Because here we had a flood to top ’72
less than a year ago.
The Flood of ’72 got enough attention
in West Pittston, Jenkins Township, Du-
ryea and Exeter Township and other af-
fected areas last September when it was
common to hear people say, “The water
was only up to here in ’72.”
A new ‘72
YOUROPINION
After 50 years of caring for animals, I have decided to retire. I
would like to thank all my clients for their confidence and sup-
port through the years. I will greatly miss the conversations and
time spent with caring pet owners. I have been blessed through
the years with a dedicated staff, especially Beth Soska who has
been my friend and assistant for over 40 years. In addition, my
wife Kelly and I would like to thank everyone for their support
and concern during the darkest days of our lives. Their many
kindnesses will never be forgotten.Dr. Jerry McDonald, my as-
sociate of two years, will continue caring for clients at Shoemak-
er Avenue Animal Hospital with the same concern and dedica-
tion.I feel honored to have been born and to have spent most of
my career in Wyoming Valley with so many great people and I
am proud to say that the people I have known were not only cli-
ents but also my friends.
Dr. Robert W. Bishop
After 50 years, Dr. Bishop says farewell
Dr. Robert Bishop hands the keys to the Shoemaker Avenue
Animal Hospital to his associate, Dr. Jerry McDonald.
The church bazaar season starts Friday.
First up the St. Peter’s Lutheran Church
Strawberry Social on Friday in Hughes-
town and the Corpus Christi Festival. The
later is a three-day event on the grounds
of the Holy Redeemer Church on Rt. 92
in Exeter Township.
Here we go
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We all hear voices rotating in our heads.
These are the conversations that we wish we
could have with people in and out of our lives, but
realize actually saying the words may be borderline
litigious.
In my case it certainly would be.
I mean, do I really want an order of protection
filed against me?
That would just be awkward at the next Tupper-
ware party.
However, if I had my druthers and a bigger set of
cohunes…here are some notes I may pen; good,
bad and nasty:
Dear Sara Lee:
Damn you and your frozen cheesecake.
I hate you. I love you. I hate you. I love you.
Fondly,
Maria
Dear Gap:
Who the hell do you think you’re kidding?
I know for real I’m not a size 4 by any other siz-
ing standard in the universe. However, I understand
that if your label says I’m a 4, when we all know
I’mmore an 8, I’ll buy more and more classic, low-
ride, boot-cut, dark-wash jeans.
You are a genius.
Love,
Maria
Dear Every Major and Minor Book Publisher in
the USA:
What do I need to do to get you to notice me? I
realize I’m not Chaucer or Faulkner or even that
damn Danielle Steel, but I’m not that bad. Really.
Some may even be amused by my ramblings.
If I wrote a book called 50 Shades of Off-Black,
containing naughtiness and really poor sentence
structure, would you publish my writing then? Be-
cause if you will, then I will.
Please have your people call my people.
Sincerely yours,
Maria
Dear Sara Blakely: Creator & Owner of Spanx:
You are my best friend.
Adoringly,
Maria
Dear Penn State:
Thank you for the best years of my life. Oh, and
of course the education.
Sorry about the incident on Old Main, 1982. I
cleaned it up as best I could.
Regretfully,
Maria
Dear School Board Members:
I’m going to tell you the same things I’ve been
preaching to my errant children for 20 years; be the
person that your kids will always be proud of. Be
patient. Be kind. Don’t interrupt. Play nice. Take
turns.
Be honest. Have integrity. NEVER BE A BUL-
LY. When I say treat another human being the way
you would like them to treat you, I mean every
word of that. Underline it. Italicize it.
And, don’t pick your nose in public…just pri-
vate.
(Oh, sorry, that tip is just for my own kids).
Your Taxpayer,
M. Heck
Dear Husband:
Aren’t you glad you were in my homeroom in
10th grade?
If one more student moved to town, you would
have been bumped to10-04. And then, who knows
how this all would have panned out?
You’re welcome.
Love and kisses,
Your Wife
Dear Oprah:
Enough already. Have you ever heard the term
“wearing out your welcome?”
Because you have.
Thanks for the memories…now go away.
Even Mr. Rogers knewwhen it was time to hang-
up his cardigan.
Yours truly,
Maria
Dear Denise:
Thank you for being my best friend since 5th
grade. I know you were disarmed by my big-city
glamour and sophisticated raincoat when you first
spotted me on the playground getting passed over
for kickball – again.
I’m glad you were able to penetrate my magic
bubble of urbaneness and invite me to your house
for a mayonnaise sandwich.
You’ve been my buddy for almost 40 years and I
don’t know many people who could’ve stuck
around to hold my hand through more crises than
those facing Wylie Coyote.
Frompneumonia to breast cancer to weight gain
(real or imagined) and helping me navigate the in-
tricacies of the ever-elusive GPS system, I thank
you for being the Ethel to my Lucy.
Love,
Maria
Dear ABB & The WP Library:
Eddie Ackerman tells us to find something we
love…really, really love. Then, find someone to
pay us for doing it. I have and you have and I will be
MOTHER’S DAZE
Maria Jiunta Heck
Write on
Dear Maria, thank you for writing your column
which appears in this space every week. Your read-
ers.
See MARIA HECK, Page 32
It’s strawberry time!
Not only are strawberries refreshing and delicious, but they’re
good for us.
They are high in vitamin C; in fact, ounce for ounce, they have
more vitamin C than citrus fruit.
A serving size of 1 cup has only 50 calories.
When shopping for strawberries, look for bright red berries with
fresh green caps still on.
When you remove the caps you tear cells in the berries, activating
ascorbic acid oxidase, an enzyme that destroys Vitamin C. Remove
the caps closest to serving time.
Visually check each package, making sure there are no signs of
mold growth.
If one berry is molded, mold spores will have traveled throughout
the entire package.
Use strawberries as soon after harvesting or purchasing as pos-
sible.
Refrigerator storage does not improve the quality of fresh straw-
berries.
Berries should not be left at roomtemperature for more than a few
hours.
Warm temperatures cause a browning effect in strawberries.
The pigments that make strawberries red, anthocyanin, are heat
sensitive.
They break apart and turn brown when exposed to heat. Straw-
berries also lose heat-sensitive Vitamin C during browning, heating
and cooking.
Store unwashed berries loosely covered with plastic wrap in the
coldest part of your refrigerator for two to three days at most.
Do not wash berries until ready to use.
To wash, place berries in a colander and rinse under cold running
water.
Do not allow berries to set in water as they will lose color and
flavor.
After washing, remove the green cap with a plastic-tipped vegeta-
ble peeler or paring knife without removing any of the fruit.
Here’s a refreshing Strawberry Salsa recipe you can try with chick-
en or fish.
Strawberry Salsa
1 cup coarsely chopped strawberries
1 tablespoon orange juice
1 teaspoon grated orange peel
1 green onion, finely chopped, top included
1 teaspoon Dijon-style mustard
2 tablespoons dried currants or raisins
2 tablespoons red wine vinegar
Mix all ingredients in a bowl.
Chill; serve with grilled chicken or fish.
Makes 11/2 cups.
NUTRITION
CORNER
Mary Ehret, MS, RD, LDN
Penn State Cooperative Extension
Enjoy those
nutritious strawberries
Mary R. Ehret, M.S., R.D., L.D.N., is with Penn State Cooperative
Extension, Luzerne County, 16 Luzerne Ave., West Pittston, Pa., 18643.
(570) 825-1701/602-0600. Fax (570) 825-1709. mre2@psu.edu.
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June 25 at 7 p.m. in the Parish
Center.
Class on Catholicism: St.
Monica’s &St. Barbara’s Parish-
es will be working on this togeth-
er and anyone who is seeking a
deeper understanding of the Ca-
tholic Faith is most welcome to
attend. The series begins on
Tuesday, June 26 and continues
eachTuesdayuntil August 28. At
St. Monica’s - 10:30 a.m. (Recto-
ry), at St. Barbara’s –7p.m. (Par-
ish Center). For more informa-
tion contact St. Monica’s 693-
1991 or St. Barbara’s 654-2103.
Bazaar News
Summer Picnic is July 20, 21
and 22
Volunteers Needed: Volun-
teers are needed for set-up and
clean-up, kitchen, grill, food ser-
vice, and grounds. Please con-
sider giving a few hours of help.
It is a good time for families to
volunteer together. It is also an
opportunity for high school stu-
dents to get community service
hours. See form below.
Flea Market: Items can be
dropped off at the parish center
Friday Thru Tuesday after noon.
Drop-off is at the side door by
Pride.
Please do not leave anything in
front of the door. Items NOT ac-
cepted are clothes, shoes, text-
books, encyclopedias, or elec-
tronics that do not work.
Basket Raffle/Chinese Auc-
tion: If you have any questions or
ideas please contact Karen Ber-
nardi 655-6329 or Cynthia Lib-
erski 693-2349.
Band Sponsors: Any one in-
terested in sponsoring a band for
one night? If so, call Ray @655-
6329.
Entertainment Raffle: Items
are needed for this raffle. Dona-
tions could include new and
boxed: :iPod, notepad, Kindle or
Nook. Anything pertaining to
electronics or entertainment will
do. Call Barbara @654-0645 for
details.
ST. JOHN THE
EVANGELIST PARISH
COMMUNITY
35 William Street
Phone: 654-0053
Pittston
Vacation Bible School will be-
gin on Monday June 25 and con-
tinue to June 29.
The parish office will be
closed on Wednesday, July 4.
The next Baptismal Instruc-
tion will begin 7:30 to 8:30 p.m.
August 7 in the parish center.
Bereavement Support Group
will be every Tuesday evening in
the parish center dining room
from7 to 8:30 p.m. until June 26.
June 24 – 6:30 p.m. Knitting
Ministry For more information
call the parish office at 654-
0053.
The annual parish bazaar will
be held on August 9 to 11.
The Greater Pittston Food
Pantry is sponsored by the Care
and Concern Committee of St.
John the Evangelist Parish.
Anyone in need of food is
asked to call 654-9923. Distribu-
tion of food is by appointment
only.
The Free Health Clinic is open
at 5:30 p.m. every Wednesday in
Faith
Continued from Page 13
St. Monica's Senior Acolytes Brandon and Ryan Tomsak, twin sons of Cheryl and Frank Tomsak,
graduated fromWyoming Area High School. The boys have served in their parish church, formerly
St. Joseph's and now St. Monica's Parish, since second grade. Fromleft, Deacon Bill Jenkins, Ryan
Tomsak, Brandon Tomsak and Father Leo McKernan.
See FAITH, Page 17
Call 570-674-4500
Attorney
John J. Terrana
400 Tird Avenue, Kingston
283.2990
My Father Wasn’t ALawyer
I didn’t come from a family of lawyers
or doctors. I came from a family of
hard workers, as anyone who knew my
parents can attest.
My parents met in the Wilkes-Barre
dress factory where they both worked.
My father was a dress cutter, and
my mother was a seamstress. Their
hard work allowed me to be the first
member of my very large family to earn
a college degree.
I learned my work ethic watching my
parents work hard to raise their four
children. They both worked at manual
labor jobs well into their seventies.
Retirement was never an option.
I’ll work just as hard for you.
My parents gave me the tools I
needed to work hard, study hard, and
open my own law practice that I started
on the day I graduated from law school.
I’ve been representing seriously
injured clients for 30 years. Call me
today for a free consultation.
You’ll not only be a client, you’ll be
a friend.
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the former Seton Catholic High
School, first come first serve.
Greater Pittston Kids Closet
celebrating its third anniversary
provides new and gently used
clothing.
Hours are Wednesday from 9
to 11:30 a.m. and 5 to 7 p.m.
The Closet always ccepts do-
nations of new and gently used
clothing.
ST JOHN’S LUTHERAN
7 Wood St., Pittston
Pastor John Castellani
Organist Marcia Colleran
Lay Reader Michelle Cherney
Acolyte Justin Lazarowicz
Greeter Joe Mersincavage Sr.
Ushers Frank Caapobianco,
Alan Drummond
Vacation Bible School will be
on August 6 to 10. This year
theme is Sky... where every thing
is possible with GOD.
Volunteers are needed. Please
leave a message for Marcia Col-
leran.
GLS is a year round fund rais-
er. Leave a message for Tracy if
you have any questions or want
to get involved.
Acolyte for June 24 Justin La-
zanowicz
The second annual pig roast
will be held on Sept. 22 from2 to
6 p.m. There will be a bake sale
and basket raffle again this year
Acolyte Schedule for Julyis: 1,
Katie Colleran, 8, Sarah Ciesla,
15, Emily Goyne, 22, Brett Roo-
ney, 29, Brooke Cherney.
Altar Guild for next month is
Marcia Colleran, Nancy Castel-
lani and the alternate is Michelle
Cherney
There is a VBS Meeting at
5:30 p.m. on Monday, July 25.
There is a council meeting at
6:30 p.m. on Monday, July 9.
Members and guests are wel-
come to worship and perhaps to
join this church family.
If you have any questions,
comments or suggestions please
call 655-2505; e-mail address
isstjohnspittston@verizon.com
ST. JOHN’S P.M. CHURCH
316 Main St., Avoca
Pastor Rich Rock
570-457-8281
Sunday Worship 10:00 a.m.
Holy Communion the first
Sunday of every month
Bible Study every Wednesday
6:00-7:30 p.m.
ST. MARIA GORETTI
Laflin Road, Laflin, PA. 18702
42redwood@comcast.net
www.stmariagoretti-laflin.org
The traditional Novena to St.
Maria Goretti will begin on
Wednesday, June 27, with Nove-
na prayers being offered after
each Mass.
The Feast Day of St. Maria
Goretti is Friday, July 6. Mass
will be celebrated at 5:30 p.m.
All eleven-year old boys and
girls are invited to meet in the
Parish Center at 5 p.m. on that
day.
Immediately before the cere-
mony, one boy and one girl will
be selected by lottery to crown
St. Maria. All of these children
will participate in the offertory
procession, bringing forward,
not only the gifts for the Mass,
but, live roses signifying the
prayers and petitions of all par-
ishioners and participants plead-
ing for the intercession of St.
Maria Goretti.
Following Holy Communion,
the childrenwill bestowa special
blessing on all who attend the
ceremony.
The children will bless the
congregation through the inter-
cession of another eleven-year
old, St. Maria Goretti.
The parishfestival is July27-
29.
The “Fill-A-Buckets” are still
available in the foyer of the
Churchthis weekend. These bas-
kets are only for use at the “Fill-
A-Bucket” Stand.
The assembled buckets are to
be returned no later than July 21.
Also, there will be inside air-
conditioned Parish Center: Bin-
go, Bake Sale and(newthis year)
West Wind Jewelry Sale.Great
kids’ section with pony rides,
Water Wars and face painting.
Special features this year:
Friday, July 27: Performers
from the David Blight School of
Dance
Saturday, July 28: Performers
from Lynnette’s Twirlerettes,
Pittston Division
There will be a special draw-
ing for three children’s bicycles.
Vacation Bible School
This year’s Vacation Bible
School will be held Monday, Ju-
ly 9 through Friday, July 13.
The theme this year is “TEAM
GOD”. Games and projects will
be based on the Olympics. All
children ages 4-12 are welcome
whether parishioners or non-par-
ishioners.
The camp begins at 9:30 a.m.
and concludes at 12:30 p.m.
A registration form is availa-
ble at the Parish Office or in the
foyer of the Church. The form,
along with a registration fee of
$10 per child, must be completed
and returned to the Parish Office
by June 30.
ST. MARY’S POLISH
NATIONAL CATHOLIC
CHURCH
200 Stephenson St. Duryea
Rev. Fr. Carmen G. Bolock,
Pastor Phone: 457-2291
Email: padre@saintma-
ryspncc.org
Website: saintmaryspncc.org
Holy Mass: Sunday 9:30 a.m.
Weekdays: 8 a.m.
Holy Days: 8 a.m. & 7 p.m.
ST. MONICA’S CHURCH
363 West 8th Street, West
Wyoming, PA 18644
Office Hours - 9:00 a.m. to
4:30 p.m., Mon. – Fri.
Phone: 570-693-1991
Email: olos363@verizon.net
www.stmonicanepa.com.
Father Leo McKernan, Pastor
Mr. William Jenkins, Deacon
Mass Schedule
Saturday Vigil: 4:00 p.m.
OLOS
Sunday: 8:30 a.m. STJ; 11:00
a.m. OLOS
Daily Mass at OLOS – During
Summer Months. Mon-Tues-
Wed.-Fri: 7:00 a.m. (Please note:
no Thurs. p.m. Mass)
No Bible Study During Sum-
mer
First Friday Mass – 7:00 p.m.
followed by Eucharistic Adora-
tion until Midnight.
No Bible Study During Sum-
mer-
First Friday Mass – 7:00 p.m.
followed by Eucharistic Adora-
tion until Midnight. July 6 is the
next Adoration for First Friday.
All are welcome.
Parish Office: 570-693-1991
June Schedule:
June 21to July 4, Fortnight for
Freedom, a 14-day period of
prayer, education and action in
support of religious freedom.
Our Bishop has requested this
voluntary period of prayer.
Newseries: Catholicism– Be-
ginning on Tuesday, June 26 and
continuing for ten weeks con-
cluding on August 28.
St. Monica’s Parish and St.
Barbara’s Parish will host a se-
ries of ten presentations on Ca-
tholicism.
St. Monica’s will be at 10:30
a.m. and St. Barbara’s will be at
7:00 p.m. This series covers top-
ics such as, The Mystery of God,
Mary, the Mother of God, The
Mystery of Christ’s Sacrifice-
…to mention a few. For more in-
formation call St. M’s at 693-
1991 or St. B’s at 654-2103. Or
you can email: olos363@veri-
zon.net or stanthonyexe-
ter@comcast.net.
16th Diocese of Scranton Pil-
grimage: ledbyThe Most Rever-
end Joseph C. Bambera, Bishop
of Scranton to the Basilica of the
Immaculate Conception in
Washington, D.C. on Saturday,
September 15, 2012.
Bus Fare is $40.00 per person.
Reservations close on July 16.
New Altar Servers: Any one
(from3rd grade thru high school
– (boys and girls) interested in
serving Christ and His Church in
this role, please call the Parish
Office at 693-1991.
A new class is now forming.
Lectors: the Parish is always in
need of new Lectors (Readers of
the Sacred Word.) If you are in-
terested in this form of service,
please call Father McKernan at
693-1991.
If you feel you are called to
serve as Acolyte, Lector or Eu-
charistic Minister, please call Fa-
ther McKernan to discuss this
Parish Ministry.
Music Ministry – as our choirs
and orchestra grow, they are in
need of music stands. If you have
one you no longer use, please
consider donating it to the music
ministry. You can contact the
Parish Office at 693-1991. Ar-
rangement can be made for pick-
up if needed.
ST. PETER’S EVANGELICAL
LUTHERAN CHURCH
100 Rock Street, Hughestown
Stpeters_elc@yahoo.com
654-1009
Summer Schedule
Worship Service Sunday 9
a.m.
Strawberry Social will be held
June 30 from 4 to 7 p.m. Take
outs will be at 3:30 p.m.
Tickets are $5 for adults and
$3 for children under 10.
Tickets include shortcake and
beverage.
Also available will be wim-
pies, hot dogs with hot dog sauce
or sauerkraut anda varietyof sal-
ads.
For tickets call Pam at 655-
0043 or 313-2829 or Lois at 654-
4948.
Vacation Bible School is July
15-19, from 6 to 8:30 p.m. Clos-
ing exercise is July 20 at 7 p.m.
All are welcome ages 3 years
up to and including 6th grade.
Call Leslie at 762-1737 to reg-
ister.
QUEEN OF THE APOSTLES
PARISH
715 Hawthorne St.
(570) 457-3412
stmarysavoca@verizon.net
www.stmaryavoca.4lpi.com
Daily Masses: 8 a.m.
(Wednesday at 7 p.m.)
Eucharistic Adoration: Tues-
days from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m.
Miraculous Medal Novena:
Wednesday following the 7 p.m.
Mass
Weekends Masses: Saturday
at 4 p.m.; Sunday at 8, 9:30 and
11 a.m.
Confession: Saturdays 3-3:45
p.m.; anytime upon request by
calling 457-3412.
The parish’s youth group will
meet today, Sunday, June 24.
Call Lori Ostrowski at 457-8840
for meeting times and locations.
The building and grounds
committee will meet at 6:30 p.m.
onMonday, June 25inSt. Mary’s
School, 742 Spring St.
The worship committee will
Faith
Continued from Page 16
See FAITH, Page 18
THE MUSIC BOX
DINNER PLAYHOUSE
196 HUGHES ST, SWOYERSVILLE, PA
Call: 283-2195 or 800-698-PLAY
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2012 SUMMER THEATRE WORKSHOP AGES 7 TO 12
SESSIONS BEGIN JULY 23
PERFORMANCES OF DISNEY’S 101 DALMATIONS
AUGUST 24, 25, 26
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meet at 7 p.m. on Monday, June
25 in the rectory, 715 Hawthorne
St.
The social concerns commit-
tee will meet at 8 p.m. on Mon-
day, June 25 in the rectory.
The finance council will meet
at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, June 26 in
the rectory.
The festival committee will
meet at 6:30 p.m. on Wednesday,
June 27 in St. Mary’s School.
Anyone interested in volunteer-
ing at the picnic is invited to at-
tend.
The parish will participate in
the “Fortnight for Freedom”
June 21-July 4. This national 14-
day period of prayer, education
and action is being organized by
the United States Conference of
Catholic Bishops in response to
the Department of Health and
Human Services’ (HHS) man-
date to force employers – includ-
ing religious charities – to pro-
vide contraceptives and abor-
tion-inducing drugs in their
health plans, for free.
The parish will pray the nove-
na prayer to St. Thomas More
and a Prayer for Religious Free-
domfollowing the daily Masses.
Individuals who are unable to at-
tend daily Mass but who would
like to participate may get the
prayers in the church, by calling
the rectory office at 457-3412, or
by visiting the parish’s Facebook
page: Queen of the Apostles Par-
ish, Avoca, PA.
The parish will have festival
set-up nights at 6 p.m. on Mon-
day, July 9 and Tuesday, July 10
on the festival grounds, corner of
Hawthorne and Spring Streets.
The annual parish festival will
take place on July 19-21. The
parishioners are currently seek-
ing clean coffee cans with lids
and theme basket donations.
Cans and theme basket dona-
tions may be left on the back
porch of the rectory, 715 Haw-
thorne St. For more information
about the theme baskets, contact
Elizabeth Dessoye at 815-7635
or edessoye@gmail.com. Any-
one interested in volunteering at
the festival may contact at Tara
Iovacchini at 954-2456.
The parish will sponsor two-
week math tutoring sessions at
St. Mary’s School, 742 Spring
St. The sessions, which will be
taught by Coleen Reza, PAcerti-
fied elementary education and
mid-level mathematics teacher,
include touch math, introduction
to pre-algebra and introduction
to algebra. For more information
or to register, contact Reza at
498-9811 or coleenvols@hot-
mail.com.
SECOND PRESBYTERIAN
143 Parsonage St., Pittston
654-1411
June 24 – 10 a.m. Worship
June 26 – 7 p.m. AA meeting
TRINITY EPISCOPAL
CHURCH
Spring Street and Montgom-
ery Avenue, West Pittston
Parish Mission:
“To live and build holy com-
munity.”
All welcome: Worldwide An-
glican Communion:
“We believe in one holy, Ca-
tholic apostolic church.” Web of
information and links at
www.trinityepiscopalchurch-
westpittston.org and www.dio-
beth.org.
Sunday Holy Eucharist: 11
a.m. every Sunday.
Food Pantry: June items need-
ed are kids’ instant drink mixes,
pasta and sauces and cereals.
Gerrity’s gift cards, cash dona-
tions and other non-perishable
foods also accepted.
The daily prayer is for those
with needs requesting prayerful
support.
Start Prayer network at parish
office 654-3261.
Youth Program: 10:45 a.m. ev-
ery Sunday.
Faith Forum for Adults:
Enrichment for adults seeking
spiritual renewal and opportuni-
ties for ministry and voluntee-
rism.
Parish Life Events Team:
Bi-monthly first Sundays.
Parish Council: Every second
Sunday.
Women of Trinity: Every third
Sunday. WOT Ministry Invita-
tion. The Women of Trinity have
undertaken a ministry to help
support Good Shepherd Episco-
pal Church of Scranton in their
outreach to the homeless of the
region.
Each month after enjoying a
home cooked meal at Good
Shepherd all who have needs
may “shop” for necessities like
clothing, shoes, toiletries in a
store-like setting in the church’s
refurbished basement of donated
items.
The Women of Trinity have
supported this ministry by deliv-
ering donations of clothing, new
undergarments and socks and
toiletries to the Scranton church.
WOTcollects trial size andho-
tel toiletries and invites the par-
ish community to join with them
in helping the less fortunate.
Donations of trial size and
sample size toiletries are wel-
come.
All dayrental of the newlyren-
ovated banquet room and kitch-
en is $100. Call 654-3261. The
next semester starts September
18 for Music Together Classes
for infants and children through
age five accompanied by a par-
ent or caregiver.
Visit www.musictogether.com
for details or call 654-3261.
Giant neighborhoodyardsales
will be run from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m.
every first Saturday through Oc-
tober.
Dozens of vendors, chili dogs
with homemade sauce, wimpies,
bake sale.
Vendor spots available, $10,
reservations required. Call 654-
3261.
UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH
Corner of Broad & Church
Sts.
Pittston
Rev. Dr. Michael Turner
Sunday Worship Service 9:30
a.m.
Children’s Sunday School:
9:30 a.m.
Holy Communion: 1st Sunday
each month
Choir Rehearsal: Thursday’s
at 7 p.m. unless told otherwise
United Methodist Women:
2nd Monday
Website www.umcpittston.org
Phone 655-4340
Faith
Continued from Page 17
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Brought to you as a paid public service by
the Law Offices of Dominick P. Pannunzio,
294 Main Street, Dupont, 655-5541
By
Dominick P.
Pannunzio, Esq.
A federal appeals court has ruled that most bone
marrow donors can be paid, overturning the
government’s interpretation of a decades-old law
making such compensation a crime punishable by up
to fve years inprison. Inits ruling, the 9thU.S. Circuit
Court of Appeals said a technological breakthrough
makes donating bone marrow a process nearly
identical to giving blood plasma. It’s legal – and
common – to pay plasma donors. Therefore, the
court ruled, bone marrow donors undergoing the
new procedure can be paid as well and are exempt
from a law making it a felony to sell human organs
for transplants.
***
North Carolina’s new law requires pharmacies to
use an electronic system that tracks purchases of
products containing the ingredient pseudoephedrine,
the main ingredient used to make the drug
methamphetamine.
***
The U.S. Supreme Court has declined to hear appeals
of three cases involving students’ free-speech rights
on the Internet. Two cases involved Pennsylvania
students who had posted mockeries of their school
principals on the Internet, while another case
involved a West Virginia student who had ridiculed
a peer online. In the Pennsylvania cases, lower
courts ruled the Internet speech did not constitute
substantial disruptions at school. However, in the
West Virginia case, lower courts supported the school
district’s decision to discipline the student.
***
The Utah Supreme Court has cleared the way for
wrongful death lawsuits fled on behalf of a fetus
after ruiling that an unborn child qualifes as a
“minor child” in a state statute.
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Question 1
In 1960,
“Death Valley
Days” was a
popular televi-
sion series fea-
turing stories of the
old West. Accord-
ing to local historian Charles
McCarthy, what connection
did Pittston have with the long-
running series?
1960 – 52 Years Ago
Observing the deterioration
of the Wyoming Borough Me-
morial honoring those who
served in the U.S. armed forces,
The Queen Esther American
Legion Post Committee, headed
by Paul Warnagiris, set about
organizing a drive to replace the
wood and glass monument.
Aiding chairman Warnagiris
were Legionnaires Nicholas
Pappas, Eugene Lukesh,
Charles Mazzarella, Robert
Warnagiris, Richard Parsons,
Joseph Hiznay and Leonard
Zavada.
The monument, which was
erected 18 years earlier, was
showing signs of wear from the
elements. The post pledged
$100 to begin the drive.
A new Duryea Borough Post
office was set to be built on
The Veterans of Foreign Wars
Post 1227 grounds on Stephen-
son Street. The post was com-
mended by local officials for
donating the grounds for the
betterment of the community.
The facility was designed and
engineered by John Reilly of
Pittston. Duryea “tradesmen”
Fred Miller, Barney Ostrosky
and Pat McNulty were sched-
uled to start work on the pro-
ject, which was expected to cost
$42,800 and be completed in
the fall of the year.
“The Bridges at Toko-Ri”
starring William Holden and
Grace Kelly was screened at the
Comerford Drive-In. For the
summer, the American Theatre
sponsored a Kiddies Club Party
hosted by local radio person-
ality Jim Ward, featured TOPS
baseball Cards, chances to win
puppies and gifts from
Kresge’s.
1970 – 42 Years Ago
After 42 years as director of
music at Duryea, Northeast and
Pittston Area High Schools,
Charles “Masters’ Mustinski
retired. Among his many
achievements, he organized
fourteen major dance bands,
sponsored over 110 young musi-
cians into the professional
ranks, organized the “Duryea
Teenage Orchestra” and partici-
pated in every commencement
but one at Duryea, Northeast
and Pittston Area High School.
Mustinski began teaching in
1926, and in 1957, realized his
dream of receiving a degree in
music, which he attained at
Wilkes College.
Upon the 192nd anniversary
of the massacre the of Benja-
min and Stuckley Harding
families, a group of citizens
from the Harding section of
Exeter Township planned a
ceremony at the plaque which
commemorated the event. Indi-
ans overtook the settlers as they
worked their fields in 1778. The
plaque, which the group main-
tained had been neglected is
located “on the highway right
above the Harding Hose
House.”
The inscription reads “On
June 30, 1778 in or near the
ravine leading to the river not
far from this spot, Benjamin
and Stuckley Harding were
killed by Indians. Being among
the first that lost their lives in
the days immediately preceding
the massacre of July 3. Erected
by Dial Rock Chapter, Daugh-
ters of the American Revolu-
tion, June 30, 1912. This site
donated by Mr. P.F. Joyce.”
Due to his specialization in
internal medicine, Major Ge-
orge M. Breza, M.D., of Pitt-
ston, was asked by the U.S.
Army Surgeon General to travel
to Vietnam to tour field and
army base hospitals. A graduate
of Pittston Area, the doctor
attended to President Dwight D.
Eisenhower when he was a
patient at Walter Reed Army
Hospital in Washington D.C.
Top 10 songs of 1970
“Mama Told Me Not to
Come” – Three Dog Night
“Mystery of Love” – Leer
Brothers Band
“Long and Winding Road” –
Beatles
“The Love You Save” – Jack-
sons
“The Wonder of You” – Elvis
Presley
“Ride Captain Ride” – Blues
Image
“Get Ready” – Rare Earth
“My Baby Loves Lovin’” –
White Plains
“Daughter of Darkness” –
Tom Jones
“Make Me Smile” – Chicago
In 1970, President Richard
Nixon passed the Voting Rights
Act, which called for the voting
age to be lowered to 18. The
Sunday Dispatch Inquiring
Photographer asked Pittston
residents, “How do you feel
about 18-year-olds voting?”
Fred DeSanto answered, “If
people under 21 have to be
ruled by politicians, they should
have a say.”
Matt LoPresto added, “If a
kid is old enough to fight for
his government’s policies, he is
old enough to help determine
them.
1980 – 32 Years Ago
Pittston native John Christie
took an academic leave from
his duties as an assistant profes-
sor at Indiana State University
to begin writing a book on the
proposed restoration of the
ocean liner S.S. United States.
The first liner completely built
in the U.S., the United States
entered service in 1952 and was
one of the fastest ships in the
world. It transported vacation-
ers until the late 60s when Pres-
ident Nixon withdrew govern-
ment subsidies. Christie
planned his book chronicling
the $30 million renovations and
repairs necessary to make her
seaworthy again. However,
according to the Internet, fi-
nancing endeavors fell through
and, in 1984, some of the ship’s
parts were sold to museums and
collectors. As of February 2012,
new interest in preserving the
ship has been rekindled by a
group of investors.
The 34th annual John A.
Allan Golf Tournament was
set to be played at Fox Hill
Country Club, making it one of
the oldest tournaments in the
area. The 1979 winners, Bill
Musto Jr. and Mark Jarolen,
were prepared to defend their
title against contenders Ed
Hennigan and his partner Dave
Monka, Carlyle Robinson and
Jim Cicon, Rollie Schmidt
and Tom Gauntlett, Len and
Joe Coleman and Leo Feld-
man and Don Koval. Fox Hill
Country Club officially opened
in April 1921. Local business-
man, John A. Allan, served as
president from1935-1937.
The 28th annual UNICO
East-West Football classic was
set for Wilkes-Barre Memorial
Stadium. Wyoming Warriors
Gene Chikowski, Ed Wrubel,
Greg Hall, Van Tocket, Bill
Prebola, Sam Turone, Tim
Yurek and Joe Tedesco played
for the West and Pittston Area’s
Nick Dardes, Sam Bellanca
and Gerry Musto performed
for the East.
1990 – 22 Years Ago
John Luvender, of Avoca,
was named a finalist in the
Hometown USA Video Festival
contest. In its 13th year, the
National Federation of Local
Cable Programmers recognized
outstanding programs produced
by or for local stations. Luven-
der’s documentary, “A Matter
of Conscience,” about Vietnam
veteran and artist Bill Short,
featured an original soundtrack,
visual images with examples of
Short’s work and was shown on
local cable stations in the Bos-
ton area.
Question 2
Franceen Pisano, of Wyom-
ing, and Kimberly Prebola, of
Harding, were best friends as
well as seniors at Wyoming
Area High School. They shared
Duryea Post Office built 52 years ago
Peeking
into the past
With Judy Minsavage
See PEEKING, Page 20
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Unique Cake Creations
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That will excite all your senses!
Let the
CAKE FAIRY
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for you!
Plus...
Candy Platters,
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wide variety of
Gourmet Apples
also available
Call Samantha at 655-3238
William St. • Rt. 11, Pittston
Duchessoutlet.com • 654-3851
DUCHESS OUTLET
Madame Alexander Dolls
Thousands of
Men’s/Ladies’ Raincoats
Don’t just watch a movie, experience it!
All Stadium Seating and Dolby Surround Sound
ALL FEATURES NOW PRESENTED IN DIGITAL FORMAT
825.4444 • rctheatres.com
• 3 Hrs. Free Parking At Participating Park & Locks with Theatre Validation
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(Parenthesis Denotes Bargain Matinees)
All Showtimes Include Pre-Feature Content
Avoid the lines: Advance tickets available from Fandango.com
Rating Policy Parents and/or Guardians (Age 21 and older) must
accompany all children under 17 to an R Rated feature
*No passes accepted to these features.
**No restricted discount tickets or passes accepted to these features.
***3D features are the regular admission price plus a surcharge of $2.50
D-Box Motion Seats are the admission price plus an $8.00 surcharge
First Matinee $5.25 for all features (plus surcharge for 3D features).
FREE FAMILY FILM FESTIVAL JUNE 26TH & 27TH
AT 10:00AM WITH:
Puss in Boots - G - 90 min
Please visit RCTHEATRES.COM for a complete
list of dates and movies
**Brave - PG - 105 min.
(1:15), (1:45), (3:30), (4:00), 7:20, 9:35
***Brave in RealD 3D - PG
(2:10), (4:30), 7:45, 10:00
**Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter
- R - 115 min.
(1:30), (4:00), 7:10, 9:40
***Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter
in RealD 3D - R - 115 min.
(2:00), (5:00), 7:50, 10:15
**Seeking a Friend for the End of
the World - R - 110 min.
(1:45), (4:05), 7:45, 10:05
Rock of Ages - PG13 - 135 min.
(1:10), (1:50), (4:00), (4:45), 7:00, 7:30,
9:45, 10:15
**That’s My Boy - R - 125 min.
(1:20), (2:00), (4:15), (4:45), 7:20, 7:50,
9:55, 10:20
Prometheus - R - 130 min.
(1:35), (4:15), 7:10, 9:45
***Madagascar 3 in RealD 3D -
PG - 100 min.
(1:30), (3:50), 7:15, 9:30
Madagascar 3 - PG - 100 min.
(1:00), (3:10), (5:20), 7:30, 9:50
Snow White and the Huntsman
in DBox - PG13 - 125 min.
(1:10), (4:05), 7:05, 9:45
Snow White and the Huntsman -
PG13 - 125 min.
(1:10), (4:05), 7:05, 9:45
Men In Black III - PG13 - 110 min.
7:15, 9:50
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SABATELLE’S
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114-116 S. MAIN ST., PITTSTON • 654-4616 - 654-4617
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$
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$
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Great Food!! Hall Seats 80
many experiences during their
high school years as cheerlead-
ers, members of the National
Honor Society, Drama Club
and SADD. However they also
shared something else in 1990,
what was it?
Answer 1
According to local historian
Charles McCarthy, the pop-
ular television series, “Death
Valley Days,” that aired from
1952 to 1975 was sponsored by
The Pacific Coast Borax Com-
pany. Before television, the
company originally advertised
its 20-mule team Borax product
by using a mule team driven by
muleskinners traveling from
New York City to Death Valley
California in 1919. Pittston was
one of its stops in August of
that year.
