WILKES-BARRE, PA $1.

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Celebrating
36
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121 S. Main Street, Pittston
654-0067
Northeast Fair
Wishing The
The Law Offices of
Michael I. Butera
Continued Success as they Grow and Prosper Each Year
Providing Quality Legal Services To The People of Northeast PA
COUPON SAVINGS INSIDE WORTH $316
BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE SUNDAY DISPATCH
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As a young man I didn’t give
much thought to becoming a
dad but I was pretty sure if I did
I would not become what I
wound up becoming – a long-
distance dad.
I am trying to think of the
best word to describe the guy
standing in the parking lot of a
McDonald’s in New Jersey, four
miles past the Delaware Water
Gap, on a Sunday evening in
1995 watching until it was out
of sight the sedan carrying my
daughter and son off to a new
life.
Dumbfounded is as good as
any. I really wasn’t sure what to
do next.
Greta was 12 at the time,
Michael 9, so for the previous
dozen years I had been defined
by the role of father. I woke
kids up in the morning, put
them to bed at night, and did
very little with the time in be-
tween that was not related to
them.
Even when they weren’t with
me, I found myself thinking
about them. That, I knew, was
not going to change.
Around the time Greta was
born – June 6, 1983, D-Day to
the rest of the world but G-Day
to me, I began to say – I read
someplace that kids will get a
lot of teachers, a lot of coaches,
a lot of friends, but they get
only one dad. I took that to
heart. She and later Michael –
who arrived on Sept. 27, 1986 –
had to come first. Period.
That was not a problem.
In fact, I came to see that as a
blessing. Christ said “if you
want to be first, put yourself
last,” and God, fortunately,
knew that was a pretty tall order
for most people, especially
guys. So he made us fathers.
Putting my children first
came easy. Even changing
diapers – and I changed thou-
sands – was never a chore. I
always felt I was doing an enor-
mous favor for this little person
entrusted to me.
Although putting them first
came easy, I admit fathering
was not always easy.
I’ve always said my kids
found buttons to push on me
that I didn’t know I had.
I clearly recall a standoff with
Greta at a fast-food joint when
she was about two-and-a-half
and I pronounced she was not
going out to the playground
until she ate her food to which
she dug in her heels and
wouldn’t eat a bite.
We must have sat there 45
minutes staring each other
down and all the while I kept
thinking “parenting is for
younger people.” I was almost
34 when she was born and felt
all my life experience had pre-
pared me for children. I was
wrong.
I stood for a good while in
that parking lot in New Jersey
after the car with my kids had
disappeared before I climbed
into my own vehicle headed
back to Pennsylvania. I wasn’t
sure how I was going to handle
this long-distance relationship
but I was determined to figure
it out.
I didn’t have a whole lot of
money then but I immediately
bought a cell phone.
It was 1995 and I had never
heard of a cell phone before.
My brother took me to the store
to pick one out.
The idea that I could call the
kids from anywhere to say
goodnight was a godsend.
Cell phones in those days
were about the size of a small
pound cake and the batteries
held a charge long enough for
one decent phone call. But
that’s all I needed.
When my children were liv-
ing with me, my nighttime
routine with each of them was
to tuck them in, kiss them
goodnight, and say, “Daddy
loves you. Daddy is very proud
of you. Daddy will always take
care of you.”
I wanted that to continue.
And it did until they got to an
age where I sensed it made
them uncomfortable. That was
okay because by then I was sure
the message had sunk in deep.
I’m not sure which of those
three nighttime proclamations
was most important but I sus-
pect it evolved along with them.
The “Daddy will always take
care of you” came to mind
when my son was graduating
from college. “What if there’s
no job out there?” he asked.
“Then you move in with me
for as long as it takes,” I an-
swered. “And I provide a car for
you to run around in and we
play tennis together almost
every day and you don’t have to
worry about food or shelter or
money or anything.”
I had mixed emotions when
he landed a position immediate-
ly. It would have been nice to
have him around.
Being a long-distance dad
during their junior high and
high school years – putting
40,000 miles a year on my car
in addition to paying $300 cell
phone bills – prepared me for
what was to come: college (they
both went to art school in Sa-
vannah, Georgia); and careers
(Greta now lives in L.A. and
Michael in Chicago.)
She just turned 29 and he’s
25. They still come first.
Ed Ackerman, optimist
eackerman@psdispatch.com
A long-distance dad
Father-daughter team.....................................3
A dad first..........................................................4
Back to family’s roots......................................6
Local Chatter ....................................................8
Matters of Faith ...............................................10
Editorial /Cartoon ...........................................14
Letters...............................................................15
Flag Day ............................................................16
Peeking into the Past......................................17
Nutrition............................................................31
Town News ......................................................39
Sports ..............................................................48
Obituaries .......................................................58
Weddings ..........................................................1B
Birthdays.........................................................4B
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VOL. 66, NO. 19
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You could say there’s paint in
their blood.
The father/daughter team of
Ben and Jennifer Gadomski of
Falls can be found most any day
on the roadways and parking lots
of Northeastern Pennsylvania
painting lines. They operate M
And she got to know how ev-
erything worked.
“So right after that guy quit, we
just put her on the job and she’s
been back there ever since.”
Jennifer’s great grandfather,
Forrest Mayo formed the compa-
ny in 1958 with his wife, Marga-
ret. And the company has been in
TONY CALLAIO/FOR THE SUNDAY DISPATCH
Father and daughter team of Ben and Jennifer Gadomski stand in front of their street lining truck. Ben is very proud of his daughter's
decision to join the family business.
By JOE HEALEY
jhealey@psdispatch
Along family lines
Father/daughter form lasting bond working side by side
“We were in the middle of a job
in Wyoming County when one of
myemployees quit,” he said. “Be-
tween the first and second appli-
cation, he just quit.”
Jennifer’s playing around on
the equipment when she was
young likely helped out.
“She would always climb
around the back of the paint truck
when she was little,” Ben said.
Mayo Striping and their bond is
strong, like the double yellow
stripes they leave behind on a
freshly paved roadway.
Jennifer, now 22, has been
working with her dad since she
was 12 years old, helping him
paint lines in parking lots.
Her dad beams with pride tell-
ing the story of her first job on the
road.
See LINES, Page 24
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A dad. A husband. A lawyer.
In that order?
“In that order,” Atty. Rocco
Schillaci says. “And the first two
have a lot to do with how good I
am at the third.”
At no time was that more evi-
dent, his wife Allison said, than
when their newborn daughter,
Maria, was hospitalized with a
heart problem last February at
Alfred I. duDpont Hospital for
Children in
Wilmington,
Delaware. “She
was there a
month and
Rocco didn’t
want to leave
her; so much of
the time he was
at her bedside
with his cell
phone out and
his laptop tak-
ing care of cli-
ents. One day I
said, ‘What are
you doing?’
and he said,
‘This is the way
I am.’”
The way
Rocco Schilla-
ci is he attributes tofamilyvalues
instilled by his father, Joseph,
and late grandfather, Rocco.
“Family was always everything,”
he said. ‘There was no other
way.”
Those family values are some-
thing Schillaci is determined to
intertwine into his law practice
which opened at 733 Main St.,
Avoca, in mid-March, later than
had been planned because of lit-
tle Maria’s month-long hospital-
ization.
Allison stayed with Maria the
entire time and Rocco returned
home only when necessary. Ma-
ria, who was born on January16,
of this year, was diagnosed with
a heart issue on Feburary 14 –
“Yes, Valentine’s Day,” Allison
says – and was released fromthe
hospital on March 14.
“She’s all right,” Rocco recalls
saying to his wife, “let’s do the
next thing.”
The next thing was the open-
ing of their practice. Yes, their
practice. Allison is an attorney
too. She and Rocco met in law
school at Dickinson from where
they graduated in 2005. “When
we married our friends used to
say we’d love to hear the argu-
ments in your house,” Rocco
said.
A DAD F I RST
Practicing what he preaches
BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE SUNDAY DISPATCH
Attys. Allison and Rocco Schillaci work in their law offices in Avoca, located in a building they purchased from Rocco's father, Joseph.
Atty. Rocco
Schillaci
points to a
painting of
downtown
Avoca at his
law office in
Avoca, locat-
ed just doors
away from
where his
grandfather
operated the
highly suc-
cessful Laura
Fashions. The
painting is by
artist Tom
Dougherty, an
Avoca native.
Atty. Schillaci
balances
family with
profession
The way
Rocco
Schillaci is
he attri-
butes to
family
values
instilled by
his father,
Joseph,
and late
grandfa-
ther,
Rocco.
By ED ACKERMAN
Dispatch editor
See SCHILLACI, Page 25
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Gary Thorne is the owner of
Continental Car Care in Larks-
ville. He lives in Exeter with his
girlfriend Deb Olaviany. Three
years ago he noticed pain in his
upper back. When it didn’t go
away, he realized it was more
than a pulled muscle and got it
checked out. An MRI showed a
tumor in his spine.
The tumor was treated
with radiation.
In March, Thorne was
diagnosed with Multiple
Myeloma, a rare form of
blood cancer generated
from bone marrow. There
is no known cure.
The goal of his doctors is to
clear Thorne’s bone marrow of
cancer through chemotherapy so
he can eventually be treated at
Fox Chase Cancer Center, Phila-
delphia, with a bone marrow
transplant which will then re-
quire two months of isolation.
It’s super expensive.
That’s why Olaviany and other
friends of Thorne have orga-
nized “Friends Fighting for Ga-
ry” for Sunday, July 1, at Bo
Brothers in Wyoming with live
music starting at 2 p.m.
Donations are being accepted
at the doors and there we will be
wrist bands and tee shirts with
every donation of $20 or more.
There will be 50/50 drawings,
raffles for prizes, and guest bar-
tenders.
Live entertainment includes
Rub Yer Soul, Giggles, Phil
Lonergan, and Bo Brother Joe.
In an email Olaviany wrote,
“He is now undergo-
ing more rigorous che-
mo. And will be un-
dergoing a bone mar-
row transplant in Phi-
ladelphia soon. He
will be in total isola-
tion in Philly for four
to six weeks and then
continue home isolation for six
months, obviously unable to
continue working or having an
income. The meds he is on are
not covered by insurance, plus
being self-employed he has to
provide his own insurance,
which will cease when he is
forced to stop working. Gary and
I have been together for eight
years. I see what a hard-working,
committed and well-respected
man he is.
“This is a very difficult, pain-
ful, and frightening time for him
and all that know him and care
about him as Multiple Myeloma
has no cure and statistics can be
quite scary. We hope to have a
fantastic response to this call for
all to come out and lend some
support. Anyone can call me at
592-5434 with questions.”