Answer 2
In 1990, Franceen Pisano, of
Wyoming, and Kimberly Preb-
ola, of Harding, filled out ap-
plications for the Miss Penn-
sylvania National Teenager
Contest to be held in Harris-
burg. Both girls took top hon-
ors. Franceen was chosen Miss
Pennsylvania National Teenager
and would go on to compete in
Florida for Miss National Teen-
ager title. Kimberly took the
Miss Pennsylvania National
Talent honor at the pageant. As
best friends, both girls were
happy with each other’s success
and accomplishments. Cele-
brating its 42nd anniversary
this year, the pageant, founded
in 1970, has awarded more than
$102 million scholarships since
its creation.
But friendship is precious,
not only in the shade, but in the
sunshine of life and, thanks to a
benevolent arrangement, the
greater part of life is sunshine.
Thomas Jefferson
Peeking
Continued fromPage 19
3.89 for the spring semester.
While at Misericordia Universi-
ty, she was a member of the Edu-
cation Club, English Club and
Campers Ministry and Orienta-
tion Leader.
She is a member of the Sigma
Tau Delta International English
Honor Society.
Galen Marie Mayorowski,
Old Forge, graduated on June 1
from Holy Cross High School.
While at Holy Cross, she was a
four-year member of the tennis
team, serving as captain of the
team in her senior year, a mem-
ber of the Ceramics and Pro-life
Clubs.
She plans toattendKing’s Col-
lege in the fall and major in biol-
ogy pre-veterinarian.
Aubre and Galen are the
daughters of Attorney Gale and
Vanessa Mayorowski, Old
Forge and granddaughters of
Mary Kay and John Vitale, Pitt-
ston; the late Nicholas Pannun-
zio, Pittston; and the late Frank
and Mildred Mayorowski,
Blakely.
They have a sister, Olivia Ann,
16 years old.
Costello receives degree
Megan Costello, of Pittston,
was presented a Juris Doctor De-
gree from the University of New
Hampshire School of Law in a
May ceremony.
While at UNH School of Law,
Costello’s article, “Look Before
You Leap: A Developer’s Guide
to Copyright Infringement and
Stopping Secondary Liability
Before It Starts,” was published
in the World Jurist Association’s
Law and Technology Journal.
A 2005 graduate of Pittston
Area High School, Costello
earned her Bachelor of Science
degree in Information Sciences
and Technology magna cum
laude in 2008 from Penn State
University.
She is the daughter of Dr. Jo-
seph and Mary Costello, of Pitt-
ston, and the sister of Kayla Cos-
tello.
Her grandparents are Paul and
Joan (Russavage) Dolman, of
Avoca; and the late Joseph and
Ruth (Cebula) Costello, of Du-
pont.
Happy birthday
Happy birthday wishes go to
Bryan Rush, of Plymouth, who
will celebrate his special day on
June 25.
Receives Juris Doctor
degree
Megan Kwak, of Wyoming
recently, received a Juris Doctor
degree from Widener Law on
May 19. during commencement
exercises.
College graduates
Congratulations to Christine
Ryzner and Samantha Smith
Ryzner, both of Duryea, who
graduated from Fortis Institute
on June 15.
Births Announced
A girl was born to Misty and
Scott Baker of Pittston on June 1
A girl was born to Nancy and
Eugene Canfield of Duryea on
June 10
A girl was born to Julie Saun-
ders andDavidLuloof West Pitt-
ston on June 10
Local chatter
Continued fromPage 8
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Tis Week’s Dining Guide Feature:
MAY
DINING GUIDE
WINNER
MRS. CAROLE GRAFF
of Duryea
To Advertise In Te Dining Guide Call:
Steve Morris • 829-7290
ENTER TOWIN
THIS MONTH’S
GIFT CERTIFICATE:
Fill out and deliver
or mail entry to:
Te Sunday Dispatch
Dining Guide
109 New Street
Pittston, PA 18640
Name:____________________
Address:___________________
__________________________
City:______________________
State:______________________
Zip:_______________________
Phone:____________________
• BOBBY O’S
FAMILY RESTAURANT
• BROOKSIDE
EATERY AND PUB
• CASTLE INN
• COOPER’S WATERFRONT
• DENTE’S CATERING
• ERNIE G’S
• FIRE & ICE
• IPANEMA GRILLE
• NARDONE’S RESTAURANT
• SAVO’S PIZZA & RESTAURANT
Look On Te Following Pages For
Tese Advertiser’s Weekly Ads
Located at the
Thornhurst Country Club
143 Country Club Estates
Thornhurst, PA 18424
(570) 991-9040
OPEN WED THRU MON 11AM ‘TIL CLOSE
Follow us on Facebook: thebrooksideeatery&pub
E
THIS WEEK’S SPECIALS:
MONDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY
Only 20 minutes from Pittston & Dupont...Come up and see it...You may meet the Suscon Screamer!
Double Burger
Monday
2 of our 1/2 Pound
Black Angus
Beef Burgers for
$
12...
So Bring a Friend!
Boneless Buffalo
Wings
with a
frosty mug
of Ice Cold Beer
$
4.95
Bud Light
Clam Night
1/2 Dozen
Littleneck Clams
and a Pint of
Ice Cold Bud Light
$
4.95
Shellfsh
Friday
1/2 Pound of
Cajun Crawfsh &
a frosty cold mug
of beer
$
6.95
Specials run nightly 5pm - 7pm
COUPON
FREE!
Beer Battered
Onion Rings
with purchase
of any lunch
or dinner
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SUNDAY
DISPATCH
in the Pittston Commons, Pittston By-Pass, Pittston
& Family Restaurant
Since
1964
655-0001
OPEN WEEKDAYS 11 TO 9;
FRI. & SAT. 11 TO 10;
SUN. 12-8
NEW MENU ITEMS
COUPON SPECIAL
When you buy 12 cuts at the regular price. Price
does not include sales tax. Cannot be used with
other specials. Good for our Red Pizza only.
EXPIRES 6/30/12
12 CUTS OF PIZZA
ONLY
$
4.99
DELIVERY, PICK-UP OR EAT-IN COUPON
• Buffalo Bites • Garlic Parm Wings
• Cheesesteak Pizza • Cobb Salad
MONEY SAVING SPECIALS
7 DAYS A WEEK
All First Responders
And Service Connected
Personnel In Uniform
Will Receive A
15
%
Discount
Cannot be used with other specials or discounts
Eat-In Only
www.savospizza.com
SUN., MON., TUES.
7 A.M.-3 P.M.
WED., THUR., FRI., SAT.
7 A.M.-8 P.M.
509 Exeter Ave., West Pittston
“The Best Breakfast Around”
• Overstuffed Omelets • Huge Frittatas
• Fluffy Buttermilk Pancakes • Hand Dipped FrenchToast
Voted “Best Value”...”Most Affordable”... and Favorite Restaurant” by our loyal customers
Serving Affordable Home-Cooked Meals • Eat-In or Take-Out
Call For Our Daily Specials, 654-2536
Check Out Our Breakfast Specials:
• Mon. - Fri. only
$
3.99 incl. FREE COFFEE
• Sat. & Sun. Reg. FREE COFFEE with breakfast special
1022 Main St.
Avoca, PA 18641
570-457-1600
Tuesday — 40¢ Rhode Island Clams
Eat in only (Sold in Quantities of 10)
5-10 PM HOT DOGS $1.00 • 6-8PM 12oz. Coors Light $1.00
Wednesday — 40¢ Wings Eat in only (Sold in Quantities of 10)
Monday — 5-10 PM Build a Burger $3.00
6-8PM 12oz. Miller Lite Drafts $1.00
JUNE ENTERTAINMENT
Friday, June 29th - Dave Williams - 8pm
CALL FOR DAILY LUNCH SPECIALS
AFFORDABLE FAMILY RESTAURANT
View Our Full Menu At: menusnepa.com/bobbyos1.html
HANDICAPPED ACCESSIBLE
Tues.-Thurs. 11 to 9 • Fri. & Sat. 11 to 10 • Closed Sun. & Mon.
Dine In • Take Out • Delivery 654-2200 Fax: 654-2265
300 MAIN ST., DUPONT
WE DELIVER
654-2200
(Formerly Kalmanowicz Corner Store)
VOTED BEST
CHEESESTEAK
2009-2012!
VOTED BEST
HAMBURGER
2011!
HOMEMADE FRIED CHICKEN
SICILIAN STYLE WHITE PIZZA $9.95
SICILIAN STYLE PIZZA $7.95
Includes Soup or Salad, Vegetable and Potato
4 PIECES $7.95
8 PIECES $11.95
12 PIECES $15.95
12 CUTS
12 CUTS
Ask About Our
Catering Menu For
GRADUATION
Or Any Occasion!
PRIME RIB OF BEEF $9.95
JUNE SPECIALS
Includes
Fries &
Cole Slaw
Phone: 696-3580 • www.FIREandICEonTobyCreek.com • RT 309, Trucksville - Just North of Sheetz
Experience Our New
Outdoor Dining
Every
Night
Visit our
Web Site for Details
COOPER’S SEAFOOD HOUSE
WATERFRONT • 304 KENNEDY BLVD • PITTSTON • 654-6883
ALL THIS WEEK
MONDAY & TUESDAYS
$
29
99
Cold Water Surf & Turf
1 Pound Dungeness Crabs...........$15.99
Martinis.........................................$4.99
6 oz. South African Lobster Tail &
6 oz. Filet Mignon
OUTDOOR CABANA
OPEN DAILY
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THIRD ANNUAL HOMECOMING
AT THE PARISH GROVE: NEWPORT STREET, SHEATOWN (Next to Guardian Care Center)
Rev. James R. Nash & The Parishioners Invite Everyone To Join In The Fun At The ...
ETHNIC FOODS • GAMES • BINGO • CHINESE AUCTION • PONY RIDES • FACE PAINTING
MASS ON SATURDAY AT 4 P.M. featuring STANKY AND THE COALMINERS
NANTICOKE
St. Faustina
Kowalska
Parish
FRI., SAT., SUN.
JUNE 29-30
JULY 1
NEXT WEEKEND!
FRIDAY
SUNDAY SATURDAY
STEALING
NEIL
IRON
COWBOY
GONE
CRAZY
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A Healthy Dinner
will be provided
June 28, 2012
6pm - 7:30pm
All Ages
June is scleroderma awareness
month.
Eleanor Bellanco, a Junction
native who lives at Wesley Vil-
lage, is a scleroderma patient.
“When I was diagnosed I cried
three days,” she said. “And I said
I can’t cry anymore, because if a
cry I can’t laugh. I haven’t cried
since.”
Bellanco said she once heard
of a scleroderma patient
who was from her old
Junction neighborhood.
She tracked the women
down in a nursing home,
called the home, told her
story and asked if she
could visit. “I wanted to
go in there and hold her
hand and say honey,
you’re not alone. I wanted say
good-bye to a lady I never met.”
But the nurse Bellanco talked
to on the phone said, “She’s not
responding. You wouldn’t want
to see her, especially since you
have it, too.”
Bellanco didn’t go and the
woman died soon after. While
Bellancoappreciatedthat nurse’s
advice, she regrets not going. “It
helps victims to have support, to
know you are not alone.”
Scleroderma is a connective
tissue disease that involves
changes in the skin, blood ves-
sels, muscles, and internal orga-
ns. It is an autoimmune disorder,
a condition that occurs when the
immune system mistakenly at-
tacks and destroys healthy body
tissue.
The cause of scleroderma is
unknown. People with this con-
dition have a buildup of a sub-
stance called collagen in the skin
and other organs causing hard-
ening. This buildup leads to the
symptoms of the disease which
vary widely. Localized sclero-
derma usually affects only the
skin on the hands and face and
may not cause serious complica-
tions. In more severe cases pa-
tients may have trouble swallow-
ing, heartburn, muscle weak-
ness, pain and severe pulmonary
fibrosis, which is the leading
cause of death in severe cases.
The disease usually affects
people 30 to 50 years old. Wom-
en get scleroderma
more often than men do.
It’s considered rare with
an estimated 300,000 to
400,000 people affected
in the United State.
Bellanco is in her 80s
and was diagnosed only
two years ago which is
unusual for a scleroder-
ma patient, though she suspects
she may have had scleroderma
years before she was diagnosed.
“I was treated for everything
but,” she said.
A missed diagnosis is not un-
usual as the symptoms mimic
other conditions.
“Maybe somebody will read
this and ask the doctor to test for
scleroderma,” Bellanco said.
Bellanco said while there are
no local scleroderma support or
information groups, there is one
that serves Eastern Pennsylva-
nia.
It’s the Delaware Valley Chap-
ter (Eastern PA, Southern NJ,
DE) in Cherry Hill, N.J. Awom-
anwhoansweredthe phone there
said the chapter would be happy
to take calls from people, espe-
cially new patients, who are
looking for information or sup-
port. The number is 1-856-779-
7225.
Bellanco said she would wel-
come calls, too. Her number is
655-1697.
Scleroderma patient offers her support to others
June is
scleroderma
awareness
month
By JACK SMILES
jsmiles@psdispatch.com
Women get
scleroder-
ma more
often than
men do.
Children will have an opportu-
nity to learn about different art
mediums in downtown Pittston
beginning June 25 at the Kids’
Art Camp at the Arts Seen Gal-
lery, 71 S. Main St., Pittston.
The five-day camp is for chil-
dren ages 8 to12 and will be held
from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. is
June 25-29.
Each day a different profes-
sional artist will instruct in a dif-
ferent art medium. The schedule
is as follows: Day one – fused
glass with Maria Livrone; day
two, photography with John Le-
vandoski; day three, clay with
Sandy Trocki; day four, drawing
with JoAnne Raynis; and day
five, origami, the art of paper
folding, with Peter Uritz.
Cost is $110 and pre-registra-
tion is required. To register, call
654-1200.
Art camp starts Monday
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Bumps & Dents Repaired
Insurance Claims Welcome
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“Avoca! To me it was the gran-
dest place on earth. As soon as
the taxi reached Main Street, the
little town seemed to stretch out
its arms and wrap me in its wel-
coming love. My heart began to
pound furiously as we pulled in
front our house.” – Bertha Dom-
mermuth quoted in the book
“Sister Bertha, Sister Ruth” by
Marie S. Rice.
Paul Dommermuth’s class-
mates at the old Duryea high
school in the 1950s found him
fascinating, according to Diane
Plisga, who was Diane Rutkow-
ski when she graduated with
Dommermuth in 1953.
That was an understandable
reaction fromteenagers in1950s
Duryea, where virtually every-
body was Caucasian with East-
ern European backgrounds.
Dommermuth was a dark-
skinned Ethiopian.
Plisga said if Dommermuth
was ever considered an outsider,
that didn’t last long and his skin
color was never an issue, except
in a positive way.
“He was very handsome. I re-
member that brown skin and big
white teeth. He was very friend-
ly. A gentleman. Very smart. He
was well-liked by everyone, es-
pecially the teachers. He had a
sense of humor. He became one
of the guys. His personality just
shined. Everyone in Duryea was
fascinated.”
They would have been even
more fascinated had they known
how Dommermuth wound up at
Duryea High. The story, re-
counted in a 1984 book Sister
Bertha, Sister Ruth by Marie S.
Rice, is worthy of Hollywood
script.
The nameless son of an Italian
father, likely a soldier in Musso-
lini’s army, and an Ethiopian
teenager, he was born in Gullali,
Ethiopia, in1935 during the Ital-
io-Ethiopian War. He was adopt-
ed when he was five weeks old,
though not legally, by Bertha
Dommermuth and Ruth Ship-
pey, missionaries from the Full
Gospel Chapel in Avoca.
They spirited him away from
the hospital to their mission
school in Addis Ababa, a day’s
ride on mule back, and named
him Paul Dommermuth.
Within months after the wom-
en adopted Paul, the Italian army
–armedwithheavyartillery, ma-
chine guns and airplanes – over-
whelmed the small, primitive
Ethiopian army, committing
atrocities as they did. It was
claimed in the book that the Ital-
ians used mustard gas against
bare-footed Ethiopian tribesmen
clad in lion skins and spread bro-
ken glass on their escape route.
The war routed Bertha Dom-
mermuth and Shippey fromtheir
mission. They escaped by car to
the American Embassy, their
driver dodging bodies and bul-
lets. As the Italians advanced,
Ethiopian ruler Haile Selassie
and his cabinet fled and the
country fell into chaos.
Young Ethiopian men stole
guns from an arsenal. From the
book: “Looters broke into stores
and crowds with guns lined up
outside. When one came out
with something another wanted
they just shot himdown and took
it.”
In the heart of the city what
was left of the government and
the last fleeing businessmen set
the entire business district on
fire rather than leave it for the
Italians.
Even after the Italians took
over the city, Dommermuth and
Shippey would not give up their
mission. They went back to their
building and school to find loo-
ters had ransacked it and killed
their dogs and the Italians had
claimed what was left to quarter
troops.
With Paul in tow, they moved
the mission around the city, but
were thrown out by the Italians at
every stop.
During their moves, Dommer-
muth and Shippey witnessed
men cutting meat from live
cows, men with their tongues cut
out, truck loads of bodies being
hauled to mass burials in trench-
es. At night they heard the
crunching sound of hyenas de-
vouring the bodies.
Even so, they refused to leave
until they were accused as spies
and forcibly expelled by the Ital-
ians.
Nowtheyfacedthe problemof
getting Paul out of Ethiopia.
Technically he was a citizen, and
as a boy, coveted in the country’s
culture. Back in Avoca, Mary
Hastie, the founder of the Full
Gospel Chapel, mounted a letter
campaign of affidavits and bank
statements which convinced an
Italian captain to arrange pass-
ports and let the women leave
with Paul.
They made their way to Egypt
and then Cyprus, from where
they sailed to New York on the
Italian liner Rex. From New
York they took a bus to Scranton
and Avoca, in all a journey of six
months
In 1939 Pittston attorney Jar-
rett Jennings handled adoption
proceedings in Luzerne County
court and Paul Dommermuth of-
ficiallybecame the sonof Bertha
Dommermuth.
Though he lived in Avoca,
Paul went to school in Duryea, as
the Dommermuth home adja-
cent to the Full Gospel Mission
Church was in what was then the
fifth ward of Avoca which bor-
dered Duryea.
As a student he played tuba in
the band and was the student
PAUL DOMMERMUTH
Story worthy of a Hollywood script
Ethiopian-born boy escaped war and was raised in Avoca
Paul Dom-
mermuth's
entry in the
Duryea
High
School
1953 year-
book
See DOMMERMUTH, Page 32
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The Seventh Annual Tour of
Historic Churches of Greater
Pittston will take place today
Sunday, June 24, starting at 1
p.m. at the First Presbyterian
Church, Exeter Avenue, West
Pittston. Atty. Jan Lokuta, orig-
inator of the tour, will serve as
the tour guide.
“All are invited to participate
andreflect onthe progress the in-
dividual churches and the bor-
ough at large have made since
the flood of September 2011,”
Lokuta, a Dupont native and art-
ist said.
From First Presbyterian
Church, the group will visit The
Christian and Missionary Alli-
ance, The First Congregational
UnitedChurchof Christ, andIm-
maculate Conception Roman
Catholic Church, all on Luzerne
Avenue in West Pittston, then
visit Trinity Episcopal Church
on Montgomery Avenue and
conclude with the First United
Methodist Church on Wyoming
Avenue, Lokuta said.
“We will also pay tribute to the
Salvation Army in recognition of
the 100 years of work in West
Pittston,” he added.
Lokuta announcedthat the Lu-
zerne County Transportation
Authority will provide the Lu-
zerne County Trolley to trans-
port tour attendees from one lo-
cation to another.
First United Methodist
Church will host a reception in
its education room at the end of
the tour and all participants and
members of all congregations
are invited to attend.
S E V E N T H A N N U A L E V E N T
Tour of historical Greater Pittston churches today
NIKO KALLIANIOTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Jan Lokuta, in charge of today's church tour of highlighted churches that played a role in the days
after last year's flood, is pictured at the First United Methodist Church in West Pittston.
What Tour of historical West Pitt-
ston churches
When Today, starting at 1 p.m.
Where Begins at First
Presbyterian Church, Exeter Ave.,
West Pittston
Cost Free
I F YO U G O
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Cross Valley Federal Credit
Union recently held a second
grand opening celebration at its
new Pittston location, at The
Pittston Crossings, Hwy. 315.
Cross Valley FCU’s ribbon-
cutting ceremony marked the or-
ganization’s ninth branch in
Northeastern Pennsylvania. The
day included a luncheon, cake
and special guests: Froggy 101’s
Selena, and TUXfromthe WBS
Penguins. Scottie Saver, Cross
Valley FCU’s mascot, was on
hand to spend time with mem-
bers.
Members who visited the
branch during the week also had
a chance to win exciting door
prizes such as gift cards and an
Apple iPad.
Winners included: Johnathan
Smalley; Apple iPad; Jeff Mati-
ko, Best Buy gift card; Steven
Rodriguea, Lowe’s gift card;
Caitlin Turkos, Lowe’s gift card;
Jack Wise, Bed Bath & Beyond
gift card; John Kozerski, Mi-
chelle Finnegan, Nancy Fenaro,
William Knox; Darden gift
cards; Barbara Parry, Mathew
Sabetta, Mathew Ross, Jenna
Galli, Luke Mazzarro; Dunkin’
Donuts gift cards; Sarah Miller
and Roy Collins, Amazon gift
cards.
BILL TARUTIS/ FOR THE SUNDAY DISPATCH
Cross Valley Federal Credit
Union recently celebrated the
grand opening of its Pittston
branch with a ribbon cutting
ceremony. Fromleft, first
row, Lee Sorber, assistant
vice president of information
technology; Jeremy Bealla,
vice president of information
technology; John Monico,
vice president of operations;
Leonard V. Shimko, board
treasurer; Thaddeus Prekel,
board member; Al Baloga,
board secretary; Joseph
Shimko, board vice chair-
man; Edward Kaushas, presi-
dent/CEO; Angelique Pattillo,
Pennsylvania Credit Union
Association; Gina Palmaioli,
branch manager; Bryan Pal-
maioli; Colleen Phillips, vice
president of marketing. Sec-
ond row, Helene Vernagis,
advisory board; Scottie Sav-
er, Dan Chipego, CFO; and
Bryan Palmaioli, Jr.
Cross Valley
FCU opens
ninth branch
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T
he Northeast Fair was
simply delightful this
past week with the
rides and the food and the
animals and the exhibits.
But tonight’s the night
you’ve been waiting for.
It’s Elvis night in Greater
Pittston and the ladies are
Route 315 on Suscon Road in
Pittston Townshi. Tickets are
$9 at the gate, but the mati-
nee price from 1 to 4 p.m. is
$7. Ages 2 and under are
free. Admission includes
rides, exhibits, shows, con-
tests, educational segments.
absolutely giddy.
Pittston’s own Sean Klush
brings his Graceland-ap-
proved Elvis act to the stage
and will close out the 6-day
fair with two shows, at 6:30
p.m. and 8:30 p.m.
The fair opens today at 1
p.m. and it’s just off state
Feeding the animals is permitted at the Northeast Fair in Pitt-
ston Township.
Two-year-old Malachi Gove goes for a 'spin' with the
help of his momWilt as they listen to the band 'Cabinet.'
AFAI
REMEM
Photos by BILL TARUTIS
People have a
blast on Full Tilt
at the Northeast
Fair in Pittston
Township on
Wednesday
night.
Fair goers cruise the midway at the Northeast Fair on Wednesday night.
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Fair goers walk around the Northeast Fairgrounds as dusk
approaches on Wednesday.
Eight-year-old Sydney Williams of Luzerne tries her
hand at winning a goldfish.
IRTO
MBER
A circular
fisheye
photo of fair
goers walking
by the ferris wheel
at the Northeast Fair
Wednesday night.
Emma Rosencrans, 8, right, and her sister Samantha, 6, both of Plains Township, ride together
on the swings at the Northeast Fair in Pittston Township on Wednesday night.
Michaela Benczkowski, left, Breann Kem-
merer, and Arianne Grilli strike a pose on
the Super Cat.
Buffo the Clown kids around with Cassidy
Pfeiffer, 8, of Old Forge.
Chicks scurry around their pen at the
Northeast Fair.
Pittston Township firefighter SamAlba drives
around Mrs. Pennsylvania Kimberly McLen-
don of Shickshinny and her husband Gary.
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Avoca Scout Troop 316 and
Crew 3701 participated in the
50th annual West Point Campo-
ree of the United States Military
Academy in April.
Attended by over 6,000 Scouts
from 22 states, this 3-day event
show cased the military’s best
and brightest engaged in training
exercises.
Scouting skills were tested in
military scenarios hosted by Ca-
dets who were in Scout troops
themselves just two years prior.
The boys from Avoca Troop
316 competed in the Zodiac as-
sault boat competition.
From left, first row, are Adain
McGowan Dan Smith, Noah
Jennings Charles Vermac, Jeff
Swingle, Joshua Sepcoski and
USMA Sophomore Cadet Steve
Vollmer from Long Beach, CA.
Second row, Matt Gromola, Bla-
sé Twardorski, Mike Twardorski,
Chris Gunshore, Shaun O’Ma-
lia, Tyler Sepcoski, Irene Mag-
don, Bridget McGowan, Scout
Master Matt Fino and Sarah
Gromola.
Avoca Scouts at 50th annual West Point Camporee
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manager of the basketball team.
After he graduated in 1953, he
went to Houghton College then
to the University of Rochester
for a Masters of Arts degree in
sociology and then to North Car-
olina at Chapel Hill for a Ph.D. In
the ‘60s he joined the NAACP
and participated in protest
marches. He was a lover of jazz
and jazz ocean cruises.
He came back to Avoca spar-
ingly. It is known in 1963 for a
high school class reunion and in
1981 to be with his mother when
she died.
Dr. Paul R. Dommermuth died
at age 76 on November 18, 2011
in Dunkirk, New York, where he
was professor emeritus of sociol-
ogy at SUNY Fredonia. He had
been married, but was divorced.
He had no children.
His passing was little noted lo-
cally. His obituary didn’t make
its way here until last month
when there was a memorial gath-
ering for him in Fredonia.
Dommermuth
Continued fromPage 25
forever grateful.
An added bonus? Really.
Good. Friends.
Just remember, my ashes go
on that mantle.
Gratefully,
MJH
Dear Insurance Carrier:
Yes, I do realize breast cancer
is considered a “pre-existing
condition”.
I honestly didn’t think it would
be a post-existing condition, like
hammer toe or something. But
forgive me for thinking that in
this country, people who have
battled cancer probably
shouldn’t be declined for health
insurance…especially since hair
plugs and cauliflower ear are
covered by your plan.
Since the causes of my disease
have been tossed into a hospital
incinerator somewhere in Geor-
gia, It’s highly unlikely my breast
cancer will return.
Perhaps that should be consid-
ered prior to that big, fat denial
you stamped on my application?
However, should the need ever
arise for consideration of hair
plugs, I’ll call you.
Thanks for Nothing,
Maria E. Heck
Dear Darlene, my Pilates
Torturer:
Thank you for whipping my
spongy, lazy, Dough Boy body
into shape, twice a week, every
week.
Sorry I curse. And perhaps
toss an icy glare of resentment
your way. And sometimes, throw
up.
It’s all for the greater good and
I appreciate you not throwing me
out.
I promise to not eat baked
beans before Tuesday’s class.
Fitfully yours,
Maria
Dear Madeline:
You are my favorite.
Love,
Mom
Dear Nicholas:
You are my favorite.
Love,
Mom
Dear Patrick:
You are my favorite.
Love,
Mom
Dear Readers:
Thank you for reading this dri-
vel for the past 8 years.
You are my favorite.
Love,
Your Columnist,
Maria Jiunta Heck
Maria Heck
Continued fromPage 15
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Diamonds in the Ruff
The United Food and Com-
mercial Workers (UFCW) credit
union broke ground for a new
branch office at 450 South Main
Street on the corner of Spring
Street on
Wednesday af-
ternoon.
Officer of
the credit union
and city offi-
cials wielded
shovels for the
ceremonial start of construction
Designed by Quad 3, the new
building will feature a retro fa-
çade in keeping with the city’s
downtown revitalization theme.
UFCWalready has a presence
in the city in the form of a kiosk
in Quinn’s Market.
The new 2,500 square foot of-
fice will replace that and offer a
full range of services, including
mortgages, loans and deposits.
The new branch will have two
drive-through tellers, a drive-
through ATM and night deposit.
The branch will employee 10.
UFCW has branches in King-
ston, Hanover and a main branch
in Wyoming.
MAI N STREET DEVELOPMENT
ALEXANDRIA ANTONACCI/FOR THE SUNDAY DISPATCH
Holding shovels in front at the credit union ground breaking, fromleft, CEO John Hayduk, SamMarranca and Pittston Mayor Jason Klush. In the background fromthe
credit union are Dominick Pannunzio, Taylor Miller, Leslie Melochick, TomCalaide and Rob Belza. Representing the city are council members Joe Chernouskas, Danny
Argo and Mike Lombardo; assistant solicitor Joe Castellino, treasurer Kathy Cunard, city manager Joe Moskovitz, police chief Robert Powers, redevelopment director
Jerry Mullarkey, JimNorris, Marty Moughan and Chris Latona. On the left are Shirley Bartos and Brandi Partash of the Chamber of Commerce.
Construction of new
credit union underway
By JACK SMILES
jsmiles@psdispatch.com
The branch
will em-
ployee 10.
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In the towns
The Avoca/Dupont Little
League is in the process of plan-
ning the 2013 season and is seek-
ing members of the community
to attend meetings for the pur-
pose of electing a board of direc-
tors for the 2013 season. All
communityresidents are encour-
aged to become involved for the
betterment of the league. Little
League or baseball experience is
not necessary to participate.
The next meeting is at 7 p.m.
on Sunday, July 8 at the Avoca
Community Center, corner of
Main Hawthorne Streets.
Subsequent meetings will take
place at 7 p.m. on August 12 and
September 9.
For more information, contact
acting Secretary Tony Franchetti
at 332-4087.
Happy birthday
Happy birthday to Arianna
McMahon who will celebrate
her first birthday on Tuesday,
June 26. And happy birthday to
her grandmother, Betsy Craig,
who will celebrate her special
day on Saturday, June 30.
VFW Auxiliary Bingo
The V.F.W. Post 8335 Ladies
Auxiliary will sponsor a Bingo
party on Wednesday, June 27 for
the patients at the V.A. Medical
Center, Wilkes-Barre. The ladies
are collecting the following un-
wrapped items to give as prizes
or gifts: T-shirts (all sizes espe-
cially XXL and XXXL), slip-
pers, diabetic socks, blankets,
throws, afghans, books, maga-
zines, puzzles, games, cards,
shaving cream and deodorant.
Please note food, glass or
sharp objects cannot be accept-
ed. Donations canbe droppedoff
until 5p.m. onJune 27at the post
home, 915 Main St. The ladies
will leave the post home at 5:30
p.m. to go to the V.A. Medical
Center. Transportation is availa-
ble to members who need it.
Queen of the Apostles
Queen of the Apostles Parish’s
youth group will meet today,
June 24. Call Lori Ostrowski at
457-8840 for meeting times and
locations.
The building and grounds
committee will meet at 6:30 p.m.
onMonday, June 25inSt. Mary’s
School, 742 Spring St.
The worship committee will
meet at 7 p.m. on Monday, June
25 in the rectory, 715 Hawthorne
St.
The social concerns commit-
tee will meet at 8 p.m. on Mon-
day, June 25 in the rectory.
The finance council will meet
at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, June 26 in
the rectory.
The festival committee will
meet at 6:30 p.m. on Wednesday,
June 27 in St. Mary’s School.
Anyone interested in volunteer-
ing at the picnic is invited to at-
tend.
The parish will participate in
the “Fortnight for Freedom”
June 21-July 4. This national 14-
day period of prayer, education
and action is being organized by
the United States Conference of
Catholic Bishops in response to
the Department of Health and
Human Services’ (HHS) man-
date to force employers – includ-
ing religious charities – to pro-
vide contraceptives and abor-
tion-inducing drugs in their
health plans, for free.
The parish will pray the nove-
na prayer to St. Thomas More
and a Prayer for Religious Free-
dom following daily Masses. In-
dividuals unable to attend daily
Mass but who would like to par-
ticipate mayget the prayers inthe
church, by calling the rectory of-
fice at 457-3412 or by visiting
the parish’s Facebook page:
Queen of the Apostles Parish,
Avoca, PA.
The parish will have festival
set-up nights at 6 p.m. on Mon-
day, July 9 and Tuesday, July 10
on the festival grounds, corner of
Hawthorne and Spring Streets.
The annual parish festival will
take place July 19-21. Parishion-
ers are currently seeking clean
coffee cans with lids and theme
basket donations. Cans and
theme basket donations may be
left on the back porch of the rec-
tory, 715 Hawthorne St. For
more information about the
theme baskets, contact Elizabeth
Dessoye at 815-7635 or edes-
soye@gmail.com. Anyone inter-
ested in volunteering at the fes-
tival may contact at Tara Iovac-
chini at 954-2456.
The parish will sponsor two-
week math tutoring sessions at
St. Mary’s School, 742 Spring
St. The sessions, which will be
taught by Coleen Reza, PAcerti-
fied elementary education and
mid-level mathematics teacher,
include touch math, introduction
to pre-algebra and introduction
to algebra. For more information
or to register, contact Reza at
498-9811 or email her at coleen-
vols@hotmail.com.
Wildcats sign ups
The Duryea Wildcats will
have sign-up sessions for foot-
ball and cheerleading from 5:30
to 7:30 p.m. on Wednesday, June
27 at the Wildcats Field, corner
of Kramer and Shaft Streets, Du-
ryea.
Taxes due Saturday
Avoca Tax Collector Therese
Wrubel reminds all residents the
final days to pay the 2012 Avoca
Borough and Luzerne Country
tax bills is Saturday, June 30.
Tax bills may be paid in person
from 4 to 5 p.m. on Friday, June
29 at the Avoca Municipal
Little League asks for community involvement
AVOCA
JACKIE BORTHWICK-GALVIN
457-3351
avocahappenings@verizon.net
The office of the Luzerne County District Attorney donated funds to help purchase a bulletproof vest
for Officer Charles Swisher of the Avoca Police Department.
The donation was made possible from drug forfeiture funds and was donated to the Adopt-A-Cop
program created by the founders of Fallen Officers Remembered to help purchase this valuable,
life-saving equipment.
Kranson Uniform was also instrumental with the purchase and fitting of the vest.
Anyone wishing to donate to the mission is asked to contact Jaclyn at 760-9034 or emailfalof-
frem@aol.com, or send a check payable to Fallen Officers Remembered, PO Box 2299, W-B, PA,
18703.
In the photo, from left, Jaclyn Pocceschi Mosley, Fallen Officers Remembered president and co-
founder, presents a bulletproof vest to Avoca Police Department Officer Charles Swisher as Ryan
Kranson, vice president of Kranson Uniform, looks on.
See AVOCA, Page 35
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201 Foote Avenue, Duryea
FREE DELIVERY! CALL 457-8881
OPEN DAILY: 6 a.m.-7 p.m. • Saturday & Sunday ‘til 5 p.m.
REHOSKI’S MARKET
DELI
Bottom Round Roast ............................. $2.99 lb.
Rump Roast .......................................... $2.99 lb.
Eye Round Roast ................................... $3.99 lb.
Fresh Cut Minute Steaks........................ $4.99 lb.
Lean Steakettes .................................... $3.99 lb.
Smoked Bacon...................................... $4.99 lb.
Turkey Breast ........................................ $5.99 lb.
Imported Polish Ham............................ $6.99 lb.
Provolone Cheese................................. $4.99 lb.
The Duryea Ambulance Asso-
ciation membership drive is cur-
rently underway.
Membership fee is $30. While
lesser gifts are appreciated, they
donot cover the membershipfee.
The fund drive will conclude
June 30.
Wildcats sign ups
The Duryea Wildcats will
have sign-up sessions for foot-
ball and cheerleading from 5:30
to 7:30 p.m. on Wednesday, June
27 at the Wildcats Field, corner
of Kramer and Shaft Streets.
Church festival
Nativity of Our Lord Parish
will have its annual festival from
6 to11p.m. on Friday, July 6; 5 to
11:30 p.m. on Saturday, July 7;
and 4 to 10 p.m. on Sunday, July
8 on the picnic grounds of Sa-
cred Heart of Jesus Church, 529
Stephenson St. As you munch on
some of the area’s best ethnic and
traditional picnic foods, you will
enjoy the live entertainment of
“Picture Perfect” from 7 to 11
p.m. onFriday, “Jude’s Polka Jets
II” from 5 to 7 p.m. and “Flaxy
Morgan” from7:30 to11:30 p.m.
on Saturday and “The Sperazza
Band” from6 to10 p.m. on Sun-
day.
As you’re touring the grounds
stopping to play Bingo, games
and purchasing raffle tickets for
a chance to win baskets and cash
prizes, you won’t want to miss
the parish’s famous homemade
potato pancake stand.
For those of you who love Bin-
go, you certainly won’t want to
miss the parish’s pre-picnic bin-
go Thursday, July 5 in Sacred
Heart Hall. Doors open at 6 p.m.
and games start at 7 p.m.
Admission is $10 for a board
of three cards. Regular games
will have prizes valued at $50
plus cash specials.
Before the bingo fun starts, the
parish committee will open the
doors at 5 p.m. for shoppers to
check out their giant flea market
in the basement of Sacred Heart
of Jesus Church. Stop by and
look for early bargains!
Golf Tournament
The Annual Care and Concern
Free Health Clinic Golf Tourna-
ment will take place on Friday,
July 13 at Emanon Country
Club, Falls.