Businesses can donate money
or merchandise and be recog-
nized as sponsors. Sponsors will
be listed at the restaurant and on
the promotional items including
flyers and posters.
Benefit set for Exeter cancer patient at Bo Bros. July 1
Thorne
Contact Thorne’s daughter, Megan Thorne, at 574-9390 or email her at
Thorne.Megan@gmail.com or Deb Olaviany at 592-5434 or Gary’s long
time friend and event organizer Paul Stamberger at Barber Ford, 962
Wyoming Avenue, Exeter, PA18643. Call 602-0226 or email Stamberger
at paul@barberautogroup.com.
HOW TO HEL P
By JACK SMILES
jsmiles@psispatch.com
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When 140 people crowded in-
to Suite 101at 457 N. Main St. in
Pittston last Sunday for an open
house at the new Skibitsky and
Molina Law Office, it was just
like old times at Detato’s Super-
market.
Why?
The offices are located in the
same space where Gene Moli-
no’s great grandparents, C.A.
and Josephine Detato, operated
their busy supermarket from
1968 until it was sold to Insala-
co’s in the mid-’70s.
Actually, C.A. and Josephine
startedDetato’s market in1919in
a small storefront attached to
their home on Main Street. They
later moved it to North Main
Street at what is now the site of
the Pittston Senior Center before
moving across New Street to
what is now the law office.
Molino said while he and his
partner did not choose the site
because of its family history, it
was part of the appeal. “This site
is a great fit for us,” he said. “The
history behind it is an added bo-
nus.”
Like his great grandparents,
Molino also moved from an of-
fice further down Main Street to
the new site.
“We’re honored to have our
law practice located in Pittston
and to be part of the continued
revitalization of the city,” he
said. “We’re proud to be located
in the Junction with many new
businesses that openedinjust the
past year, and others that have
been a fixture here for decades.”
The lawyers have a display of
memorabilia from Detato’s mat-
ted and framed on the reception
area wall.
Gene lives in Exeter with his
wife, Stacey. Greg lives in Du-
ryea withhis wife, Christine, and
their children.
Shown is the grand opening of Detato's Supermarket in 1968. Holding the ribbon in the first row, fromleft, are Doreen Detato Bieryla, Peggy Detato, WilliamDetato, Ken
Detato, Bobby Detato; unknown; C.A. Detato, owner; Josephine Vitale Detato, owner; Anthony Detato; Lois Detato; Minnie Detato Colangelo; Matthew Colangelo; Tony
Detato; Rose Colangelo Molino. Second row, Robert Detato, WilliamDetato, Frank Colangelo, Elizabeth Vitale, WilliamVitale, and Lillian Vitale Henderson. Those uni-
dentified are Detato employees, family members and friends.
Lawyers find a ‘super’ site for new offices
Offices are on site of one
partner’s grandparents:
Detato’s Supermarket
By JACK SMILES
jsmiles@psdispatch.com
TONY CALLAIO/FOR THE SUNDAY DISPATCH
Greg Skibitsky, left, and Gene Molino are shown in front of a display of Detato's Super Market mem-
orabilia in their law offices located in the same building.
Gene Molino displays a Deta-
to's grocery bag, probably from
1968.
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FLY NONSTOP AT
LOW-LOW FARES FROM
WILKES-BARRE/SCRANTON
TO ORLANDO/SANFORD
Flights beginning June 21
st
The Seventh Annual Tour of
Historic Churches of Greater
Pittston will take place on Sun-
day, June 24, starting at 1 p.m. at
the First Presbyterian Church,
Exeter Avenue, West Pittston.
Atty. Jan Lokuta, originator of
the tour, will serve as the tour
guide.
“All are invited to participate
andreflect onthe progress the in-
dividual churches and the bor-
ough at large have made since
the flood of September 2011,”
Lokuta, a Dupont native and art-
ist said.
From First Presbyterian
Church, the group will visit The
Christian and Missionary Alli-
ance, The First Congregational
UnitedChurchof Christ, andIm-
maculate Conception Roman
Catholic Church, all on Luzerne
Avenue in West Pittston, then
visit Trinity Episcopal Church
on Montgomery Avenue and
conclude with the First United
Methodist Church on Wyoming
Avenue, Lokuta said.
“We will also pay tribute to the
Salvation Army in recognition of
the 100 years of work in West
Pittston,” he added.
Lokuta announcedthat the Lu-
zerne County Transportation
Authority will provide the Lu-
zerne County Trolley to trans-
port tour attendees from one lo-
cation to another.
First United Methodist
Church will host a reception in
its education room at the end of
the tour and all participants and
members of all congregations
are invited to attend.
7th annual historic church tour next Sunday
Participants
will visit
WP churches
by trolley
PHOTO COURTESY OF WEST PITTSTON HISTORICAL SOCIETY
First United Methodist Church, West Pittston, shown in this historic photo, will host a reception following the annual tour of historic
Greater Pittston churches next Sunday, June 24.
LOCALCHATTER
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What are you chattin’ about? Call 602-0177 or email sd@psdispatch.com and let us know.
Marcia Tomaszewski and
MarkRoney, of Dupont, recent-
ly rode their motorcycles to Lex-
ington, Kentucky. They, along
with friends, traveled 620 miles
and arrived there in one day.
While in Kentucky, they visit-
ed Daniel Boone’s Fort, the Ken-
tucky Horse Park, Eastern Ken-
tucky University and enjoyed the
music of one of their favorite
bands, The Gas House Gorillas.
They also spent time with
Robert Mullins who served with
Mark in the 82nd Airborne Divi-
sion 1990-1994 and in the Per-
sian Gulf War 1990-1991.
Marcia is the daughter of Sally
Tomaszewski and the late Fred-
die Tomaszewski.
Off to U of S
Connie M. Buttacci, West
Wyoming, recently graduated
from Scranton Prep. A member
of the National Honor Society,
she was the founder of Prep’s
“Students for the Ethical Treat-
ment of Animals” club, and par-
ticipated in numerous other
clubs.
She is a volunteer at Pet Ser-
vices by Denise, shadows Dr.
Mark Stair, a local veterinarian,
and has volunteered at the local
SPCA.
Buttacci was awarded a Loyo-
la Scholarship to The University
of Scrantonwhere she will major
in Biology/Pre Veterinary stud-
ies.
She is the daughter of Joe and
Flory Buttacci and the grand-
daughter of Dominick and
Blanche Buttacci, Dunmore,
and the late Joe and Mary Pic-
cillo, Pittston.
She has a brother Joe, a junior
at The University of Scranton.
Kutztown grad
Nicole Sciandra, a 2008 grad-
uate of Pittston Area High
School, graduated Summa Cum
Laude from Kutztown Universi-
ty with a B.S. in Secondary Edu-
cation Mathematics. She was the
recipient of the Kapp Mu Epsi-
lon Award in Mathematics for
maintaining a 4.0 overall GPA.
Nicole is the daughter of Joseph
Sciandra, of Inkerman; and
Joyce Sciandra, of Pittston.
Birthday notes
Happy birthday wishes go to
Sam Valenti, Exeter, who cele-
brated on June 11, Ruthie An-
derson, Hughestown celebrat-
ing June 20, Paul Hindmarsh
Jr. celebrating on June 20 and
Joan Hines Morton, Pittston,
formerly of West Pittston, cele-
brating on June 21.
Anniversaries
Happy anniversary wishes go
to Hank and Sara Walker of
Suscon who celebrated on June
13, Tony and Ginger Grieco of
Duryea celebrating on June 19
and Mark and Heidi Singer of
Hughestown celebrating on June
19.
Bard grad
West Pittston resident Erin
Hannigan graduated from Bard
College in Annandale-On-Hud-
son, NY, on Saturday, May 26
during the College’s 152nd com-
mencement.
Hannigan was awarded a
bachelor’s degree.
Local pair takes motorcycle trip to Kentucky
Holly Cox, 6-and-one-half years old, recently donated 10 inches of her hair to Locks of Love.
The daughter of Steve and Colleen Cox, Holly had her hair cut at Sapphire Salon and Spa. She is
a first-grade student at Wyoming Area Catholic.
Donates hair to ‘Locks of Love’
Marcia Tomaszewski and Mark Roney visited Daniel Boone's Fort
on a bike trip to Kentucky.
Connie Buttacci
Nicole Sciandra
See CHATTER, Page 36
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Girard J. Mecadon
Attorney
At Law
363 Laurel Street • Pittston
654 - 5030 www.mecadonlaw.com
• PERSONAL INJURY • AUTOMOBILE,
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PERSONAL ATTENTION THAT GETS RESULTS
West Pittston Tomorrow con-
venedthis past Thursdayevening
at the Wyoming Area Secondary
Center for the fifthandfinal pub-
lic meetingorganizedbythe Fed-
eral Emergency Management
Agency.
This concluded months of
committee meetings and plan-
ning to get the borough back on
track and moving forward into
the future.
“We are goingtofindthe mon-
ey and we are going to fight for
it,” exclaimed Judy Aita, chair of
the West Pittston Tomorrow or-
ganization that formed after the
devastating flood of September
2011. The money that Aita allud-
ed to is the money needed to get
proposed projects off the ground
to recover and restore West Pitt-
ston.
Aita went on to say that grants
areneededandlobbyingis essen-
tial to get West Pittston Tomor-
row’s vision, with the help of
community input, in getting pro-
jects off the ground.
A15-minute slide presentation
illustrated proposed projects
such as: attracting newbusiness-
es, roads and sidewalk renova-
tions, newstreet lighting system,
a bigger library, a river overlook
museum, community gardens,
expanding the century house
project, acquiring and convert-
ing vacant commercial buildings
tocreateloft-styleapartments for
youngwage-earners andmiddle-
aged “empty nesters,” and im-
prove sewers in flood-affected
areas.
With all the proposed projects,
the underlying problem is a call
for a levee system. West Pittston
Tomorrowestimates a dike of1.5
miles along the Susquehanna
River is neededtoprotect the less
than one-square mile borough
fromanother catastrophe like the
500-year flood of tropical storm
Lee. The organization has re-
ceived estimates between $7-
millionto$18-milliontoproduce
such a levee.
Tropical storm Lee affected
dozens of businesses and ap-
proximately600-homes fromthe
ravaging flood.
West Pittston Tomorrow will
contact the Army Corps of Engi-
neers as soonas possiblerequest-
ing them to commission a feasi-
bility study, which will enable
the borough to seek federal mo-
nies neededtoprotect for thebor-
ough.
Local, county and state offi-
cials and/or their representatives
were in the audience to support
the initiative.
In addition to the announced
improvements, Rev. John Major
of the Trinity Episcopal Church,
who began the evening with a
prayer, was pleased to announce
that theEpiscopal Dioceseof Be-
thlehem donated $20,000 to-
wards the borough’s recovery ef-
forts.
Leigh Magnotta, business de-
velopment specialist for the
Greater Scranton Chamber of
Commerce and MetroAction,
announced there is approximate-
ly $3-million dollars available
for businesses affected by the
September 2011 flood through
the Luzerne County Flood Re-
coveryLoanProgram. A1%loan
rate with terms up to 60-months
are being offered.
For further information on the
loanprogramyoumaycall Leigh
at 570-341-0270or youcanapply
online at www.MetroAction.org.
WEST PI TTSTON TOMORROW
Plans for WP’s future are revealed
TONY CALLAIO PHOTOS/FOR THE SUNDAY DISPATCH
Judy Aita, chair of the West Pittston Tomorrow initiative, address-
es the audience after a 15-minute presentation of proposed plans
for getting West Pittston rebuilt and restored.
Cheryl Butera, left, and Joyce Lloyd sell West Pittston Tomorrow
merchandise.
Months of work
culminates in
presentation
Thursday
By TONY CALLAIO
Sunday Dispatch Correspondent
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MATTERS OF FAITH
email items for this page to sd@psdispatch.com; fax to 602-0183
The Cooperative Vacation Bi-
ble School of West Pittston will
hold registration today at the
First United Methodist Church,
Wyoming Avenue in West Pitt-
ston.
Bible School will be Monday,
July 9 through Friday July 13. It
will begin at 8:30 a.m. for early
breakfast and the program will
begin at 9 a.m. and end at 12:15
p.m.
For more information you can
contact the First United Metho-
dist Church office at 655-1083
from 8:30 a.m. to 12 p.m.
STRAWBERRY FESTIVAL
The Session of Deacons of the
First United Presbyterian
Churchof West Pittstonare plan-
ning their annual Strawberry
Festival and Mini- Flea Market
on Saturday, June 23, at St. Ceci-
lia’s, 1700 Wyoming Avenue
Exeter.
The Flea Market and Straw-
berry Festival will open rain or
shine from11 a.m. to 5 p.m. The
public is invited to shop, have
some lunch and cake, strawber-
ries and ice cream provided by
the Deacons.
Tickets for the strawberries
and ice creamare available at the
door.
PEDIATRIC CLINIC
The Care and Concern Pediat-
ric Health Clinic, located in the
former Seton Catholic School
building on William Street in
Pittston, will be open the first
and third Thursday of each
month.
Free healthcare is providedfor
infants through age 11.
Registration is from 4:30 to
5:30 p.m.
Participants should bring your
child’s immunization records
with them.
Parents or guardians must be
present to have their child exam-
ined. All services are free and
confidential.
The clinic is sponsored by the
Care and Concern ministries of
the Parish Community of St.
John the Evangelist, Msgr. John
Bendik, Pastor.
For more information call
855-6035.
REFORMED
PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH OF WYOMING
VALLEY
1700 Wyoming Avenue, Forty-
Fort
Pastor Rev. R.F. Dymond
Morning Worship: 10:30 a.m.
Bible School: 11:45 a.m.
Wednesday evening prayer
service: 6:30 p.m. every other
Wednesday
Visitors are welcome.
For additional informationcall
570-693-1918.
BENNETT PRESBYTERIAN
501 Bennett Street, Luzerne
Everyone is welcome.
The church is handicap acces-
sible.
BETHEL UNITED
METHODIST
532Main St.
Avoca
(570) 457-2566
Pastor Sharon Dietz (570)
282-0104
Sunday – Worship Service -
11:15 a.m.
Communion first Sunday of
each month – non perishable
food items will be collected this
day.
Mondays – Bible study – 6
p.m. alternating each week with
Brick UM Church, Duryea.
1st Thursday of each month –
food give-away 4 to 6 p.m. for
needy of Avoca and Duryea.
Non-perishable food items
and monetary donations are ac-
cepted at this time.
If you have a prayer request,
call Pastor Dietz who will activa-
te prayer chain.
BRICK UNITED
METHODIST
935 Foote Ave., Duryea
(570)457-4424
Pastor Sharon Dietz (570)
282-0104
Sunday Worship Service 9:45
a.m. Sunday School – 10:15 a.m.
during morning Worship
Services for ages 3-12
Communion first Sunday of
each month – non perishable
food items will be collected this
day.
Mondays – Bible study – 6
p.m. alternating each week with
Bethel UM Church, Avoca.
Miracle of Awareness – coffee
time – 6 p.m. meeting 7 p.m.
Thursday – New beginnings
meeting 7 p.m. Third Thursday
of each month – United Metho-
dist Women – 6:30 p.m.
CHRISTIAN AND
MISSIONARY ALLIANCE
CHURCH
Luzerne Ave. and Parke Street
West Pittston
Christ’s Community Clothes
Closet will offer summer hours
for the months of June and July.
The closet will open on
Wednesday from6 to 8 p.m. Peo-
ple with emergency needs can
call the church office at 654-
2500 for special appointments.
The closet accepts gently used
clothing and share it with the
community without cost.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Rev. James H. Breese, pastor,
Water Street, Pittston
The First Baptist Church, Wa-
ter St., Pittston, is running a bus
trip to Sight and Sound in Lan-
caster to see the production, Jo-
nahonSeptember15. The tripin-
cludes dinner at Good & Plenty
and the show. Refreshments will
also be served on the bus. The
cost of the trip is Adults (age 19
and older) $108, Teens (ages 13
to 18) $78, and Children (ages 3
to 12) $56.
A non-refundable deposit of
$30 is required to hold a seat and
the balance due by June 30. Seat-
ing is limited, so please reserve a
seat on the bus today!
To make a reservation or for
more information, please con-
tact Cindy Hrobuchak, 780-
7712, or by e-mail,morn-
star54@live.com.
Rev. James H. Breese is the
pastor of First Baptist Church.
For more information, please
contact the churchoffice at (570)
654-0283.
The church will hold a Sunday
School Open House, Schools
Out Sunday School’s In, on Sat-
urday, June 23 from 11 a.m. to 2
p.m. Children and teens are en-
couraged to attend, along with
their parents to see howexciting,
fun and beneficial Sunday
School can be. Refreshments
will be provided.
For more information, please
contact the churchoffice at (570)
654-0283.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL
UCC
500 Luzerne Avenue
West Pittston
Rev. Joan Mitchell, Pastor
Sanctuary is handicapped ac-
cessible.
Sunday at 11 a.m. Morning
Worship Service
Rev. Gordon Wilson will lead
our service this morning.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH
14 Broad Street Pittston
Sunday Worship 9:15 a.m.
with Rev. William N. Lukesh.
FIRST UNITED
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
West Pittston
Rev. James Thyren
654-8121
Services are being held at St.
Cecilia’s Roman Catholic
Church on 1700 Wyoming Ave,
Exeter as we recover from the
flood of September 2011. There
is parking on Wyoming Avenue
and in the lot behind the church.
Sunday, June 17, 11:00 a.m.,
Worship; 12:05 p.m., Choir Re-
hearsal.
Wednesday, June 20: 6:00
p.m., Set up for Strawberry Fes-
tival.
Thursday, June 21: 6:00 p.m.,
Set up for Strawberry Festival.
Saturday, June 23: 11 a.m. - 5
p.m., Strawberry Festival and
Mini-Flea Market will be held at
St. Cecilia’s, 1700 Wyoming
Ave, Exeter.
FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Wyoming Ave., West Pittston
FULL GOSPEL CHAPEL
Avoca
Adult Sunday School, 9:30;
Sunday morning worship at
10:30 a.m.
Wednesday evening Bible
study and prayer service at 7:00.
The churchalsohosts the Rose
of Sharon Church with Rev. Vin-
cente Torres on Sunday after-
noon at 3:00 p.m. for the Hispan-
ic community.
GLENDALE GOSPEL
CHURCH
105 Church Drive
Glendale/Pittston Township
Sunday Service 10:45 a.m.
HARDING CHURCH OF
CHRIST
RR 1 Box 187A, Falls
Sunday services: 10:00 a.m.
Sunday School and 11:00 a.m.
Church Service.
Call 388-6534 www.harding-
churchofchrist.org
Cooperative Bible School registration today
The Children’s Ministry of the Christian and
Missionary Alliance Church, 317 Luzerne Ave-
nue, West Pittston, will host an indoor Chil-
dren’s Fun Fest on Saturday, June 23 from1:30
to 4 p.m. Registration will begin at 1:15 p.m.
Features include exotic animals, carnival
games, prizes and refreshments.
Event is open to families with children to age
twelve without cost.
Committee members are Laura Hall, Pittston;
Betty Minella and Lynn Jumper of Duryea, Da-
vid and Allison Crisci of Scranton, Joyce Malo-
ney and Jean Shields of Wyoming; Ann Louise
Byerly, Sandy Christian and Carolyn White of
West Pittston and Judy Strope of Wilkes-Barre.
For additional information, call 654-2500.
Children’s Fun Fest next Saturday
See FAITH, Page 11
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FACTS OF
LAW
Brought to you as a paid public service by
the Law Offices of Dominick P. Pannunzio,
294 Main Street, Dupont, 655-5541
By
Dominick P.
Pannunzio, Esq.
The U.S. Supreme Court has upheld a lower
court decision to ban political contributions
to candidates for public offce and political
organizations by foreign nationals. The decision
means that foreign nationals, other than lawful
permanent residents, are completely banned
from donating to candidates or parties, or
making independent expenditures in federal,
state or local elections.
***
Employers in California are no longer able
to obtain consumer credit information for
applicants or employees under a newlaw, unless
the positions are “managerial.”
***
Under a new Massachusetts oil heating law,
every homeowner with an oil heating system
is required to install an oil safety valve or an
oil supply line with protective sleeve in their
system. The cost is approximately $150 to
$350, depending on the system. The required
upgrade is to prevent leaks fromtanks and pipes
that connect to your furnace.
***
The U.S. Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals has
held that Eastern Michigan University may
have violated the Constitution by expelling
a graduate student who refused to counsel
affrmatively about homosexual conduct based
on her religious beliefs.
***
Under a new law in Florida a candidate must
be registered in the same party for nearly 17
months before a general election. The old law
precluded candidates fromswitching parties less
than six months before the general election.