Registration is at 11:15 a.m.
with a shotgun start at 12:30 p.m.
Format is captain and crew.
Cost is $85 per player or $340
per foursome. Price includes
lunch, dinner, awards and prizes.
Several sponsorships are availa-
ble: hole in one - $500, eagle -
$400, birdie - $300, par - $200
and bogey - $100.
Friends of the clinic sponsors
are also available and will be rec-
ognized in the dinner program.
All proceeds will benefit the
clinic.
For more information, call Jim
at 654-2585.
Germania festival
The Germania Hose Company
will have its annual festival July
17-21. There will be rides, food
and fun! Keep reading the Du-
ryea News for details as they be-
come available.
Little League trip
American Legion Brennan
Regan Post 585 will have its sec-
ond annual bus trip to the Little
League World Series on Thurs-
day, Aug. 23. The trip is open to
children ages 7-12 and their
chaperones.
Due to the success of last
year’s trip, Legion members plan
to send two buses this year. For
more information, call the post
home at 457-4242.
Charity Train Ride
The Greater Pittston Charity
Train Ride railroad excursion to
Jim Thorpe is Sunday, Sept. 9.
The excursion in a 1920s era
open window coach pulled by a
diesel locomotive will depart at 9
a.m. from Duryea and return at
approximately 6:45 p.m. Upon
arrival in Jim Thorpe, passen-
gers will have an opportunity to
browse the many specialty shops
and restaurants sprinkled
throughout this historic area.
Tickets are $65 each. Checks
should be made payable and sent
to the Greater Pittston Charity
TrainRide c/oPittstonMemorial
Library, 47 Broad St., Pittston,
PA18640.
All proceeds will benefit the
Pittston Memorial Library,
Greater Pittston YMCA, and the
Care and Concern Free Health
Clinic. For more information,
contact Gloria at 693-0766 or Ti-
na at 407-0579. Tickets are limit-
ed and available on a first come
first seated basis.
Class of ’57 reunion
The Duryea High School of
Class of 1957 is planning its 55th
anniversary class reunion for
Saturday, Nov. 10 at the Dupont
Hose Company. Interested class-
mates may call Judy at 457-3406
or Lois 457-9401for more infor-
mation.
Borough ambulance drive concludes June 30
DURYEA
JACKIE BORTHWICK-GALVIN
457-3351
duryeahappenings@verizon.net
Building, 752 Main St.
Individuals paying tax bills via
mail should send the bar coded
copy of the tax bill to Avoca Bor-
ough, c/o Therese Wrubel, 129
FactorySt., Avoca, PA18641. If a
receipt is requested, please in-
clude both copies of the tax bill
and a self-addressed stamped en-
velope with payment.
Following this payment peri-
od, Wrubel will be in her office
from 9 to 11 a.m. on Tuesdays.
For additional information, call
at 457-4891. The office will be
closed July 3 and 10.
1960s classes
Several graduating classes of
Avoca High School from the
1960s will have a pizza, strombo-
li, and antipasto party from 6:30
to 11:30 p.m. on Saturday, Aug.
25 in St. Mary’s School auditori-
um, 742 Spring St. The cost is
$25 per person. The event is BY-
OB. Soda and ice will be provid-
ed.
Interested classmates can
make a reservation by sending a
check for $25 to Cathy Appnel,
515 Grove St., Avoca, PA 18641
by July 14. Checks should be
made payable to AHS Classes of
the ’60s.
For more information, contact
the group on Facebook or call
Appnel at 457-7974, Marie
Payne at 709-5674 or Pauline
Reedy at 817-5125. Classmates
are encouraged to bring pictures
and memorabilia to the party.
Charity Train Ride
The Greater Pittston Charity
Train Ride railroad excursion to
Jim Thorpe is Sunday, Sept. 9.
The excursion in a 1920s-era
open window coach pulled by a
diesel locomotive will depart at 9
a.m. from Duryea and return at
approximately 6:45 p.m. Upon
arrival in Jim Thorpe, passen-
gers will have an opportunity to
browse the many specialty shops
and restaurants sprinkled
throughout this historic area.
Tickets are $65 each. Checks
should be made payable and sent
to the Greater Pittston Charity
Train Ride, c/o Pittston Memo-
rial Library, 47 Broad St., Pitt-
ston, PA 18640. All proceeds
will benefit the Pittston Memo-
rial Library, Greater Pittston
YMCA and the Care and Con-
cern Free Health Clinic.
For more information, contact
Gloria at 693-0766 or Tina at
407-0579. Tickets are limited
andavailable ona first come first
seated basis.
Avoca
Continued fromPage 34
Duryea Borough, through the
co-operation of CEO (Commis-
sion on Economic Opportunity),
will provide free summer meals
to children until August 17. Chil-
dren do not need to register or
provide any information to re-
ceive a free meal.
CEO operates the Weinberg
Northeast Regional Food Bank
and is committed to ending
childhood hunger. The distribu-
tion site for Duryea Borough is
the Healey Memorial Play-
ground which was designated by
CEO based on census data and
household income guidelines.
Children can receive a free
lunch between noon and 1 p.m.
Monday through Friday at the
Healey Memorial Playground,
Foote Avenue. For more infor-
mation, contact Borough Man-
ager Lois Morreale at 655-2829.
Free lunch for Duryea youth at
Healey Playground thru Aug. 17
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The Polish American Citizens
Club will award a scholarship to
a student freshman enrolled in a
college or university for the
2012-2013 school year. Appli-
cants must be a direct descend-
ant (ie. son, daughter, grandson,
granddaughter) of an active
P.A.C.C. member, obtain and
submit proof of a G.P.A of not
less than 3.0, typed essay and an
interview before the scholarship
board.
For information, contact Ed-
ward Romanko at 655-2137,
John Kulick at 655-2762 or Jack
Kuligowski at 655-8672. All en-
tries must be received no later
than July 4.
Council meeting
The next regular monthly
meeting of the Dupont Borough
Council will be held at 7 p.m. on
Tuesday, July 10 in the James
Cocco Council Chambers.
Compost facility
The Greater Pittston Compost
Facility Committee will meet at
7 p.m. on Wednesday, June 27 at
the Dupont Municipal Council
Chambers.
Sacred Heart bazaar
July will be a business month
for the SacredHeart of Jesus Par-
ish Family as they begin prepara-
tions for their annual church pic-
nic.
Stands Chairpersons Stan
Barnak and Tim Stonikinis an-
nounce the construction of the
stands for the picnic will take
place from7 a.m. to noon on Sat-
urday, July 14 and continue dur-
ing the weekdays as needed.
If you have a truck and/or
hammer, please feel welcome to
come and lend a hand. Contact
Carol at the rectoryoffice at 654-
3713 for more information.
Sacred Heart has purchased
new burners for the potato pan-
cakes and the state of the art
equipment will be tested at 7
p.m. on Wednesday, July11at the
parish garage.
All volunteers who have
worked frying pancakes for the
picnic are asked to come and try
out the new burners. Contact
Carol at 654-3713 for details.
Food Chairman Joe Lacomis
and Tom Lello will begin food
preparations on Wednesday, July
25 at the parish hall and continue
until Aug. 4.
Volunteers are needed to help
with annual event at all hours,
day and night, in the kitchen, on
the grounds andthe manyvariety
stands.
Borough news
Dupont Borough refuse bags
are nowavailable at the hub. Ad-
ditional bags are $16 for a pack
of 10.
Dupont Public Works Dept.
service schedule for the week of
June 24 is as follows:
Monday, June 25 - Refuse
Tuesday, June 26 - Yard Waste
Wednesday, June 27 - Mixed
Papers.
Orders for 2012 “Party in the
Park” t-shirts can be made at the
municipal office or at the “Hub-
One.” Cost is $10each, with2XL
and above at $12. There will be a
limited amount available for sale
at the party.
YMS of R Barbecue
The 49th Annual Open Pit
Chicken Barbecue sponsored by
Branch #2, YMS of R of Holy
Mother of Sorrows will be held
fromnoon to 6 p.m. on Saturday,
July 14 on the church grounds.
Donation is $8. Dinner includes
half a chicken, coleslaw, French
fries, roll, cake and beverage.
Tickets are available from Ar-
nold Borc at 654-8175 or in the
rectory.
Gas service
Applications to request gas
service are available at the mu-
nicipal office during regular
business hours. For more infor-
mation, contact Mike Trussa,
UGI representative, at 829-8664.
Food giveaway
The monthly food distribution
sponsored by the Dupont Lions
will be held from 4 to 5 p.m. on
Thursday, June 28 at Holy Moth-
er of Sorrows Church, Wyoming
Avenue. All qualifying residents
of Dupont and Suscon are eligi-
ble.
Crime Watch
The monthly meeting of the
Dupont Neighborhood Crime
Watch will be held at 6:30 p.m.
on Tuesday, June 26 at the Du-
pont Municipal Building.
Community Garden
The Dupont Community Gar-
den Park is in need of a fewgood
volunteers with watering and a
bit of nurturing. Any individual
or organization can offer an hour
or two once a week. Contact Pat-
ty McDonald at the municipal
office at 655-6216.
Polish American Citizens Club offering scholarship
DUPONT
ANN MARIE PADDOCK
407-0231
dupont.news@comcast.net
The Dupont Lions-sponsored Pittston Area Leo's Club newly-elected officers for the 2012/2013 school year will be sworn in at 6 p.m. on
Monday, June 25 during the Dupont Lions Club Installation Dinner at the VFW Post Home, Dupont. From left, first row, are Irene Mag-
don, vice-president; Lea Garibaldi, treasurer. Second row, Haleigh Zurek, secretary; and Megan Dougherty, president with mascot,
Leonardo.
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The West Pittston Open is
scheduled Sunday, Aug. 26 at
EmanonCountryClub, Harding.
Emanon. Cost is $80 and in-
cludes your golf, cart, prizes, and
dinner. Fees are due no later than
August 17. To join the fun, stop
by or call Ellen in the borough
office at 655-7782, option 1.
Rams news
The West Pittston Rams will
hold one “late” sign up for the
2012 season from 6 to 8 p.m. on
Wednesday, June 27 at the club-
house at the football field, Bell
Tower Entrance. Cost is $110per
child which includes 10-lottery
tickets at $5 each. Cost for addi-
tional children per family are $10
each.
New football players will be
required to purchase a jersey.
Ages 5-7 will be D-Team, ages
7-9 will be C-Team, ages 10-11
will be B-Team and ages 12-14
will be A-Team. League age is
the age of a child on August 1.
League restrictions will ac-
commodate age and weight. Ev-
ery registrant must have copies
of the following: birth certifi-
cate, current picture and two
proofs of residence (a valid driv-
er’s license and a utility bill
Parents/guardians may also
use this time to drop off neces-
sary paperwork or pictures for
already-registered children.
Practices start the week of July
15.
Coaches will be in touch with
all registrants via contact infor-
mation given with their registra-
tion.
Corpus Christi bazaar
Corpus Christi Church bazaar
will be held at the Holy Redeem-
er Church grounds Rt. 92 in
Harding this coming Friday,
June 29 through Sunday, July 1.
Friday and Saturday: 5:30 to 11
p.m.; Sunday: 1 – 7 p.m. Enter-
tainment: Friday, June 29 -
Groove Train, 7 – 11 p.m.;Satur-
day, June 30 - Flaxy Morgan, 7-
11p.m.;? Sunday, July 1 - Water-
street with Joe Valenti & Bill
Payne, 1 – 4 p.m.; Sweet Pepper
and the Long Hots, 4 – 7 p.m.
Young Run-4-Fun
The West Parks & Recreation
Board will host the Fourth of Ju-
ly Young Run-4-Fun at 9 a.m. on
Wednesday, July 4 at Sobeski
Stadium.
Entry forms are available in
the West Pittston Borough office
and distributed in the Wyoming
Area Elementary schools.
Special thanks goes to the
Wyoming Area Cheerleaders
and Cross Country team for vol-
unteering in this event as well as
sponsors: Argo’s, Superior Plus
Energy, Don’s Machine Shop,
Dance Theatre of Wilkes-Barre,
Work of Art Learning Center,
Yoga with Corinne, Blue Cross,
Independent Graphics and the
West Pittston Rec Board.
For further information, call
Gina Malsky 332-7817.
Class of l950 reunion
West Pittston High School is
planning its 62nd anniversary
class reunion for Friday, Aug. 17
at Glenmaura Country Club,
Moosic. Announcements have
been sent out to classmates to re-
mind them of this date. Any
classmate who did not receive an
invitation is asked to contact Ge-
orge Miller, chairperson.
All reservations must be in by
July 10.
SAT classes
Wyoming Area is again offer-
ing SATVerbal and Math review
classes this summer. If interested
in enrolling in these classes, call
Mrs. Rabel at 655-2836, ext.
2339.
Each session will feature 10
hours of instruction. Cost for
non-residents will be $50. Cost
for residents will vary depending
on enrollment. Costs are expect-
ed to run between $20 and $30
per 10 hours of instruction.
WA Class of ‘77
The Wyoming Area Class of
1977 will hold its 35th anniver-
sary reunion on from1 to 8 p.m.
on Sept. 29 at the Checkerboard
Inn, Carverton Road, Trucks-
ville. Cost is $40 per person.
Reservations can be made by
sending checks payable to: WA
Class of ’77, c/o Cindy Yudiski
Lynch, 355 Susquehanna Ave.,
Exeter, PA 18643 or visit the
Wyoming Area Class of ’77
Facebook page.
Street department
Yard waste will be picked up
from Montgomery Avenue to
Erie Street onMondays andfrom
Montgomery Avenue to Susque-
hanna Avenue on Tuesdays.
Residents are asked to place
yard waste in open containers.
No plastic bags will be picked
up.
Tree limbs should not exceed
four feet in length or 1/2-inch in
diameter and must be tied in
bundles.
Any resident requesting chip-
ping of tree limbs is asked to call
the Public Works Building at
655-7786 to be placed on a
schedule.
Tax collector
George L. Miller, tax collec-
tor, announces the 2012 county
and borough taxes have been
mailed.
The face period continues un-
til June 30. Penaltyperiodwill be
honored through December 15
when the tax books will be
closed.
Office hours during rebate are
from 6 to 8 p.m. Tuesday and
Wednesday.
It is the property owner’s re-
sponsibility to forward tax bills
to financial institutions for pay-
ment. If a receipt is requested,
please include a self addressed
stamped envelope with payment.
For appointments, call 655-
3801 or 655-7782 ext. 232.
Birthday notes
Celebrating this week: Sheri
Slusser, June 24; Antoinette La-
Fratte, June 25; Maria Yonki,
Bruce Silveri, Alexandra Ami-
co, June 27; Courtney Santee,
Craig Wrubel, Sarah Jallen,
Kayla Bucci, Pat Flynn, June 28;
Lisa Vazquez, June 29; Dolores
Rozelle, Gino Marinelli, Jacque-
line Zabresky, June 30.
Thought of the week
Music is the harmonious voice
of creation; an echo of the invis-
ible world.
Quote of the week
“God, grant me the serenity to
accept the things I cannot
change, the courage to change
the things I can, and the wisdom
to know the difference.” – Rein-
hold Niebuhr
Bumper sticker
Chance makes our parents, but
choice makes our friends.
West Pittston Open golf tournament August 26
WESTPITTSTON
Tony Callaio
654-5358
tonyc150@verizon.net
Corpus Christi Church bazaar will be held at the Holy Redeemer Church grounds Rt. 92 in Harding Friday, June 29 through Sunday, July 1. Friday and Saturday: 5:30 to 11
p.m.; Sunday: 1 ± 7 p.m. Entertainment: Friday, June 29 - Groove Train, 7 ± 11 p.m.; Saturday, June 30 - Flaxy Morgan, 7- 11p.m.; Sunday, July 1 - Waterstreet with Joe Valen-
ti & Bill Payne, 1 ± 4 p.m.; Sweet Pepper and the Long Hots, 4 ± 7 p.m.
Shown is the bazaar committee.
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Due to Little League District
Tournament schedules, the
Community Yard Sale at the
Exeter Lions Little League
ComplexonCedar St will be res-
cheduled to Sunday, July 29
from 830 a.m. until 1230 p.m..
Interested Sellers can obtain
space for $10 by contacting
Frank DeAngelo atdeange-
los4@comcast.net. Spaces
should be reserved by Sunday,
July 22.
Sellers will be given an area
around the perimeter of the field
and will be able to display mer-
chandise on tables and in the
space between them and the
fence. Sellers must provide their
own tables.
Sellers can set up beginning at
630 a.m on the morning of the
sale. All unsold merchandise
must be removed from the
Grounds by 2:30 p.m. that same
day. Space will be limited to the
first 25 vendors. Again, contact
Frank DeAngelo atdeange-
los4@comcast.netby Sunday,
July 22 for details and to reserve
your space. The concession
stand will also be open to sell
coffee and breakfast items.
SAT review classes
Wyoming Area is again offer-
ing SATVerbal and Math review
classes this summer. If interested
in enrolling in these classes, call
Mrs. Rabel at 655-2836, ext.
2339. Each session will feature
10 hours of instruction.
Cost for non-residents will be
$50. Cost for residents will vary
depending on enrollment. Costs
are expected to run between $20
and $30 per 10 hours of instruc-
tion.
Golf tournament
The Annual Care and Concern
Free Health Clinic Golf Tourna-
ment will take place on Friday,
July 13 at Emanon Country
Club, Falls.
Registration for a foursome is
$340 or $85 for individuals and
includes lunch, dinner, awards
and prizes. Sponsorships are
Hole in One, $500; Eagle, $400;
Birdie, $300; Par, $200; Bogey,
$100. For more information, call
Jim at 654-2585.
Cosmopolitan Seniors
Cosmopolitan Seniors travel
coordinator Johanna is accepting
reservations for a trip to Mount
Airy Casino on Wednesday July
11. Pickups in Exeter and Pitt-
ston. You do not have to be a
member to come on these trips.
Details can be obtained from Jo-
hanna at 655-2720.
Atlantic City bus trip
Saint John’s Lodge #233 is
sponsoring its second annual bus
trip to Resorts Casino in Atlantic
City, Saturday July 28. Donation
is $40 and includes $25 in free
slot play (must be 21 to receive
the free play offer), movies down
and back, raffle and much more.
Photo ID or a Resorts Player
Card is required. The bus will
leave the Wyoming Valley Mall
near Sears Automotive at 7:30
a.m. and leave Atlantic City at 7
p.m. Reservations are a must.
Payment is due with reservation.
Call Vince Tedeschi at 371-9940.
Masons’ barbecue
Saint John’s Masonic Lodge
#233 and Tyre Square Club Ma-
sonic Lodge Golden Rule #15
have scheduled a joint open
house and barbecue for August
18 at Saint John’s Lodge Hall,
498 Yatesville Road, Jenkins
Township.
The barbecue begins with
cooking at 7 a.m. with servings
from11a.m. until 6 p.m. (or until
the food runs out, whichever
comes first.)
Prices are an easy $10 for the
chicken or ribs and $25 for a rack
of ribs. For more information,
call Jerry Venetz at 654-9833 or
Fred Kotula at 655-1687.
Borough news
Exeter Borough Police remind
citizens that anyone caught
dumping or littering along Pack-
er Avenue will be cited. Anyone
who sees such action is asked to
contact the Exeter Borough Po-
lice at 654-3301. Increased pa-
trols will be present.
All violators will be subject to
the issuance of a parking cita-
tion. This activity will be sched-
uled for the first Friday of each
month until November.
Exeter Police Department
warns all dog owners that it is a
violation of borough ordinance
to fail to clean up after your ani-
mal. Numerous complaints have
been filed and the department
will begin aggressively enforc-
ing said ordinance. Any and all
violators will be subject to a fine
of not less than $25 and a maxi-
mum of $300. Any resident who
witnesses such an event is to call
the Exeter Borough Police De-
partment, Office of the Chief of
Police at 654-3001, ext 1.
Exeter Borough Police De-
partment reminds all residents
that any vehicle parked along the
roadway not currently inspected
or registered is in violation of
Exeter Borough Abandoned Ve-
hicle Ordinance and subject to
fine and costs along with the re-
moval of the vehicle at the own-
er’s expense.
Exeter Borough will collect all
plastic household containers on-
ly numbers one through seven.
The number is located in the
chasing arrows on the bottom of
the household containers. All
lids can be placed in the recy-
cling also. Five gallon plastic
containers are also acceptable.
No plastic toys, fencing or other
materials are acceptable.
Yard waste
Exeter Borough has begun
yard waste collection on Thurs-
days. Residents are asked to
place yard waste curbside by 6
a.m. and are encouraged to use a
mulching mower blade and
mulch grass weekly, leaving it on
the lawn. The benefits include
keeping fertilizer and pesticides
onthe treatedyard, thus reducing
the expense of additional treat-
ments.
Yard waste consists only of the
following materials: shrubbery
or grass clippings and tree limbs.
Tree limbs are not to exceed
three feet lengthor1/2-inchindi-
ameter. Limbs should be bun-
dled, tied and placed in an open
container. Rocks, stones, dirt
and animal waste are not accept-
able forms of yard waste.
St. Barbara’s Parish
The Golden Age Club will
meet at 1:30 p.m. on Thursday,
June 28 at the Parish Center.
Hostesses are Theresa Blasav-
age, Etta Chiampi and Netta
Deeb.
A bazaar meeting will be held
at 7 p.m. on Monday, June 25 in
the Parish Center.
The Christian Women’s Orga-
nization is sponsoring an Italian
Basket for the Bazaar. Anyone
wishing to donate items for the
basket can drop them off at the
rectory between 9 a.m. and 2
p.m. Monday through Friday.
The last dayfor donations will be
Thursday, July 12.
Class on Catholicism: The se-
ries of 10 presentations begins on
Tuesday, June 26 and continues
each Tuesday until August 28.
Times are 10:30 a.m. at St. Mon-
ica’s and 7 p.m. at St. Barbara’s.
For more information, contact
St. Monica’s at 693-1991 or St.
Barbara’s at 654-2103
Volunteers are needed for ba-
zaar set-up and clean-up, kitch-
en, grill, food service and
grounds. Sign-ups will be after
Mass in the next few weeks.
Basket Raffle/Chinese Auc-
tion: For more information, con-
tact Karen Bernardi at 655-6329
or Cynthia Liberski at 693-2349.
Band sponsors: Anyone inter-
ested in sponsoring a band for
one night is asked to call Ray at
655-6329.
Items are needed for an enter-
tainment raffle.
Community yard sale rescheduled to July 29
EXETER
EILEEN CIPRIANI
287-3349
ecipriani@comcast.net
West Wyoming Hose Co #1
will hold a Community Day on
July 28. The event will have
food, games, prizes and demon-
strations, something for every-
one. More details will follow as
they become available.
Dean’s list
David Mizzer, son of Mark
and Cathy Mizzer, of West
Wyoming, achieved dean’s list
recognition for the spring 2012
semester at the Penn State Uni-
versity Smeal School of Busi-
ness at Main Campus. He will
graduate in December 2012 with
a major in Business Marketing.
Mizzer plans to work in the
California area after graduation.
Compost yard
The compost yardwill be open
from10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Satur-
days.
Yard waste containers should
not exceed 30 pounds. No plastic
or recyclable bags, stones or dirt
are allowed. Residents are asked
not to dumb their yard waste out-
side the fence.
Recycling reminder
West Wyoming recycling con-
tainers are located behind Hose
Company No. 1.
Recycling can be dropped off
any day of the week.
The following is the list of ac-
ceptable items for recycling
commingled food and beverage
containers, #1 & #2 plastic con-
tainers (numbers are located on
the bottom of plastic container).
#1 recyclables include soda, wa-
ter, flavored beverage bottles,
salad dressing bottles, peanut
butter jars and mayonnaise jars.
#2 recyclables include milk jugs
and laundry detergent bottles,
shampoo, drain cleaners, aspirin
bottles.
Hose Co. No. 1 plans Community Day for July 28
WESTWYOMING
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Janet E. Flack will serve as
chair and master of ceremonies
for the upcoming annual observ-
ance ceremony commemorating
the Battle of Wyoming at 10 a.m.
on Wednesday, July 4 at the
Wyoming Monument National
Historic Site, Wyoming Avenue,
Wyoming.
This will be the 134th annual
ceremony on the grounds of the
Wyoming Monument, a tradi-
tion started in 1878 when the
100th anniversary of the Revolu-
tionary War Battle and Mas-
sacre, which occurred near
Wyoming, was celebrated. In Ju-
ly, 1878, then U.S. President
RutherfordHayes came tothe ar-
ea to be the keynote speaker for
the event.
Flack is a graduate of Wyom-
ing Seminary and Endicott Col-
lege, Beverly, Massachusetts.
She studied fine art at the State
University of New York, Albany
and also graduated from Har-
rington College of Design in
Chicago. She is the new board
president of the Luzerne County
Historical County, a board mem-
ber andvice chair of the Everhart
Museum in Scranton, a board
member of the Catherine McAu-
ley Center for Women and Chil-
dren, a member of Circle 200
and was the 2005 recipient of the
Sisters of Mercy Woman of the
year award.
Rabbi LarryKaplanof Temple
Israel in Wilkes-Barre will serve
as chaplain for the event. The
Wyoming Valley Band will be
providing patriotic music
throughout the ceremony.
The event is open to the public
free of charge and tent covered
seating is provided.
Borough news
Wyoming Borough is working
on a newsletter project. The
newsletter will be distributed to
all homes within the borough.
Businesses interested in adver-
tising in the first issue should
contact the borough office at
693-0291 for more information.
The opening day of the Farm-
er’s Market in the Butler Street
Park is scheduled for June 30.
The market will run from 9 a.m.
to 2 p.m. on Saturdays during the
growing season. Vendor space is
available. For information, call
the borough office at 693-0291.
SAT review classes
Wyoming Area is again offer-
ing SATVerbal and Math review
classes this summer. If interested
in enrolling in these classes, call
Mrs. Rabel at 655-2836, ext.
2339. Each session will feature
10 hours of instruction.
Cost for non-residents will be
$50. Cost for residents will vary
depending on enrollment. Costs
are expected to run between $20
and $30 per 10 hours of instruc-
tion.
Compost yard
The West Wyoming compost
yard will be open from10 a.m. to
2 p.m. on Saturdays for residents
of West Wyoming and Wyom-
ing. The compost yard accepts
brush, branches, leaves and
grass. Residents are reminded to
take care that yard waste does
not contain plastic or recyclable
bags. The compost yard does not
accept stones or dirt. Compost is
also available free of charge to
residents of both towns.
Ambulance membership
The annual ambulance mem-
bership for June 2012 – June
2013 registration is now in pro-
gress. Membership applications
have been sent to every house-
hold in Wyoming Borough.
Anyone who has not received an
application can call 693-1371
and leave a message with your
name and address.
Anyone whodoes not paytheir
membership but uses the ambu-
lance service will be responsible
for payment in full.
Lawn reminder
Wyoming Borough reminds
residents to cut their grass and
remove high weeds from their
properties as per ordinances.
St. Monica’s news
Congratulations and Good
Luck to St. Monica’s Senior
Acolytes, Brandon and Ryan
Tomsak, twin sons of Cheryl and
Frank Tomsak. Both young men
graduated from Wyoming Area
High School and their future
plans take them in different di-
rections. Brandon will begin his
studies at L.C.C.C in Nanticoke
and Ryan has plans to join the
Navy. Both have served in their
parish church, formerly St. Jo-
seph’s and nowSt. Monica’s Par-
ish, since second Grade.
A 10-part series entitled “Ca-
tholicism” begins on Tuesday,
June 26 and continues each
Tuesday until August 28. The
presentations will be held at 10
a.m. at St. Monica’s and at 7 p.m.
St. Barbara’s. For more informa-
tion, call St. Monica’s at 693-
1991or St. Barbara’s at 654-2103
or email olos363@verizon.net
or stanthonyexeter@com-
cast.net.
Vacation Bible School is being
held from June 25- 29. Lillian
Dominici is coordinating the
week’s events which include
many indoor and outdoor activ-
ities. Adult volunteers are need-
ed as well as teen volunteers to
help with the games and creative
activities. Helpers may call Lil-
lian at 693-6227.
Vocation Golf Classic 2012
will be held on Monday, July 30
at Blue Ridge Trail Golf Club,
Mountaintop. Registration is 10
a.m., lunch is 11 a.m., shotgun
start is at noon. His Excellency
Bishop Joseph C. Bambera and
the seminarians will add a spe-
cial challenge to the participants.
For more information and reg-
istration, call 207-2250 or con-
tact Development@dioceseof-
scranton.org. Deadline for spon-
sorship is July 16.
WA ice hockey
The WA Ice Hockey Middle
School League is now taking
names of interested fifth and
sixth-grade students residing
within the Wyoming Area
School District for the 2012-
2013 season.
For more information, contact
Dawn Thomas atme-
jane134@aol.com
Library news
Wyoming Free Library An-
nounces Summer activities for
the children.
Tea Party: Fancy Nancy and
the Friends of the Wyoming Free
Library say “Bonjour” and ask
the pleasure of your company at
a Tea Party from10 a.m. to noon
onSaturday, July7. Dress inyour
most glamorous outfit and re-
ceive a “Cadeau” (that means
“gift” in French.)
Luke Fuller, our maitre d’, will
escort guests. Boys and girls and
a parent are invited. Nancy has
invited a visitor from France to
join us – 16 year old Tatiana En-
jovly fromLyon, France. Tatiana
has many special things to share.
A donation of $2 per child in-
cludes the cost of a photo. Call
the library at 693-1364 or sign up
on Facebook by June 25 to re-
serve you place at the table.
“Bientot” (that means “see you
soon” in French.)
Teddy Bear’s Picnic is spon-
sored by Little Miss Library
Grace Washney and her Court,
Abby Tirva and Eliana Para. Join
us at the Butler Street Park from
2 to 3:30 p.m. on Saturday, June
23. Bring your blankets and your
favorite Teddy Bear (or stuffed
animal.) Enjoy some Teddy Bear
Music, games and snacks. A do-
nation of $2 per family will in-
clude a photo of your child with
the bear. In case of rain, the event
will be held at the library.
Jewelry Making Classes for
Mommy and Me is an introduc-
tion to making Bracelets using
“Memory Wire” and an assort-
ment of beads will be held from
10 to11:30 a.m. on Thursday, Ju-
ly 19. “Mommy and Me” is for
children ages 4 and up and an in-
dependent learninggroupfor ag-
es 8 and up. Follow-up classes
canbe arrangedtomake earrings
and necklaces. The cost per
bracelet is $5. Call the library by
July 14 to reserve a slot in the
class. .
2012 Summer Reading Club
Activities
Space is limited so please reg-
ister for the programs that you’re
able to attend. Call 693-1364 to
register.
Monday, June 18 - 10 a.m.,
Summer Reading Club registra-
tion
Thursday, July 5 - 11 a.m.,
Make your own glow in the dark
jewelry; noon, ages 6 and up.
Friday, July6–11a.m. tonoon,
ages 6 and up, make your own
glow in the dark jewelry from
Monday, July 9 – 10:30 to
11:30 a.m., preschool story time,
ages 3-5. “If You Give a Mouse
A Cookie” by Laura Numeroff
Wednesday, July11–11a.m. to
noon, glow jars. Child must
bring an empty jar with lid.
Thursday, July 12 – 11 a.m. to
noon, what do your dreams
mean? Let’s find out! Ages 6 and
up
Friday, July 13 – Noon, movie
day.
Saturday, July 14 – Noon to 3
p.m., game day. All ages are wel-
come.
Monday, July 16 – 10:30 to
11:30 a.m., preschool story time,
ages 3-5. “Chrysanthemum” by
Kevin Henkes
Wednesday, July18–11a.m. to
noon, ghost stories, ages 6 and
up.
Friday, July 20 – 11 a.m. to
noon, make your own black light
t-shirt, ages 6 and up. Child must
bring their own black t-shirt.
Saturday, July 21 – 10 to 11
a.m., Furry Tail reading pro-
gram, all ages are welcome;
noon to1p.m. - Ravenous Read-
er’s book discussion, “The
Graveyard Book” by Neil Gai-
man, all ages are welcome. Pizza
and soda provided.
Monday, July 23 – 10:30 to
11:30 a.m., preschool story time,
ages 3-5. “Chicka, Chicka Boom
Boom” by John Archambault
Wednesday, July 25 – 11 a.m.
to noon, make your own black
light t-shirt, ages 6 and up. Child
must bring their own black t-
shirt.
Friday, July 27 – 11 a.m. to
noon, monsterize yourself, ages
6 and up.
Saturday, July 28 – Noon, doll
workshop, ages 6 and up
Monday, July 30 – 10:30 to
11:30 a.m., preschool story time,
ages 3-5. “Brown Bear, Brown
Bear, What Do You See?”by Bill
Martin, Jr.
Wednesday, Aug. 1–11a.m. to
noon, monsterize yourself 101,
ages 6 and under.
Monday, Aug. 6 – 10:30 to
11:30 a.m., preschool story time,
ages 3-.5 “Harold and the Purple
Crayon” by Crockett Johnson
Monday, Aug. 13 – 10:30 to
11:30 a.m., preschool story
times, ages 3-5. “Harry the Dirty
Dog” by Gene Zion and Marga-
ret Graham
Flack to chair Battle of Wyoming Commemoration
WYOMING NEWS
EILEEN CIPRIANI
287-3349
ecipriani@comcast.net
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The Greater Pittston
YMCA kick off summer
on the official first day of
the season, June 20, with
Summer Palooza 2012,
hosted by Sam Sangue-
dolce, Michael Lombardo
and Dion Fernandes at the
Open Space in Pittston at
73 South Main Street from
6 to 10 p.m.
The proceeds of the
event, sponsored by Palaz-
zo 53, Reilly Associates
and the YMCA, benefit
the Greater Pittston YM-
CA. The Yoffered compli-
mentary babysitting to all
attendees from 6 to 9 p.m.
at the Y.
‘Summer Palooza’ fundraiser benefits YMCA
BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE SUNDAY DISPATCH
Greater Pittston YMCA Executive Director Craig Lukatch welcomes about 100 people to the Summer
Palooza at the Open Space on Main Street in Pittston Wednesday night.
Brandy Feichter of Pittston, left, Carmel and Judd Spencer of Yatesville, and Ann and Red O'Brien of
Pittston talk at the Summer Palooza. Margaret Rogo, left, and Julie Donahue, both of Jenkins Town-
ship, at the Greater Pittston YMCA Summer Palooza.
Allison Vozniak of Swoyersville, left, and Alan Dente of Pittston
pose for a photo at the Summer Palooza.
Trish and George Pegula of 'Good 2
Go' performduring the Greater Pitt-
ston YMCA Summer Palooza at the
Open Space in Pittston on Wednes-
day night.
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I recently attended a military
funeral in Plains Township and
was very impressed with what I
observed. Eighteen members of
the of the Plains Township vol-
unteer honor guard of American
Legion Post No. 558 performed
their military assignments with
excellence and precision at the
funeral, church and cemetery.
I watched the people who at-
tended on this cold, windy and
rainydarkday, watchingthe hon-
or guard snap to attention and sa-
lute as the coffin passed by, car-
rying one of their own. At the
cemetery, there were tears and
sadness in their eyes. At the play-
ing of the TAPS(a military tradi-
tion), more than half of the 100
people in attendance were cry-
ing. This is a very moving and
lasting experience that everyone
should see at least once in their
life time.
You will never forget it and
you have a memory of this funer-
al for life. I have attended many
funerals in the past as a police of-
ficer and elected state constable
(on duty) in Lackawanna and
Luzerne Counties for over 40
years and this funeral was one of
the best organized funerals I had
the pleasure of attending. I
would like to congratulate every
member of that honor guard and
other honor guard members ev-
erywhere for what they do.
Everyone appreciates what
you do as a volunteer and I’m
sure you will be rewarded some-
day by someone higher than us.
Thank you, veterans every-
where.
Bill Dillon
Jenkins Township
Korean Vet (USAF)
YO U R O P I N I O N
Praise for American Legion
Post #558 Honor Guard
When Stephanie Bojnowski
graduated from Seton Catholic
High School in 2000 where she
playedsoccer andbasketball, she
knewwhat she wanted to do – be
a cop.
Stephanie’s mother Michele
said that was better than her oth-
er choice. “She was always very
athletic and we knewshe was go-
ing to do something like that, she
wanted to go in the service, but I
said “oh, no, you’re my only
daughter.’ ”
Stephanie attended LCCCand
Lackawanna College and earned
a degree in criminal justice. In
2002 she secured jobs in security
at the Tobyhanna Depot and at
the same time as a part time pa-
trol officer inDupont. WhenDu-
pont police sergeant Tony De-
Mark was sent to Iraq with the
reserves, Bojnowski was named
acting Sargeant in Dupont. She
worked both jobs, Dupont by day
and Tobyhanna by night.
But her real dream was to be a
state trooper. In 2007 she real-
ized that dream when she was
hired by the Maryland State Po-
lice.
Today, she is a decorated Ma-
ryland State Police Trooper in
Queen Anne’s County, Mary-
land.
Last month, she was awarded
the 23rd Annual Sgt. Wallace J.
Mowbray Memorial Award for
Outstanding Law Enforcement
Officer for Queen Anne’s Coun-
ty. The award is sponsored by the
Centerville, Maryland Rotary
Club. She was one of five final-
ists for the Mowbray award.
In a story in the Star Review, a
newspaper in Easton, Maryland,
Harold Reece, of the local Ro-
tary club, said of Bojnowski,
“She was one that was really in-
volved in volunteerism, drug ar-
rests, fugitive arrests, traffic
stops, and criminal investiga-
tions. She put in extra time in the
community and volunteer activ-
ities.”
Bojnowski was also the Cen-
terville Trooper of the Year for
2011and was a finalist for Mary-
land State Trooper of the Year.
Her mother said she is proud
or her daughter’s accomplish-
ments, but worries about her
safety. “Oh my God, I’m
thrilled,” she said. “Being a
mother I was upset when she
moved away, but I’mhappy now.
I worry, but less as time goes on.
She’s very level-headed.”
Michele Bojnowski and Ste-
phanie’s father Joe live in Du-
pont.
Seton graduate a ‘top cop’ in Maryland
Stephanie Bojnowski gets award in Queen Anne’s County
By JACK SMILES
jsmiles@psdispatch.com
Stephanie Bojnowski
The face periodfor payment of
the 2012 county and township
tax bills will expire on June 30.
There are no office hours at the
municipal building until the
school bills are mailed. Taxes
can be paid at 3 Laflin Road, In-
kerman between 4 and 5 p.m. on
Tuesdays between or by special
appointment by calling the tax
collector at 654-9710.
After June 30, the county and
municipal taxes will be payable
at the penalty amount until De-
cember 31.
Any property owner who has
not received a tax bill or anyone
who has received a tax bill in er-
ror should contact the tax collec-
tor as soon as possible.
Property owners with escrow
accounts should forward their
tax bill to their mortgage compa-
nies as soon as possible.
Also, new homeowners
should complete the Homestead
Exemption form to receive the
reduction of any future tax bills.
Property taxes due
JENKINS TWP.
St. Peter’s Lutheran Church,
Rock Street will hold a Straw-
berry Social from 4 to 7 p.m. on
June 30. Takeouts will begin at
3:30 p.m. Donation is $5 for
adults and $3 for children under
10. Ticket includes strawberry
shortcake and a beverage. Spe-
cial menu will include whim-
pies, hot dogs with sauce or sau-
erkraut and a variety of salads.
For more information, call Pam
at 655-0043, 313-2829 or Lois at
654-4048
Girls League schedule
Hughestown Girl’s League
schedule:
June 25, Violets vs. Rosebuds;
June 26, Rosebuds vs. Daffodils;
June 27, Twigs vs. Violets; June
28, Daffodils vs. Twigs.
A new scoreboard has been
donated by Assistant Chief of
Police Darrin Bidwell, James
Brodosky and Byron Webb.
Picnic in the Park
The Picnic in the Park will be
held fromnoon to 5 p.m. on July
21. There will be games for all
ages, Tug of War between Hugh-
estown police and firemen dunk
tank, moonwalk, pony rides
from1to 3 p.m. and DJ JimSim-
ko offering dance routines for
everyone.
All is free of charge. Anyone
wishing to donate cakes or sal-
ads may do so by calling 654-
2061or contact Carmen Ambro-
sino or Wayne Quick. They also
can be dropped off the day of the
picnic.
Gift and Card Show
The Gift and Craft Show will
be held from noon to 5 p.m. on
November 6 at the Hughestown
Hose Company, 30 Center St.
Chairpersons Mary Ann Quick
and Mary Golya are chairper-
sons for the event.
Strawberry Social Saturday
HUGHESTOWN
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NORTHEASTFAIR, Commerce
Road in the Grimes Industrial
Park, Suscon Road. Concludes to-
day, Sunday, June 24, 1 p.m. to
10:30 with Shawn Klush, Elvis Im-
personator, Agricultural Exhibit
Departments, 25 rides by Reit-
hoffer Shows, petting zoo, magi-
cian, motor sports, multiple food
consessions and more.
CORPUS CHRISTI PARISH,
Holy Redeemer Church grounds,
Rt. 92, Harding; Friday, June 29,
5:30-11, Saturday, June 30, 5:30-11,
Sunday, July 1, 1-7.
Entertainment: Friday, 7-11,
Groove Train; 7-11, Saturday, Flaxy
Morgan; Sunday, 1-4, Waterstreet
(Joe Valenti & Bill Payne); Sunday,
4-7 p.m. Sweet Pepper and the
Long Hots.
St. PETER’S EVANGELICAL
LUTHERN CHURCH, 100 Rock
Street, Hughestown
Strawberry social June 30.
Tickets are Adults $5, children $3
that includes shortcake and bev-
erage. Also available will be wim-
pies, hot dogs, variety of salads
and bake beans.
Take-outs as well 3 p.m. to 3:30
p.m. Serving 3:30 to 7 p.m.
NATIVITY OF OUR LORD
PARISH, 529 Stephenson St., Du-
ryea. 6-11 p.m. July 6, 5-11:30 p.m.
July 7, 4-10 p.m. July 8. Entertain-
ment: 7-11 p.m. July 6, Picture Per-
fect; 5-7 p.m. Jude’s Polka Jets II,
7:30-11:30 p.m. Flaxy Morgan, July
7; 6-10 p.m. July 8, The Sperazza
Band. Get things started early
with pre-picnic bingo in the Sa-
cred Heart Hall at 7 p.m. The flea
market also will open early that
day at 5 p.m. in the church base-
ment.
ST. JOSEPH MARELLO PAR-
ISH, at Our Lady of Mount Carmel
church grounds, 237 William St.,
Pittston. 5-11 p.m. July 13-15. Enter-
tainment: 7-11 p.m. July 13, Flaxy
Morgan; 7-11 p.m. July 14, Jeanne
Zano Band; 6-10 p.m. July 15,
Sweet Pepper and the Long Hots.
Big-ticket raffle: 2,000$20chanc-
es available to win a Chevy Cruze
or $20,000.
GERMANIAHOSECOMPANY,
will hold its annual festival July 17-
21. There will be rides, food and
fun. Entertainment TBA
QUEEN OF THE APOSTLES,
715 Hawthorne St., Avoca. 6-10
p.m. July 19, 6-11 p.m. July 20, 5-11
p.m. July 21. Entertainment: 7-10
p.m. July 19, Millennium; 7-10 p.m.
July 20, Hometown Boyz; 6-11 p.m.
July 21, Banana Hammocks. The
Bounce House is a main attraction
for little ones. Potato pancakes,
pizza fritta, homemade baked
goods, cheesesteak and chicken
cheesesteak hoagies, pizza, Bitty
Bill’s Ice cream, Rita’s Italian ice.
Games of chance for adults and
a grand raffle featuring a top prize
of $1,000andthemebaskets anda
trunk of cheer.
ST. BARBARAPARISH, on the
grounds of St. AnthonyChurch, 28
Memorial St., Exeter. 5:30-11 p.m.
July 20-21, 5-10 p.m. July 22. En-
tertainment: 7-11 p.m. each eve-
ning. July 20, Sweet Pepper and
the Long Hots; July 21, Jeanne Za-
no Band; July 22, Flaxy Morgan.
Homemade tripe, a delicacy that
draws the crowds.
ST. MARIA GORETTI, 31 Laflin
Road, Laflin. 5-10 p.m. July 27-29.
Entertainment: July 27, Groove
Train; July 28, Mason Dixon; July
29, Jeanne Zano Band. Pony rides
for adventurous little ones.
SACRED HEART OF JESUS
PARISH, 215 Lackawanna Ave.,
Dupont. 6-11 p.m. Aug. 2-3, 5-11 p.m.
Aug. 4. Entertainment: Aug. 2, Joe
Stevens Kickin’ Polkas; Aug. 3, Joe
Stanky and his Cadets; Aug. 4,
John Stevens’ Doubleshot. Home-
made cheese, potato and cabbage
pierogies are a draw.
ST. MICHAEL’S THE ARCH-
ANGEL BYZANTINE CATHOLIC
CHURCH, 205 North Main, Pitt-
ston. Saturday, August 4, 9a.m. to
4 p.m. and Sunday, August 5 10
a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Flea Market, ziti
dinner, homemade piggies, halus-
ki, pirohi, wimpies hot dogs and
sauerkraut.
Bake sale Saturday. Money
prize raffles.
ST. JOHN THE EVANGELIST
PARISH COMMUNITY, Broad
andChurchstreets, Pittston. 5:30-
10 p.m. Aug. 9-11. Ethnic and picnic
foods. Entertainment: Aug. 9,
Somethin’ Else; Aug. 10, Hillbilly
D’Luxe; Aug. 11, Flaxy Morgan. Set-
on auditorium becomes a one-
stop shopping center for books,
CDs, jewelry and more.
PITTSTON TOMATO FESTIV-
AL, Tomato Lot, Main Street, Pitt-
ston. Aug. 16 – 19. Over fifty thou-
sand people will attend the four-
day event that has been touted as
one of the best festivals in North-
eastern Pennsylvania. Delicious
food, a tomato fight, sauce wars, a
varietyof liveentertainment, apa-
rade, 5K run, games, rides, arts
and crafts and bingo.
OBLATES OF ST. JOSEPH
FUNFEST: Seminary grounds on
Highway 315, Pittston. Sunday
Aug. 26. “End of Summer” Out-
door Chicken Bar-B-Q dinner on
the seminary grounds, fromNoon
– 5:00 p.m.. Mass at 11:00 a.m. Live
entertainment with Jeanne Zano
Band, raffle prizes, instant bingo,
specialty baskets and kids’ corner
with pony rides, face painting,
magic show and bounce house.
EDITOR’S NOTE: Let us know
about your group’s summer ba-
zaar and we’ll list them through-
out the summer.
GREATER PI TTSTON BAZAAR L I STI NG
BILL TARUTIS FILE PHOTO/THE SUNDAY DISPATCH
Phyllis O'Boyle of
Dupont, right, and
Olivia Lombardo of
Pittston Township
scoop out a serving
of tripe at the Our
Lady of Mount Carmel
Church bazaar in
Pittston last year.
This year, the St.
Joseph Marello Par-
ish bazaar will be at
Our Lady of Mount
Carmel church
grounds, 237 William
St., Pittston from 5 to
11 p.m. on July 13
to15.
Serving up spoonfuls of fun
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Sports
The Greater Pittston Legion
Senior baseball team won three
of four games dating back to Sat-
urday, June 16 and had one game
rained out. Going into today’s
game at home versus Tunkhan-
nock GP is 8-1 and in first place
in the Wyoming Valley League
standings at the halfway point of
the season.
They have a one-game lead
over Tunkhannock in the stand-
ings, but manager Drew Whyte
doesn’t care much about that.
“As far as I’m concerned we
have a three-game. We’re plus
three with nine to go.”
What he means is GPhas three
fewer losses than 5-4 Back
Mountain, the team with the
fourth fewest number of losses.
That matters because the top
four teams make the playoffs and
there is no real reward for first
place.
On June16 GPbeat Mountain-
top-2, 8-4. Granteed was the
winning pitcher and Nowicki
was 3-for-4. Last Sunday GPlost
to Back Mountain 2-1. Maloney
was the loser, but did not allow
an earned run. GP loaded the
bases in the seventh but couldn’t
score.
On Tuesday GP beat Mouna-
tiontop-2 again 5-1. Ron Musto,
who has been red hot all season,
had two hits as did Ryan Carey
Thursday’s 8-7 win over Nan-
ticoke in honey Pot was a wild
one. GP lead 8-1 into the bottom
of the sixth when Nanticoke
scored six, with the help of a
couple of outfield errors. Roma-
nowski pitched a complete
game.
SENI OR L EGI ON BASEBAL L
BILL TARUTIS
Greater Pitt-
ston shortstop
Randy McDer-
mott fields a
ground ball
against Nanti-
coke..
At 8-1 GP Legion faces six games
See LEGION, Page 44
Home today versus Tunkhannock at 5:45
By JACK SMILES
jsmiles@psdispatch.com
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P.J. Bone (double, triple, two
RBI), Musto (3-4, double, two
RBI) and Bart Chupka (3-4, two
doubles, RBI) were the top hit-
ters.
Whyte said he didn’t consider
pulling Romanowski during the
six-run rally. “No, he would have
no part of coming out. He’s a
tough kid.”
GP faces six game over the
next eight days. After today the
team will be down to 11 players
for the week, as several players
are gone for “shore week.”
The standings belowdo not in-
clude Saturday’s games when
Back Mountain and Hazleton
played a double header and
Wilkes-Barre was at Nanticoke.
Standings
Greater Pittston 8-1
Tunkhannock 8-3
Hazleton 5-2
Mountaintop – 2 6-3
Nanticoke 7-5
Back Mountain 5-4
Swoyersville 4-6
Plains 4-8
Wilkes-Barre 2-9
Mountaintop 1-10
This week’s games all 5:45
Today
Tunkhannock at GP
Monday
Nanticoke at GP
Wednesday
GP at Swoyersville
Thursday
Hazleton at GP
Friday
Wilkes-Barre at GP
Sunday
GP at Hazleton
Legion
Continued from Page 43
Greater Pittston's P.J. Bone, right, steals second base ahead of the tag of Nanticoke's Michael Sulcoski.
Greater Pittston first baseman Bart Chupka receives a quick throw forcing back a Nanticoke base runner.
BILL TARUTIS/ FOR THE SUNDAY DISPATCH
Greater Pittston's AdamRoma-
nowski delivers a pitch against
Nanticoke in American Legion
baseball action Thursday eve-
ning at Ted Hiller Park
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Larry Medico and his son
Mariano, a high school golfer for
Holy Redeemer, defeated Mike
Hirtler Jr and Bill Burke, 1-up
yesterday afternoon to win the
last slot in the quarterfinals of
the John A. Allan Memorial
Golf Tournament at Fox Hill.
In the quarters, the Medicos
were paired with Richard Lanes-
ki and Pittston Area graduate
Brandon Matthews.
Medico and Matthews played
against each other in the high
school season. Both were state
qualifiers.
Other matchups in the quar-
ters, which went off yesterday af-
ternoon, were Gill/Corbett ver-
sus Carroll/Davis, Mulhern/Co-
leman versus Mantione/Weis-
carger, and Gill/Vonderheid
versus Hoover/Davis.
The finals and semi-finals are
today
LOCAL GOL F
Finals today in John A. Allan
Mariano Medico, who teamed up with his father Larry, chipped within a foot of the hole on No.17.
TONY CALLAIO/ PHOTOS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Dan Rolles rolls an attempted put on No.3 while Judge Tom Burke
looks on.
Bill Burke chips on No.17 dur-
ing Match Play.
Joe Joyce tees off on No.1 of
the Allan Tournament.
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Local teams fromDuryea/Pitt-
ston Township, West Pittston
and Greater Wyoming Area are
entered in the District 16 and 31
Major Little League Softball
Tournaments.
All three teams won one game
and lost one game during the
week. They played in losers’
bracket games last evening,
which were too late for our dead-
line.
At least one team survived as
GWAplayed at West Pittston last
night in a District 31 losers’
bracket game.
District 16 Major Softball
Duryea/Pittston Twp 8
Plains/N. W-B1
Nina Cencetti pitched a com-
plete game one-hitter, striking
out 14 batters to lead Duryea/
Pittston Township to an 8-1 vic-
tory over Plains/North Wilkes-
Barre in District 16 Major Divi-
sion softball action on Wednes-
day.
Cencetti also helped her cause
by going 3-for-4 at the plate.
Also leading the way for Du-
ryea/Pittston Township were
Lauren Cawley and Morgan Me-
saris withtwohits apiece. Angel-
ica Singer, Bella Gorzkowski
and Kerri Shamnoski had one hit
each.
Nanticoke 4 Duryea/Pittston
Township 2
In the winner’s bracket final of
the District 16tournament, Jenna
Litowski struck out 10 Thursday
as Nanticoke Area advanced to
Monday’s final with a 4-2 victo-
ry and sent Duryea/Pittston Twp.
to the loser’s bracket.
Litowski picked up the victo-
ry, while Miranda Dunn and
Megan Murphy led the Nanti-
coke Area offense by each lacing
a single and scoring a run.
For Duryea/Pittston Town-
ship, Nina Cencotti whiffed
eight and also singled and scored
a run. Mackenzie Gable also sin-
gled for Duryea/Pittston Twp.
Duryea/Pittston Twp. played
at Mountaintop Saturday eve-
ning in a losers’ bracket game.
The winner will have to beat
Nanticoke twice on Monday and
Wednesday to win the tourna-
ment. Nanticoke need one win.
ALEX ANTONACCIPHOTOS
Lauren Cawley slides safely into home scoring on a passed ball for Duryea/Pittston Township in a District 16 Major All-Star Softball game
GWA and WP in losers’ bracket final
L I TTL E L EAGUE SOF TBAL L
Last night’s winner advanced to title round
MacKenzie Gable looks nervous as she watches her Duryea/Pitt-
ston Township teamrally.
See SOFTBALL, Page 47
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The District 16 and 31 Little
League All-Star Tournaments
started yesterday with six local
teams in action. In District 16
Majors Jenkins Township
played at Avoca/Dupont and
Mountaintop was at Duryea
yesterday, Saturday. Tomorrow,
Monday, in another first round
game, Pittston Township is at
Nanticoke.
In District 31 Majors yester-
day Exeter was at Northwest,
West Side played at West Pitt-
ston and Swoyersville played at
Wyoming/West Wyoming.
All the local teams will play
again this week in the double
elimination tournament.
There are three games involv-
ing local teams in the District 16
and 31 9-10 All Star tourna-
ments today. In District 16 soft-
ball Nanticoke is at Jenkins
Township today at 6 p.m.
In District 31 9-10 softball
Back Mountain is at Greater
Wyoming Area also today at 6
p.m. GWAis the onlylocal team
entered in the D-31 tourney.
In 9-10 baseball Hanover is at
Duryea today at 6 p.m.
The tournaments continue
during the week. On Tuesday in
District 16 softball Duryea/Avo-
ca/Pittston Twp will have a
home game against an opponent
to be determined.
There are two games involv-
ing local teams on Tuesday in
the 9-10 boys tournament. Pitt-
ston Township is at Jenkins
Township and Pittston is at Ash-
ley/Newtown. Both games re at
6 p.m.
Jenkins Township also has a
team in the District 16 Junior
Softball tournament. That be-
gins the first week of July.
In boys 10-11 Pittston and
Avoca-Dupont have teams en-
tered. That tournament begins
the first week of July. In d-16 Ju-
niors Avoca/Dupont, Jenkins/
Pittston, and Duryea/Pittston
Township are entered. That be-
gins the first week of July.
In District 16 Seniors Duryea/
Pittston Township and a com-
bined Avoca/Dupont/Pittston/
Jenkins team are entered. That
begins the first week of July.
West Pittston is in the D-31
10-11 boys tourney. Greater
WyomingArea is inthe boys Ju-
nior and Senior tournaments. In
the Senior tourney GWA and
Back Mountain are the only
teams entered.
Local LL teams
in action today
L I T T L E L E A G U E T O U R N A M E N T S
By JACK SMILES
jsmiles@psdispatch.com
District 31 Major Softball
West Pittston 7 Back Moun-
tain 3
Starting pitcher Olivia Ko-
petchny picked up the win as
West Pittston held Back Moun-
tain to two hits.
Grace Angelella and Julia Ko-
petchny each had a pair of hits
for West Pittston while Sarah
Holweg, Annie Karcutskie and
Lauren Kelley all doubled.
Kingston/Forty Fort 3 GWA
1
Melinda Holena (2-for-3) hit
the game-winning double for
Kingston/Forty Fort in support
of pitcher Melodi Raskiewicz,
who threw a one-hitter while
striking out nine.
Mandi Zawatski also had two
hits in the win.
Bob Horlacher 12 WP 0
Sydney Faux gave up one hit
and struck out six to lead Bob
Horlacher over West Pittston.
Sarah Traver went 3-for-3 with a
triple and Katie McCue went 3-
for-3 with a home run in the win.
Annie Karucskie had a single
for West Pittston.
GWA 21 West Side 3
Gwen Glatz hit a homerun and
triple with two RBIs to lead
GWA to a huge win over West
Side.
Megan Dillon hit a single with
three RBIs while Carlina Urban
hit a double with two RBIs in the
win.
Cassidy Graham pitched sev-
en strikeouts for GWA.
Heaven Hurry hit one single
with an RBI for West Side.
GWA played at West Pittston
in a loser’s bracket elimination
game Saturday. The tourneycon-
tinues next week.
Softball
Continued from Page 46
TONY CALLAIO
West Pittston's Olivia Kopetchny delivers a pitch in the earlier
innings against Back Mt.
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Download
Our New
Mobile
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The Greater Pittston Junior
Legion is currently sporting a 12
- 3 overall record and a 8 - 2 con-
ference record. The next time
they win a game it will be a mile-
stone win for coach Ron Musto.
He went into the season with
187 wins as a Legion coach, all at
the senior level. With the12 wins
so far this season he is at 199
wins entering this week. The
next win by the Junior team will
be Musto’s 200th combined as a
Senior and Junior coach.
Last week’s games
Swoyersville 4 GP 0
The locals suffered their first
conference lost of the season
when they traveled to Swoyers-
ville and faced the preseason fa-
vorite. Corey Lescavage pitcher
a tremendous game in his 4 2/3
innings of work striking out
three batters and not issuing a
walk. Kyle Charney led the of-
fense with 3 hits.
GP 5 Nanticoke 1
Zach Lopatka allowed three
consecutive singles to open the
game to the host Nanticoke
squad but only allowed one run
to score. The crafty lefthander
found his grove as he did not al-
low another run and allowed on-
ly two more hits through his next
5 1/3 innings of work. He struck
out batters and 3 walks. Jeremy
Zezza recorded the save in 2/3 of
an inning. The squad was paced
by Marty Michaels two singles,
Tyler Daugherty’s 2 singles and
walk, Marty Cirelli’s 2 walks and
single and Corey Lescavage and
Tyler Mitchell’s double.
Nanticoke 7 GP 4
The teams found themselves
playing each other again within
four hours. This time Nanticoke
was opportunistic as they reac-
hed starter Jeremy Zezza for 5
runs in the first inning. The GP
group kept scratching away and
closed the game to 5 - 4 but did
not have enough to complete the
comeback. Louis Tazamalas
found his stroke with three sin-
gles in the comeback effort.
GP 5 WB 4
In a very bizarre contest
played at the Atlas the locals gar-
nered a victory by rallying with
two outs and no one on base to
score four runs in the bottom of
the seventh and overcome a 4 - 1
deficit. Jeremy Zezza walked,
Marty Michaels delivered a dou-
ble, Tyler Mitchell walked to
load the bases.
Tyler Daugherty and Zach Lo-
patka then followed with walks
andthe marginwas closedto4-3.
Evan Musto then worked a full
count walk to tie the game before
Marty Cirelli’s groundball was
misplayedtocomplete the come-
back. Marty Michaels picked up
the win in one inning of work.
Musto, Lopatka, Gushka, Mitch-
ell all had singles.
GP13 Tunkhannock 0
The GP squad traveled north
and brought their hitting shoes
with them as they scored 9 runs
over the first to frames of play
and never looked back. Kyle
Charney was masterful on the
mound as he struck out 6 batters
and did not issue a walk. Louis
Tazamalas continued two swing
a hot stick as he scorched 3 hits
to fuel the onslaught.
Tyler Mitchell was right on his
tail with two singles, Rocky Rut-
kowski had a double and single,
while Evan Musto walked twice
and doubled. Zach Lopatka led
the game off with a stand up tri-
ple and Corey Lescavage dou-
bled. Rookie Kyle Musto deliv-
ered a sharp single through the
middle to secure the victory.
GP 9 Back Mountain 4
Zach Lopatka took the bump
and tossed 61/3 innings of no-hit
baseball and dominated the vis-
itors the Back Mountain. He sent
eight batters down swinging and
allowed only one walk. Center-
fielder Jeremy Stach pressured
the visitors with three line drive
singles, Marty Michaels has
continued to contribute at the
plate as he laced two singles, Jer-
emy Zezza and Lopatka added a
double each. Brandon Charney
making his first legion appear-
ance on the mound recorded the
last two outs of the game.
GP 3 Mountaintop 2
In a playoff type atmosphere
the locals hosteda verymuchan-
ticipated match up with Moun-
taintop that entered the contest
with a 7 - 2 record. Marty Mi-
chaels and Jeremy Zezza com-
bined on the victory with Zezza
picking up the victory. Zach Lo-
patka had two hits while Louis
Tazamalas, Evan Musto, and
Zezza all had singles.
Both of Mountaintop’s runs
were unearned as was GP’s win-
ning run in the sixth. The final
out of the game was the play of
the year thus far. Right fielder
Marty Cirelli snared a fly ball
and promptly threw a strike to
Musto at the plate who applied a
sweeping tag to the sliding base
runner to end an outstanding
contest.
GREATER PI TTSTON JUNI OR L EGI ON
Musto on verge of 200th Legion win
2012 Greater Pittston
Junior Legion Baseball
Teamwill try to get
RomMusto's 200th
win this week. Front
row, fromleft, Kyle
Musto, Josh Kopcza,
Tyler Dougherty, Steve
Homza, Brandon Char-
ney. Second row, Jus-
tin Steinburger, Marty
Michaels, Nikolas
Gushka, Corey Les-
cavage, Zach Lopatka,
Marty Cirelli. Third
row, Tyler Mitchell,
Louis Tazamalas,
Rocky Rutkowski,
Jeremy Zjsmilezza,
Evan Musto, Kyle
Charney
Back row, Manager
Ronald Musto, Jr.,
TeamSponsor Joe
Kopcza (Metcalfe&
Shaver Funeral Home),
Player Development
Coordinator Anthony
Bellino, Assistant
Coach Gary Lopatka
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This Summer the Greater Pitt-
ston YMCA will become sports
camp central for kids of North-
east Pennsylvania. With five dif-
ferent camps tochoose fromthere
is something for every kid.
The Y will be offering volley-
ball, baseball, tennis, soccer and
swimming camps this summer.
Each camp will be coached by lo-
cal community members with
years, some decades, of experi-
ence in their particular sport.
Michael Labagh, the Senior
Program Director at the Greater
Pittston YMCA, will take charge of the
Volleyball andSwimmingcamps. Labagh
played NCAA Division III Volleyball for
one year at LesleyUniversitywhere he led
the teamin kills, blocks, and service aces.
He was ranked Top 20 for NCAA Divi-
sion III for blocks per game and service
aces for the 2007-2008 season. He has
been coaching since 2008 beginning as a
volunteer Assistant and working his way
up to the Head Coach at Dallas High
School for the Boys 2011 Season.
Labagh now coaches the girls and boys
Volleyball teams at Abington Heights
HighSchool wherehemanagedawinning
record and a playoff run for both teams in
his first season as Head Coach. He also
volunteered his time coaching Boys and
Girls ages 14-18 for NEPA Club Volley-
ball the past 2 club seasons. He swam at
Misericordia University
for three years where he
specialized in Breast-
stroke and the Individual
Medley (IM). He was
ranked among the Top10
for the 100 and 200
Breaststroke events at the
Middle Atlantic Confer-
ence (MAC) Swimming
Championships all three
seasons he competed. He
received the Coach’s
Award for the 2009-2010
season and the Sports-
manshipAwardfor the MAChis final sea-
son in 2011. He volunteered as a coach for
the Dallas High School’s boys and girls
Swim Teams since 2008 and has coached
two years for their Summer Swimming
Program. Mike currently coaches at
Abington Heights High School for the
boys and girls swim teams. After his first
season as Head Coach he led the girls’
team to win the District II Championship
and qualify for the State Championship
meet.
The volleyball camp will be July16 –19
from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. for ages 10 to 14
costing $60. The swimming camp will be
July 30 to August 2 from 4 p.m. to 5:30
p.m. for ages 10 and up costing $60 for all
four days or $20 per day.
Joe O’Brien, instructor at the Greater
Pittston YMCA, will lead the tennis sum-
mer sports camp. He played
4 years of high school tennis
for Wyoming Area and was
named team captain. He or-
ganized and held numerous
team practices in the ab-
sence of coaches. He contin-
ues to play in intramural
leagues throughout the area.
He has a Minor in Exercise
Science-Fitness Leadership
from Luzerne County Community Col-
lege and received the Health, Physical
Education & Movement Sciences Dis-
tinction Award from the College; he is
currently working towards a Bachelor’s
degree in Athletic Training at East
Stroudsburg University.
The tennis camp will be July 23 – 27
from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. for ages 10 to 14
costing $75.
Sara Donahue will be coaching the kids
for the soccer camp. She is currently a 7th
grade reading teacher at Pittston Area
Middle School, and assistant coach of the
division champion varsity girls’ soccer
team. Donahue has been around soccer
since she was five years old, havingplayed
for the Greater Pittston Stoners for 13 sea-
sons. She was a member of the varsity
girls’ soccer team at Pittston Area. She
graduated from Elizabethtown College,
where she played intramural soccer for
four years, andMarywoodUniversity. Her
philosophy of teaching soccer includes
emphasizing developing
a love for the game and a
love of exercise. She be-
lieves that socialization
and teamwork are the key
tenets of soccer instruc-
tion at a young age.
The soccer camp will
be July 30 to August 3
from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. for
ages 10 to 14 costing $75.
The baseball camp is pleased to have
former major league baseball player Bob
Duliba will be coaching. Duliba is a for-
mer Major League Baseball right handed
pitcher who has 20 years of professional
baseball experience. He made his Major
League Baseball debut on August 11th,
1959 for the St. Louis Cardinals. He also
played for the Los Angeles Angels from
1963-1964, the Boston Red Sox in 1965,
and the Kansas City Athletics (now Oak-
land Athletics) in 1967. He has a total of
176 games pitched during his tenure in
Major league Baseball. Duliba had suc-
cess against some of baseball `s best hitters
at thetime, includingHall of Famers Hank
Aaron, Luis Aparicio, Ernie Banks, Ro-
berto Clemente, Al Kaline, Willie Mays,
Bill Mazeroski, and Duke Snider who he
kept toa .114collective battingaverage (4-
for-35). He nowlives in this area where he
hopes to strengthen the baseball program.
The baseball camp will be August 7, 10
&11 for ages 10 thru 12 costing $45.
SUMMER SPORTS CAMPS
YMCA instructors named
Mike Labagh Bob Duliba Joe O'Brien Sara Donahue
The Greater Pittston facility will five sports camps for area children
To register for or inquire
about any of our Summer
sports camps please contact
Michael Labagh at the Grea-
ter Pittston YMCA at 570-
655-2255 ext.104 or email
mlabagh@greaterpitt-
stonymca.org.
FOR MORE
I NFORMATI ON
The Y will be offering
volleyball, baseball,
tennis, soccer and
swimming camps this
summer. Each camp
will be coached by
local community
members with years,
some decades, of
experience in their
particular sport.
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Wyoming Area junior Tia Brown med-
aled in the AA PIAA District 2 swim-
ming competition. Although being in-
jured for much of the regular season, she
managed to garner fifth place in the 50-
yard freestyle and sixth in the 100-yard
freestyle.
Brown
garners
medals
for WA
WA swimmer Tia Brown was a district
medalist.
The Wyoming Area cheer-
leadersarerunningacheer clinic
for girls five through12fromJu-
ly 24 to July 27 from10 a.m. to1
p.m. inthe highschool cafeteria.
The cost is $40 per child. The
clinicdirectors arethecheer pro-
gramcoachesJosetteCefaloand
Krista Baines and the 20-12-13
Warrior cheerleaders.
Thecampfeatures fundamen-
tals, skilled stations (cheers,
kicks, dances, stunts and tum-
bling) and individual instruc-
tion.
There will be a performance
and pizza party on the last day
and awarding of certificates.
To register please send a
checkpayabletoWyomingArea
cheerleading to Josette Cefalo,
103 Jean Street, Exeter PA
18643.Include the following in-
formation: child’s nameaddress,
phone number, emergency day-
time phone number, age and
grade in September, allergies/
limitations, and t-shirt size.
The deadline for registration
is July10.
Pictured are the 2012-2013 WA Varsity Cheerleaders with Coach JosetteCefalo.FromLeft to
right: Alex Dougherty, Brittany Lemardy, Nickarena Gilpin, Juliana DeNardi, Kiersten Gregorio,
Danielle Bulger, Alli Sitkowski, AnnaMalsky, Jennie Skursky, Maria Pelliccia, Karyssa Gregorio,
Dominique Denisco, Erin Maloney, Coach Cefalo, Rachel Leandri, Alexa Malloy, Kayla Radle,
Emily Connors, Mari Taggart, Lauren Maloney, Abby Gibbs, Hannah Begley, Brittney Eramo,
Jaclyn DeNardi.
WA cheer clinic signing up
Merle Bainbridge, a legend-
ary athlete at the old West Pitt-
ston High School, is going into
the John Louis Popple Luzerne
County Sports Hall of Fame.
Bainbridge will be inducted at
the 2012 Induction banquet on
August 9 at the Ramada Inn on
Public Square in Wilkes-Barre.
Bainbridge was an all-star
quarterback and team captain
for the West Pittston Rams in
the 1950s. He was a two-year
starter on the basketball team
and was a District 2 bronze
medal winner in the javelin in
his senior year.
Bainbridge quarterbacked the
Lafeyette College football
team. He gotb a master’s degree
at Temple.
He came back to West Pitt-
ston and coached the Rams in
the 1960s up to the time of the
Wyoming Area merger. He
stayed on one year as an assist-
ant at Wyoming Area.
He later coached at Spring-
Ford and Coastville high
schools and Ursinus University
where he was the defensive
coordinator for 13 seasons. He
won six championships at dif-
ferent levels.
He retired in 1994 after a 34
yaer teaching career.
He and his wife Alberta live
in Royesford. have two sons,
Mark and Merle Jr,. and six
grandchildren.
No wonder the Pittston Area
girls soccer team won their
division championship. All 11
of their starters were all-stars,
either first team, second team
or honorable mention and five
of them are freshman.
1ST TEAM
Goalkeeper
Jordan Cumbo (11)
Defense
Katelyn Pugliese (9)
Midfield
Liz Mikitish (11)
Madison Cardinale (9)
Forward
Allie Barber (9)
2ND TEAM
Defense
Mallory Yozwiak (12)
Megan Karuzie (9)
Midfield
Carly Filipski (9)
Forward
Nicolette Bradshaw (12)
Danielle Fereck (12)
Honorable mention
Sarah Kosik (12)
Pittston Area eighth grader
Colin Tracy won the Long
Jump and placed second in the
110M Hurdles at the 2012
USATF Mid-Atlantic Associ-
ation Junior Olympic Track &
Field Championship as an In-
termediate athlete (15-16 years
old) on Sunday, June 3, at
Abraham Lincoln in Philadel-
phia.
Tracy’s Long Jump perform-
ance was 5.85 meters or 19’ 2
1/3" and his 110M Hurdle time
was 16.01.
Although Colin is 14 years
old, he had to compete in the
Intermediate division since his
birth date falls prior to Decem-
ber 31. This was the first time
he compete with the 39" hur-
dles. At the PIAA junior high
level, he competed with the 36"
hurdles throughout the spring in
the WVC.
Pittston Area grad Jonathan
Woytach did the job at the
plate and in the field for the
Marywood baseball team. Woy-
tach hit .348 (46-for-132) with
nine doubles, 23 RBI and 34
runs, the latter was second best
on the squad. He also walked
21 times and had a team-high
13 sacrifices.
At secondbase, Woytach
made six errors on 165 chances
for a .952 fielding percentage.
The junior’s performance
earned him Colonial States
Athletic Conference second
team honors.
Another PA graduate, Keys-
tone sophomore Lisa Ostran-
der, earned honorable mention
in the Colonial States Athletic
Conference for her play with
the softball team this spring.
Ostrander, an outfielder, hit
.315 (34-for-108) with seven
doubles, a home run, 12 RBI
and 25 runs.
THESMILES FILES
Bainbridge to Hall
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CORPUS CHRISTI
Holy Redeemer Church Grounds
Rt. 92 - Harding
JUNE 29 - JULY 1
Friday & Saturday
5:30 -11:00 p.m.
Sunday
1:00 - 7:00 p.m.
Friday: Groove Train
Saturday: Flaxy Morgan
Sunday: Waterstreet
& Sweet Peppers
and the Long Hots
AMAZING ETHNIC
FOOD • GAMES
FLEA MARKET
BINGO
The Wyoming Area Soccer
Parents Association will meet
today, Sunday, June 24 at the
Butler Street Park in Wyoming
at 6 p.m.
Junior Patriots to meet
Junior Patriots will meet at 1
p.m. today, June 24 at Albert
West Park on Swallow Street.
All coaches are advised to at-
tend. Registration is from 1 to 3
p.m. for cheerleader and foot-
ball players ages 6 to 14. Players
must be 14 years old on Aug. 1.
Cheerleading practice will be
held from 5:30 to 7:30 p. m. on
July 2.
WP Rams late sign up
The West Pittston Rams will
hold one late sign up from 6 to 8
p.m. on June 27 at the clubhouse
at the football field, Bell Tower
entrance. Registration is $110
per child which includes 10 lot-
tery tickets at $5 each. Addition-
al children per family will be
charged $10 each.
New football players will be
required to purchase a jersey.
Children ages 5 to14 (by August
1) are eligible.
Every registrant must have co-
pies of the following: birth cer-
tificate, current picture and two
proofs of residence, for exam-
ple- a valid driver’s license and a
utility bill.
Parents/ guardians may also
use this time to drop off neces-
sary paperwork or pictures for
their already-registered child.
Practices start the week of July
15.
WWE Panthers sign ups
Registrations for the Wyom-
ing/West Wyoming/Exeter Pan-
thers Football-Cheerleading As-
sociation will be held from 3 to
5 p.m. on June 30 at the field
house on Cedar Street, Exeter.