Saporito, Saporito & Falcone
Attorneys At Law
William J. Watt, III, Esquire; Samuel A. Falcone, Jr., Esquire;
Joseph F. Saporito, Jr., Esquire; Carlo J. Saporito
Representing the Seriously Injured
-Since 1946
• Auto Accidents
• Personal Injury
• Social Security Disability
• Workers’ Compensation
654-4643
490 N. Main Street
Suite 202, Pittston

ZUMBA
®

Classes
Monday & Wednesday 10am to 11am
Call the Studio to Register
SPOTLIGHT SPOTLIGH SPOTLIGH
Dance Studio • 570-540-5910
405 Main St. • Duryea
The Nativity of Our Lord Par-
ish in Duryea will hold its annual
summer picnic on Friday, July 6
through Sunday, July 8 at the Sa-
cred Heart of Jesus Church
grounds, 529 Stephenson St.,
Duryea and will feature ethnic
foods and live entertainment.
The entertainment lineup is
“Picture Perfect” on Friday
night, “Jude’s Polka Jets” and
“Flaxy Morgan” on Saturday
night and “The Sperazza Band”
on Sunday night.
There will be a pre-picnic in-
door bingo and a flea market at 6
p.m. on Thursday, July 5.
Planning the Nativity of Our Lord Parish summer picnic are, fromleft, first row, TimWelling and Alan
Hoover. Second row, Madeline Macheska, Denise Decker and Carol Charnogursky. Third row, Tom
Macheska, Michelle Piontek, Lillian Witkowski and Ann Frances Kurzweil. Fourth ro, Jeff Bauman,
Bob Kundrat, Helen Negvesky and Mercedes McHale. Fifth row, Beverly Dulny, Marie Yonushka,
Judy Lambert and Father Andrew Sinnott.
Nativity summer picnic July 6-8
HOLY MOTHER OF
SORROWS PNCC
212 Wyoming Avenue, Dupont
Rev. Zbigniew Dawid, Pastor
Sunday Masses:
Today, June 17, Father’s Day
there will be only one Mass at
7:30 a.m.
Father’s Day breakfast will
take place right after Mass.
All father’s and their families
are invited to participate on this
special day set aside to honor
them.
INDEPENDENT BIBLE
CHURCH
328 Main Street, Duryea, PA
18642. (570) 451-0346 Home/
Office. JLaCava@TheBible-
Church.org
INKERMAN
PRESBYTERIAN
Main St., Inkerman
Services: Sundays, 8:30 a.m.
LANGCLIFFE
PRESBYTERIAN
1001 Main St Avoca
Sunday worship 11:15 a.m.
The Langcliffe Church is
handicapped accessible. Nurs-
Faith
Continued from Page 10
See FAITH, Page 12
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T
PRICES EFFECTIVE
JUNE 17
TH
THRU
JUNE 19
TH
PRICES EFFECTIVE WITH GOLD CARD ONLY
TO ASSURE SUFFICIENT SUPPLY OF SALE ITEMS, WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO LIMIT THE PURCHASE OF SALE ITEMS. EXCEPT WHERE
OTHERWISE NOTED. NONE SOLD TO DEALERS OR WHOLESALERS, NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS.
*PURCHASE REQUIREMENTS ON GOLD CARD ITEMS DO NOT INCLUDE MILK, CIGARETTES OR PRICE OF THE GOLD CARD ITEM.
401 Kennedy Blvd., Pittston, PA • 570-655-8000
DOUBLE COUPONS EVERYDAY • TUESDAY SENIOR CITIZENS DISCOUNT
SUPERMARKETS
www.quinnsmarkets.com • Like us on Facebook at quinn’s shursave markets
Artwork for display purposes only & thank you for your cooperation.
SUNDAY ONLY
6/17/12
MONDAY ONLY
6/18/12
TUESDAY ONLY
6/19/12
WITH GOLD CARD WITH GOLD CARD
RIPE, SWEET
CANTALOUPES
WITH GOLD CARD
WITH GOLD CARD
WITH GOLD CARD WITH GOLD CARD
WITH GOLD CARD WITH GOLD CARD WITH GOLD CARD
PEPSI CUBES
24 PACK/12 OZ. CANS
RED SEEDLESS
GRAPES
CENTER CUT
BONE-IN
PORK CHOPS
BONELESS & SKINLESS
CHICKEN
BREAST
1
99
LB.
ERA LAUNDRY
DETERGENT
50 OZ. BTL.
2
99
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1
98
DELI SLICED
AMERICAN
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2
88
LB.
//
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$
12
F
O
R
MUST BUY 2
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$6.99 EA.
99
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LB. 1
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WITH GO
PRICED
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BUY 1 GET 1
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BLUEBERRIES
OR
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OR
GRAPE TOMATOES
GREAT
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PORK
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7
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TWO
GREAT
LOCATIONS!
Every MONDAY
at Market Street Pub
GETPOUNDEDNIGHT!
Market Street Pub
29 Market St., Jenkins Twp.
570-655-8091
Owen Street Pub
245 Owen St., Swoyersville
570-287-6074
WEDNESDAY
TurtleBites
$
6.49
CoorsLight Pounder
$
1.75
In-HouseOnly.
Many MorePounder Specials
5- 10PM
RhodeIsland
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ery is provided for children dur-
ing worship.
MOOSIC ALLIANCE
CHURCH
608 Rocky Glen Road, Moosic
Pastor: Doug Jensen 457-
6020
maccma2@verizon.net
Sunday morning Sunday
School for all ages at 9:30 a.m.
Sunday morning Worship at
10:45 a.m.
Prayer meeting, Wednesdays
at 7:00 p.m.
Celebrate Recovery Ministry,
Thursdays at 7:30 p.m.
OBLATES OF ST. JOSEPH
Highway 315, Pittston
Masses are held daily in the
seminary chapel at 7 a.m. (Mon-
day – Friday) and on Saturday
mornings at 8 a.m. There are no
weekend Masses.
Confessions are heard daily
from9 a.m. - noon and from3 to
6 p.m.
Office hours are Monday –
Friday: 9:30 a.m. – 5 p.m., eve-
nings and weekends by appoint-
ment. Office phone number is
654-7542. You can now contact
the Oblates on Facebook:
www.Facebook.com/OBLATE-
SOFSTJOSEPH or on Twitter
@OblatesStJoseph
Every Wednesday evening
Mass is celebrated at 7 p.m. in
conjunction with the Novena to
St. Joseph &St. Joseph Marello.
Novena prayers and the blessing
of the first-class relic of St. Jo-
seph Marello, Founder of the
Oblates of Saint Joseph Congre-
gation, immediately follow the
Mass. All are welcome.
Tune into Catholic Radio 750
AM. The radio studio is located
in the seminary building and is
broadcast daily from dawn to
dusk. For more information
about this station, contact Ed
Niewinski at 287-4670.
Happy Father’s Day to all
Dads.
The Diocesan Council of Ca-
tholic Women (DCCW) execu-
tive board will hold a special
meeting next Saturday, June 23,
in the seminary community
room starting at 9:00 a.m.
The Outdoor Chicken Bar-
B-Q Dinner is Sunday, August
26, on the seminary grounds.
Volunteers are asked to be pre-
sent for this important meeting
The Oblate Fathers will be
making their annual retreat from
June 18-22 at the Carmelite Re-
treat House in Mahwah, NJ.
Altar Servers Day is being
planned for the end of this
month, Friday, June 29, at the
seminary. The day-long event is
open to all young people who are
altar servers in any parish in the
Diocese of Scranton. The event
is FREE, just need to register by
calling 654-7542, e-mail: osj-
seminary@comcast.net.
For more news and informa-
tion about the Oblates of Saint
Joseph locally and around the
world, go to our web-
site:www.oblates-stjoseph.com
ST. JOSEPH MARELLO
PARISH
OUR LADY OF
MT. CARMEL
ST. ROCCO’S
Pittston
Weekend Masses: At Our La-
dy of Mt. Carmel Church, on
Saturday at 4:00 and 7:00 p.m.
and on Sunday at 8:00 and 11:00
a.m. At St. Rocco Church, on
Saturday at 5:30 p.m. and on
Sunday at 9:30 a.m.
The Oblate Fathers will be
making their annual spiritual re-
treat the week of June 18 at the
Carmelite Retreat House, Mah-
wah, New Jersey. There will be
no 7:30 a.m. Mass fromTuesday
to Friday this week. Father Jo-
seph Adonizio will be celebrat-
ing the 11:30 a.m. Mass and will
be available for any emergen-
cies. No Holy Hour this Tuesday.
The Rectory office will be
closed.
Best wishes and prayers to Ge-
nevieve Zendian, 100 years
young on Saturday, June 23. A
Mass of Thanksgiving will be
celebrated at Our Lady of Mt.
Carmel Church at 4:00 p.m.
St. Joseph Marello Parish Ba-
zaar will be held on Friday, July
13, Saturday, July14 and Sunday,
July 15 on the church grounds
William Street, Pittston. A fes-
tival planning meeting will be
held on Monday June 25at 7:00
p.m. in the Church Center
St. Joseph Marello Parish Raf-
fle is now underway. Buy your
tickets now for a chance to win
2012 Chevrolet Cruz or $20,000.
Donations are $20.00 each and
only 2,000 tickets to be sold.
Seller of the winning ticket re-
ceives $500.00.
Faith
Continued from Page 11
See FAITH, Page 13
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For tickets to buy or sell call
Connie Toole at 655-3681, Frank
Sciabacucchi 655-6125, Pena
Hansen-332-5989, or the rectory
office-654-6902.
The Altar & Rosary Society
will host their last meeting of the
season with a dinner buffet be-
ginning at 6 p.m. on Thursday,
June 21, in the Parish Center.
Topics for the rest of the year will
be discussed. Theresa Mulesky,
president, will preside.
An Altar and Rosary Bus Trip
will be held on August 19. The
bus will be leaving the Park &
Ride on Oak St., Pittston Twp. at
9:15 a.m. and returning between
7:30-8:00 p.m.
Cost is $63 which includes the
play “They’re Playing Our
Song,” dinner and stop in Tan-
nersville.
Payment due by July 1. Call
654-2876 for details.
Boys and girls who are altar
servers in their parishes are invit-
ed to a free special day for all Al-
tar Servers on Friday, June 29,
from 10 a.m. – 3 p.m. It will be
held on the grounds of St. Jo-
seph’s Oblate Seminary, Laflin,
and hosted by the Oblates of St.
Joseph Religious Community.
Registration begins at 10 a.m. If
you are interested in participa-
ting contact the Oblates Semina-
ry Office at 654-7542 or email
them at: osjseminary@com-
cast.net before June 25. Pastors
and parents are welcome
First Holy Communion Pho-
tos can be ordered by going on
the web to: www.prin-
troom,com/pro/pricephotos;
click on the “St. Joseph Marello
Communion 2012” link enter the
password “Pittston” and fill out
the on-line order form.
Anyone wishing to donate
fresh flowers in memory of a
loved one may bring them to the
church on Saturday morning.
Anyone interested in renting
the Parish Banquet Hall or Meet-
ing Room should call Christine
Silinskie, hall manager at 704-
8861 for details and/or a tour of
the facility.
Mt. Carmel Senior Choir will
hold rehearsal on Mondays from
7-8:30 p.m. St. Rocco Senior
Choir will resume weekly re-
hearsals on Tuesdays at 7:30
p.m. in the choir loft of St. Rocco
Church. New members are wel-
come.
The Annual Parish Golf Tour-
nament was a great success. All
the golfers had a most enjoyable
and fun-filled day on the golf
course with beautiful hot weath-
er.
The meal afterwards was a fra-
ternal banquet. A thank you to
the committee members: Kenny
Augustine, John Bingham, Jack
Casper, Jason Eike, Emory Guf-
frovich, Frank Sciabacucchi for
carrying out the details of this
project.
A special thank you to John
Binghamand his helpers for pre-
paring a very delicious dinner.
St. Rocco’s Closing
On Sunday, July 1 at 2 p.m.,
there will be a special closing
Mass for Saint Rocco’s Church
with a special ceremony of lock-
ing the doors. Mrs. Ida Bartoli
and Mr. Chester Montante will
perform this special ceremony.
Following the Mass, there will
be a procession with the Blessed
Sacrament to Our Lady of Mt.
Carmel Church.
The procession will start from
St. Rocco’s Church, West Oak
Street, South Main Street, Broad
Street and at our Lady of Mt.
Carmel Church.
The benediction with the
Blessed Sacrament will con-
clude this religious service.
Following the service, a light
reception will be held in the
Church Hall.
Beginning Sunday, July 8, the
9:30 a.m. Mass fromSt. Rocco’s
Church will be moved to Our La-
dy of Mt. Carmel Church
CORPUS CHRISTI PARISH
Luzerne Ave., West Pittston
Daily Mass
7:30 a.m. at Immaculate Con-
ception; 8:30 a.m. at Holy Re-
deemer
Weekend Masses
Saturday 4:00 p.m. at Immac-
ulate Conception
5:00 p.m. at Holy Redeemer
Sunday 7:30 a.m. at Immacu-
late Conception
9:00 a.m. at Holy Redeemer
10:30a.m. at Immaculate Con-
ception Confession
3:00-3:30 p.m. at Immaculate
Conception
4:00-4:30 p.m. at Holy Re-
Faith
Continued from Page 12
See FAITH, Page 18
• Personal Injury
• Workers’ Compensation
• Social Security Disability
• Family Law
(Divorce/Custody/Support)
• Bankruptcy
• Real Estate Transactions
and Closings
• Wills,Trusts, Living Wills,
Powers of Attorney
• Estate Administration
• Corporations/Business Law
• Landlord-Tenant
• Collections
• Municipal Law
ATTY. GREGORY S. SKIBITSKY, JR.
GSkibitsky@skibitskyandmolino.com
ATTY. GENE M. MOLINO
GMolino@skibitskyandmolino.com
457 North Main Street, Suite 101 • Pittston, PA
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During the week a couple of women
came to the counter and fewothers sent us
emails all inquiring about the same thing.
Theywantedtoplace ads honoringtheir
dads in our Father’s Day edition, but we
had to tell themwe aren’t publishing a Fa-
ther’s Day edition.
We never have.
Maybe we should, but it would likely be
very small, not like our Mother’s Day spe-
cial section where we ran more than 200
pictures of Moms and their kids and fam-
ilies.
It’s not that we don’t appreciate our
Dads, it’s that for most of us Moms have a
special place in our hearts. Moms, after
all, are sweet and tender and look good in
cute colorful pictures in newspaper pages.
They cry at the silliest things. They stay
home with the kids.
Dads on the other hand bring home the
bacon. They hang out at the club. They are
rough and tough and don’t look so hot in
cute colorful pictures on newspaper pag-
es.
They fight and die in wars. They watch
football. They drink beer, smoke cigars
and hunt and fish. Stereotypes, of course.
In 2012 the maternity and paternity
lines are blurred.
Moms bring home the bacon (and in
most cases cook it). They can be rough
and tough. They watch football. Moms
fight and die in wars. They drink beer and
some of them even smoke cigars.
Really, we’ve seen it.
In the future the lines will be blurred
even more.
Did you know there are more female
college students, than male college stu-
dents and that in 40 percent of households
Moms earn as much or more of the family
income as Dads?
Nostalgically older readers may yearn
for the days when Dad worked and Mom
stayed home and raised the kids.
Many believe it was a formula which
worked. But those days aren’t coming
back and the new formula works, too.
The new formula is no formula.
Many families are different from what
they used to be.
It’s cool to make fun of old fashioned
Dads sometimes.
But no matter what, no matter what
changes traditional two-parent homes
will always have their place.
And Dads will always matter.
A lot.
Just ask their sons and daughters.
Happy Father’s Day.
Happy
Father’s Day
Picture, if youwill, holidays without decorations, bare walls in
homes, restaurants andschools. Refrigerators are bare for lackof
children’s artwork, everything looks dark and drab. No color, no
excitement, no individual expression - like early television in
black and white.
Picture, if you will, parades without marching bands, no back-
ground music on television and in movies, no theme songs to
humalong with. Howabout quiet sporting events? No iPods, no
radio stations, no catchy tunes to let you know you have a cell
phone call.
Picture, if you will, quiet graduation ceremonies, weddings,
birthdays, even amusement parks, all quiet.
Now think of our children or grandchildren with no school
plays or programs or concerts toperformin. Theyare not singing
songs in school or bringing home the art projects they made for
each holiday and event. Picture a world where there is no outlet
for every child to be able to express himself and live a well-
rounded life.
Every night on the news and every day in the newspaper, we
see another school district cutting art and music programs in
schools or choosing not to replace retiring art and music teach-
ers, which is a future death for those programs.
We all knowthe amount of art and music teachers in any given
district is a very small percentage of the full faculty, but this is
what we cut? We also knowthat things are tough, people under-
stand that, but if anyone thinks their taxes will not be raised be-
cause of these cuts, they are fooling themselves.
Taxes will forever be raised to the max whether we can afford
the increase or not, but the students will pay the biggest price of
all. If they do this, sports will be next and then what? These are
our children, our future; it has to be more than just dollars and
cents. Please, someone, find the solution. I would like all school
board members and school administrators to spend one week
without music andart of anykind. See if it is evenpossible. See if
you want to be part of a future without new expressions in these
areas.
Yes, I understandyouhave toughdecisions tomake, but shame
on any of you who vote to diminish or eliminate art and music in
our schools. I am sure someone will say I don’t understand how
hardthese decisions are. I do. Others will saybecause I happento
have two children and one daughter-in -aw who teach music in
three different school districts that I have a personal agenda.
Maybe I do. But that agenda is my 4-year-old granddaughter,
who is now in pre-school and loves to sing and make crafts to
express herself as well as learn all she can every day she is in
school . Howdo I look her in the eye and tell her that those things
will be missing in her public school education? How?
Marlene Chamberlain
Asks where we would be without art and music
OUROPINION
YOUROPINION
To all AFSCME and Pa retirees:
You all worked years to enjoy your retirement, the so-called
“Golden Years.” You paid your taxes, income, property, Social
Security, Medicare and into your retirement fund.
Your Congress, state, county elected officials are planning to
take it away. Now what are you going to do to protect it? You
can’t sit under the apple tree, eating and drinking and you can’t
expect your union officials to do all of the work. You must get
involved and do the walk with themand not only the talk and we
will be much stronger in numbers.
Urges AFSCME members to attend June 21 meeting
See AFSCME, Page 15
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You read and heard that Con-
gress wants to privatize Social
Security and healthcare, give tax
breaks to the one percent, allow
big corporations not to pay their
taxes andgive subsidies tobigoil
companies at taxpayers’ ex-
pense.
What is happening in your
state and your communities?
Let’s talk about your property
taxes.
They are constantly increas-
ing, as if your medical insur-
ances, cost of living but your in-
come is status quo.
You haven’t had a COLA in-
crease since 2001. Your elected
officials gave themselves a hefty
raise at midnight in 2005. We all
voted for casino gambling with
revenues to be used for property
tax relief.
What did you receive?
Pittance.
Theyliedtoyouandthe gover-
nor and state representatives
passed out the money for various
pet projects in their districts.
How many of you own homes
- young and old, especially reti-
rees who live on a limited in-
come.
Find it hard to pay your prop-
erty taxes?
We had HR 1275 to reduce
property taxes but they did noth-
ing with it.
We have HB1776 that was in-
troduced with over 60 co spon-
sors — Republicans and Demo-
crats. In your area, you have Sen-
ator Yudichak, Reps. Toohill,
Boback, Mullery as co sponsors.
I have sent letters to these offi-
cials asking them to support HR
1776. I haven’t heard from Sen.
Gordner, Baker, Blake, Rep. Ka-
vulich, Carrroll, Pashinski and
Mundy.
Phyllis Mundy pointed out
that a division between and the
political parties, “I have never
seen polarization of America the
same way as I do today.”
She called for the middle class
to (wake up) and protect their
own interest if they fail to do so.
We are headed for calamity.
Retirees, get involved.
Support your organization and
attend meetings. If you don’t,
you stand a good chance of los-
ing your home and benefits.
Contact your elected state offi-
cials on HR1776, SB1400 do it
today.
See you at 1p.m. on June 21at
Norm’s Pizza, 275 N Sherman
St. Wilkes-Barre.
Charles Urban
President AFSCME Sub
Chapter 8702
AFSCME
Continued from Page 14
YOUR OPI NI ON
I just wanted to take a minute
to correct some major errors in
Superintendent Cosgrove’s ad-
dress to the graduates of Pittston
Area on Friday Night.
The first error came as he
spoke to the students and re-
ferred to this very day as June
6th, D-Day.
June 6th is indeed D-Day,
however, the date of graduation
was June 8th.
The second error came when
he referred to Dr. Benjamin Car-
ter as a great neuro-surgeon at
Johns Hopkins University Hos-
pital.