Registration is $65 per child or
$75 per family.
PA soccer conditioning
PA girls’ high school soccer
conditioning will begin on Tues-
day July 10 from 10 a.m. - noon
at the Cefalo Center at the high
school. For more information on
the preseason conditioning
schedule and the upcoming fall
season, go to http://pittstonarea-
soccer.weebly.com/
PA football boosters
The Pittston Area Football
Booster Club is having a manda-
tory meeting for parents of play-
er’s grades 7 to 12 on Thursday
July 28 at the practice field next
to the Cefalo Center at 7:30 p.m.
Information regarding pic-
tures, practice schedules and
summer events will be dis-
cussed. Any players with out-
standing candy money are urged
to turn it in immediately.
Romanczuk Memorial Golf
Tourney
The Third Annual Keith Ro-
manczuk Memorial Golf Tour-
nament is August 4 at Blue
Ridge Golf Resort in Mountain-
top. It’s a Captain and Crew
event. Entry is $100 per player
and includes all events, cart,
lunch and chances to win prizes
and awards for longest drive and
closest to pin.
Registration is at 6:45 a.m.
and tee time is 7:30.
To register email bromanc-
zuk@comcat.net or call 570-
299-1438.
WA Middle School
Ice hockey
The WA Ice Hockey Middle
School League is now taking
names of interested fifth and
sixth-grade students for the
2012-2013 season residing with-
in the Wyoming Area School
District. Games and practices
will be held at the Revolution
Ice Center in Pittston.
For more information, contact
Dawn Thomas atme-
jane134@aol.com.
SPORTS BRI EFS
Wyoming Area
soccer parents
meeting today
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UNI TED METHODI ST STRAWBERRY SHORTCAKE SOCI AL
Having a berry good time
BILL TARUTIS/ FOR THE SUNDAY DISPATCH
Above, Ken Burkel, right, Phil Burkel,
both of West Pittston, and Fred, Chad,
and Michele Southern, all of Wilkes-Barre.
At left, one of the strawberry shortcakes
with ice creamserved at the strawberry
shortcake supper.
Below Bill Langdon, left, and Jackie
Southern, both of Wilkes-Barre, enjoy
their food.
Maysie Cochran of Hughestown puts the finishing touches on a
peach shortcake at the United Methodist Church of Pittston
Lisa Gillespie of Pittston Township carries peach shortcakes out
of the kitchen at the United Methodist Church of Pittston's Straw-
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Joseph E.Fedor
Faith fu l Son,Caring Broth er,Loving
H u sb and,Devoted Fath er,Loyal Friend
M ayyou b eatpeace
6/16/93
It’sdifficu ltto h old on som etim es,
b u tsom edayb eyond ou rtears
all th eworld’swrongs,
b eyond th eclou ds,and all wecan see
and tou ch ,th erewill b elove,com passion
and ju stice,and wesh all all u nderstand.
A lwa ysrem em bered with m u ch love,
Rosella a nd Josette.
7
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In Loving M em oryOf
E ttore J.
Ans elm i,Sr.
W h o passed away46
yearsago,Ju ne27,1966
Forty-sixyearsago you
wentawayto H eaven.
W em issyou b u tare
h appyforyou and m om .
S a dly m issed by son s,
EttoreJr.a n d
Richa rd An selm i
OBITUARIES
Raymond J. Stavish, 75, a resi-
dent of West Wyoming, passed
away unexpectedly on Friday eve-
ning, June 15, 2012, at his resi-
dence.
His loving wife is the former
Agnes Yurcho. Together, Ray-
mond and Agnes celebrated their
55th wedding anniversary on April
27, 2012.
Born on June 28, 1936, in
Swoyersville, Raymond was the
son of the late Walter and Mary
(Sharisky) Stavish.
Raised in Swoyersville, Ray-
mond was a graduate of the former
Swoyersville High School, Class
of1954. AUnitedStates Armyvet-
eran, Raymond honorably served
his country during peace time. Up-
on his honorable discharge on Sep-
tember 13, 1957, Raymond had at-
tained the rank of Specialist 3rd
Class.
Prior tohis retirement, Raymond
was employed for 15 years as a
truck driver for the Luzerne Coun-
ty Road and Bridge Department.
In his earlier years, he owned and
operated Arco Gas Stations in
West Wyoming,
Wyoming and
Kingston.
A man of faith,
Raymond was a
member of Saint
Monica’s Parish,
Our Lady of Sorrows Church,
West Wyoming.
Family was the center of Ray-
mond’s life and he cherished each
moment he had with his loved
ones. He always held a special
place in his heart for his beloved
grandchildren, Elise and Gary.
Raymond will forever be re-
membered as a loving and caring
husband, father, grandfather,
brother, uncle and friend. He will
be deeply missed by all those who
knew and loved him.
In addition to his loving wife,
Agnes, Raymond is survived by
his son, Gary Stavish, and his wife,
Michelle, of West Wyoming; his
daughter, Deborah Roccograndi,
and her husband, Thomas, of
Kingston; his grandchildren, Gary
Stavish Jr. and Elise Stavish; his
brothers, Walter Stavish of New
Jersey; Daniel Stavish, of Morris-
ville, Pennsylvania; John Stavish,
of New Jersey; and William Stav-
ish, of New Jersey; his numerous
nieces and nephews.
The funeral was on Saturday,
June 23, 2012, from the Wroblew-
ski Funeral Home Inc., 1442
Wyoming Avenue, Forty Fort, fol-
lowed by a Mass of Christian Buri-
al to be celebrated in Saint Mon-
ica’s Parish, Our Lady of Sorrows
Church, 363 West 8th Street, West
Wyoming, with the Reverend Leo
J. McKernan, his pastor, officiat-
ing.
Interment with the Rite of Com-
mittal followed in Mount Olivet
Cemetery, Carverton.
For additional information or to
send the Stavish family an online
message of condolence, you may
visit the funeral home website
www.wroblewskifuneralhome-
.com.
In lieu of flowers, memorial con-
tributions may be made in Ray-
mond’s memory to Saint Monica’s
Parish, 363 West 8th Street, West
Wyoming, PA18644.
Raymond J. Stavish
June 15, 2012
Mrs. Mary E. Mikovitch
passed away Thursday after-
noon, June 21, 2012, at the
Geisinger Wyoming Valley
Medical Center, Plains
Township.
Born in Scranton, she was
a daughter of the late Alex-
ander and Alice Darmetko
Haberek. Educated in
Scranton schools, she had
been a resident of Duryea
for the past 70 years.
She was a former member
of Sacred Heart of Jesus
Church, now Nativity of
Our Lord Parish, Duryea.
She was precededindeath
by her husband, John, who
passed away on May 27,
1989; two brothers, Chester
and Joseph Haberek; four
sisters, Gertrude Deresin-
ski, Stella Bartko, Sophie
Laskowski and Florence
Mikovitch.
Surviving are son, Gerald
Mikovitch, and companion
Barbara Michalowski,
Scranton; daughters, Mrs.
Helen
Duszak
and hus-
band Peter,
Duryea;
Mrs.
Elaine
Gamble and husband John,
Duryea; grandchildren, Pe-
ter, Susan and Lynn Duszak;
Gerald Mikovitch; Brian
and Scott Wychoskie; great-
grandchildren, Alicia Dus-
zak, Kevin and Gracie Mi-
kovitch; Hailey Wychoskie;
nieces and nephews.
Funeral will be held
Monday, June 25, 2012, at 9
a.m. from the Bernard J.
Piontek Funeral Home Inc.,
204 Main St., Duryea, with
a Mass of Christian Burial at
9:30 in Sacred Heart of Je-
sus Church, Duryea, with
the Rev. Andrew Sinnott of-
ficiating. Interment will be
held at St. John’s Cemetery,
Duryea. Friends may call to-
day, June 24, 2012, from5 to
8 p.m.
Mary E. Mikovitch
June 21, 2012
Kathleen (Hout) Best
passed away in Niagara Falls,
NY on September 17, 2011 at
home surrounded by her fam-
ily, under the care of Niagara
Hospice. Born in Niagara
Falls, NY she was the daugh-
ter of Norita Hout and the late
Frank Hout.
Kathleen worked in the pro-
duce department at Weis Su-
permarket. She was an auxil-
iary member of the VFW in
Pennsylvania. She enjoyed
cooking and watching cook-
ing shows.
Besides her mother, she is
survived by one sister and five
brothers. She was predeceased
by her husband James Best.
A service will be held at
Saint Mary’s Cemetery in
Avoca at 1 p.m. on June 28,
2012.
Kathleen Best
Sept. 17, 2011
The Cellular Connection, the
largest Verizon Premium Wire-
less Retailer inthe U.S., openeda
store in Pittston Township on
Friday The new store is located
at 320 Highway 315, in the Wal-
Mart shopping center. Store rep-
resentatives helda ribboncutting
ceremony and made a $500 do-
nation to the Pittston Township
Volunteer Fire Department.
Shown cutting the ribbon is Ron
Davis, regional manager; Brie
Klinges, sales associate; and Da-
nielle Carr, store manager.
JOE HEALEY/THE SUNDAY DISPATCH
Cellular Connection
opens Pittston store
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OBITUARIES
Margaret Diane Argenio, 56,
passed away Thursday, June 21,
2012, surrounded by her loving fam-
ily, after a long and courageous bat-
tle with breast cancer.
Born in Pittston on October 21,
1955, she was a daughter of Harold
and Rosemary Holleran Ash. She
was a graduate of Wyoming Area
High School.
Diane was a life member of Cor-
pus Christi Parish, Immaculate Con-
ception Church, West Pittston. She
was employed by Associated Respi-
ratory for over 15 years and most re-
cently at InterMountain Medical
Group, as a medical billing special-
ist.
She had a passion and talent for
crafts andwas always inspiredbyher
Irish heritage. Diane fulfilled her
lifetimedreamof travelingtoIreland
a few years ago.
She was a faithful wife, dedicated
mother, grandmother, loving daugh-
ter and sister, adoring aunt and com-
passionate friend.
She always had a
smile, even on
days most of us
couldn’t smile.
“One day at a
time”was howshe
lived, andshe passedthat strengthon
to her family. She will be greatly
missed on earth, but her spirit lives
on through her family, especially her
grandchildren.
She was preceded in death by her
grandparents, Thomas andMargaret
Holleran.
Besides her parents, she is sur-
vived by her husband of 37 years,
Charles “Tar” Argenio; Diane was
blessed with four beautiful children,
DiannaRoss andhusband, Bill, West
Wyoming; son Charlie and wife Ni-
cole, Dupont; daughter Danielle,
Exeter; son Adam and wife Marisa,
Fort Bliss, El Paso, Texas.
She was known as “Nana” to her
eight beautiful grandchildren, Ma-
ria, Madelynn, Makayla and Mat-
thewRoss; Allie, Isabella and Soph-
ia Argenio, and Karly Kovitch; also
survivingare brothers, TomAshand
wife Cindy, Greencastle, Pa.; Harold
and wife Mary Kay, Exeter; Brian
andwifeNicole, Exeter; brothers-in-
law, Joseph Argenio and wife Judy,
Camp Hill, Pa.; Joe Balitza, Palmer-
ton, Pa.; and numerous nieces and
nephews; great nieces and great ne-
phews. She also loved her two little
“Furry Kids,” Angel and Baby.
The funeral was held Saturday,
June 23, 2012, fromthe Howell-Lus-
si Funeral Home, 509 Wyoming
Ave., West Pittston, with Mass of
Christian Burial in Corpus Christi
Parish, Immaculate Conception
Church, West Pittston. Interment
was in Mountain View Burial Park,
Harding.
In lieu of flowers, memorial dona-
tions may be sent to American Can-
cer Society, East Central Divisions,
P.O. Box 897, Hershey, PA18700.
Margaret Diane Argenio
June 21, 2012
TheodoreJ. Brooks, age91,
died Wednesday afternoon,
June 20, 2012, at the River-
sideRehabilitationandNurs-
ing Center, Taylor.
He was the husband of
Eleanor Mroczkowski
Brooks, who passed away in
2001.
He was born in Exeter, a
sonof the late JohnandJoan-
na Kozlowski Brooks, and
was a graduate of the Old
Forge High School.
He was employed as a ma-
chinist for GarwoodIndustri-
es, Exeter, and was an expert
SchwinnTechnicianforSick-
lers BicycleShops inWilkes-
BarreandScranton. Hewas a
member of Prince of Peace
Parish and the former St. Mi-
chael’s Church, Old Forge.
HewasanArmyAir Corps
Veteran of World War II sta-
tioned in the Galapagos Is-
lands, and he also served in
the Civilian Conservation
Corps in Idaho.
He was anavidhunter who
hunteduntil hewasinhis80s.
Healsohadalovefor fishing.
He was preceded in death
by a daughter, Cynthia Koss;
abrother, FrancisBrooks; sis-
ters Florentine Graham, Zel-
ma McCloskey and Nancy
Strzalka.
Surviving is a son, Ronald
J., and his wife, Pat, Lehman
Township; four grandchil-
dren; three great-grandchil-
dren; sisters Stephanie “Pat”
Sickler, Swoyersville; Ro-
semary Ash and Joan Travis,
both of Michigan; nieces and
nephews.
A Mass of Christian
Burial will be held Monday,
June25, 2012, at10a.m. inSt.
Mary’s Church, Grace and
Lawrence St., Old Forge. In-
terment will be in St. Stanis-
laus Cemetery, Old Forge.
There will be no public call-
inghours. Contributions may
be made to Meals on Wheels
of Lackawanna County. The
Palermo and Zawacki Funer-
al Home Inc., 409 N. Main
St., Old Forge, is in charge of
arrangements.
Theodore J. Brooks
June 20, 2012
Robert T. Johnson went
home tobe withhis Lordand
Savior, Jesus Christ, onTues-
day, June 19, 2012.
Born in Wilkes-Barre on
September,17,1949, hewasa
son of the late Bernard and
Sarah Carver Johnson.
He was educated in the
Plymouth schools, and later
workedfor masonryandcon-
struction companies.
Robert was a member of
the Nanticoke Christian Fel-
lowship Church, Nanticoke.
Throughout his life he en-
joyed hunting, fishing,
woodworkingandtaxidermy.
He greatly enjoyed his vis-
itswithhisgrandchildrenand
spent muchtimewithhis Do-
bermans, Goliath and Mag-
num.
He was preceded in death
bya brother, Ronald; andsis-
ter Carol Oakley.
Robert will be deeply mis-
sed by his wife of 41 years,
theformer PaulaMatovchak;
daughter, Candida Yashkus,
and her husband, Bernard,
Pittston Township; son, Jere-
miah, and his wife, Maura,
Nanticoke; grandchildren,
Breanna and Bethany Yash-
kus, and Isaiah, Cecily and
Greta Johnson; brother, Ber-
nard, Nanticoke; sisters Rose
Jumper, Plymouth; Mary
Ann Wegrzynowicz, Je-
rymn; Eleanor Murphy, De-
triot; Sarah Keefe, Swoyers-
ville, and Maureen Major,
Lehman; numerous nieces
and nephews.
A Memorial Service will
be held at the convenience of
the family.
Donationsif desiredcanbe
madetotheNanticokeChris-
tian Fellowship or the charity
of the donor’s choice. Ar-
rangementsarethroughKiel-
ty-Moran Funeral Home
Inc., 87 Washington Ave.,
Plymouth.
Robert T. Johnson
June 19, 2012
Joseph A. Alfano, 90, of Wyom-
ing, passed away on Tuesday, June
19, 2012, at the St. Luke’s Villa,
Wilkes-Barre.
BorninWyoming, he was a sonof
the late Agostino and Paulina Man-
tione Alfano.
He was a member of St. Barbara
Parish at St. Anthony of Padua
Church and its Holy Name Society,
serving as an usher for many years.
Mr. Alfanowas a1939graduate of
Wyoming High School and as a
young man had worked in the local
coal mines. He was a budget analyst
at the Tobyhanna Army Depot for
over 20 years, prior to his retirement
in 1984.
For many years,
he enjoyed his
vegetable garden,
growing tomatoes
and sharing them
with his family
and friends. In the
past few years, he enjoyed socializ-
ing at the Kingston Senior Citizens
Center.
He was preceded in death by his
wife, the former Mary DeAngelo
Alfano, in 2008; and a brother, An-
gelo Alfano.
Surviving are his son, Dr. Gus Al-
fano and his wife, Barbara, Wyom-
ing, and their children, Stephen, Ja-
sonandMatthew. Alsosurvivingare
his brothers, Charles, and his wife,
Sarah Alfano, Philadelphia, Salva-
tore and his wife, Rose Alfano,
Wyoming; sister, Carmella Alfano,
Va.; numerous nieces and nephews.
Funeral services was heldonSat-
urday, June 23, 2012, from the Gub-
biotti Funeral Home, 1030 Wyom-
ing Ave., Exeter, with a Mass of
Christian Burial at St. Barbara Par-
ish in St. Anthony of Padua Church,
Memorial Street, Exeter. The Rev.
Paul McDonnell, O.S. J., will be cel-
ebrant. Interment was in St. John the
Slovak Cemetery, Exeter. To send
the family an expression of sympa-
thy or an online condolence, please
visit www.gubbiottifh.com.
Joseph A. Alfano
June 19, 2012
Robert Gordon, 76, of Kingston,
passed away Saturday, June 16,
2012, in Geisinger Wyoming Valley
Medical Center, Plains Township.
Born on November 11, 1935, in
Pittston, he was the son of the late
Robert and Louise Boles Gordon.
Prior to retirement, he was em-
ployed by Muskin Pools for 35
years.
He was an Army veteran, serving
duringtheKoreanWar, andhewas a
member of Veterans of Foreign
Wars, Post 6325 of Hudson, Pa. He
alsowas anavidCBradiofan, going
by the handle of the “Catman.”
Surviving are his wife, Sonia
Skordinski Gordon; daughters, Na-
dine Gordon Magoski and her hus-
band, Brian, of Kingston, and Holly
GordonBuchananandher husband,
Stephen, Delaware; grandchildren,
MeganMagoski, BrianMagoski Jr.,
Zachary Magoski, Paul MorrowJr.,
Shelby Morrowand Zoe Buchanan.
The funeral will was private. In-
terment was in St. Vladimir’s Cem-
etery, Larksville. Arrangements
were by the Kopicki Funeral Home,
Kingston.
Robert Gordon
June 16, 2012
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F U N E R A L S E R V I C E S I N C .
255 MCALPINE STREET, DURYEA, PA 18641 (570) 457-4387
MARK KIESINGER,
FUNERAL DIRECTOR and SUPERVISOR
David Rachkowski, 54, of
Duryea, passed away Wednes-
day, June 20, 2012 at his home.
He was born in Duryea on
September 29, 1957, and was a
son of the Edna (Stetz) Rach-
kowski and the late Leonard
Rachkowski.
David was a member of Na-
tivity of Our Lord Parish, Du-
ryea. He was a graduate of Pitt-
ston Area High School and
King’s College. He worked
many years for Pittston Lumber
and was currently employed by
Craft Oil, Avoca. Davidlovedto
travel. He has traveled to many
places in the United States. He
will be deeply missed by his
family and friends.
In addition to his mother, his
brother, Richard L. Rachkow-
ski, and his wife, Cathy, of
Clarks Summit; his niece, Amy,
Calif.; and his nephew, Eric,
Idaho, survive him.
A blessing service was held
Saturday, June 23, 2012, at
Kiesinger Funeral Services
Inc., 255 McAlpine St., Du-
ryea, with Fr. Andrew Sinnott
of Nativity Of Our Lord Parish,
Duryea, officiating. Interment
services will be private.
David’s family would like to
thank the staff at Heartland
Hospice for their compassion-
ate care and support which Da-
vid received.
In lieu of flowers, memorial
contributions may be made to
Heartland Hospice, 38 N. Main
St., Pittston, PA18640.
Online condolences may be
made to www.kiesingerfuneral-
services.com.
David Rachkowski
June 20, 2012
OBITUARIES
Jean S. (Maroney) King, a
resident of Port Griffith, died
Sunday, June 17, 2012, in Ma-
norCare Nursing Home, King-
ston.
She was born June 6, 1928, in
Pittston, a daughter of the late
James Maroney and Gertude
(Burke) Maroney.
She was the wife of Earl
King.
Surviving, in addition to her
husband, are daughters, Mary
and husband Mike Pisano, Pitt-
ston Township; Marian and
husband Frank Shedlarski,
Dallas; step-daughter Sandy
and husband George Horst,
Shavertown; grandsons, Sean
and wife Erica Shedlarski;
Dustin and wife Candice She-
dlarski; granddaughter, Kelly
Pisano; great-grandson Caleb
Shedlarski; great-granddaught-
er, Alexa Shedlarski. Also sur-
viving are five step-grandchil-
dren; 11 great-step-grandchil-
dren and four great-great-step-
grandchildren.
She was preceded in death by
brothers, William Maroney,
James Maroney and Gerald
Maroney; sister, Marian
O’Haire.
Funeral services were Thurs-
day, June 21, 2012, from the
Graziano Funeral Home Inc.,
Pittston Township, with the
Rev. Richard Cirba officiating.
Interment was in Chapel
Lawn Memorial Park.
To submit online condolenc-
es, please visit GrazianoFuner-
alHome.com.
Jean S. (Maroney) King
June 17, 2012
Dolores A. Abbey, of Pittston,
passedawayat home onSaturday,
June 16, 2012.
A daughter of the late Regina
Kashuba and Joseph Kapinsky,
she was 85 years old.
She graduated in 1947 from
College Misericordia in Dallas.
Following graduation, she moved
to New York City, where she
workedas a dieticianat the Bronx
VAMedical Center. After relocat-
ingtoLakeCareywithher family,
she taught home economics at the
Tunkhannock Area School. She
later continued
her career innu-
trition at the
Pittston Hospi-
tal and ulti-
mately retired
as Chief Clini-
cal Dietician of the Wilkes-Barre
VA Hospital.
Dolores was passionate about
politics, lovedanimals (especially
cats), was an avid reader and
crossword puzzler, and relished
foreign films and theater.
She was predeceased by her
son George Abbey Jr. and her
brother, Robert Kapinsky.
Sheis survivedbyher daughter,
Linda Abbey, and her husband,
Mervyn Wallis, Briarcliff Manor,
N.Y.; her son Christopher Abbey
and his wife, Mary Lane Abbey,
Yorba Linda, Calif.; she is also
survived by niece, Susan Kapin-
sky, andnephew, Roger Kapinsky
and his wife, Penny Kapinsky,
whoservedasher loyal andloving
caregiver until the end. Amemo-
rial and celebration of her life
will be scheduled at a later date.
Dolores A. Abbey
June 16, 2012
HelenE. Nocek, 86, of Wyom-
ing, passed away Monday, June
18, 2012 at the Wilkes-Barre
General Hospital.
Born March 18, 1926 in Tay-
lor, she was the daughter of the
late George andPauline Borosto-
vik Gregorczyk. Prior to her re-
tirement, she was employed by
the Rex Shoe Company, Exeter.
She was a member of St. Jo-
seph’s Church of St. Monica’s
Parish, Wyoming.
Helen was an active member
of the Wyoming/West Wyoming
Senior Citi-
zens. She was
also an avid
Penn State fan
and enjoyed
doing puzzles
and reading.
She was preceeded in death by
her husband, John; brothers,
Walter and Chester; sister, Ann
Thompson.
Surviving are her sons, James
and his wife Darlene, Ithaca,
N.Y.; John, at home, and Mi-
chael, Peckville; grandchildren,
Gabrielle, Teresa, Jimmy, Noah,
Grace and Jordan; great grand-
children, Haley and Liam; sister
Eleanor Semanski, Taylor; sev-
eral nieces and nephews.
Funeral was held on Thurs-
day, June 21, 2012, fromthe Bed-
narski Funeral Home, 168
Wyoming Avenue, Wyoming,
with a Mass of Christian Burial
in St. Joseph’s Church of St.
Monica’s Parish, Wyoming.
Interment was in St. Joseph’s
Cemetery, West Wyoming.
Helen E. Nocek
June 18, 2012
Elizabeth Emma Calkins Zie-
linski, 72, of Plymouth, passed
away peacefully surrounded by
her lovingfamily, Sunday, June17,
2012.
Born May 16, 1940, in Wilkes-
Barre, she was a daughter of Al-
veyWesleyandMatilda Elizabeth
Susan (Krebs) Calkins.
Elizabeth worked as a seam-
stress for many years at Mary
McIntosh and Fit Rite Headwear,
of Wilkes-Barre.
Family was the most important
part of Elizabeth’s life as she cher-
ished her children, grandchildren
and great-grandchildren. Her
greatest moments were the times
she spent laughingwiththem. She
will be forever remembered as a
strong, devotedmother andgrand-
mother. Her will was her way.
She held her faith as a member
of the Valley View Union Chapel
Church and prior to St. Nick’s of
Wilkes-Barre.
Inadditiontoher parents, Alvey
Wesley Jr. and Matilda Elizabeth
SusanCalkins, Elizabethwas pre-
ceded in death by her infant son,
William; brother, Alvey Wesley;
andher best friend, Aunt Margaret
(Peggy) Krebs.
Elizabeth is survived by her
husband of 45 years, Eugene
James Weaver Jr.; sons, Carl Tho-
mas and Karrie Zielinski of West
Pittston, Thomas JosephZielinski
of Wilkes-Barre, Alvey Wesley
Zielinski and Cheryl of Hanover
Township; daughters, Matilda
(Tilda) Zielinski, Elizabeth
(Becky) VaughnZielinski, bothof
Wilkes-Barre; sisters, Theonora
(Nornie) and Willard Rollins,
Joanne Marie and Thomas He-
witt, Catherine Ann Harrison;
grandchildren, Samantha Nicole
(Zielinski) and Robert Shinko of
Landsdale, Pa.; Stephanie Nicole
Zielinski and Brandon Madison,
Easton, andEmersonJones of Ar-
kansas; Sarah Nicole Zielinski
andKevinKingof FortyFort; Carl
(Louie) Thomas Zielinski Jr.,
Kyre IsiahLouis Zielinski, bothat
home; Shawn Rogers, Plymouth;
Nicole Lee Zielinski, Nina Nicole
Zielinski, Crystal Lee Dawson,
Felicia Lynn Dawson, Alanda
Dawson, Ella Zim; Charlie, Da-
nielle and Christopher Zielinski;
many nieces, nephews and great-
grandchildren.
A funeral service was held
June 21, 2012, fromWilliams-Ha-
gen Funeral Home Inc., 114 W.
Main St., Plymouth, with the Rev.
Ronald Cease officiating.
In lieu of flowers, memorial do-
nations can be made to the Valley
ViewUnion Chapel.
Elizabeth Emma Calkins Zielinski
June 17, 2012
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The Greater Pittston Chamber of Commerce would like
to thank all the contributors and supporters of the
Hometown Heroes Memorial Project for making it a reality.
Thank You!
Lieutenant Colonel
Richard Berrettini
1st Lieutenant
Jeffrey DePrimo
Captain T.J. Hromisin
Critically wounded in the Iraq conflict
Corporal
Dale Kridlo
PA State Trooper
Joshua Miller
Police Officer
Rodney F. Pocceschi
IN KIND DONATIONS
Flagpole - Patricia Stella • All Service Rite, Inc. • Balloon Works, Inc. • Coon Industries, Inc. • Cooper’s Seafood on the Waterfront
Dente’s Catering & Rental • Dupont Developers, Inc. • Dupont Monument Shop • First National Community Bank
Jennifer Robinson of SEVEN Design • Joseph Makarewicz of Everest Business Services LLC • Ken Pollock Suzuki
Mark Kowalczyk of Marks’ Landscaping • Northeast Sign Service • Rexel • Rolling Thunder National- PA Chapter 3 • Sharon Carfora
Sunday Dispatch • Susquehanna Brewing Company • The Banana Hammocks Band • The Citizens’ Voice • The Coffee Table Café
The Flower Tent • The Times Leader
BLOCKS
Albert J. Kridlo • Albert B. Melone Co. • Atlas Realty, Inc. • Atty. Joseph & Kathy Burke • Barber Ford • Blue Ribbon Farm Dairy, Inc.
Charlie & Karen Adonizio • Computer Visionaries, Inc. • Custom Seats, Inc. • Dupont Developers, Inc. • Joseph & Rosemary Dessoye
Judge & Mrs. Michael Vough • Landmark Commuity Bank • Insalaco Development Group • M&T Bank • Medico Industries, Inc.
MERICLE Commercial Real Estate Services • Michelle & Ken Dale • Our Lady of the Eucharist • ParenteBeard, LLC
Sandy & Marlene Insalaco • State Rep. Michael Carroll • The Terrana Family • UFCW Federal Credit Union
MONETARY DONATIONS
Alberta Carter
Albine & Molly Remsky
Antonino Farinella
AS Powers Sons, Inc.
Bob & Louise Shainline
GT Fabrication, Inc.
Greater Pittston Chamber
Women’s Network
Jim & Elaine Zambetti
John & Margaret Brozzoski
John B. Cooper
John P. Robbie
Marie Forlenza
Mark & Margaret Nobile
Mary McFarland
Mr. & Mrs. Carl Witkowski &
Family
Mr. & Mrs. John Stepanski
Mr. & Mrs. Ray Calabrese
Nick &Ann Marie Piccini
Surveying
Paul & Michele Cooper
Philip & Carol Fulmer
Pittston Area School District
Employees
Rita Mecadon
The Chropowicki Family
The Martin Family
BRICKS
Al & Gerri Sigman
Allan Glodzik
Alberta Kridlo
Ambrosino Family
Andrene Lasky
Andrew & Shirley Bartos-2
Andy & Michelle Kosik
Ann Cadden & Family
Ann Marie Morgan & Son
Anthony J. Ciliberto, Jr.
AS Powers Sons, Inc.-3
Atty. Joseph & Elizabeth Dessoye
Barbara Coyne
Bernardine Skurla
Bob Bilbow
Capozucca Brothers
Carmen Sciandra
Carol Calabrese
Casey-Kasa Coal Co.
Cathee Evans-2
Catherine and Sandy Gubbiotti
Christian & Kerry Girman
Damian Kridlo
Danielle Fediw
Dave and Amy Flaim
David & Joanna Fusco
Deborah & Bernard Rachilla
Deborah Wall
Dr. Eugene DeMinico
Dupont Borough
Duryea Lions Club
Ed & Mary Kay Ackerman
Elaine Faleski
Eric and Ann McCabe-3
Eric and Jen Sperazza
Florence Duffy
Giambra Family
Ginger Murphy
Girard J. Mecadon, Esq.
Golden Care of NEPA, Inc.
Helen C. Adonizio
Helen Ann DePrimo-5
Highway Federal Credit Union
Hon. Fred Pierantoni
Italian American Veterans
Luzerne Co. Post 1
James & Linda Dessoye
James McHale & the George A.
Pugliese Memorial Committee
James Tighe
Jay & Dorothy Delaney
Jay & Katie Duffy
Jeanne Rowker
Jenkins Twp. American Legion
Post 938
Jenkins Twp. Lions Club
Jerry Mancinelli
Jerry Mullarkey
Jim and Lorraine Murphy
Jodi &Tony Calabro
John H. Kennedy, Esq.
John R. Williams
Joseph &Ann DeLucca
Joseph & Jodi Boylan
Joseph DePrimo
Joseph D. Angelella
Joyce Flynn
Kay Delong
Kenneth J. Musto
Knights of Columbus
372 - Pittston PA
Limongelli Family
Lynn Kridlo-Cingolani & Renee
Marsola
Madelyne & Zoe Kridlo
Mary Monichelli
Michael Fereck
Mike & Jean Sowinski
Mike & Kathy Sperazza
Mike & Kelly Carroll
Milazzo Industries, Inc.
Moe Mullarkey
Monsignor John Bendik
Moose Lodge 1207
Mr. & Mrs. Edward Jones
Mr. & Mrs. Jack Ryan
Mr. & Mrs. Jerry Hromisin
Mr. & Mrs. John J. Chisdock
Mr. & Mrs. Martin F. Quinn
Mr. & Mrs. Richard Yaniello
Mr. & Mrs. William Hopple
Mrs. Joyce Butera & Family
Paul C. Stamberger
Paul F. Leonard-5
Penn State University/WB
Peter J. Adonizio Funeral Home
Peter M. Butera
Peter J. Lello
Philip Gelso-2
Pittston Area School District
Employees
Pittston Lithuanian Club
Przybytek-Kundlas VFW Post
4909, Dupont
Ray Capozucca
Renee Valenti
Robert Cingolani
Robert & Jennifer Haas
Robert Reynolds
Robert Volvonas
Rosemary Gitkos, Keri &
Caz Vermac, Joyell &
Anthony Campbell
Sabatelles Market
Sal Bernardi, Jr.
Sam DeAlba
Saporito, Saporito & Falcone
Savo’s Pizza & Family Restaurant
Sharon Tonte
St. John’s Altar & Rosary Society
Szumski Family
The Dessoye Family
The Law Firm of Skibitsky
and Molino
The Law Offices of Tony Ross
Tom & KimWysokinski
Tony and Brandi Bartush
Tony and Dolores D’Elia
Upper Pittston Sportsmens Club
Vincent Waszczak
West Wyoming Eagles Post 1965
William & Nancy Keating
C M Y K
SUNDAY DISPATCH SUNDAY, JUNE 24, 2012 PAGE 1B
Social Section
Inside
WA celebration..........2, 4, 5
Birthdays............................3
Schools ..............................6
Classified......................8-16
S E C T I O N B
➛ S O C I A L
Mr. and Mrs. James J. Musto, of West Pittston, will celebrate
their 60th wedding anniversary on June 28, 2012.
Theywere marriedinSaint Cecilia’s Church, Exeter, bythe late
Rev. Edward Sokolowski.
Their attendants were the late Monica Simons, maid of honor;
Jean Marie Cronauer, cousin of the bride, junior bridesmaid; the
late John Musto, brother of the groom, best man; ushers were the
late Kevin O’Keefe, brother of the bride, and Joseph Simons,
friend, ushers.
Mrs. Musto is the former Mary Lou O’Keefe, daughter of the
late John and Mae O’Keefe, of Exeter. She was employed as sec-
retary at Diamond Manufacturing Company, Wyoming.
Mr. Musto is the son of the late James and Jennie Musto, of
West Pittston. He was employed by Nelson Manufacturing Com-
pany, Wyoming and also a self-employed upholsterer.
Their marriage has beenblessedwiththree children, Mariellen,
deceased; Ron, of Pittston; and M.C. Palladino, of Philadelphia.
They have five grandchildren and one great grandchild.
A family dinner hosted by their children will mark the occa-
sion.
Mr. and Mrs. James J. Musto
Note 60th anniversary
Leah Nicole Lampman, daughter of April Roxby and Thomas
Lampman, of Duryea, was baptized on May 13 at Queen of the
Apostles Parish by Rev. Phillip Sladicka. Godparents are Marcia
Lampman Esq. and Lance Corporal Shawn Roxby. Maternal
grandparents are Doreen Weitz and Frank Roxby, of Moosic. Pat-
ernal grandparents are Mary Ellen Lampman and Joseph Lamp-
man, of Avoca. Paternal great-grandmother is Jean Reedy, of
Avoca. A celebration was held at the West Side Social Club.
Leah Nicole Lampman
Lampman baby baptized
Elizabeth Lee Silveri, daughter of Matt and Missy Silveri, Oly-
phant, was baptized on Sunday, June 17 at the First Presbyterian
Church of Lackawanna Valley, Peckville. She was born on May 9
at Moses Taylor Hospital, Scranton. Grandparents are Bruce and
Barb Silveri, West Wyoming, and Julie and John DePrimo, Oly-
phant. Great-grandparents are Ray and Pat Yunkunis, West Pitt-
ston; Joan Silveri, West Pittston; and Irene Guzinski, Olyphant.
Godparents are Dr Gene Schiappa, New York City, NY and El-
izabeth Mahon, Cherry Hill, NJ.
Elizabeth Lee Silveri
Silveri baby baptized
Helene Jadus, 29, of Duryea and Pete Lieback, 44, of Hugh-
estown were united in marriage on April 27. The ceremony was
officiated by the Honorable Fred Pierantoni.
The bride is the daughter of Stanley and Linda Jadus, of Du-
ryea. She is a 2001 graduate of Pittston Area High School and
earned a Bachelor of Science degree in medical imaging from
Misericordia University. She is employed as a registered MRI
Technologist at Moses Taylor Hospital.
The groom is the son of Pete and Sharon Lieback, of Hugh-
estown. He is a 1986 graduate of Pittston Area High School and
attended Bloomsburg University. He graduated from Penn State
Sheriff’s Academy in 2008. He is employed by the Luzerne
County Sheriff’s Department.
Following the ceremony, the Liebacks enjoyed had a lovely
sun-filled honeymoon in Riviera Maya, Mexico. The newlyweds
currently reside in Duryea.
Mr. and Mrs. Pete Lieback
Wedding vows exchanged
Wyoming Seminary gradu-
ates Sean Banul, of Pittston,
and Amy Shick of Mountain
Topreceivedthe Willis L. Dean
Citizenship Prize during the
school’s 168th commence-
ment.
The awardis giventoa senior
boy and girl who approach
most closely the ideal Wyom-
ing Seminary graduate in scho-
lastic achievement, good citi-
zenship and participation in ex-
tracurricular activities.
Banul, a Levi Sprague Fel-
low who gave the student ad-
dress at commencement, also
receivedthe Dr. WilliamSchul-
er Pierce Award for his accom-
plishments in science.