The distinguished surgeon
that he was talking about is Dr.
Ben CARSON.
Dr. Carson is a dynamic per-
son who is not only brilliant but
also gives back to the communi-
ty.
Yes, it is true that his mother
made him and his brother do a
book report a week, but his
mother could not read at all. Dr.
Carson and his brother were not
aware of that until they were ol-
der.
I have personally heard those
words from his mouth.
Mr. Cosgrove said she could
barely understand what they
wrote.
My purpose for this letter is to
express how shocked I was that
the instructional leader of Pitt-
ston Area would make such glar-
ing mistakes. I am a school ad-
ministrator in Maryland at an
elementary school and was em-
barrassed that he would not take
the time to research his content
for the speech and present the in-
formation correctly.
I am proud to be a graduate of
Pittston Area and was surprised
at how easily the words to the
school song came back to me.
I have come a long way from
my roots in Avoca and still return
to the area with pleasure and
gratitude.
Please let your readers know
that Dr. Ben Carson is the neuro-
surgeon at Johns Hopkins and
not Benjamin Carter.
Sincerely,
Kathy Oliver Jones
Pittston Area’77
Geneva College ’81 BSEd
Loyola University in
Maryland ’05 MEd
P.S. The s belongs at the end of
Johns. I made that mistake when
I moved here until I was in-
formed that the man’s name was
actually Johns!
Sets record straight regarding graduation speech
We wish to extend our heart-
felt gratitude to all of our family,
friends and neighbors whose
thoughtfulness during our diffi-
cult time touched our hearts and
helped in so many ways.
We are especially thankful for
everyone’s generosity and char-
itable offerings, making this
tragedy easier for us to get
through.
We would like to thank and
recognize the expertise and
quick response by local fire-
fighters, EMS and the American
Red Cross.
We also want to thank Father
Joseph Verespy of Sacred Heart
of Jesus Church, Dupont, parish-
ioners and numerous organiza-
tions for their help and support
during this difficult time.
Aspecial thanks toKane Man-
agement and employees for their
support generosity and under-
standing. Thank you and God
bless you.
Mark Wasta, Tammy
Carvin and Mark Jr.
Appreciates thoughtfulness during difficult time
Our family and friends have
been quite fortunate to share the
heartfelt legacy of our dear, be-
loved Dad, Samuel Goldstein, a
businessman, mentor and our
‘Papa.’
Samuel provided a lifetime of
inspiration to all who knew him,
not to mention his eternal bond
with his Lillian, an amazing wife
and mother.
His love and devotion for his
family always was his first prior-
ity. He possessed timeless
strength and incredible drive.
Samuel was an outstanding
role model, displaying his ex-
traordinary attitude at all times
along with keen insight and a
strong sense of character.
Whether you knewmy father a
short time or all of his life, you
could not help but love him. He
was so kind.
My father and mother, wed in
1940, raised four children, ten
well-educated and hard-working
grandchildren; and 13 precious
great-grandchildren.
My folks
shared success-
es and failures.
They worked
long hours but
still took the
time to travel
and enjoy life.
Dad, you are
the best. Thank you for inspiring
your blessed family to follow
their dreams. Youhave taught me
the value of hard work and you
have made an indelible mark on
the lives of those with whomyou
came in contact.
It’s been 19 years but I want
you to know that Lillian finds
comfort, joy and courage from
our faith, which you passed on to
us. We are truly blessed with this
woman of valor, honor and sin-
cerity.
Finally, Dad, I miss you more
than words can say. I think of you
often.
Thank you.
Happy Father’s Day.
Debra Goldstein
A loving daughter remembers
her dad on Father’s Day
Samuel
I wish I had my father to say
hello to,
I wish I had my father to say I
love you,
It has been a long time since I
could say this,
It has been a long time since I
could give him a kiss
My father was the very best
dad he could be,
He was always there and did so
much for me.
So on this Father’s Day, just re-
member this,
Tell himthat you love himand
give him a hug and kiss,
For when he is not longer with
you,
You will miss him ever day
through and through,
You will miss the fun times
and the sad times too.
You will miss – oh how he
loved you,
He is looking down on you
each and every day
Saying I hope you know I
loved you in my special way.
Love and God bless
Beryle Stover
Pittston
Dad
The members of the Hughes-
town Hose Company note that
their Annual Ambulance Sub-
scription Drive is nowcoming to
an end.
This annual drive is specifical-
lydesignedtohelpwiththe oper-
ating expenses associated with
the borough’s ambulance ser-
vice.
The drive assists with the pur-
chase and maintenance of the
equipment, radios and special-
ized patient transport gear regu-
larly used with the ambulance
service.
The members maintain their
vehicle with certified and high-
ly-trained personnel and are on
call 24-hours a day, 7 days a
week, 365 days a year for all
kinds of incidents.
Each residence and business
in the borough is asked to donate
$25 to this year’s Ambulance
Subscription Drive. Your sub-
scription allows your household
Hughestown Hose
Co. ambulance
subscriptions due
See HUGHESTOWN, Page 26
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Honoring the stars and stripes
TONY CALLAIO/FOR THE SUNDAY DISPATCH
Above, The Knights of Columbus, Pittston, honor the flag on Flag Day, 2012. At left, Veteran Sam
Guarnieri, far left, along with Ron Godfrey, Ed Zielinski, John Gambino, Ernie Bulford, TomZanow-
icz, JimJones, and Joe O'Hara fromVFWPost 4909, Dupont, participate in a rifle salute. And below,
members of the Knights of Columbus, Council 372, Pittston, leads the procession to the Pittston City
Firehall to honor our country's flag. Trailing is the Honor Guard fromVFWPost 4909, Dupont.
F L AG DAY
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Question 1
When former Pitt-
ston area resident
Robert McCawley
returned to his home-
town for a visit what
did he have difficulty
finding?
1964 – 48 Years Ago
A2C Joe Makala of West Pittston
was selected Outstanding Airman of the
Month out of 5,800 airmen at Char-
lestown Air Force Base, South Carolina.
An Air Force radar operator, he was
honored for his exemplary conduct and
performance of duty for working 10,
18-hour days during the Panama Crises.
He was awarded an all-expenses-paid
fishing trip to Lake Moultrie, South
Carolina.
Martin L. Mattei, supervising princi-
pal for the Northeast School District,
announced the inaugural summer school
program for students in grades seven
through 11.
Resident students were charged a $5
refundable fee and non-resident students
$25 for a two-hour course and $40 for a
four-hour course.
The Pittston Township V.F.W. Bowling
League sponsored a trip for local base-
ball fans to attend a Phillies-Giants
baseball game at Connie Mack Stadium.
Enjoying the trip with fellow league
bowlers were Bruno Migliosi of West
Pittston, Dominick “Maverick” Nar-
done, Al Mecadon and John “Bozo”
Connors.
At this point during the ’64 season,
the hopes of Phillies fans couldn’t be
higher. And they would stay that way
most of the season. On Father’s Day,
future Hall of Famer Jim Bunning threw
a perfect game against the New York
Mets.
Come September, the 1964 Phillies
held a six and a half game lead with 12
games to play. They then lost ten straight
games (the first seven played at home)
and fell into a second place tie.
The Phillies finished in a second-
place tie in the National League with the
Cincinnati Reds, while posting a record
of 92–70. The teams finished one game
behind the NL and World Series cham-
pion St. Louis Cardinals, and just two
games ahead of fourth-place San Fran-
cisco.
The former Wyoming Valley Hotel,
also known as the Valley House, was in
the process of being demolished to make
way for area redevelopment projects.
The hotel dated well before 1900. The
Boyle Family of Pittston purchased the
hotel at the turn of the century and it
was frequented by city visitors and tour-
ing performers.
It was said that heavyweight cham-
pion Jack Johnson was once employed
as a porter there.
Operators of the hotel included Joe
Keating, Thomas Kehoe, J. Hefron
and Jim Galasso.
US Navy Seaman apprentice Joseph
Chonka, of Wyoming, and Seaman
Edward T. Carey, of Pittston, were
crewmembers aboard the guided missile
cruiser USS Little Rock.
The cruiser was set to embark on a
training exercise then set sail for the
North Atlantic.
The Little Rock began a three-year
conversion from a Cleveland-class gun
cruiser to a Galveston-class guided mis-
sile cruiser at New York Shipbuilding
Corp in 1957, in Camden, NJ.
The vessel was reconfigured to carry
48 of the long-range Talos missiles.
1974 – 38 Years Ago
The John D. Stark Post 452 Amer-
ican Legion of Greater Pittston Firing
Squad participated in the 196th Harding
Massacre anniversary program. Mem-
bers of the squad were William Rule,
detail commander; William Detato,
Paul Minnelli, William Pikonis and
Donald Carey.
The program was to take place “a
short distance north of the Harding Fire
House.”
According to a published genealogy
of Captain Stephen Harding (1723 –
1789), “Stephen moved with his family
to make a permanent settlement on the
west side of the Susquehanna River,
near ‘falling spring.’ This settlement was
named ‘Harding Settlement’ and is now
the village of Harding.
“Stephen commanded Fort Jenkins
during the Wyoming Massacre. Two of
his sons were among the first killed in
the massacre. Captain Harding, his wife
Amy and two of his sons are buried in
the Jenkins-Harding Cemetery located
at the corner of Wyoming Avenue and
Linden Street in West Pittston.”
Wyoming Area seniors were presented
awards at a special ceremony. Donald
Shemanski received the ROTC scholar-
ship as one of only 56 recipients in the
State.
Following graduation, Donald would
be commissioned as an officer in the
U.S. Army.
Deborah Anzalone and Dominick
Mazzarella received jackets from Chief
Petty Officer Thomas Conroy of the
U.S. Navy for outstanding performance
in their physical education classes. Rita
Weiss received the Betty Crocker
Homemaker of Tomorrow Award award-
ed to outstanding girls in the field of
home economics.
George Oschal was given the Daugh-
ters of the American Revolution award
for Good Citizenship and Karen Puza
received the Rensselaer Medal for high-
est average in math and science.
St. Anthony’s Parish in Exeter enlisted
the help of wives and children of men in
the parish to contribute ideas for their
Father’s Day Liturgy.
Janine Oliveri composed lyrics for a
song. Ann Marie Ferrara, Angelo and
Lisa LaNunziata, Sandra Clarke,
Karen and Joseph Serino were sched-
uled to take part in the readings for the
Mass. Helping in the arrangements were
Mrs. Michael Zaboski, David Pizano,
Sandra Clarke, Jeanne Pizano, Rev.