Prior to commencement, he
received the President’s Educa-
tional Excellence Award, the
Wyoming Seminary Model
United Nations Award and the
PIAA Scholar Athlete Award.
The son of Mr. and Mrs. Mi-
chael Banul, of Pittston, he has
been inducted into the Cum
Laude Society, the national
academic honor society for
college preparatory schools.
Shick also received the Paul
Kafrissen Memorial Computer
Award for excellence and cre-
ativity in computer studies.
Prior to commencement, she
received the President’s Educa-
tional Excellence Award, the
PIAA Scholar Athlete Award
and the Brooks Christian Citi-
zenship Prize.
The daughter of Mr. andMrs.
Bradley Shick, of Mountain
Top, she has been inducted into
the CumLaude Society, the na-
tional academic honor society
for college preparatory
schools.
Honored at Wyoming
Seminary commencement
Amy Shick, left, of Mountain Top, and Sean Banul, of Pittston,
were award winners during Wyoming Seminary Preparatory
School's commencement ceremonies.
The Friends of the Pittston
Memorial Library recently held
their annual dinner meeting at
the Gramercy Restaurant in Pitt-
ston. The Friends will sponsor a
meet the author visit /reception
with Chuck Miceli at 6:30 p.m.
on Thursday, Aug.2 at the li-
brary.
Plans are also under way for
the Friend’s Annual Library Fall
Festival which includes a large
book sale /flea market, face
painting, refreshments and
more. The Friends support pro-
grams and services for the li-
brary.
For more information on join-
ingthe Friends or the library, call
654-9565.
Library Friends plan author visit, festival
Friends of the Pittston Memorial Library recently held their annual dinner. Fromleft, first row, are
Eva Mae Falcone, Eileen Burns, Ellen Mondlak, Ann Marie Conroy; Maria Capolarella-Montante,
vice president; and Theresa Ormando. Second row, Charlotte Para, past president; Ann Simko,
treasurer; Winnie Winters;, Elaine Mariggi, Patricia Gregorio, Ann Monahan and Brenda Lispi,
president. Third row, Janet Delaney, secretary; Nancy Baiera, Patricia Joyce, Staff; Ann Hogya,
library director; and Ann Teresa Engleman.
C M Y K
PAGE 2B SUNDAY, JUNE 24, 2012 SUNDAY DISPATCH
➛ S C H O O L S
The Third Annual Wyoming
Area Scholarship/ Award Cele-
bration was held on May 24 with
more than 360 in attendance. A
total of 46 scholarships and or
awards were presented and more
than 75 students were honored.
Eight new scholarships were in-
troduced and the Principal’s
Award was announced that
night.
The new scholarships are:
James M. Campenni; The Fallen
Warrior; John Anthony “Beno”
Borzell; James A. Gilmartin;
Greater Pittston Chamber of
Commerce; Michael McCler-
non; Pittston Hospital Class of
1982; and Wyoming Area Kiwa-
nis.
Freddie Marianacci, a Wyom-
ing Area graduate and winner of
the Ring of Pride and the George
Miller awards, was guest speaker
and directed his remarks to the
students in attendance. Maria-
nacci graduated from Lehigh
University and earned a Master’s
Degree fromYale Universityand
is employed at Yale University.
John Borzell, who along with
his wife Mary Claire awarded
two scholarships in memory of
their son, John Anthony “Beno”
Borzell, also offered brief re-
marks.
Positive comments abounded
WYOMI NG AREA
75 students honored at Scholarship/Award Celebration
The Wyoming Area Scholarship Celebration committee: first row, left to right, Karen Aritz, Rosella Fedor, Teddy Rabel, Rita Mauriello,
Barbara Bullions, Lisa Dolhon. Second row, Alicia Adonizio, Terri Bugelholl, Anita Montante, Karen Schall, Juel Ann Klepadlo, Tony
Callaio. Absent at time of photo: Ann Agolino, Brian Butler, Sue Dorbad, Amy Hetro, Daneen Kearns, Gina LaNunziata, Leo Lulewicz,
Jennifer Vacula.
Fallen Warrior Memorial: John Anthony ™Beno∫ Borzell, Mark Dushok, first row, left to right, Chris Chipolis, Gina Chipolis, Steve Chipolis, Katelin Coolbaugh, Nikole
Dougherty, Dorianna Williams, Brina Platt, Jack Borzell, Mary Claire Borzell. Second row, Annaliese Romani, Mary Sklaney, Mary Chipolis, Regina Romani, Tiffany
Callaio, Melissa Dolman, Ashley Aritz, Sadie Fice, Ryan Kennedy, Julianna Borzell, Ann Polizzi, Mark Polizzi, Nissa Polizzi. Third row, Rachel Sklaney, John Romani,
Bob Chipolis, Christine Romani, Maria Marianacci, John Marianacci, Doreen Marianacci, John Marianacci, C.J. Chairge, Kevin Dushok, Richard Dushok.
Wyoming Area faculty Scholarships. Front, Samantha Evarts, Alexandra Amico, Nick Bartoli, James Rose, Theresa Kelly, Danielle
Dolhon. Second row, Carla Evarts, Charlene Amico, Mary Ann Bartoli, Catherine Rose, Sara Kelly, Lisa Dolhon. Third row, TimEvarts,
David Amico, JimRose, Shawn Kelly, Dave Dolhon.
Casimir J. Dylo Memorial Scholarship, left to right, Andrew Kuffa, Cataldo Garzella, Jacqueline
Stash, Wanda Stash, Frank Stash, Lauren Stash.
Superintendent (top 10 students) and Fedor (top five) Awards. Front, Jacqueline Stash (Superin-
tendent), John Barcelon ( Superintendent and Fedor), Allison Golden (Superintendent and Fedor),
Jessica Hollister (Superintendent and Fedor), Theresa Kelly (Superintendent). Second row, Trevor
Alder (Superintendent and Fedor), David Bonomo (Superintendent), Emily Lukasavage (Superin-
tendent). Not pictured: Jonathan Scrobola (Superintendent and Fedor), James Scrobola (Superin-
tendent.)
Dr. Doris Wyllie. Front, Joyce Scrobola, Jonathan Scrobola, Tre-
vor Alder, Cindy Alder. Back, James Scrobola, Kip Alder.
The John B. Campbell/Exeter Lions Scholarship, first row, Rita Colondo, Ken Radle, Kendra Radle,
Jeanmarie Radle, Larry Colondo. Second row, Leonard Bonfanti, Toni Valenti, Richard Shields,
Janet Serino, Linda Hyzenski.
George Miller award, Front, Lois Miller, Joseph Adonizio, George Miller, Chrissy Argenio, Barbara
Argenio, Eddie Miller. Back, Alicia Adonizio, Paul Argenio.
Rhonda Lambert presents the
National Choral Award to Riley
Thomas.
Charlie Adonizio, left, presents
the Greater Pittston Chamber
of Commerce Scholarship to
Conner Mangan.
See CELEBRATION, page 4
C M Y K
SUNDAY DISPATCH SUNDAY, JUNE 24, 2012 PAGE 3B
➛ S C H O O L S
Peyton Antal, daughter
of Corey Antal, Dupont
and Chris Antal, Suscon
celebrated her fifth birth-
day on June 23. Her
grandparents are Richard
and Susan Leonard, Du-
pont; and Richard and
Barbara Antal, Suscon.
She celebrated her birth-
day with family parties
and a trip to the Philadel-
phia Zoo. Peyton has a
sister, Avery, who will
celebrate her sixth birth-
day on August 9.
Peyton Antal
Alana Aufiere, daugh-
ter of Michael and Patti
Aufiere, will celebrat her
ninthbirthdayonJune 25.
She is the granddaughter
of Carmella Aufiere and
the late Felice Aufiere.
Her maternal grandpar-
ents are the late Joseph
and Mildred Miele. Ala-
na loves dancing, cheer-
leading and playing with
her dog, Juicy. She has an
older sister, Linnae.
Alana Aufiere
Evan Corcoran, son of
Lynn and Donald Corco-
ran, Laurel Run, celebrat-
ed his seventh birthday on
June 13. He is the grand-
son of Joseph and Angel-
ica Borysewicz, Dupont
and Charlotte Corcoran,
Plains. Evan has two
brothers, Cameron, 12;
andShane, 10; anda sister
Irelyn, 5 years old.
Evan Corcoran
Madeline DeSanto, daughter of
Sean and Jessica DeSanto, of
Wyoming, is celebrating her second
birthday today, June 24. She is the
granddaughter of David and Gail
Humko, of Harding, and Anthony
and Christine DeSanto, of Pittston
Township. She is the great-grand-
daughter of Bernadine Yochem, of
Exeter; John Humko Jr., of Harding;
Robert YochemSr., of Virginia; and
Ann Codick, of Taylor. She is also
the great-great-granddaughter of
Bertha Yourelonis, of Ashley. Ma-
deline loves being outside, playing
on her swing set and any activities
that involve water. She also enjoys
playing with her dog, Booka.
Madeline DeSanto
Robert
James Dolan,
son of Robert
and Lynn Do-
lan, of Avoca,
celebrated his
fourth birthday
on June 19. He
is the grandson
of John and
Louise Stasik
and Robert and
Elaine Dola,n
of Duryea.
Robert has a
sister, Kayleen,
8 years old.
Robert
Dolan III
Dante Gerald In-
salaco, son of Car-
men and Kimberly
Insalaco, Dallas,
celebrated his first
birthday on June
21. He is the grand-
son of Rick and
Lois Connors,
Wyoming; Paul
Brooks, Harding;
and the late Car-
men and Gerri In-
salaco. Dante has a
brother, Carmen,
who was 3 years
old in April.
Dante Insalaco
Arianna Elizabeth
McMahon, daughter of
Jessica Craig, of Avoca,
and Joseph McMahon, of
Wilkes-Barre, will cele-
brate her first birthday on
June 26. Her grandpar-
ents are Carl and Eliza-
beth Craig, of Avoca, and
John and Priscilla Pro-
karym, of Pittston. Great-
grandmother is Margaret
Zinkavich of Duryea. A
party will be held to cele-
brate Arianna’s birthday.
Arianna
McMahon
EdwardRobert Rosiak, son
of Ed and Kristy Rosiak, of
Avoca, celebrated his seventh
birthday on June 21. He is the
grandson of Robert and Ka-
ren Carmasse, of Pittston,
and the late Edward and Lor-
raine Rosiak, of Pittston. He
is the great-grandson of Beu-
lah Vaughn, of Altoona. Ed-
die has a sister, Ella, age 4 ½.
He enjoys playing basketball
at Avoca Rec Center, soccer
with the Greater Pittston
Stoners and baseball at Du-
pont Little League. Eddie cel-
ebrated his birthday with a
pool party.
Edward Rosiak
Milania Marie Wid-
dick, daughter of John
and Leslie Widdick, of
Pittston Township, cele-
brated her first birthday
on June 21. She is the
granddaughter of Robert
and Marilyn Starna, of
Pittston Township; Joann
Turco, of Yatesville; and
John and Rose Ann Wid-
dick, of Exeter. Milania
has a brother Beau, 4
years old. Apartyis being
held to mark this special
occasion.
Milania Widdick
Gia Francesca Appel, daugh-
ter of Kristy Appel, Exeter, and
Joseph Appel, Pittston, cele-
brated her seventh birthday on
June 23. She is the grand-
daughter of Gary and Suzanne
Patrick, Exeter; and Butchy and
Sandra Appel, Pittston. She is
also the great granddaughter of
Santa Limongelli Stella, Pitt-
ston. A party at Sno-Cove was
held in honor of the occasion.
Gia Appel
The Pittston Library an-
nounced the following:
• For the month of July
there will be a “Fill a Bag
Book Sale” in the lobby.
• Basic computer classes
for adults are offered at
10:30 a.m. on Thursdays.
Call the library to register.
• Crochet Club meets at
10 a.m. Tuesdays and 6 p.m.
Thursdays.
• July Schedule for Lego
Club: The Monday group
will meet on July 9 and the
Wednesday group will meet
on July 11. Lego Club mem-
ber may switch days for the
summer only. Lego Club is
wait-list only by calling the
library
• Child, Teen and Adult
Summer Reading Program
is currently in progress. The
program will run June 18 to
Aug. 13. All programs re-
quire registration.
•Each week children can
choose a bedtime story.
Bedtime stories are wrapped
books that young readers
can take home and rate.
Each returned rate slip will
be entered to win prizes. An
art contest based on the
“Dream Big” theme will be
held. Submissions can be in
all art mediumexcept sculp-
ture and must be no larger
than 15 inches. Deadline for
submission is July 23.
• Attention teens: Teen
volunteers insixthgrade and
up are needed to help with
book logs. The hours can be
used for community service
hours
• Adult Baked Goods
Book Club will meet at 6
p.m. on July 2 at 6 p.m. to
discuss the book, “The Curi-
ous Incident of the Dog in
the Nighttime” by Mark
Haddon.
• Friends of the Library
will meet on Wednesday, Ju-
ly 26. Call the library to reg-
ister.
• The library will be
closed on Wednesday, July 4
in observance of Independ-
ence Day.
• Summer hours will be-
gin soon. Weekdays will re-
main the same; however,
hours for Saturdays in July
and august will be from 9
a.m. to 1 p.m.
Pittston Library sets programs
Stop by or mail your birthday photo to:
The Sunday Dispatch
109 New Street
Pittston, PA18640
Pictures can run in back and white for $2 or color for $10. Deadline is Wednesday at 5
p.m., but space is limited, so pictures will be published on a first-come, first-served
basis. Any questions, please call 602-0168.
HAPPY BIRTHDAY!!
Checks can be made payable to The Sunday Dispatch.
The region’s best young pianists,
including two from the Greater Pitt-
ston Area, will be featured in a radio
broadcast of the Northeastern Penn-
sylvania Philharmonic Piano Com-
petition on WVIA FM at 2 p.m. to-
day, June 24.
Finalists include Dominick Cris-
tofori D’Alessandro, of West Pitt-
ston, and Rachel Insalaco, of Laflin.
The 11 finalists were chosen from
27 original contestants. There were-
five5 finalists in the Junior Division
(grades 7-9) and six finalists in the
Senior Division (grades 10-12). The
final round performances took place
on June10 in the Sordoni High Defi-
nition Theater at the WVIA Studios
in Jenkins Township.
The Junior Division performanc-
es featured on the special broadcast
today will be D’Alessandro, An-
drew Gallagher, of Taylor; Marala
Mackarey, of South Abington
Township; Kyler McAllister, of Jef-
ferson Township; and Sienna Marie
Tabron ,of Wilkes-Barre.
The Senior Division finalists will
be showcased at 2 p.m. on Sunday,
July 1 on WVIA-FM. They are In-
salaco, Garrett Craig-Lucas, of Dal-
ton; David A Galaydick, of South
Abington Township; Nathan Gra-
bow, of Lake Ariel; Matthew Huer-
tas, of Dalton’ and Rachel Ann Lon-
gacre, of Hallstead.
The finalists performedtwoselec-
tions before a panel of judges, in-
cluding Sister Joan Paskert of the
Marywood University music facul-
ty, Eugene Albulescu of the Lehigh
University music faculty and Law-
rence Loh of Northeastern Pennsyl-
vania Philharmonic.
The winners of the competition
received monetary prizes and op-
portunities to perform at Philhar-
monic events.
Two local pianists featured
An awards ceremony was recently
held at the Tenth Street Elementary
School in the Wyoming Area School Dis-
trict. Awards were presented in the ar-
eas of perfect attendance, academic ex-
cellence, academic achievement and
peer tutoring,
PERFECT ATTENDANCE
GRADE 1 - Jillian Rogish, Gabriele
Seals, Katie Rowlands
GRADE 2 - Tyler Brzozowski, Shelby
Hallman, Anna Napkora
GRADE 3 - Amanda Misson, Adam
Wisnewski, Jocelyn Williams
GRADE 4 - Michael DeSanto, Joseph
Mazza, Samantha Maszeroski, Joshua,
Guilford, Brianna Misson, Madelynn
Ross
GRADE 5 - Jesse Cegelka, William
Fauntleroy, Nicholas Perry
GRADE 6 - Bshayer Al-Salem, Emily
Cheskiewicz, Lila Donnelly, Stephanie
Sepko, Bruce Rowlands, Elizabeth
O’Brien
ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE
GRADE 4 - Abigail Barhight, Luke
Coolbaugh, Joshua Cumbo, Michael De-
Santo, Marissa Kovaleski, Michael Alba,
Seth Kopcza, Alison Lynch, Cassidy Or-
zel, Nicole Silinskie, Ariel Vikara, Ga-
brielle Andiario, Joshua Guilford, Made-
lynn Ross, Ian Williams
GRADE5- Cara Yorina. Mike Remley,
Kya Robbins, Kayla Taddei, Carlina Ur-
ban, Michael Amato, NicoleButler, Grace
Jeffery, Stephen Lucas, Kiaura Ruskey,
Alana Start, Marissa Traglia, Matthew
Wycoski, Micheal Abromovage, Nicholas
Perry
GRADE 6 - Kayla Dovidas, Alexander
Gonzales, Olivia Astolfi, Kelly Carroll,
AnthonyDeAngelo, AlexHawk, JakeHo-
gan, C.J. Rome, Skylar Santacroce, Jim-
my Kosco, Nina Sypniewski, Matthew
Wright, Alex Ambruso, Justine Buczyn-
ski, Amanda Casterline, Annie Karcut-
skie, Ben Klaproth, Ray Knaub, Addison
Orzel, Julianna Ritsick, Kristi Skok, P.J.
Angeli, Antonio DeNardi, Megan Dillon,
Gwendolyn Glatz, Julia Kopetchny, Marc
Anthony Minichello, Jessica Parente,
Matthew Silinskie, Dylan Melberger, Mi-
randa Smith, Zebulon Chisdock, Shane
Eslick, Connor McCormick, Shane Son-
day, Alyssa Vikara.
ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT
GRADE 4 - Charles Banashefski,
DanteBovani, AidanDollak, RebeccaDy-
mond, Jonithen Griener, Chelsea Mor-
gan, Ryan Petrucci, Carlyle Robinson,
JosephSanfilippo, AmarahScott, Carley
Yuhas, Nicholas belles, BrennaJohnson,
Samantha Maszeroski, Joseph Mazza,
Cody O’Neill, Emma Sands, Dillon Wil-
liams, Jonathan Augustine, Matthew
Brown, Evan freeman, Brianna Misson,
Jade Nace, George Sharkey, Thomas
Wycoski
GRADE 5 - Vitaliy Biksey, Steven Bo-
nomo, Damien Bronsburg, Quynh Bui,
Jesse Cegelka, Tori Ciannilli, Bella Con-
cha, Ilana Cunningham, Brittany Dovi-
das, Matthew Foersch, Valerie Gerchak,
Lincoln Heck, Nick Katulka, Abby Nel-
son, Jimmy Sheridan, Kendra Shotwell,
Connor Ardoline , Riley Brown, Peter
Calimeres, Ryan Carter, Dimitri De Pie-
tro, William Fauntleroy, Abigail Gober,
Skylar Norton, Paige Ross, MatthewTar-
nalicki, Julia Zimmerman, Gavin Bryan,
Anna Campbell, Joshua Carlson, Jaden
Cordero, Jenna Donahue, Raymond
Driving Hawk, Brett Kostik, Tatum Mas-
lousky, Aubrey Mytych, Rachel Pisarcik,
Alexa Regis, Meghan Shulde, Kaylee Yo-
rina, Alexandra Cook, Toby Hallman
GRADE 6 - Bradley Barletta, Cole
Bresnahan, EmilyCheskiewicz, LilyDon-
nelly, GraceFurcon, Curtis Hager, Allison
Lampman, Hallie Stark, Jessica Walk-
owiak, Erica Gallagher, Lindsay Higdon,
Sam Greenfield, Alyson Grindall, Olivia
Williams, Bella Waltz, Jonelle Olaviany,
Amber Rought, Genevieve Fedrici,
Casey McNew, Thomas Walkowiak, Oli-
via Bugelholl, Kyle Chromey, Akira Con-
dry, Jordan Frye, Sarah Holweg, Lizzie
Moore, CaseyOrlando, AaronZezza, My-
kaluh Marcy, Loren Richards, Bruce
Rowlands, Gabe Slusser, Samantha Tho-
rek, Brandon Williams, Brittani Clarke,
Felicia Deininger, Justin Esposito, Ga-
brielle Granteed, Kathryn Lombardo,
Justin Randazzo, Kaleigh Shission, Eli-
jah Smith, Shelby Stackhouse, Steven
Yordy, Mallory McMaster, Sarah Miller,
Tyler Nayavich, Hannah Hinkle, Michael
Karsko, Jacob Schelinski, Cassandra Sy-
pulski, Colby Thomas.
PEER TUTORS
GRADE 4 - Abigail Barhight, Carley
Yuhas
GRADE 5 - Alexa Regis, Madeline
Kwiatkowski, Aubrey Mytych, Meghan
Shulde, JoAnna Gunning
GRADE 6 - Addison Orzel
Tenth Street students are honored
C M Y K
PAGE 4B SUNDAY, JUNE 24, 2012 SUNDAY DISPATCH
➛ S C H O O L S
7
6
2
3
6
7
that night.
Complete information on all
scholarships is available at wyo-
mingarea.org under “guidance
department scholarships.”
The fourth annual celebration
is scheduled for May 23, 2013.
Anyone interested in discuss-
ing potential scholarships/
awards should call Mrs. Rabel at
570-655-3826, ext. 2339.
CELEBRATION
Continued from Page 2B
School board and administration. Front, Deanna Farrell, Beth Gober-Magnan, Janet Serino. Back
Dr. Frank Casarella, Bob Kaluzavich, Ray Bernardi, John Marianacci, Vito Quaglia.
David J. Williams Memorial Scholarship, The Warrior Award. Front row, Nancy Williams, Jack Wil-
liams, Catlyn Smith, Antoinette Smith, Michael Smith. Second row, Pat Williams, Janis Coolbaugh.
Rosemary Campenni Memorial Scholarship. Front row, Ashley Aritz, Chrissy Campenni, Karen
Aritz, Lauren Frisbie, Gary Frisbie, Judy Frisbie, Mary Rose Campenni. Second row, Alyssa Aritz,
TomCampenni, SamAritz, Julian Campenni.
Michael McClernon Memorial Scholarship. Front, Rose Biscotto, Jon Nelson, Gena McClernon,
Riley Thomas, Aine Thomas, Lori Raymond. Back, Melissa Nelson, Paula Vullo, Melissa Butler,
John Thomas.
Bausch/Lomb Medal. Cindy Alder, Trevor Alder, Kip Alder.
Moose Lodge 1207 Award. Front, Maureen Bilbow, MacKenzie
Bilbow, Morgan Bilbow, Bob Bilbow.
West Pittston Women's Club Scholarship. Front , Ann Alaimo,
Georgeanne Nuff, Sarah Crake, Joan Pribula. Back, Marilyn Pahl,
Alberta Phelps.
Ann and Ron Nicholson Memorial Scholarship. Scott Nicholson,
Maylan Nicholson, Sarah Crake, Greg Nicholson.
2A Ring of Pride Al Ciampi Memorial Scholarship. Front row,
Louis Ciampi Sr., Joe Adonizio, Nick Bartoli.
Second row, Alicia Adonizio, Mary ann Bartoli.
Ring of Pride Al Ciampi Memorial Scholarship, Front row, Joseph
Adonizio, Gini Ciampi, Nick Bartoli.
Second row, P.J. Adonizio, Alicia Adonizio, Mary Ann Bartoli.
C M Y K
SUNDAY DISPATCH SUNDAY, JUNE 24, 2012 PAGE 5B
➛ S C H O O L S
Third annual Wyoming Area Scholarships/Awards Celebration
West Pittston American Legion Post 542/First Lt. Jeffrey DePrimo Memorial Award, first row, left to
right, Richard Simonson, Aaron Steve, Kyle Brogan, Ashley Melendez, Robert Phillips. Second row,
Gina Steve, Shawn Brogan, Heather Lewis, Ron Faust, Carmen Melendez, Cesar Melendez, Janice
Phillips.
West Wyoming American Legion Post 904 Award, first row, left to right, Gina Steve, Aaron Steve,
Olga Costello. Second row, Joseph Herbert, Richard Yarosavich, Ron Semanski, Paul Shaffer.
Michael L. Pesta UFCWMemorial Scholarship, first row, fromleft, Michael Smith, Catlyn Smith,
Antoinette Smith, Nancy Pesta. Second row, Janice Coolbaugh, Morgan DeAngelo, KimDeAngelo,
Mitchell DeAngelo.
Wyoming Area Student Council: Jean Matys Memorial Scholarship, first row, left to right, Nikole
Dougherty, Michael Kohut, Hannah Shelly. Second row, TomDougherty, Sherry Dougherty, Chris-
tine Kohut, Joe Stachokus, Heidi Stachokus, John Shelly.
Wyoming Area Wrestling Scholarship, left to right, Maria Maz-
zone, Nicodemo Mazzone, Brenda Meehan, Michele Valdez.
Wyoming Area Key Club: Mark Dushok Memorial Scholarship,
left to right, Kevin Dushok, Lisa Chihorek, Theresa Kelly, Richard
Dushok.
The Greater Pittston Chamber Women's Network Scholarship,
left to right, Brandy Partush, Sarah Crake, Rosemary Dessoye,
Shirley Bartos.
The Ivo/Tosca Giannini Scholarship, left to right, TomGiannini,
Jessica Hollister, Betsy Giannini.
Thomas and Patricia Kearns Rama Club Scholarship. Barbara
Bullions, Keri Irace, Karen Irace, Donald Irace.
The Principal's Award, left to right, Vita Quaglia, principal; Lauren
Frisbie, Judy Frisbie, Gary Frisbie.
Dolores McHugh Boys Basketball Memorial Scholarship, left to
right, Joseph Vullo, TomMcHugh, Louis Vullo, Maureen McHugh
Aritz, Cindy Vullo.
Michael B. Pedley Memorial Scholarship, left to right, Carmela
Partash, Rebina Borzell, David Bonomo, Marie Pedley, Bruce
Pedley.
Francis/Joanne Pineno Scholarships to Bloomsburg U. and Penn
State U., seated, Nicholas Szewczyk, Robert Lewis. Standing,
Megan Lewis, Robert Lewis Jr.
West Pittston Cherry BloosomScholarship. Front, Linda Hyzen-
ski, Toni Valenti, Sarah Crake, Millie Vasil. Back, Charlotte Kee-
ney, George Taggart, Matthew Crake.
C M Y K
PAGE 6B SUNDAY, JUNE 24, 2012 SUNDAY DISPATCH
➛ S C H O O L S
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$
529
95
PN43E450
40” Bravia
LCD TV
$
549
95
KDL40BX450
40 Bravia
LCD TV
$ 95
KDL40BX450
60” 1080p
Plasma TV
$
1099
95
Z60PV220
60 1080p
Plasma TV
pp
$ 95
60PV220
4-piece
package
$
1399
95
P
a
c
k
a
g
e
S
p
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c
ia
ls
Commencement exercises for West Side Career and Technology
Center were conducted on June 8 with100 diplomas being awarded.
100 diplomas awarded at West Side Career and Technology Center
Members of the Class of 2012 of West Side Career and Technology Center are, fromleft, first row, Daniel Ian Connolly, Dillon Swanson, Justin Grocki, Freddie Boston, Samantha Savakinas, Lauren Hef-
felfinger, Chenay Champluvier, Kayla Walsh, Ryan Searles, Hannah Smith, Derrick Eyerman, Amanda Hamilton, Rebecca Rosenko, Desiree Sharp, Dominic Erfman, Jonathan Garrison, Dave Eland,
John Maskalis, Mark Davis. Second row, Dylan Williams, Brian Bonnerwith, Ron Cook, Chris George, Ashley Zimmerman, Theresa Lee, Alicia Bevan, Sarah Golembewski, Elise Jardine, Kimberly Sor-
belli, Jamie Kizer, Devon Reich, Bethany Bielut, Sean Dunn, Jeremy Bytheway, Wygant Courter, Robert Strachan. Third row, Gage Buchanan, KisemFreeman, Elias Kocher, Terrell Sasser, Felisha Da-
venport, Samantha MacMillan, Ariel Courter, Shyann Church, Samantha Edmonds, Kelly Jones, Kassie Rodriguez, Audre Edwards, Hayli Lucas, Joey Sulz, Justin Evarts, Jonathan Lanius. Fourth row,
Mark Macosky, Kevin Adams, Jesse Nace, Derek Lewis, Heather Kennedy, Stephanie Ketcham, Mercedes Conway, Lindsey Kelly, Vera Lewis, Emily Farver, Nikki Davenport, Jia Torres, Cora Brady, An-
drew Nevel, Daniel Pierce, Shane Kocher, Sean Stone. Fifth row, Joseph Steinruck, Conner Stancavage, Stanley Sopata, George Fink, Rodolfo Quiroz, Jackie Joseph, Allisah Fuches, Taylor Darby, Nikki
Ciliberti, Kimberly Vietz, Nikki Mangan, Chris Labar, Brett Yeninas, Ryan Walsh, Josh Huntsinger, Nick Bassolino. Sixth row, Robert Schrack, Robert Lewis, David Allen, Lloyd Crawford, Michael Garrity,
Garrett Sirak, Casey Congdon, Nathan Brodosky, Arthur Lockard, Jack Ayers, Michael Price, Shawn O'Malley.
Hannah Smith, right, was valedictorian of the West Side Career
and Technology Center Class of 2012. Ryan Searles, left, was
salutatorian.
Class officers of the West Side Career and Technology Center Class of 2012 are, fromleft, Mr. Richard Rava, principal; Chenay Cham-
pluvier, secretary; Kayla Walsh, vice president; Amanda Hamilton, president; Derrick Eyerman, treasurer; Mrs. Nancy Tkatch, admin-
istrative director.
C M Y K
SUNDAY DISPATCH SUNDAY, JUNE 24, 2012 PAGE 7B
➛ S C H O O L S
Scholarship donors and recipients honored at Wyoming Area
Antony abnd Eleanor Memorial Scholarship, Front row, Lori Rose, Logan Rose, Paul Angeli, Nina
Angeli, Chrissy Argenio, Barbar Argenio, Paul Argenio. Back row, Kory Lyn Angeli, P.J. Angeli.
Angelo Schifano Memorial Scholarship. Front row, Michael Schifano Mary Ann Schifano, Nikole
Dougherty, Sherry Dougherty, TimDougherty. Seciond row, Keith Schifano, Nicole Schifano, Kira
Meager, Dina Schifano Meager.
James M. Campenni Memorial Scholarship. Front, Ashley Aritz, Chrissy Campenni, TomCampenni,
Chrissy Argenio, Barbara Argenio, Mary Rose Campenni. Second row, Alyssa Aritz, Julian Cam-
penni, Paul Argenio, SamAritz, Karen Artiz.
Wyoming Area Kiwanis Scholarship, seated fromleft, Theresa Kelly, Jessica Hollister. Standing,
Mary Swaback, Tiffany Callaio, Sandy Touw, Bob Orlando, Matt Crake.
Leonard C. Insalaco II Memorial Scholarship, seated, fromleft,
Jean Granteed, Dave Granteed, Matt Granteed. Second row, Leo-
nard Insalaco, Barbara Insalaco.
Sousa (Band) Award and Humanities/Social Studies Award, left
to right, Ken Hollister, Jessica Hollister, Sharon Hollister.
West Side Auto Award, fromleft, Caz Vermac, Dave Granteed,
Keri Gitkos.
Pittston Hospital Class of 1982 Scholarship. Front row, Ted
Kross, Kristy Boychuk, Rachel Boychuk, Karen Aritz.
Second row, Victoria Voychuk, Lynn Voychuk, Donna Drevenik.
John Anthony ™Beno∫ Borzell Scholarship, first row, fromleft,
Chris Bone, Angela Coco. Second row, Pat Bone, Georgia Bone,
Karen Coco, Michael Coco. Third row, Mary Claire Borzell, Julian-
na Borzell, Jack Borzell.
Greater Pittston Friendly Sons and James A. Gilmartin Scholar-
ships. Front row, Karen Coco (Gilmartin recipient) JimClancy,
Chris Bone (Friendly Sons), Georgia Bone. Second row, Michael
Coco, Patrick Bone.
SUNDAY DISPATCH SUNDAY, JUNE 24, 2012 PAGE 8
*Price of vehicle plus tax and tags. Prices include all rebates. $500 Independence Day Bonus Cash applied where applicable on select models (Silverado; Cruze; Traverse). * Price also includes Trade-In Bonus Cash (see dealer for qualification). *† Price includes AARP incentive
(See dealer for details); SILVERADO - Lease for $299 per month plus tax & tags, 39 month lease, 10K miles per year; $1,999 due at leasing signing. Lease payment includes GM competitive lease incentive (must currently lease a 1999 or newer non-GM vehicle to qualify, GM
competitive lease can be transferred in same household; LowAPR in lieu of rebates; †CRUZE- $149 per month plus tax, 24 month lease, 12K miles per year, Total due at signing $2418.38=includes tags and 1st payment; †MALIBU- $169 per month plus tax, 24 month lease,
12K miles per year, Total due at signing=$2198.83. Includes tags and 1st payment; †EQUINOX- $219 per month plus tax, 24 month lease, 12K miles per year, Total due at signing=$2354. Includes tags and 1st payment; †TRAVERSE - $249 per month plus tax, 24 month lease,
12K miles per year, Total due at signing=$1514. Includes tags & 1st payment; Lease Specials are to well qualified buyers (S-Tier 800+) Artwork for illustration only. Must take delivery by July 2, 2012. Not responsible for typographical errors.
$
23,450
8
AVAILABLE
Starting At
30
MPG
hwy
Stk. #12702, 2.4L DOHC 4V ECOTEC, 6 Speed
Automatic Tapshift Manual Trans., Air, PW, PDL, Onstar w/
Turn-By-Turn Navigation, Remote Keyless Entry, XM Satellite
Radio, AM/FM/CD/MP3 Format,
$
18,999
*
Starting At
Stk. #12606, Vortec 5.3 SFI V8
6 Speed Automatic, 2nd Row
Bench, Power Options,
F/R Air, XM Satellite
Radio, Onstar, Luggage
Rack, 3rd Row Seat,
Assist Steps, Remote
Start Pickup Package
$
41,999
*
Starting At
Stk. #12584, 5.3L
V8, AT, A/C, Power
Windows, Power
Door Locks, EZ
Lift Tailgate, Lock-
ing Rear Differen-
tial, Alum. Wheels,
OnStar Turn-by-
Turn Navigation,
XM Satellite
$
29,499
*
Starting At
1LT • 2LS • 1SS • 2SS
CONVERTIBLE Stk. #12610
MSRP $
22,890
0
%
APR
For 60 Mos.
MSRP $
46,105
0
%
APR
For 60 Mos.
0
%
APR
For 60 Mos.
MSRP $
36,560
33
MPG
hwy
SHOP 24/7 WWW.VALLEYCHEVROLET.COM
Sale Price
Starting At
$
30,499
O
R
$
299
LEASE
FOR
ONLY
PER
MONTH
For
39 Mos.
2012 CHEVY SILVERADO 1500 EXTENDED CAB LT 4WD Z71
This Is No
“Plain Jane” Truck
Z71 ALL STAR
EDITION
Stk. #12242, 5.3L SFI V8 6 Speed Automatic, 18” Aluminum
Wheels, Climate Control, Keyless Entry, PW, PDL, Off-Road
Z71 Suspension Package, & More!
OVER
100
SILVERADO
AVAILABLE
OVER
100
SILVERADO
AVAILABLE
Must own/lease 1999 or newer
Saturn vehicle to qualify.
We Want Your Trade! We Want Your Trade!
$ Top Dollar $ Offered! $ Top Dollar $ Offered!
ATTENTION
SATURN
OWNERS
$1000 BONUS
CASH AVAILABLE.
$1000 BONUS CASH
AVAILABLE.
0
%
APR
For 60 Mos.
MSRP $
36,955
CELLPHONES FOR SOLDIERS DROP OFF!
Donate gently used cell phones here!
VALLEY CHEVROLET SERVICE COMPLEX
221 Conyngham Ave.,Wilkes-Barre
CALL 822-2772 FOR MORE INFO.
2012 CHEVY EQUINOX LS FWD
Stk. #12613, 2.4L DOHC
4 Cylinder, 6 Speed Automatic,
Remote Keyless Entry,
Power Windows, Power Door
Locks, Power Mirrors, 17” Wheels,
AM/FM/CD, Cruise Control,
OnStar w/ Turn-By-Turn
Navigation, XM Satellite
Radio, Tilt Steering Wheel
MSRP $
24,355
LEASE
FOR
ONLY
$
219

PER
MONTH
For
24 Mos.
2012 CHEVY TRAVERSE LS FWD
MSRP $
30,775
LEASE
FOR
ONLY
$
249

PER
MONTH
For
24 Mos.
Stk. #12665, 1.8 ECOTEC VVT
DOHC 4 Cylinder, 6 Speed
Auto, Air Conditioning, Power
Windows, Power Door Locks,
Power Mirrors, Bluetooth, OnStar
w/ Turn-By-Turn Navigation,
XM Satellite Radio, Front Bucket
Seats, USB Audio Interface
MSRP $
18,865
LEASE
FOR
ONLY
$
149

PER
MONTH
For
24 Mos.
50
AVAILABLE MSRP $
22,890
LEASE
FOR
ONLY
$
169

PER
MONTH
For
24 Mos.
0
%
APR
For 60 Mos.