Enrico Giovetto, O.S.J. Regina Meshi-
ni, Gerald Zaboski, Mrs. Chester
Shimko, Sam Baldo and Rev. Law-
rence Pio, O.S.J.
Question 2
What was missing in 1984 that Du-
pont officials believed belonged to the
borough?
1984 – 28 Years Ago
Over 300 sixth graders entered the
annual Greater Pittston Jaycees Father’s
Day Essay Contest founded by Wil
Toole in honor of his late father, Ed-
ward. Out of the many entrees, 13-year-
old Adam Norwig took the top prize for
his touching essay dedicated to his
adoptive father Bill Norwig. Bill and his
wife Carol, who had adopted a Korean
girl, Tamara, two years earlier, opened
their home and hearts to Adam who was
born in Seoul, Korea.
For his prize-winning testament,
Adam received a $50 savings bond and
plaque.
In an excerpt from his essay, Adam
wrote, “This weekend dad took me on a
fishing trip with a few men from our
church and they all made me feel special
because dad tells me I am much more
than adopted. I am accepted and loved. I
am one of the family and part of each
one.”
Dominic “Rabbits” Perconte of
Wyoming was elected to a state office at
the convention of the Fraternal Order of
Eagles at Mechanicsburg. Mr. Perconte
held many positions with the Eagles and
dedicated many hours to assist in fund
drives and charitable functions held by
the club.
The Sunday Dispatch “rhyming
weather forecast” on Sunday, June 17,
1984:
A little cool,
rain on the way
just enough to
dampen Dad’s Day
1994 – 18 Years Ago
The Dispatch Student-Athlete award
winners of the year were highlighted in
the Sunday Dispatch.
Winning the top honors were Pittston
Area’s Vince O’Hop, basketball and
volleyball; Denise Insogna, Pittston
Area, track and basketball; Jim Pizano,
Wyoming Area, football and track;
Christy Dreabit, Wyoming Area, bas-
ketball and track; Erin Brennan, Seton
Catholic, basketball; and Kevin Silin-
skie, Seton Catholic, baseball and bas-
ketball. William Watson, founder of the
Dispatch, created the award in 1970.
Answer 1
Former area resident Robert McCaw-
ley traveled from Ashville, N.C. without
getting lost.
Due to new highway construction at
the Dupont exchange, he could not find
the familiar roadway to the Browntown
section.
The Sunday Dispatch asked Township
Supervisors Jim Murphy, Patsy Salvo
and Tom Fino if perhaps a large sign
stating “this way to Browntown” could
be installed.
Answer 2
Dupont Borough Officials filed pa-
pers to reclaim properties they believed
belonged to the borough. The issue,
which had been disputed since 1953,
concerned 12 homes whose owners paid
taxes to Avoca and Pittston Township.
However, the Packer Street properties
appeared to be within the Dupont Bor-
ough line.
Dear Dad, you are a very special
person to us, not only as our father, but
as a good friend. Whenever we need a
helping hand, you are always there.
Thank you, Dad, for being the Dad you
are. We love you. Happy Father’s Day.
The William Paoloni family, in an
open letter to be read at the 1974 St.
Anthony’s Parish Father’s Day Liturgical
celebration.
Shemanski gets ROTC Scholarship in ‘74
Peeking
into the past
With Judy Minsavage
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“The Best All Year”
Homemade Deli Hot Foods To Go
HOMEMADE LONZA, SOPPRESSATA, DRIED SAUSAGE, PROSCIUTTO
CENTER CUT PORK
CHOPS OR ROAST
$
2.49LB.
GROUND
SIRLOIN
$
2.79LB.
10 LB.
BAG
ITALIAN
SAUSAGE
$
3.39LB.
HOT
SWEET
GARLIC
BONELESS PORK
CHOPS OR ROAST
$
3.49LB.
COUNTRY STYLE
SPARE RIBS
$
2.39LB.
PORTERHOUSE
OR T-BONE STEAK
$
7.99LB.
$
7.99LB.
BONELESS
DELMONICO STEAK
$
8.99LB.
BONELESS
SIRLOIN STEAK
$
5.99LB.
RUMP ROAST
OR BONELESS
CHUCK ROAST
$
3.49LB.
CHICKEN
BREAST
$
2.29LB.
BONELESS
&
SKINLESS
CHICKETTA
ROAST
THE
ORIGINAL
SINCE 1978
$
3.99LB.
PORK BUTT
PORKETTA
$
2.99LB.
PORK LOIN
PORKETTA
$
3.69LB.
BABY BACK
SPARE RIBS
$
4.99LB.
LEAN BEEF
CUBES
$
3.99LB.
ROASTED CHICKETTA
ROASTED PORKETTA
ROAST BEEF
COOKED HAM
AMERICAN CHEESE
HARD SALAMI
$7.99 LB.
$6.99 LB.
$6.99 LB.
$3.99 LB.
$3.99 LB.
$4.99 LB.
BREADED FRIED CHICKEN
FRESH TOMATO PIZZA
LARGE STROMBOLI
PASTA SALAD
HOT POCKETS
OLIVE SALAD
$4.99 LB.
$14.99 TRAY
$15.99 EA.
$3.99 LB.
$6.99 EA.
$5.99 LB.
GROUND
ROUND
$
3.99LB.
$
3.99LB.
TOP ROUND
LONDON BROIL
OR STEAK
BONELESS NEW
YORK STRIP STEAK
CHICKEN BREAST
WHOLE OR SPLIT
$
1.59LB.
BONELESS/SKINLESS
CHICKEN TENDERS
$
2.59LB.
deemer
The Parish Bazaar is Fri, Sat,
Sun, June 29, 30, and July 1 at
Holy Redeemer Church
grounds.
OUR LADY OF THE
EUCHARIST PARISH
535 N Main Street, Pittston
Parish Website
www.eucharist-pittston.org.
Mass Schedule
Saturday Vigil: 4:00 p.m.
Sunday: 8:30 a.m. and 10:30
a.m. Daily Mass: 8:00 a.m.
Sacrament of Reconciliation
(Confessions)
Saturday from 3:30 p.m. to
3:45 p.m. and by appointment
Vacation Bible School
Children will be going on an
Amazing Desert Journey this
summer in VBS. Registration is
open for ages (Kindergarten –
Grade 5) who will attend VBS
from June 25 through 29, from
9:00 a.m. to noon at Our Lady of
the Eucharist, Pittston. To regis-
ter, use the form found at the
doors of the Church, call Sister
Mary Ann at 654-0263, or regis-
ter online at https://vbs.cph.org/
tools/churchIn-
fo.aspx?Church=325A949F.
Adult volunteers for VBS are
needed at many levels. Call Sis-
ter Mary Ann at 654-0263 or
register online.
Little Rock Scripture
Our Lady of the Eucharist Par-
ish Community Offering Little
Rock Scripture Study: James,
Peter, and Jude: The Catholic
Letters. Scripture Study is held
on Tuesdays and there are two
programs, one in the morning
from 8:30 a.m. until 10:00 a.m.
and one on the evening from 7
p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Both programs
will be in the Parish Hall. Father
Thomas J. Maloney directs the
program.
New Altar Servers
An instruction class for new
altar servers is now being
formed. All young people, grade
2 and up are eligible to be altar
servers. If you are interested in
this Liturgical ministry, please
let Father Tom, Sister Mary Ann
or Mrs. Bartnikowski know.
Ministry Schedule
The schedule for April – Au-
gust has been posted on the par-
ish website at www.eucharist-
pittston.org.
Priesthood Ordination
On Saturday, June 30, at 10:00
a.m. in Saint Peter’s Cathedral,
Scranton, Most ReverendJoseph
C. Bambera, D.D., J.C.L., Bish-
op of Scranton, will ordain the
following men to the Order of
the Priesthood: Rev. Mr. Alex
Roche and Rev. Mr. Jeffrey D.
Tudgay.
All of the faithful in the Dio-
cese of Scranton are invited to
participate in this solemn Mass.
Pilgrimage to Washington
On Saturday, Sept. 15, The
Most Reverend Bishop Joseph
C. Bambera, D.D., J.C.L. Bishop
of Scranton will lead his first pil-
grimage as Diocesan Bishop to
the Basilica of the National
Shrine of the Immaculate Con-
ception, Washington, DC. The
day will include opportunities
for public as well as private
prayer, confession, touring the
National Shrine as well as the
Campus of The Catholic Univer-
sity of America concluding with
Mass. Bus fare: $40.00 per per-
son made payable to Our Lady of
the Eucharist with buses leaving
from either our parish or our
deanery.
To assure bus transportation it
is requested by the bus company
to hold strictly to a deadline of
July10 for reservations. To make
your reservation please contact
the parish office at 654-0263.
Facebook
Checkout the parishFacebook
page for all the latest informa-
tion. The address iswww.face-
book.com/OLEPARISH.
Sick and Elderly
On the first Friday of each
month Communion is brought to
those who are unable to partici-
pate in Sunday Mass because of
age or health. The Sacrament of
the Anointing of the Sick is cele-
brated with anyone seriously ill,
anticipating a serious operation,
or quite elderly.
PRINCE OF PEACE PARISH
Old Forge
St. Mary’s Church, Lawrence
Street, Saturday Vigil 4 p.m.
Sunday, Mass 8 and 10 a.m.
St. Lawrence Church, Main
Street, Saturday Vigil 5:30 p.m.
Sunday Mass 11:15 a.m.
SACRED HEART OF JESUS
Lackawanna Ave., Dupont
This week’s mass schedule is
Monday through Friday at 7
a.m., Saturday at 7:30 a.m. and 4
p.m. and Sunday at 8:30 a.m. and
10:30 a.m.
The Rosary will be prayed be-
fore the first mass each day dur-
ing June.
Members of the Holy Name
Society will receive Communi-
on as a group at the 8:30AM
mass today.
The annual parish picnic will
be held on August 2, 3 and 4 on
the parish grounds. Donations of
non-perishable food items and
paper goods are beingsought (no
super-size items). Containers
have been placed in the church
lobby. You may also leave them
on the back porch of the rectory.
Please label them "Food Buck-
ets". Deadline for donations is
July 8.
Donations are also being
sought for the stands such as
dolls, household items, games
and toys, etc. Be sure that the
items are new. You can also do-
nate a themed basket or items/
monetary donations for a theme
basket. There is no limit to your
design. If you have any ques-
tions, contact Ann Marie Pad-
dock, 654-0897or the rectoryof-
fice, 654-3713. Items may be left
on the rear porch of the rectory.