LS • LT • LTZ
Available
Stk. #12683
Stk. #12588, 2.4L DOHC,
6 Speed Automatic Transmission,
Air Conditioning, Power
Windows, Power Door
Locks, OnStar w/
Turn-By-Turn Navigation,
Remote Keyless Entry,
AM/FM/CD/MP3,
XM Satellite Radio
25
AVAILABLE
2012 CHEVY CRUZE LS 2012 CHEVY MALIBU LS
23
AVAILABLE
2012 CHEVY SILVERADO
1500 REGULAR CAB
Stk. #12525, Vortec 4.3L V6 MFI 4 Speed Automat-
ic, Air Conditioning, Locking Rear Differential, 17”
Steel Wheels, 40/20/40 Split Bench Seat, Stabilitrak
$
19,999
*
Starting At
Stk. #12063, 3.5L V6 Automatic, Dual Zone Air
Conditioning, Stabilitrak, Six-Way Power Driver
Seat, PW, PDL, Tilt, OnStar, XM Satellite Radio
$
22,499

*
20
AVAILABLE
Starting At
0
%
APR
For 60 Mos.
MSRP $
24,175
2012 CHEVY SONIC LT
Stk. #12680, 1.8L Ecotec-VVT DOHC 4 Cyl, Auto,
Stabilitrak, XM Radio, AM/FM/CD, PDL, A/C,
Rear Wiper Washer, Spoiler, OnStar
$
15,999
*
12
AVAILABLE
Starting At
35
MPG
hwy
30
MPG
hwy
MSRP $
26,665
0
%
APR
For 72 Mos.
TRADE-IN
BONUS
CASH
on select
trucks
$
500
INDEPENDENCE DAY
CASH
IN ADDITION TO ALL CURRENT OFFERS
(ON SELECT MODELS. 2012 CRUZE, TRAVERSE, SILVERADO. EXCLUDES LEASES.)
2012 CHEVY IMPALA
LS SEDAN
2012 CHEVY CAMARO
COUPE
2012 CHEVY MALIBU
LS
2012 CHEVY SUBURBAN
LS 4X4
2012 CHEVY SILVERADO
1500 4WD CREW CAB
PAGE 9 SUNDAY, JUNE 24, 2012 SUNDAY DISPATCH
SUNDAY DISPATCH SUNDAY, JUNE 24, 2012 PAGE 10
533 Installation/
Maintenance/
Repair
533 Installation/
Maintenance/
Repair
554 Production/
Operations
554 Production/
Operations
554 Production/
Operations
EQUIPMENT MECHANIC
Permanent, full time position for repair and
installation of automotive lifts, and other
hydraulic, pneumatic and electronic automo-
tive equipment. Experience as a technician
would be helpful. Full benefits program.
To apply please send your resume to:
PANZITTA SALES AND SERVICE
72 George Ave., Wilkes-Barre, PA, 18705
or email james@panzittasales.com
MACHINIST MACHINIST
INDUSTRIAL INDUSTRIAL ELECTRICIAN ELECTRICIAN
MAINTENANCE MECHANIC MAINTENANCE MECHANIC
MAINTENANCE TRAINEE MAINTENANCE TRAINEE
Fabri-Kal Corporation, a major thermoforming plastics company
has immediate full-time benefited openings.
Machinist: Traditional machine shop methods & equipment,
repair/modification of tooling & production components, fabrication
of parts. Formal Machine Shop training by a technical school,
state certification or a minimum of 6 years experience required.
Industrial Electrician: Conduit, EMT and ridged pipe; Equip-
ment testing; AC/DC motors and drives; PLC systems. 3 Yrs
Exp. HS/GED required, vocational/trade school preferred.
Mechanic: Troubleshooting, hydraulic/pneumatic, machine shop,
plumbing, welding, rebuild mechanic devices, schematics, test
equipment, basic electrical systems. 3 Yrs Exp. HS/GED
required, vocational/trade school preferred.
Maintenance Trainee: Associates Degree in Electronic field or
Technical Certification in Electronics to include AC/DC Fundamen-
tals, Industrial Electricity, Motor Controls, AC/DC Drives, PLC’s,
Basic testing equipment/Multi-meter/Amp probes.
Drug & Alcohol screening and background checks are conditions
of employment. Competitive wage and benefits package: Health
Insurance, Prescription, Dental & Vision, Disability, 401K, Educa-
tion, Paid Leave.
Apply on site: Monday-Friday 8AM-5PM;
or forward resume to:
Fabri-Kal Corporation
ATTN: Human Resources
Valmont Industrial Park
150 Lions Drive, Hazle Township, PA 18202
FAX: (570) 501-0817
EMAIL: HRPA@Fabri-Kal.com
www.f-k.com
EOE
100 Announcements
200 Auctions
300 Personal Services
400 Automotive
500 Employment
600 Financial
700 Merchandise
800 Pets & Animals
900 Real Estate
1000 Service Directory
MARKETPLACE
To place a Classified ad: Call 570-829-7130 or 1-800-273-7130 Email: classifieds@thepittstondispatch.com
thepittstondispatch.com
100
ANNOUNCEMENTS
110 Lost
ALL JUNK
VEHICLES
WANTED!!
ŠCALL ANYTIME
ŠHONEST PRICES
ŠFREE REMOVAL
CA$H PAID
ON THE SPOT
570.301.3602
BEST PRICES
IN THE AREA
CA$H ON THE $POT,
Free Anytime
Pickup
570-301-3602
570-301-3602
CALL US!
TO JUNK
YOUR CAR
WANTED
ALL JUNK
CARS &
TRUCKS
HEAVY
EQUIPMENT
DUMPTRUCKS
BULLDOZERS
BACKHOES
Highest Prices
Paid!!!
FREE
REMOVAL
Call
Vitos & Ginos
Anytime
288-8995
Line up a place to live
in classified!
LOST. iPod Shuffle
in Sullivan Park, off
Lambert St. Pittston.
Lime green, special
needs person is
missing it very
much.
570-654-0909
120 Found
FOUND MOWER
Nice red Snapper In
Hanover Township,
near route 29.
Wheels were taken
off of it. Mower is
new.
Cell # 570-760-6717
135 Legals/
Public Notices
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby
given that Letters
Testamentary have
been granted in the
Estate of EUGENE J.
LAFRATTE, a/k/a
EUGENE LAFRATTE,
late of the Borough
of Dupont, who died
May 13th, 2012. All
persons indebted to
said Estate are
requested to make
payment and those
having claims to
present the same,
without delay, to the
Executor, LOUIS
LAFRATTE and his
Attorneys. Saporito,
Saporito & Falcone
490 North Main
Street Pittston, PA
18640
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE OF LOCA-
TION OF PENNSYL-
VANIA LIQUOR
STORE FOR THE
SALE OF LIQUOR- In
accordance with the
provisions of the Act
of April 12, 1951, P.L
90, known as the
“Liquor Code”,
notice is hereby
given that the
Pennsylvania Liquor
Control Board has
determined upon
the location of a
Licensing Service
Center/Warehouse
at 161 Center Point
Boulevard, Center
Point Commerce
and Trade Park
East, Jenkins Town-
ship, PA, Luzerne
County.
PENNSYLVANIA
LIQUOR CONTROL
BOARD.
ESTATE NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby
given that Letters
Testamentary have
been granted in the
Estate of ANNA
MARIE WALKER,
A/K/A ANNA WALK-
ER, late of the City
of Pittston, who died
May 21, 2012. All
persons indebted to
said Estate are
requested to make
payment and those
having claims to
present the same,
without delay, to
SUZANNE MALLOY
and her Attorneys,
Saporito, Saporito &
Falcone
490 North Main St.
Pittston, PA 18640
135 Legals/
Public Notices
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby
given that Letters
Testamentary have
been granted n the
Estate of JEAN M.
LOFTUS, late of
the City of Pittston,
who died
May 22, 2012.
All persons indebt-
ed to said Estate
are requested to
make payment and
those having claims
to present the
same, without
delay, to the
Executrix, ANN
LOFTUS and her
Attorneys.
SAPORITO,
SAPORITO &
FALCONE
490 NORTH
MAIN STREET
PITTSTON, PA
18640
ESTATE NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby
given that Letters
Testamentary have
been granted in the
Estate of MAR-
GARET SORBER,
late of Hunlock
Township, who died
May 29, 2012.
All persons indebt-
ed to said Estate
are requested to
make payment and
those having claims
to present the
same, without
delay, to the Execu-
tors, ANDREW
SORBER AND
REBECCA
KOWALEK and
their Attorneys.
SAPORITO,
SAPORITO
& FALCONE
490 NORTH
MAIN STREET
PITTSTON, PA
18640
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN THAT THE
BOARD OF
DIRECTORS OF THE
PITTSTON AREA
SCHOOL DISTRICT
WILL HOLD A SPE-
CIAL MEETING ON
TUESDAY JUNE 26,
2012 AT 6:00 P.M.
IN THE LIBRARY OF
THE PITTSTON
AREA SENIOR
HIGH SCHOOL,
5 STOUT
ST.,YATESVILLE,
PITTSTON, PA, FOR
THE PURPOSE OF
ADOPTING THE
FINAL 2012-2013
SCHOOL BUDGET
AND FOR SUCH
OTHER & FURTHER
BUSINESS AS MAY
COME BEFORE
THE BOARD.
BY ORDER OF
THE BOARD
DEBORAH A.
RACHILLA
SECRETARY
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby
given that Letters
Testamentary have
been granted in the
Estate of WILLIAM
J. JAMES, late of
the Township of
Exeter, who died
April 1, 2012.
All persons indebted
to said Estate are
requested to make
payment and those
having claims to
present the same,
without delay, to the
Executrix, KATH-
LEEN A. JAMES
and her Attorneys.
Saporito, Saporito
& Falcone
490 N. Main St.
Pittston, Pa 18640
150 Special Notices
NEPA-AIRSOFT
North Eastern PA
Airsoft
WHAT IS AIRSOFT?
Airsoft is a military
simulation sport in
which players par-
ticipate in mock
combat with mili-
tary-style replica
weapons & tactics.
Come visit us at:
www.nepa-
airsoft.com
A Web Site
Dedicated to the
Airsoft Community
in NorthEast
Pennsylvania and
surrounding areas.
Home of the
Patriots Airsoft
Squad
We are always
looking for New
Members!
Contact us today
at:
webadmin@
nepa-airsoft.com
Say it HERE
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
< < < < < < <
ADOPTION:
Loving couple
hopes to adopt a
baby. We
promise a lifetime
of love & security
for a newborn.
Please call
Lori and Mike at
1-888-499-4464
150 Special Notices
P PA AYING $500 YING $500
MINIMUM
DRIVEN IN
Full size 4 wheel
drive trucks
ALSO PAYING TOP $$$
for heavy equip-
ment, backhoes,
dump trucks,
bull dozers
HAPPY TRAILS
TRUCK SALES
570-760-2035
542-2277
6am to 8pm
310 Attorney
Services
B A N K R U P T C Y
DUI - ARD
SOCIAL SECURITY
DISABILITY BENEFITS
WORKERS’ COMP
Free Consultation
25+ Years Exp.
Joseph M.
Blazosek
570-655-4410
570-822-9556
blazoseklaw.com
Free Bankruptcy
Consultation
Payment plans.
Carol Baltimore
570-822-1959
SOCIAL SECURITY
DISABILITY
Free Consultation.
Contact Atty. Sherry
Dalessandro
570-823-9006
409 Autos under
$5000
DODGE `98
AVENGER
Rebuilt engine, new
transmission, cus-
tom 3” exhaust.
Weapon R intake,
Blitz front bumper
and side skirts,
custom Evil 8 paint
job, vertical doors,
after market wheel
and tires, over
$10,000 invested.
Asking $4,000.
Call 570-287-8410
or 570-855-2699
GRAND MARQUIS
‘99 GS
Well maintained,
Smooth riding,
4.6L, V8, RWD,
Auto, Power
windows, power
locks, New
Inspection,
Serviced,
Silver over blue.
Good tires
$3,750
Call 823-4008
MERCURY `79
ZEPHYR
6 cylinder
automatic.
52k original miles.
Florida car. $1500.
570-899-1896
TOYOTA `90 CAMRY
138,000 miles,
inspected until
3/2013, runs
excellent, does
need rear struts.
Interior is like new.
$1200. Call
(570)824-7087
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
412 Autos for Sale
FORD `07 FOCUS
SES Sedan
Alloy wheels, heat-
ed seats, CD play-
er, rear spoiler, 1
owner, auto, air, all
power, great gas
mileage, priced to
be sold immedi-
ately! $6,995 or
best offer.
570-614-8925
412 Autos for Sale
& Auto Sales
519 Wyoming Ave
Scranton
570-961-5945
www.tomsgarage
andsales.com
CHEVY ‘10
CAMARO SS
11,100 miles Gray
$29,499
DODGE ‘09
CALIBER SXT
SXT 29,200 miles
Red $12,995
GMC ‘08
SIERRA SLT
LOADED w/ Plow
25,600miles White
$31,495
FORD ‘08
EXPLORER
Eddie Bauer
36,000 miles, Black
$20,995
FORD ‘08 EDGE
LIMITED AWD
28,000 miles, Red
$22,995
HYUNDAI ‘07
SANTA FE
FWD 74,000 miles
Gray, $13,495
TOYOTA ‘06
SIENNA LE
34,000 miles
Light Blue, $15,900
CHEVY ‘03
SUBURBAN LT
85,000 miles
Silver, $10,900
MERCEDES ’00
BENZ ML320
70,000 miles,
Black, $8,899
HONDA ‘00
PASSPORT
Black, 88,000 miles
DOMESTIC &
FOREIGN
SALES & SERVICE
Specializing in Specializing in
A/C Ser A/C Ser vice vice
DODGE ‘02
VIPER GTS
10,000 MILES V10
6speed, collec-
tors, this baby is
1 of only 750 GTS
coupes built in
2002 and only 1 of
83 painted Race
Yellow it still wears
its original tires
showing how it
was babied. This
car is spotless
throughout and is
ready for its new
home. This vehicle
is shown by
appointment only.
$39,999 or trade.
570-760-2365
FORD ‘02 MUSTANG
GT CONVERTIBLE
Red with black
top. 6,500 miles.
One Owner.
Excellent Condi-
tion. $17,500
570-760-5833
Let the Community
Know!
Place your Classified
Ad TODAY!
570-829-7130
WANTED!
ALL
JUNK
CARS!
CA$H
PAID
570-301-3602
MERCURY GRAND
MARQUIS ‘99 GS
Silver, 4.6L, V8,
Auto, power steer-
ing, power brakes,
power windows &
locks. 104k, New
Inspection! Great
Condition! Call
570-823-4008
PORSCHE `01
BOXSTER S
38,500 miles. Black
with beige interior. 6
speed transmission.
Air & CD player.
Excellent condition.
$17,600. Call
570-868-0310
412 Autos for Sale
TOYOTA ‘04 CELICA GT
112K miles. Blue,
5 speed. Air,
power
windows/locks,
CD/cassette, Key-
less entry, sun-
roof, new battery.
Car drives and
has current PA
inspection. Slight
rust on corner of
passenger door.
Clutch slips on
hard acceleration.
This is why its
thousands less
than Blue Book
value. $6,500
OBO. Make an
offer! Call
570-592-1629
415 Autos-Antique
& Classic
CHEVY ‘30 HOTROD COUPE
$49,000
FORD ‘76 THUNDERBIRD
All original $12,000
MERCEDES ‘76 450 SL
$24,000
MERCEDES ‘29
Kit Car $9,000
(570) 655-4884
hell-of-adeal.com
MAZDA `88 RX-7
CONVERTIBLE
1 owner, garage
kept, 65k original
miles, black with
grey leather interior,
all original & never
seen snow. $7,995.
Call 570-237-5119
MERCEDES-BENZ `73
450SL
Convertible with
removable hard top,
power windows, AM
/FM radio with cas-
sette player, CD
player, automatic, 4
new tires. Cham-
pagne exterior; Ital-
ian red leather inte-
rior inside. Garage
kept, excellent con-
dition. Reduced
price to $26,000.
Call 570-825-6272
427 Commercial
Trucks &
Equipment
CHEVY ‘08 3500
HD DUMP TRUCK
2WD, automatic.
Only 12,000 miles.
Vehicle in like
new condition.
$19,000.
570-288-4322
439 Motorcycles
BMW 2010 K1300S
Only 460 miles! Has
all bells & whistles.
Heated grips, 12 volt
outlet, traction con-
trol, ride adjustment
on the fly. Black with
lite gray and red
trim. comes with
BMW cover, battery
tender, black blue
tooth helmet with
FM stereo and black
leather riding gloves
(like new). paid
$20,500. Sell for
$15,000 FIRM.
Call 570-262-0914
Leave message.
HARLEY `05 DYNA
LOWRIDER
Black / gold, 2,000
miles, original
owner, extra pipes
& helmet. $13,500.
570-237-1103
HARLEY ‘10 DAVIDSON
SPORTSTER CUSTOM
Loud pipes.
Near Mint
174 miles - yes,
One hundred and
seventy four
miles on the
clock, original
owner. $8000.
570-876-2816
HARLEY DAVIDSON `07
Road King Classic
FLHRC. Burgundy /
Cream. 6 speed.
Cruise control. Back
rests, grips, battery
tender, cover. Willie
G accessories.
19,000miles. $13,250.
Williamsport, PA
262-993-4228
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘80
Soft riding FLH.
King of the High-
way! Mint origi-
nal antique show
winner. Factory
spot lights, wide
white tires,
biggest Harley
built. Only
28,000 original
miles! Never
needs inspec-
tion, permanent
registration.
$7,995 OBO
570-905-9348
SUZUKI ‘01 VS 800
GL INTRUDER
Garage kept, no
rust, lots of
chrome, black with
teal green flake.
Includes storage
jack & 2 helmets.
$3600
570-410-1026
439 Motorcycles
YAMAHA ‘97
ROYALSTAR 1300
12,000 miles. With
windshield. Runs
excellent. Many
extras including
gunfighter seat,
leather bags, extra
pipes. New tires &
battery. Asking
$4,000 firm.
(570) 814-1548
442 RVs & Campers
FOREST RIVER`08
5TH WHEEL
Model 8526RLS
Mountain Top,PA
$18,500
570-760-6341
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
SUNLINE `06 SOLARIS
Travel Trailer. 29’,
mint condition, 1
slide out a/c-heat.
Stove, microwave,
fridge, shower
inside & out. Many
more extras, includ-
ing towing, hitch
equipment & sway
bars. Satellite dish
& stand. Reduced.
$10,900. Selling
due to health
issues.
570-842-6735
TRAVELCRAFT ‘93
28’ Motorhome
52,000 miles
$12,000 negotiable.
570-333-5110
WINNEBAGO ‘81
LOW LOW MILES
42,000+
ALL NEW TIRES
GREAT PRICE
$4000
CALL
570-825-9415
AFTER 5 PM
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
CHRYSLER `02
TOWN & COUNTRY
Luxury people
mover! 87,300 well
maintained miles.
This like-new van
has third row seat-
ing, power side &
rear doors. Eco-
nomical V6 drive-
train and all avail-
able options. Priced
for quick sale
$5,495. Generous
trade-in allowances
will be given on this
top-of-the-line vehi-
cle. Call Fran
570-466-2771
Scranton
FORD ‘02 EXPLORER
Red, XLT, Original
non-smoking owner,
garaged, synthetic
oil since new, excel-
lent in and out. New
tires and battery.
90,000 miles.
$7,500
(570) 403-3016
FORD ‘73 F350
Stake Body Truck
55,000 Original
miles - garage
kept, only 2 own-
ers, hydraulic lift
gate, new tires,
battery and brakes.
Excellent condition.
$7500.
Call 570-687-6177
MERCURY `03
MOUNTAINEER
AWD. Third row
seating. Economical
6 cylinder automat-
ic. Fully loaded with
all available options.
93k pampered miles.
Garage kept. Safety /
emissions inspected
and ready to go. Sale
priced at $6995.
Trade-ins accepted.
Tag & title process-
ing available with
purchase. Call Fran
for an appointment
to see this out-
standing SUV.
570-466-2771
Scranton
MITSUBISHI `11
OUTLANDER SPORT SE
AWD, Black interi-
or/exterior, start/
stop engine with
keyless entry, heat-
ed seats, 18” alloy
wheels, many extra
features. Only Low
Miles. 10 year,
100,000 mile war-
ranty. $22,500. Will-
ing to negotiate.
Serious inquires
only - must sell,
going to law school.
(570) 793-6844
460
AUTOMOTIVE
SERVICE
DIRECTORY
468 Auto Parts
All Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Wanted
Highest
Prices
Paid In
CA$H
FREE
PICKUP
570-574-1275
503 Accounting/
Finance
CITY OF PITTSTON
Full-Time Police Officer
And Firefighter/
Engineer Civil Service
Examination
The City of Pittston
will conduct a Civil
Service Examination
for the position of
full-time police offi-
cer and firefighter/
engineer on Satur-
day, July 21, 2012 at
8:30 a.m., at the
Pittston Area Senior
High School, 5 Stout
Street, Yatesville,
PA. There will be a
written Civil Service
Examination as well
as a physical fitness
test conducted the
day of the Examina-
tion. Applicants for
police officer must
have 1 year prior
experience and
must be Act 120
certified. Firefight-
ers/engineer must
have EMT certifica-
tion and Firefighter 1
certification. If inter-
ested obtain an
application and
other information at
the City Clerks
Office, Pittston City
Hall, 35 Broad
Street, Pittston, PA
18640. Completed
applications must
be received by 4:00
p.m. Wednesday,
July 11, 2012 at the
City Clerks Office.
There is a non-
refundable applica-
tion fee.
Equal Opportunity
Employer
506 Administrative/
Clerical
CLERICAL
Experienced Cleri-
cal candidate need-
ed for the Pittston
Area. Applicant
should have at least
2-3 years of clerical
experience and be
detail oriented.
Duties include, but
are not limited to;
answering phones,
data entry, cus-
tomer returns, and
customer service.
This is a full-time
day shift position,
Monday – Friday
7:30 am–4:00 pm.
Interested persons
should apply at:
Team Employer
Solutions
20 Reynolds St
Kingston PA 18704
570-714-5955
Monday – Thursday
9:00 am to 2:00 pm
Friday - 9:00 am to
12:00 Noon
Spa Hospitality Team
The Woodhouse
Day Spa is currently
hiring for Full Time
Front Desk Staff.
Must be available to
start immediately.
Position requires
outstanding cus-
tomer service skills;
shift includes days,
evenings & some
Saturdays. Please
apply in person at
the spa.
Monday-Friday 9-6.
387 Wyoming Ave.,
Kingston. EOE
BEAUTY
506 Administrative/
Clerical
INSURANCE CLERK
Busy medical prac-
tice seeking part
time insurance
clerk. Experience in
insurance verifica-
tion and authoriza-
tion a must. Send
resumes to: c/o
The Times Leader
Box 4065
15 N. Main Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18711-0250
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
522 Education/
Training
BANQUET,
RESTAURANT &
CATERING Facility
located in Northeast
PA is seeking expe-
rienced
LINE COOKS, CHEFS
AND SOUS CHEFS
BANQUET SALES
MANAGER
Positions are full
time with heath ben-
efits, vacation, per-
sonal time and com-
petitive salary/
wages. If you are a
motivated individual
with great people
skills and can work
in a fast pace envi-
ronment submit
your resume and
join our team. Send
resume to:
BOX 4070
c/o Times Leader
15 N. Main St.,
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18711
527 Food Services/
Hospitality
KITCHEN STAFF
Experienced Only
Part-time. Day 1
benefits - Medical,
Dental, Eye. 401k
program. Meal plans.
Apply online:
redlobster.com/
employment.
533 Installation/
Maintenance/
Repair
MAI NTENANCE MAI NTENANCE
Self - starter with
good work ethic
needed for 2 Apart-
ment buildings in
Pittston. Position
requires basic facili-
ty maintenance &
apartment prep
skills, janitorial &
grounds mainte-
nance. Emergency
response required.
Full–time 40 hours/
week. Fax resume
to 570-602-1685
or email to
lincolnheights@
ndcrealestate.com
EOE
533 Installation/
Maintenance/
Repair
CERTIFIED DIESEL
MECHANIC WANTED
Mountain Produc-
tions, Inc is seeking
a full time, first shift
certified diesel
mechanic for our
Wilkes-Barre loca-
tion. Duties include
preventative main-
tenance and repair
of our fleet of trac-
tors, trailers and
straight trucks in a
safe and cost effi-
cient manner in a
pre-established
mechanic shop with
tools provided.
Salary begins at
$20.00/hour and is
commensurate with
experience. A mini-
mum of 2 years
experience is pre-
ferred. Send your
resume and qualifi-
cations/certification
to Jim Evans at
jim@mountain
productions.com
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
542 Logistics/
Transportation
DELIVERY DRIVER
HOME CITY
ICE COMPANY
Position opened for
a Route Delivery
Driver. “B” class
CDL license is need-
ed for this position.
40+ hours/week.
Great pay! Based in
Wilkes-Barre. Fill out
application at www.
homecityice.com,
Wilkes-Barre
Division, or email
rwetterau@
homecityice.com
Drivers: Company
Great Pay/Home-
time! No-Touch!
80% D&H. CDL-A
with 1 year experi-
ence.
866-564-8639 x107
TRI-AXLE DRIVER
3-4 years experi-
ence. Local work.
Start immediately.
Call Danny Jr. at
570-237-1734
548 Medical/Health
RN/LPN PART-TIME
A PART-TIME POSITION
IS AVAILABLE AT
FREELAND HEALTH
CENTER, FREELAND,
PA. THREE DAYS A
WEEK. NO BENEFITS.
GO TO
WWW.RHCNEPA.COM
FOR FURTHER
INFORMATION.
EOE M/F/V/H AA
548 Medical/Health
Healthcare
Highland Manor
Nursing Home
RN CHARGE NURSE/
SUPERVISOR
Full Time 7-3
Seeking organ-
ized, professional
RN to assist with
day to day
responsibilities of
the nursing unit.
Every other week-
end/ every other
holiday. LTC and
supervisory expe-
rience preferred.
Send, fax, email or
deliver resume to:
750 Schooley Ave.
Exeter, PA 18643
Ph: 570-655-3791
Fax: 570-655-4881
don-highland@seniorsnorth.com
Also seeking
experienced
CNAS
Full Time 3-11/11-7
Every other week-
end and every
other holiday.
Apply in person.
EOE
Resident Care Aides
Per diem all shifts,
weekend shifts and
12 hour shifts need-
ed, Part time may
lead to Full time.
SIGN ON Bonus for
experienced appli-
cants. Must be reli-
able, and compas-
sion for the elderly.
Must have a high
school diploma or
GED.
Apply in person:
Keystone
Garden Estates
100 Narrows Rd
Route 11
Larksville, PA 18651
NOW Hiring
600
FINANCIAL
610 Business
Opportunities
NEPA FLORAL &
GIFT SHOP
Including delivery
van, coolers, all
inventory, displays,
computer system,
customer list, web-
site and much
more. Turn key
operation in prime
retail location. Seri-
ous inquiries please
call
570-592-3327
PAGE 11 SUNDAY, JUNE 24, 2012 SUNDAY DISPATCH
www.MattBurneHonda.com
2012 HONDA
ACCORD LX
4 dr, Auto Trans, AC, PW, PL, Cruise, ABS, 6 Air Bags, Tilt,
Keyless Entry, AM/FM/CD, Model #CP2F3CEW
*
MPG
34 HWY
$219 Lease Per Mo. For 36 Months through AHFC. $0 Down Payment. 1st Payment and tags due at delivery. Residual $13,149.90.
$0 DOWN
PAYMENT
1110 Wyoming Ave,
Scranton, PA
1-800-NEXT-HONDA
570-341-1400
Open Monday - Thursday 9-9
Friday & Saturday 9-5
Used Cars
7-Year/100,000-Mile Powertrain Warranty
12 month/12,000-Mile Non Powertrain Warranty
150-Point Mechanical & Appearance Inspection
Vehicle History Report
*From the original date of frst use when said as a new vehicle
*Prior sales excluded. Tax & tags Extra. Expires 7-9-12
2000 VOLVOV50 S/W
Silver, 80K Miles
$12,750
50 TOCHOOSE FROM
01 BUICK CENTURY
Burgandy, 66K
$6,500
09 CHEVY IMPALA LS
Blue, 15K
$14,950
07 BUICK LACROSSE
Red, 19K
$15,950
03 JEEP GRANDCHEROKEE
Red, 79K
$9,750
07 JEEP LIBERTY
Black, 47K
$13,500
03 CHRYSLER CONCORDE
Gold, 71K
$5,950
06 CHRYSLER TOWN &COUNTRY LTD
Silver, 60K, R. DVD, Navi
$13,750
04 CHEVY SILVERADOCLUB CAB 4X4
White, 69K
$14,950
08 SATURN VUE XE 4WD
Navy, 64K
$13,950
02 TOYOTA SIENNA
Beige, 101K
$7,950
Thank You To Our Customers
0
.9%
APR FINANCING
NOWAVAILABLE!
*On select models to qualified
buyers for limited term.
2012 HONDA CIVIC LX SEDAN
MPG
28 City
39 HWY
***Lease 36 Months through ahfc. $0 Down Payment.
1st payment and tags due at delivery. Residual $11,952.95
Per Mo.
Lease
ease 36 Months through ahfc $0 Down Payment
Per Mo. Per Mo.
LLease
* **
• Model #FB2F5CEW • 140-hp
16-Valve SOHC i-VTEC® • 5-Speed
Automatic Transmission • Air Con-
ditioning with Air-Filtration System
• Power Windows/Locks/Mirrors
• Cruise Control • Remote Entry •
160-Watt AM/FM/CD Audio System
with 4 Speakers • ABS
• Dual-Stage, Multiple-Threshold
Front Airbags (SRS) • Front Side
Airbags with Passenger-Side Oc-
cupant Position Detection System
(OPDS) • Side Curtain Airbags
$0 DOWN
PAYMENT
2012 HONDA PILOT LX
MPG
17 City
24 HWY
****Lease 36 Months through ahfc. $0 Down Payment.
1st payment and tags due at delivery. Residual $17,388.00
Per Mo.
Lease
• 250-hp 24-Valve SOHC i-VTEC®
• 5-Speed Automatic Transmission
• 8 Passenger Seating • Variable
Torque Management® 4-Wheel Drive
System (VTM-4®) • Vehicle Stability
AssistTM (VSA®) with Traction Con-
trol • Power WIndows/Locks/Mirrors
• Front and Rear Air Conditioning with
Air-Filtration System • 229-Watt AM/
FM/CD Audio System with 7 Speakers
including Subwoofer • Remote Entry
• ABS • Dual-Stage, Multiple-Thresh-
old Front Airbags (SRS) • Front Side
Airbags with Passenger-Side
Occupant Position Detection
System (OPDS)
$0 DOWN
PAYMENT
2012 HONDA CR-V EX
MPG
22 City
30 HWY
• Model RM4H5CJW • 185-hp
• 2.4-Liter, 16-Valve SOHC i-VTEC® 4-Cylinder
Engine • Real Time AWD with Intelligent Control
System™ • Vehicle Stability Assist™ (VSA®) with
Traction Control • Automatic Transmission
• Cruise Control • A/C • One-Touch Power
Moonroof with Tilt Feature • Remote Entry
System • Bluetooth® HandsFreeLink®
• Multi-angle rearview camera with guidelines
• 160-Watt AM/FM/CD Audio System with 6
Speakers • Bluetooth® Streaming Audio
• Pandora® Internet Radio compatibility
• SMS Text Message Function
• USB Audio Interface
• Anti-Lock Braking System (ABS)
• Dual-Stage, Multiple-Threshold Front Airbags
(SRS) • Front Side Airbags with Passenger-Side
Occupant Position Detection System (OPDS)
• Side Curtain Airbags with Rollover Sensor
Lease 36 Months through ahfc $0 Down Payment
Per Mo. Per Mo.
LLease
* ***
LEASES BASED ON APPROVED CREDIT TIER 1 THRU AHFC. MILEAGE BASED ON 2012 EPA MILEAGE ESTIMATES. USE FOR COMPARISON PURPOSES ONLY.
DO NOT COMPARE TO MODELS BEFORE 2008. YOUR ACUTAL MILEAGE WILL VARY DEPENDING ON HOW YOU DRIVE AND MAINTAIN YOUR VEHICLE.
3
0
0
H
O
N
D
A
V
E
H
IC
L
E
S
TO CHOOSE FROM!
TOP
DOLLAR
FOR
YOUR
TRADE!
1
.9%
36 mos 2
.9%
60 mos
on all
USED
SUNDAY DISPATCH SUNDAY, JUNE 24, 2012 PAGE 12
610 Business
Opportunities
JAN-PRO COMMERCIAL
CLEANING OF
NORTHEASTERN PA
Concerned about
your future?
BE YOUR OWN BOSS
Work Full or
Part time
Accounts available
NOW throughout
Luzerne &
Lackawanna,
Counties
We guarantee
$5,000.to $200,000
in annual billing.
Investment
Required
We’re ready –Are
you?
For more info call
570-824-5774
Jan-Pro.com
630 Money To Loan
“We can erase
your bad credit -
100% GUARAN-
TEED.” Attorneys
for the Federal
Trade Commission
say they’ve never
seen a legitimate
credit repair opera-
tion. No one can
legally remove
accurate and timely
information from
your credit report.
It’s a process that
starts with you and
involves time and a
conscious effort to
pay your debts.
Learn about manag-
ing credit and debt
at ftc. gov/credit. A
message from The
Times Leader and
the FTC.
700
MERCHANDISE
744 Furniture &
Accessories
FURNI SH FURNI SH
FOR LESS FOR LESS
* NELSON *
* FURNITURE *
* WAREHOUSE *
Recliners from $299
Lift Chairs from $699
New and Used
Living Room
Dinettes, Bedroom
210 Division St
Kingston
Call 570-288-3607
Mattress:
A Queen Size
Pillow Top Set
Still in Plastic
Can Deliver
$150
570-280-9628

Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
MOVING SALE MOVING SALE
White Canadelx
counter height
kitchen set with 4
swivel chairs, enter-
tainment center,
coffee table, dining
room set with serv-
er, living room blue
Drexel sofa, 2 wing
back chairs and
tables, large oak
cherry entertain-
ment center, new
black leather reclin-
er, sofa & loveseat
& much more. Call
570-288-5555
SOFA/LOVESEAT
Retail $1200. like
new $250. firm.
825-5062 after 4pm
WEST WEST WYOMING WYOMING
6th Street
OPEN YEAR ROUND
SP SPACE ACE
A AV VAILABLE AILABLE
INSIDE & OUT INSIDE & OUT
Acres of Acres of
parking parking
OUTSIDE
SPACES
- $10
Saturday
10am-2pm
Sunday
8am-4pm
758 Miscellaneous
GARAGE SALE
LEFTOVER ITEMS
CRIB convertible,
like new $200. Easy
set 12’ pool $50. 19”
polo chrome rims/
tires $1,500. 1940
wood crib set best
offer. 822-3068
BEST PRICES
IN THE AREA
CA$H ON THE $POT,
Free Anytime
Pickup
570-301-3602
570-301-3602
CALL US!
TO JUNK
YOUR CAR
758 Miscellaneous
NAME BRAND
LI QUI DATI ONS
REFRIGERATOR
Brand New Ken-
more 2.4 cu ft com-
pact refrigerator.
Sells for $140. new,
our price $70!
MICROWAVE
Brand New Ken-
more 1.5 cu ft
microwave oven.
Sells new for $150.
our price $75!
DEHUMIDIFIER
Brand New Ken-
more 35 pint Sells
for $170. new, our
price $85,!
GENERATOR
Brand New UST
5500 Watt. Sells for
$600. new, our
price $300!
TILLER CULTIVA-
TOR Brand New
Craftsman electric
mini tiller/cultivator.
Sells for $250. new,
our price $125!
TOOLBOXES
Brand New Crafts-
man Toolboxes. 3
bottoms, 3 tops sell
new for $160-$320,
our price $80-$160!
GRILL gas brand
new Kenmore 4
burner 50,000 btu
sells new for $500.
asking $250!
TRAMPOLINE
Brand New Variflex
12’ with enclosure.
Sells for $350. new,
our price $175!
Find us at
Merchants
Village in
Pittston call
570-592-3426
WATER SKIS (5)
420. each. Snow ski
poles $25. Hand
made tool box $40.
Canvas carry on
bags (3) $20. each.
Concrete deer
ornaments (3) $75.
each. Schwinn boy’s
bike (2) $75. each.
Fishing equipment
call for details.
570-675-5046
776 Sporting Goods
SHUFFLEBOARD
with an electric
scoreboard. 21’
long. Excellent
condition. Asking
$2450.
570-675-5046
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
BUYING SPORT CARDS
Pay Cash for
baseball, football,
basketball, hockey
& non-sports. Sets,
singles & wax.
570-212-0398
VITO’S
&
GINO’S
Wanted:
ALL
JUNK
CARS &
TRUCKS
Highest
Prices
Paid!!
FREE PICKUP
288-8995
800
PETS & ANIMALS
810 Cats
Cat, female, adult.
Has gray, long hair.
She is very clean
and housebroken.
Free to a good
home.
570-457-3983
815 Dogs
PAWS
TO CONSIDER....
ENHANCE
YOUR PET
CLASSIFIED
AD ONLINE
Call 829-7130
Place your pet ad
and provide us your
email address
This will create a
seller account
online and login
information will be
emailed to you from
gadzoo.com
“The World of Pets
Unleashed”
You can then use
your account to
enhance your online
ad. Post up to 6
captioned photos
of your pet
Expand your text to
include more
information, include
your contact
information such
as e-mail, address
phone number and
or website.
815 Dogs
ENGLISH BULL /
TERRIER PUPPIES
CKC
8 weeks 2 males
2 females. Solid
white & brendle.
Vaccinated &
dewormed.
$1,000 neg.
570-855-6774
GERMAN SHEPHERD
PUPS
AKC registered,
with German
bloodlines. 2
females, and 4
males. Ready 1st
week of July. Call
for details
570-822-3708
ITALIAN CANE CORSO
Mastiff Puppies
ICCF Registered &
ready to go! Par-
ents on premises.
Blue.Vet Checked
570-617-4880
Pomeranian male,
under 2 years old,
crate trained, good
with dogs, cats,
kids, very friendly.
$250. Please call
570-709-4631
900
REAL ESTATE
FOR SALE
906 Homes for Sale
Having trouble
paying your mort-
gage? Falling
behind on your
payments? You
may get mail from
people who promise
to forestall your
foreclosure for a fee
in advance. Report
them to the Federal
Trade Commission,
the nation’s con-
sumer protection
agency. Call 1-877-
FTC-HELP or click
on ftc.gov. A mes-
sage from The
Times Leader and
the FTC.
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
EXETER
OPEN HOUSE
Sunday
12pm-5pm
362 Susquehanna
Ave
Completely remod-
eled, spectacular,
2 story Victorian
home, with 3 bed-
rooms, 1.5 baths,
new rear deck, full
front porch, tiled
baths and kitchen,
granite counter-
tops, all Cherry
hardwood floors
throughout, all new
stainless steel
appliances and
lighting, new oil fur-
nace, washer dryer
in first floor bath.
Great neighbor-
hood, nice yard.
$174,900 (30 year
loan, $8,750 down,
$887/month, 30
years @ 4.5%)
100% OWNER
FINANCING
AVAILABLE
Call Bob at
570-654-1490
EXETER
OPEN HOUSE
Sunday, June
24th, 1 pm -4pm
102 IDA CIRCLE
Six year old 4
bedroom home, 3
baths. Two car
garage, eat-in
kitchen, living, din-
ing & family
rooms,
office/study, utility
room & fireplace.
Gas forced air
furnace, central
air, unfinished
basement,
fully landscaped,
& deck.
$255,000.
forsalebyowner
.com
800-843-6963
Listing #23758584
LUZERNE COUNTY
Secluded 3 level
home on 15 acres
located in Black
Creek Township
(near Hazleton).
Detatched garage.
Private gated drive-
way. Call
570-459-8658
906 Homes for Sale
HANOVER TWP.
New Construction.
Lot #2, Fairway
Estates. 2,700
square feet, tile &
hardwood on 1st
floor. Cherry cabi-
nets with center
island. $399,500.
For more details:
patrickdeats.com
(570)696-1041
JENKINS TWP.
$56,000 $56,000
1252 Main St.
3 Bedrooms
1 Bath.
Finished Walk-Out
Basement.
Single Car
Garage.
Call Vince
570-332-8792
JENKINS TWP.
Highland Hills
8 Patrick Road
Magnificent custom
built tudor home
with quality
throughout. Spa-
cious 4 bedrooms,
3.5 baths, 2 story
living room with
fireplace and library
loft. Dining room,
family room and 3
season sunroom
which overlooks
professionally land-
scaped grounds
with gazebo and
tennis/basketball
court. Lower level
includes recreation
room, exercise
room and 3/4 bath.
Enjoy this serene
acre in a beautiful
setting in Highland
Hills Development.
Too many amenities
to mention.
Taxes appealed
and lowered con-
siderably for year
2013. For more
info and photos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-723
$399,900
Call Terry
570-885-3041
Angie
570-885-4896
PITTSTON TWP.
110 Front St.
This well-maintained
3 bedroom, 1.5
baths bilevel home
is in move in condi-
tion. Spacious eat-in
kitchen with custom
cabinets, tile floor
and counters.
Unique lower level
family room with
wood burning fire-
place, office space.
laundry/bath combo.
Plenty of storage
including an 8X6
cedar closet. Out-
door space has
covered patio,
columned carport
and well manicured
partially fenced
yard. Detached
large garage.
For more info &
photos, go to
www.atlasrealty-
inc.com
$205,000
MLS# 12-2053
Call Angie at
570-885-4896
Terry at
570-885-3041
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
PLAINS
70 Warner Street
2 bedrooms,
move-in ready with
appliances, nice
yard with shed and
deck, Newer roof,
and furnace, gas
heat. Low taxes.
Asking $68,000.
Please Call
570-822-8708
WEST PITTSTON
225-227 Boston Ave
Double block.
Wyoming Area
schools. Out of flood
zone. 1 side rented
to long term tenant
at $525 /month.
Other side remod-
eled - move in or
rent at $650/month.
3 bedrooms each
side, gas furnaces,
sunrooms, large
yard. $149,000. Call
570-357-0042
906 Homes for Sale
SWOYERSVILLE
62 Bohac Street
Charming brick
front ranch, in
a well kept
neighborhood, 2
bedrooms, large
eat-in kitchen, tile
bath, large closets,
hardwood floors,
1st floor laundry, full
basement, low
maintenance
aluminum siding,
shed, nice yard,
asking $105,000
Call
908-876-4108
or 908-797-6682
TAYLOR
Featured on
WNEP’s Home &
Backyard. Move
right into this 3
bedroom, 2 bath
immaculate home
with custom maple
eat in kitchen,
stainless steel
appliances, hard-
wood floors,
Jacuzzi tub, 2 fire-
places, abundance
of storage leading
outside to a private
sanctuary with
deck/pergola & Koi
pond. Off street
parking. LOW
TAXES! For more
info and photos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-733
$189,900
Call Keri
570-885-5082
WEST PITTSTON
NEW LISTING
951 Wyoming
Avenue
Bright and cheery,
well kept home.
Oak kitchen, hard-
wood floors, large
family room. One
year home trust
warranty. MLS# 12-
1858 $144,900
Call Tracy Zarola
570-696-0723
WEST WYOMING
438 Tripp St
OPEN HOUSE
Sunday
12pm-5pm
Completely remod-
eled home with
everything new.
New kitchen, baths,
bedrooms, tile
floors, hardwoods,
granite countertops,
all new stainless
steel appliances,
refrigerator, stove,
microwave, dish-
washer, free stand-
ing shower, tub for
two, huge deck,
large yard, excellent
neighborhood
$154,900 (30 year
loan @ 4.5% with 5%
down; $7,750 down,
$785/month)
100% OWNER
FINANCING
AVAILABLE
Call Bob at
570-654-1490
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
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You’re in bussiness
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WILKES-BARRE
1st block S. Franklin
St. Historic District.
Beautiful 3 story
building. 2,300
square feet on first
floor. Commercial &
residential use. 8
parking spaces.
$395,000.
Call 570-824-7173
WILKES-BARRE
Parsons Section
5 bedroom, 1 bath.
Garage. Corner lot.
Nice location. Out of
flood zone. $30,000
negotiable. Call
570-814-7453
909 Income &
Commercial
Properties
PITTSTON
FOR SALE
5 Unit
Money Maker
Available immedi-
ately. Fully rented,
leases on all five
units. Separate
utilities, new roof
in 2007, 3 new
gas furnaces, off
street parking for
6 vehicles, 3 bay
garage. Over
$29,000 in rents.
A true money
maker for the
serious investor.
Must Sell!
$145,000.
Call Steve at
(570)468-2488
912 Lots & Acreage
HARVEYS LAKE
Beach Street. 2 nice
building lots. Approx
100 x 150 each.
Public sewer avail-
able. Paved road.
Surveyed. $19,995
each.570-822-7359
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
AVOCA
1 bedroom apt. 2nd
floor, large kitchen
includes refrigera-
tor, stove, water,
garbage & sewer
fees. Nice quiet,
clean residential
neighborhood. Pets
negotiable 600/mo.
Call 570-457-1955
DALLAS
2nd floor, 1 bed-
room, quiet, fridge
and stove, off-street
parking. Garbage,
sewer, water includ-
ed. No pets. $400/
month plus lease
and security.
570-690-1003
DUPONT
Completely remod-
eled, modern 2 bed-
room townhouse
style apartment.
Lots of closet
space, with new
carpets and com-
pletely repainted.
Includes stove,
refrigerator, wash-
er, dryer hook up.
Nice yard & neigh-
borhood, no pets.
$595 + security. Call
570-479-6722
EDWARDSVILLE
21 Pugh Street.
Quiet, one way
street, half double,
cleaned and freshly
painted, 2.5 bed-
rooms, living room,
dining room,
kitchen, with
washer/dryer
hookup. Gas heat.
Small yard, small
pets considered
with additional rent.
$530.00 per month
+ security & last
months rent. No
section 8.
Call 570-793-6566
EXETER
2nd floor, 1 bed-
room. Washer/dryer
included. No pets.
$500/month
includes heat &
water. Security
deposit required.
570-357-1383
FORTY FORT
82 Yates St.
1st floor, 1 bedroom,
quiet neighborhood,
off-street parking,
washer/dryer
hook-up. No pets
$550/month
+ utilities. Available
July 1st. Call
570-287-5090
FORTY FORT
COMING
UNITS
(check availability)
America Realty
Efficiencies
$500+ utilities
288-1422
Remodeling in
progress, all 2nd
floors, all new
kitchen appli-
ances, laundry,
parking. 2 year
leases, No pets
or Smoking,
Employment
application
mandatory.
Find Something?
Lose Something?
Get it back where it
belongs
with a Lost/Found ad!
570-829-7130
JENKINS TOWNSHIP
Studio, refrigerator
& stove, all tile
flooring, off-street
parking. $500/
month + utilities,
security & 1st
month. Call
570-655-0539
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
KINGSTON &
surrounding areas
UPCOMING RENTALS:
PLAINS: 3 floors
3 bedrooms, +
bonus room. $525.
+ utilities
KINGSTON:
2 floor unit/2 baths,
2 bedrooms. deck
off Master room.
$525. + utilities
KINGSTON:
1/2 Double large
3 bedroom, new
kitchen, yard, off
street parking,
convenient location
/quiet area.
$800. + utilities
KINGSTON:
1 bedroom, 2nd
floor $460. + utilities
KINGSTON: Large
3 bedroom. 3rd
floor. Off street
parking, close to
parks, shopping....
$550. + utilities.
SHAVERTOWN:
Corner home. 2-3
bedrooms, bonus
room. 2 baths,
garage. $825. +
gas, electric. Well
as water supply.
Appliances/
maintenance are
included.in all
units..... No Pets.
Credit check,
references, lease
required Taking
applications for July
occupancy!
570-899-3407
KINGSTON
2 Apts. Available
Bring Rover or Kitty
& move right in.
1 or 2 bedroom
apt. Off street
parking, coin
laundry on premis-
es. $450-$600/
month + gas heat &
electric. Call
(570) 262-1577
GET THE WORD OUT
with a Classified Ad.
570-829-7130
KINGSTON
2nd floor, 3 bed-
rooms, very clean,
refrigerator &
stove, washer/
dryer, yard, off-
street parking, no
pets. $800/month,
plus utilities &
security. Call
(570)814-8116
KINGSTON
CONVENIENTLY
LOCATED
Architect designed,
light, bright 2nd
floor 1 bedroom
with secure entry.
Carpeted. Air con-
ditioned. Laundry
facilities. Extra stor-
age. Off street
parking. Refer-
ences, security,
lease. No smokers
please. $490/
month + utilities. Call
570-287-0900
KINGSTON
Deluxe duplex, 2nd
floor, 3 bedrooms,
den, 1.5 bath, living
and dining rooms,
eat in kitchen , all
appliances+ wash-
er/dryer, carpeted,
A/C, garage, no
pets/smoking.
Lease required
570-287-1733
MOUNTAIN TOP
WOODBRYN
1 & 2 Bedroom.
No pets. Rents
based on income
start at $405 &
$440. Handicap
Accessible.
Equal Housing
Opportunity. 570-
474-5010 TTY711
This institution is an
equal opportunity
provider and
employer.
PITTSTON
3 rooms, 1 large
bedroom, com-
pletely renovated,
corian counters, off
street parking.
$550/per month.
Utilities by tenant.
Call 570-654-5387
PITTSTON
MUST SEE!!!!
Modern 1 bedroom,
sunroom/patio, all
appliances. Off
street parking. Air,
utilities by tenant.
No Pets. $575/mo.
1 month security &
references. Call
570-655-6598
leave message
WEST PITTSTON
2nd floor, 4 rooms.
Hardwood floors.
Heat and hot water
included. No pets.
No smoking. Call
570-479-4069
WYOMING
Monument Ave
2 bedroom 2nd floor
apartment. Stove &
fridge included.
Ample off street
parking. Secure,
safe neighborhood.
$550 + utilities. Call
570-357-1138
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
WILKES-BARRE
Mayflower
Crossing
Apartments
570.822.3968
2, 3 & 4
Bedrooms
- Light & bright
open floor plans
- All major
appliances included
- Pets welcome*
- Close to everything
- 24 hour emergency
maintenance
- Short term
leases available
Call TODAY For
AVAILABILITY!!
www.mayflower
crossing.com
Certain Restrictions
Apply*
WILKES-BARRE
South Meade St.,
1st floor, secure
building,
$525/month.
Hardwood floors,
washer/dryer hook-
up, dishwasher,
central air & heat.
Tenant pays electric
and gas heat. Off
street parking.
Income verification
& 1 month security.
570-824-8517
WYOMING
2nd floor.
Completely remod-
eled. Large, 2 bed-
room + den/com-
puter room/office.
Hardwood floors,
new carpeting in liv-
ing room & dining
area. Washer/
dryer hookup, off-
street parking, no
pets. Great loca-
tion! $750/month +
utilities, security &
references. Call
(570) 885-1922
944 Commercial
Properties
DOLPHIN PLAZA
Rte. 315
1,000 &
3,800 Sq. Ft.
WILL DIVIDE
OFFICE / RETAIL
Call 570-829-1206
315 PLAZA
1,750 SQ. FT. &
3,400 SQ.FT
OFFICE/RETAIL
570-829-1206
950 Half Doubles
KINGSTON
3 bedroom, 1 bath,
half double,
$700 plus
utilities, sewer
included. No pets.
Call 570-443-0770
NANTICOKE
Huge, 3 bedroom,
1.5 bath in Hanover
Section. Parking,
$625 per month,
$1,250 due at
signing. Nice park
across the street.
Call 570-851-6448
leave message.
WILKES-BARRE
Parsons Section
3 bedroom half dou-
ble. Off street park-
ing. Pets welcome.
$550/mo. Credit /
Criminal check
required. Call
570-266-5333
953Houses for Rent
HAZLETON
E EA AG GL LE E R RO OC CK K
R RE ES SO OR RT T
Gated
Community.
4 bedrooms, 3 full
baths, and 1.5 bath.
Beautiful custom
home, finished
basement, stone
fireplace, many
many amenities,
including swimming
pool, golf, tennis,
skiing, fitness cen-
ter, among more...
Located on a
lakeview property,
Quiet & Secure,
$1200/per month,
For rent OR for
sale. No pets.
Please call
215-416-2497
WILKES-BARRE TWP.
Newly remodeled.
2 bedrooms, 1.5
baths, off street
parking, fenced
yard, some pets
okay, appliances
included.
$800/month
+ utilities & security
Call (570) 899-2665
953Houses for Rent
KINGSTON
208 Spruce Avenue
Available July 1
Single family home
for rent. 1,480 sq. ft.
3 bedrooms with
closets. 1.5 baths.
First floor laundry
room. Tile bath &
kitchen. Gas heat &
hot water. Hard-
wood floors. Gas
fireplace. New,
upgraded carpets.
Modern kitchen with
new dishwasher &
gas stove. New win-
dows. Deadbolt
locks. Full base-
ment. Residential
street. Fenced yard.
Front porch. Private
driveway. Back-
ground & credit
check. $790 + utili-
ties, 1 month securi-
ty & 1 year lease.
Call Bill.
215-527-8133
PLAINS
144 Farrell St.
Available July 3
Single family home
for rent. 1,470 sq ft.
3 bedrooms with
closets and 1.5
baths. First floor
laundry room. New
gas water heater.
Air conditioning.
New heating gas
boiler & upgraded
carpets. Modern
kitchen. New gas
stove. New 21 cubic
foot refrigerator.
New windows, gas
fireplace, deadbolt
locks. Full basement
with gas wall heater.
Residential street.
Shed. Fenced yard.
Covered back
porch. Private drive-
way. 1 year lease.
Background & cred-
it check. $790 + util-
ities & security
deposit. Call
215-527-8133
Ask for Bill
WILKES-BARRE
13 Poplar St
Available July 1
1,450 sq. ft single
home for rent. 3
bedroom with clos-
ets. Washer / dryer
included. 1st floor
bath. Great kitchen
with dishwasher,
new 21 cubic ft
refrigerator & new
gas stove. Wall to
wall carpeting. Out-
side patio with
wooded fenced
yard. Deadbolt
locks. Energy effi-
cient windows. New
ceiling fans. New
gas boiler & water
heater. Residential
street. $730 + utili-
ties, 1 month securi-
ty & 1 year lease.
Background / credit
check. Call Bill
215-527-8133
971 Vacation &
Resort Properties
FOR SALE OR RENT!
Adults Only Campground
Fleetwood Cimarron
5th wheel. 36.5C.
‘88 model. In good
condition. Located
in beautiful 150 acre
tree farm in Maine.
Swimming pools,
hiking trails, ponds,
rec halls, potlucks &
activities. Dogs wel-
come. Beautiful site
rental with huge
maple tree in front &
bubbling brook in
back. For Rent:
$350/weekly
$1,000/monthly
For Sale:
$3,500
(570) 762-3747
1000
SERVICE
DIRECTORY
1015 Appliance
Service
ECO-FRIENDLY
APPLIANCE TECH.
25 Years Experi-
ence fixing major
appliances: Washer,
Dryer, Refrigerator,
Dishwasher, Com-
pactors. Most
brands. Free phone
advice & all work
guaranteed. No
service charge for
visit. 570-706-6577
1024 Building &
Remodeling
1st. Quality
Construction Co.
Roofing, siding,
gutters, insulation,
decks, additions,
windows, doors,
masonry &
concrete.
Insured & Bonded.
Senior Citizens Discount!
State Lic. # PA057320
570-606-8438
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
Shedlarski Construction
HOME IMPROVEMENT
SPECIALIST
Licensed, insured &
PA registered.
Kitchens, baths,
vinyl siding & rail-
ings, replacement
windows & doors,
additions, garages,
all phases of home
renovations.
Free Estimates
570-287-4067
1024 Building &
Remodeling
HUGHES
Construction
NEED A NEW
KITCHEN OR
BATH????
Seasonal Rooms
Roofing, Home
Renovating.
Garages,
Kitchens, Baths,
Siding and More!
Licensed and
Insured.
FREE
ESTIMATES!!
570-388-0149
PA040387
1039 Chimney
Service
CHIMNEY REPAIRS
Parging. Stucco.
Stainless Liners.
Cleanings. Custom
Sheet Metal Shop.
570-383-0644
1-800-943-1515
Call Now!
1042 Cleaning &
Maintainence
PARAGON
CLEANING
SERVICES
Residential/
Commercial
Tenant move out.
New construction
cleanups.
“Take a Rest,
Call the Best”
570-332-0324
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
1054 Concrete &
Masonry
Wi l l i ams & Franks I nc
Masonry - Concrete
Brick-Stonework.
Chimneys-Stucco”
“NO JOB TOO
SMALL”
“Damage repair
specialist”
570-466-2916
1135 Hauling &
Trucking
ALWAYS READY
HAULING
Property &
Estate Cleanups,
Attics, Cellars,
Yards, Garages,
Construction
Sites, Flood
Damage & More.
CHEAPER THAN
A DUMPSTER!!
SAME DAY
SERVICE
Free Estimates
570-301-3754
S & S HAULING
& GARBAGE
REMOVAL
Free estimates.
Clean out attics,
basements, estates
& more.
570-472-2392
1183 Masonry
CONCRETE
& MASONRY
Brick, block, walks,
drives, stucco, stone,
steps, porches,
chimneys & repairs.
Quality craftsmanship
by an affordable
professional.
570-283-5254
1204 Painting &
Wallpaper
A.B.C. Professional
Painting
36 Yrs Experience
We Specialize In
New Construction
Residential
Repaints
Comm./Industrial
All Insurance
Claims
Apartments
Interior/Exterior
Spray,Brush, Rolls
WallpaperRemoval
Cabinet
Refinishing
Drywall/Finishing
Power Washing
Deck Specialist
Handy Man
FREE ESTIMATES
Larry Neer
570-606-9638
1213 Paving &
Excavating
DRIVEWAYS
PARKING LOTS
ROADWAYS
HOT TAR & CHIP
SEALCOATING
Licensed and
Insured. Call
Today For Your
Free Estimate
570-474-6329
Lic.# PA021520
Mountain Top
PAVING & SEAL
COATING
Patching, Sealing,
Residential/Comm
Licensed & Insured
PA013253
570-868-8375
746 Garage Sales/
Estate Sales/
Flea Markets
PAGE 13 SUNDAY, JUNE 24, 2012 SUNDAY DISPATCH
SUNDAY DISPATCH SUNDAY, JUNE 24, 2012 PAGE 14
NOCREDIT APPLICATIONWILL BE REFUSED.
Our shelves are restocked! We have the cars and we have the deals!
HIGHEST PRICES PAID FOR TRADES!
ONLY$25,990
*
*Plus tax and tag.
ONLY$279
Per
Month
*
The Kia 10-year/100,000-mile warranty program includes various warranties and roadside assistance. Warranties include power train and basic. All warranties and roadside assistance are limited. See retailer for details or go to kia.com. *24-hour Roadside Assistance is
a service plan provided by Kia Motors America, Inc. **Plus tax and tag. Picture may not represent exact trim level. Plus tax & tag, 12k miles per year with 1,500 down & fees due at signing. Payments based on a 36 month lease with approved credit.
*** Must be a documented deal. Dealer reserves right to buy that vehicle.
WyomingValley Motors
560 Pierce Street
Kingston, PA 18704
570-714-9924
www.wyomingvalleykia.com
- l0-year/l00,000-mlle llmlted power traln warranty
- 5-year/60,000-mlle llmlted baslc warranty
- 5-year/l00,000-mlle llmlted antl-perforatlon
- 5-year/60,000-mlle 24-hour roadslde asslstance`
WE WILL BEAT ANY COMPETITORS PRICE ONANEW
KIAGUARANTEEDOR WE WILL PAY YOU$1,000!
***
#D6110154
2013 KIA Rio LX
Powèr Packagè · /utomatic · /M/FM CD · USP //uxiliary Jack
/PS · Stèèring Vhèèl Mountèo /uoio Controls
ONLY
$
159
Per
Month
1
or buy for $15,990**
#K2134
Per
Month
1
2012 KIA Forte LX
Satèllitè Raoio · Pluètooth & iPoo Rèaoy
5 Star Crash Rating · 6 /irbags · Kèylèss Entry
/utomatic · Cruisè Control
or buy for $16,900**
ONLY
$
159
VlN# CGO5C783
2012 KIA Optima LX
/lloys · Satèllitè Raoio · Pluètooth & iPoo Rèaoy
Powèr Vinoows · Powèr Drivèr Sèat · Traction Control · /M/FM CD
6 /irbags · Kèylèss Entry · /utomatic · Cruisè Control
Per
Month
1
or buy for $21,540**
ONLY
$
189
#K2210
35
MPG
/utomatic · /ir · /M/FM CD · Pluètooth
iPoo Rèaoy · Powèr Vinoows · Powèr Locks
2012 KIA Soul
ONLY
$
169
or buy for $16,545**
Per
Month
1
35
MPG
29
MPG
36
MPG
2013
KIASORENTOLX
All Wheel Drive
Convènièncè Packagè
· Pluètooth
· Satèllitè Raoio
· /M/FM CD
· Powèr Locks
· Powèr Vinoows
· Kèylèss Entry
#K3000
29
MPG
PAGE 15 SUNDAY, JUNE 24, 2012 SUNDAY DISPATCH
CALL NOW 823-8888 CALL NOW 823-8888
1-800-817-FORD 1-800-817-FORD
Overlooking Mohegan Sun Overlooking Mohegan Sun
577 East Main St., Plains 577 East Main St., Plains
Just Minutes from Scranton or W-B Just Minutes from Scranton or W-B
*Tax and tags extra. Security Deposit Waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month lease 21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. See
salesperson for details. All payments subject to credit approval by the primary lending source, Tier 0 rate. Special APR financing cannot be combined with Ford cash rebate. “BUY FOR” prices are based on 72 month at $18.30 per month per $1000 financed with $2,500 down (cash or
trade). *On a retail purchase financed through Ford Motor Credit Company. Photos of vehicles are for illustration purposes only. Coccia Ford-Lincoln is not responsible for any typographical errors. No Security Deposit Necessary. See dealer for details. Sale ends
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month lease
21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 6/30/12.
24
Mos.
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied
**Lease payments based on 24 month lease 21,000 allowable miles. First months payment,
$595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 6/30/12.
24
Mos.
Auto., Alum. Wheels, Tilt Wheel,
Pwr. Seat, Safety Pkg., 1st & 2nd Air
Curtains, Side Impact Air Bags,
Anti-Theft Sys., Siruis Satellite
Radio, PL, PW, Keyless
Entry, CD, Message Center,
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied
**Lease payments based on 24 month lease 21,000 allowable miles. First months payment,
$595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 6/30/12.
24
Mos.
3.5L Engine, MyFord
Display, CD, Auto. Climate
Control,17” Steel Wheels,
Keyless Entry, MyKey,
Cruise Control, PW,
PM,
, Safety Canopy, Side Impact
Safety Pkg., Pwr. Driver’s Seat, Air, Rear Cargo
Convenience Pkg., Auto., Fog Lamps, Privacy
Glass, 16” Alum. Wheels, Roof Rack.,
Sirius Satellite Radio, PW,
CD, PDL, Keyless Entry,
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied
**Lease payments based on 24 month lease 21,000 allowable miles. First months payment,
$595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 6/30/12.
Safety Canopy, Air, Side Impact Safety
Pkg., Rear Cargo Convenience Pkg.,
Privacy Glass,16” Alum. Wheels, Fog
Lamps, Roof Rack, Pwr. Driver’s
Seat, Sirius Satellite Radio, PW,
Auto., PDL, Keyless Entry,
CD,
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied
**Lease payments based on 24 month lease 21,000 allowable miles. First months payment,
$595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 6/30/12.
24
Mos.
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied
**Lease payments based on 24 month lease 21,000 allowable miles. First months payment,
$595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 6/30/12.
Auto., AC, Pwr. Mirrors, Advanced Trac with
Electronic Stability Control, Side Curtains,
CD, Pwr. Door Locks, Tilt Wheel, ,
Cruise Control, 15” Alum.
Wheels,
Keyless Entry w/Keypad
24
Mos.
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month lease
21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 6/30/12.
Auto., CD, Anti-Theft Sys., Side Curtain Air Bags, AC,
16” Alloy Wheels, Tilt Wheel, Instrument Cluster,
Message Center, Fog Lamps, Convenience Pkg.,
Cruise Control, MyKey, Perimeter Alarm,
MyFord, SYNC, Sirius Satellite Radio,
Steve Mizenko
Service Manager
16 Yrs. at Coccia
Rudy Podest
Parts & Service
Director
28 Yrs. at Coccia
Pat McGinty
Parts Manager
21 Yrs. at Coccia
Barry Williams
Finance Manager
25 Yrs. at Coccia
George Geiges
Service Manager
25 Yrs. with Ford
Greg Martin
General Manager
22 Yrs. at Coccia
US MARINES
Joe “Bobo” Nocera
Used Car Manager
26 Yrs. at Coccia
US NAVY
Abdul Alsaigh
Sales Manager
5 Yrs. at Coccia
Terry Joyce
Sales Manager
35 Yrs. at Coccia
Tom Washington
Sales Manager
15 Yrs. with Ford
Len Gierszal
Finance Manager
1 Yr. at Coccia
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied
**Lease payments based on 24 month lease 21,000 allowable miles. First months payment,
$595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 6/30/12.
24
Mos.
STX, 3.7L V6, Auto., 17” Alum.
Wheels, ABS, Cloth Seat, Air,
CD, 40/20/40 Split Seat,
Decor Pkg., Cruise,
Pwr. Equipment Group
Jim Bufalino
Salesperson
19 Yrs. at Coccia
US AIR FORCE
Toni Grasso
Salesperson
9 Yrs. at Coccia
Marcus Ossowski
Salesperson
2 Yr. at Coccia
Frank Vieira
Salesperson
2 Yrs. at Coccia
Victor DeAnthony
Salesperson
5 Yrs. at Coccia
Kevin Uren
Salesperson
2 Yrs. at Coccia
Ginny Kutzer
Salesperson
21 Yrs. at Coccia
US AIR FORCE
Jason Kilduff
Salesperson
1 Yr. at Coccia
Mike Hallock
Salesperson
1 Yr. at Coccia
Mark Walsh
Salesperson
Patrick Yearing
Internet Specialist
24
Mos.
CD, Alum Wheels, Tilt, PW,
PDL, Pwr. Seat, Safety Pkg., Side Impact Air Bags, 1st &
2nd Air Curtains, Anti-Theft Sys., Sirius Satellite Radio,
Message Center, Keyless Entry w/Keypad,
24
Mos.
M
O
S.
APR
PLUS
XL Plus
Pkg., Cruise Control,
MyKey System,
Pwr. Equipment
Group, CD,
Pwr. Mirrors,
40/20/40
Cloth Seat, XL
Decor Group
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied
**Lease payments based on 24 month lease 21,000 allowable miles. First months payment,
$595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 6/30/12.
24
Mos.
Auto., 3.5L V6, CD, PW, SYNC, Reverse
Sensing Sys., PDL, Keyless Entry with
Keypad, Anti-Theft Perimeter Alarm,
18”Alum. Wheels, Sirius
Satellite Radio,
Tony Vetrini
Body Shop Manager
M
O
S.
APR
PLUS
M
O
S.
APR
PLUS
M
O
S.
APR
PLUS
M
O
S.
APR
PLUS
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied
**Lease payments based on 24 month lease 21,000 allowable miles. First months payment,
$595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 6/30/12.
Pwr. Windows, Advance Trac with
Roll Stability Control, PDL,
Remote Keyless Entry with
Keypad, MyFord, Air,
Convenience Group,
Auto. Headlamps, CD,
Reverse Sensing Sys
24
Mos.
SUNDAY DISPATCH SUNDAY, JUNE 24, 2012 PAGE 16
542 Logistics/
Transportation
468 Auto Parts
971 Vacation &
Resort Properties
542 Logistics/
Transportation
468 Auto Parts
971 Vacation &
Resort Properties
542 Logistics/
Transportation
BLACK LAKE, NY
Come relax & enjoy
great fishing & tran-
quility at it’s finest.
Housekeeping
cottages on the
water with all the
amenities of home.
NEED A VACATION? Call Now!
(315) 375-8962 www.blacklake4fish.com
daveroll@blacklakemarine.com
$50 off Promotion Available Now!
The Dispatch
LOCAL PROS
To Place Your Ad
Call 1-800-273-7130
TTTTTTTTTTTooooooooooo PPPPPPPPPPPPllllllllaaaaaaaaaacccccccccceeeeeeeeeeee YYYYYYYYYYYooooooooooouuuuuuuuuurrrrrrrrrrr AAAAAAAAAAAdddddddddddd
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MOVING
J. CAWLEY MOVING, LLC
JASON CAWLEY, PITTSTON
Local & long distance moves.
Residential, Offices & Institutional moves.
(570) 299-7852 jcawleymoving@yahoo.com
LAWNCARE
LAWN
MAINTENANCE
Lawns cut, shrubs, pruned, small landscaping
projects & odd jobs.
570-654-1557
LANDSCAPING
BEE CLEAN
Power Wash & Landscaping
Lawn Service • Trees • Hedges • Shrubs • Mulch
Stone • Retaining Walls & Pavers • Gutter Cleaning & More
Bruce Moluski 570-457-1840
MARTIAL ARTS
ROTHROCK’S KUNG FU &TAI CHI
ACADEMY
Call Today for 2 Free Private Classes
Kung Fu - Self Defense - Kickboxing - Tai Chi
Women’s Self Defense & Kickboxing Classes
Helps Children Develop Concentration, Discipline,
Leadership, Patience, Respect & Goal Setting
Tai-Chi Classes
Slow Motion, Low-Impact Exercise,
Improves Balance, Joint Flexibility, Blood Flow,
Leg Strength, Relieves Stress &
Promotes Well Being.
417 Main Street, Duryea, PA 18642
570-457-2591
www.rothrockskungfu.com
TRAVEL
Tuesday, July 10 & 11
Complementary room, transportation
& baggage handling. Food, Beverages
& Snacks served on bus.
$25 per person.
Al Lispi: 570-814-3137
or 570-823-9578
Overnight Junket to
Atlantic City’s
Taj Mahal!
PRESSURE WASHING
CONSTRUCTION
CHRIS LATONA
General Contractor
Ceramic Tile Work - Kitchens
- Bathrooms - Garages
- Replacement Windows
- New Homes - Additions - Doors -
Complete Remodeling
FREE Estimates - Insured
457-8145 or 655-0777
Quality Works at Affordable Prices
PA008322
Complete Home
Remodeling, Kitchens,
Baths, Drywall, Windows,
Siding & Roofs.
570-457-0087
PA# HIC EA 18685
JOHN
PREGMON
CONSTRUCTION
No Job Too Small
Residential ≈ Commercial
New & Emergency Services
Licensed & Insured
PA032422 570-602-7840
Call 24 HOURS!
ECONOLECTRIC - SINCE 1988
ALL PHASES OF
ELECTRICAL
ELECTRICAL
NORTHEAST
WINDOW, INC.
Locally Owned & Operated Since 1987
Exterior Home Improvements By
FREE ESTIMATES
570.654.4220
www.northeastwindow.com
• Windows
• Siding
• Enclosures
• Fiberglass Doors
• Storm Doors
• Vinyl Railings
• Roofing
• And More
PA018418
HOME IMPROVEMENT
GUTTERS & DOWNSOUTS
GUTTERS &
DOWNSPOUTS
Cleaned, Unclogged &
Washed Out.
Also Painting of Aluminum
Siding, Awnings, or Eaves.
Licensed & Insured,
References Available.
570-654-8432
DUMPSTER
NEED A DUMPSTER?
Call Danny Nicheporchek
Owner Operated
10 yard, 20 yard & 30 available.
570-335-4755
ADVANCED PRESSURE WASH SYSTEMS
Take Advantage of the Spring Weather!
Get black and green mold & moss removed
from your roof • Pressure Wash Homes
• Concrete Reconditioning
570-212-8390
Prompt Service
7 Days a Week
1-800-273-7130
for Local Pros
EVERY
THURSDAY
IN JUNE
from
Noon-4pm
at the
Tunkhannock
Public Library
Interested Applicants can Apply Online at www.XLCServices.com.
Interviews scheduled Monday thru Friday. Call 800-472-1013 or
walk-ins welcome at Job Fairs.
Hiring Experienced Forklift Operators $12.25 hourly,
after completion of 90 day probation period.
***STRAIGHT DAY SHIFT OR NIGHT SHIFT
(12 hour shifts ave. 42 hours per week)
***75 cent night shift pay differential offered.
***Pay increase based on skill development.
Take charge...LEARNAND EARN!
MUST HAVE 1 YEAR FULL
TIME EXPERIENCE
Skills Required:
• High School Diploma/GED
• Computer Skills
• Valid Driver’s License
• Criminal Background Check
• Pass Pre-Employment Drug
Screen & Physical
*Mehoopany Location
* Benefits Available *
BUYING JUNK
VEHICLES
$375 AND UP
ALSO BUYING
HEAVY EQUIPMENT
NOBODY Pays More
570-760-2035
Monday thru Saturday 6am-9pm • Happy Trails!
H
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
KT
Auto
www. ktauto. com
430 West Market St.,
Scranton 346-1133
• Stocking all major brands
• We gladly install internet tire purchases.
• A division of Kelleher Tire
• SEE US FOR ALLYOURTIRE NEEDS!
• Check OUR MONEY SAVING COUPONS ON OURWEBSITE!
• We Buy Low Mileage GM Cars!
CARS
10 Impala LT Florida Car $12,995
10 HHR Florida Car $12,995
09 Pontiac G-6 V6, 41K $12,995
08 Impala LT 1-Owner $11,995
08 SaturnVUE FWD $12,995
08 HHR LS $9,995
08 Malibu Hybrid, 44K $11,995
08 Pontiac G-5 In Stock $10,995
07 Malibu 38K $9,995
06 Lucerne CX $10,995
07 Impala Police Car 47K $9,995
TRUCKS
07 Uplander Cargo $7,995
05 Uplander Cargo, 3 Pass $8,995
05 Uplander Passenger Van $9,995
03 GMC 2500 8 Passenger, 58K $9,995
PICKUPS
02 Silverado 2500 3/4Ton
CNG or Gas 6.0V-8 Auto, 2WD $11,995
1252 Roofing &
Siding
EVERHART
CONSTRUCTION
Roofing, siding,
gutters, chimney
repairs & more.
Free Estimates,
Lowest Prices
570-855-5738
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