Kitchen help is needed during
the picnic from 4 p.m. to mid-
night. Duties include heating
prepared food and washing pots
and pans as they are returned
from the grounds to the kitchen.
You can volunteer for one, two or
three nights. Please call the rec-
tory, 654-3713 to volunteer.
ST. BARBARA PARISH
28 Memorial Avenue, Exeter
Office Hours: Monday – Fri-
day 9:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.
Evenings, by appointment.
Phone: 654-2103
The Feast of St. John the Bap-
tist will be celebrated on Sunday,
June 24. Masses will be held at
7:30 a.m., 9:00 a.m., 10:30 a.m.
and7:00p.m. Anyone wishingto
make a donation for the flowers
can either send it to the office or
drop it in the collection basket.
First Communion pictures and
DVDs are in. Call Denise to ar-
range for pick up.
The Golden Age Club will
meet on Thursday, June 14, at
1:30 p.m. at the Parish Center.
Hostesses are: Susan Begliomi-
ni, Carol Burns and Veronica
Spliethoff.
FathRite of Christian Initia-
tion of Adults - commonly
known as the RCIA - will be
starting up classes again in the
fall for those who may be inter-
ested in exploring more deeply
the Catholic Faith. If you may be
interested contact the parish of-
fice at 654-2103. St. Barbara and
St. Monica Parishes will be
working on this together and any
one who is seeking a deeper un-
derstanding of the Catholic Faith
is most welcome to attend. There
is no big commitment - just a
time to learn, inquire and ask
questions.
Bazaar News
The summer picnic is July 20,
21 and 22
Volunteers are needed for set-
up and clean-up, kitchen, grill,
food service, and grounds.
Please consider giving a few
hours of help. It is a good time
for families to volunteer togeth-
er. It is also an opportunity for
high school students to get com-
Faith
Continued from Page 13
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80 North Mountain Boulevard • Mountain Top, PA
570-474-5421
80 N th M 80 N th M
Open 7 Days
AWeek
9am-5pm
& By Appointment
CATS
ARE
W
ELCO
M
E
Many Products, Services &
Spa Packages Available...
We Ensure Your Pet Enjoys
The Best Spa Experience Possible!
Where Your Pet Is One Of The Family
Auntie Liz’s
Diamonds in the Ruff
Free Assesment
570-270-6700
facebook.com/earthandwearsstore
Jewelry • Pottery • Handbags
Handbound Journals • Accessories
Original Art • Unique One-of-a-Kind Gifts
Shop Local • Buy Handmade
M-T-W-Fri 10-5:30
Th 10-7 and Sat 10-5
570• 690• 6399
68 Main St. • Dallas
facebook.com/earthandwearsstore
Happy Father’s Day to my Daddy,
Dr. Daniel J. Saporito
- fromDaniel
421 Market Street • Kingston, PA
570-283-0220
172 N. Memorial Hwy • Shavertown, PA
570-675-3717
220 South River Street • Plains, PA
570-235-1283
munity service hours. Sign-ups
will be after Mass in the next few
weeks.
Flea Market: Time to start
cleaningout your basement, attic
and garage.
All those treasures you no
longer need can be donated to
our huge indoor flea market.
Items can be dropped off at the
parish center Friday Thru Tues-
day after noon. Drop-off is at the
side door by Pride. Please do not
leave anything in front of the
door.
Items NOT accepted are
clothes, shoes, textbooks, ency-
clopedias, or electronics that do
not work.
This year we are continuing
with the basket raffle and look
forward to your creativity and
basket theme ideas.
If you have any questions
please contact Karen Bernardi
655-6329 or Cynthia Liberski
693-2349.
Anyone interested in sponsor-
ing a band for one night? If so,
call Ray @655-6329.
Items are needed for this raf-
fle. Donations couldinclude new
and boxed: iPod, notepad, Kindle
or Nook.
Anything pertaining to elec-
tronics or entertainment will do.
Call Barbara at 654-0645 for de-
tails.
The committee still in need of:
napkins, paper towels, alumi-
numfoil (especially heavy duty),
ziploc sandwich bags, paper,
plastic or foam plates (6˝ and 9˝),
foam or plastic bowls, plastic
utensils (especially forks), 9 or
10 oz. foam cups, dishwashing
liquid, Brillo pads or scrubbers,
and disinfectant (for kitchen
cleanup).
Donation boxes are located in
both churches.
The Christian Women’s Orga-
nization is sponsoring an Italian
Basket for the Bazaar.
Anyone wishing to donate
items for the basket can drop
themoff at the rectory between 9
a.m. and 2 p.m. Monday through
Friday.
The last day for donations will
be Thursday, July 12.
ST. JOHN THE
EVANGELIST PARISH
COMMUNITY
35 William Street
Phone: 654-0053
Pittston
June17 – 6:30 Knitting Minis-
try
June 18 – 7 p.m. Health clinic
Board meeting,
June 19 – 7 p.m. Bereavement
Group meeting
Vacation Bible School will be-
gin on Monday June 25 and con-
tinue to June 29.
The next Baptismal Instruc-
tion will begin 7:30 to 8:30 p.m.
August 7 in the parish center.
Bereavement Support Group
will be every Tuesday evening in
the parish center dining room
from7 to 8:30 p.m. until June 26.
For more information call the
parish office at 654-0053.
The annual parish bazaar will
be held on August 9 to 11.
The Greater Pittston Food
Pantry is sponsored by the Care
and Concern Committee of St.
John the Evangelist Parish.
Anyone in need of food is
asked to call 654-9923. Distribu-
tion of food is by appointment
only.
The Free Health Clinic is open
at 5:30 p.m. every Wednesday in
the former Seton Catholic High
School, first come first serve.
Greater Pittston Kids Closet
celebrating its third anniversary
provides new and gently used
clothing.
Hours are Wednesday from 9
to 11:30 a.m. and 5 to 7 p.m.
The Closet aalways ccepts do-
nations of new and gently used
clothing.
ST JOHN’S LUTHERAN
7 Wood St., Pittston
Pastor John Castellani
Organist Marcia Colleran
Lay Reader Nancy Castella-
niAcolyte Shelby Rinaldi
Greeter Doris Mersincavage
Ushers John Peterson Sr and
John Peterson Jr
Vacation Bible School will be
on August 6 to 10. This year
theme is Sky... where every thing
is possible with GOD.
Volunteers are needed. Please
leave a message for Marcia Col-
leran.
Marcia is also looking for
someone who has extra rhubarb.
GLS is a year round fund rais-
er. Leave a message for Tracy if
you have any questions or want
to get involved.
Acolyte for June 24 Justin La-
zanowicz
Members and guests are wel-
come to worship and perhaps to
join this church family.
If you have any questions,
comments or suggestions please
call 655-2505; e-mail address
isstjohnspittston@verizon.com
ST. JOHN’S P.M. CHURCH
316 Main St., Avoca
Pastor Rich Rock
570-457-8281
Sunday Worship 10:00 a.m.
Holy Communion the first
Sunday of every month
Bible Study every Wednesday
6:00-7:30 p.m.
ST. MARIA GORETTI
Laflin Road, Laflin, PA. 18702
42redwood@comcast.net
www.stmariagoretti-laflin.org
Parish Festival July 27-29
The “Fill-A-Buckets” will be
available in the foyer of the
Faith
Continued from Page 18
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Tis Week’s Dining Guide Feature:
MAY
DINING GUIDE
WINNER
MRS. CAROLE GRAFF
of Duryea
To Advertise In Te Dining Guide Call:
Karen Fiscus • 829-7291 Steve Morris • 829-7290
ENTER TOWIN
THIS MONTH’S
GIFT CERTIFICATE:
Fill out and deliver
or mail entry to:
Te Sunday Dispatch
Dining Guide
109 New Street
Pittston, PA 18640
Name:____________________
Address:___________________
__________________________
City:______________________
State:______________________
Zip:_______________________
Phone:____________________
• BOBBY O’S
FAMILY RESTAURANT
• BROOKSIDE
EATERY AND PUB
• CASTLE INN
• COOPER’S WATERFRONT
• DENTE’S CATERING
• ERNIE G’S
• FIRE & ICE
• IPANEMA GRILLE
• NARDONE’S RESTAURANT
• SAVO’S PIZZA & RESTAURANT
Look On Te Following Pages For
Tese Advertiser’s Weekly Ads
To All Our Wonderful Friends And Clients
For All Your Well Wishes In Celebrating
Our 50th Anniversary In Business And Marriage
Dente’s Catering
& Dente’s Tent and Rental Co.
Elegance Without Extravagance
655-0801 • www.dentescatering.com
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SUNDAY
DISPATCH
in the Pittston Commons, Pittston By-Pass, Pittston
& Family Restaurant
Since
1964
655-0001
OPEN WEEKDAYS 11 TO 9;
FRI. & SAT. 11 TO 10;
SUN. 12-8
NEW MENU ITEMS
COUPON SPECIAL
When you buy 12 cuts at the regular price. Price
does not include sales tax. Cannot be used with
other specials. Good for our Red Pizza only.
EXPIRES 6/30/12
12 CUTS OF PIZZA
ONLY
$
4.99
DELIVERY, PICK-UP OR EAT-IN COUPON
• Buffalo Bites • Garlic Parm Wings
• Cheesesteak Pizza • Cobb Salad
MONEY SAVING SPECIALS
7 DAYS A WEEK
All First Responders
And Service Connected
Personnel In Uniform
Will Receive A
15
%
Discount
Cannot be used with other specials or discounts
Eat-In Only
www.savospizza.com
SUN., MON., TUES.
7 A.M.-3 P.M.
WED., THUR., FRI., SAT.
7 A.M.-8 P.M.
509 Exeter Ave., West Pittston
“The Best Breakfast Around”
• Overstuffed Omelets • Huge Frittatas
• Fluffy Buttermilk Pancakes • Hand Dipped FrenchToast
Voted “Best Value”...”Most Affordable”... and Favorite Restaurant” by our loyal customers
Serving Affordable Home-Cooked Meals • Eat-In or Take-Out
Call For Our Daily Specials, 654-2536
Check Out Our Breakfast Specials:
• Mon. - Fri. only
$
3.99 incl. FREE COFFEE
• Sat. & Sun. Reg. FREE COFFEE with breakfast special
1022 Main St.
Avoca, PA 18641
570-457-1600
Tuesday — 40¢ Rhode Island Clams
Eat in only (Sold in Quantities of 10)
5-10 PM HOT DOGS $1.00 • 6-8PM 12oz. Coors Light $1.00
Wednesday — 40¢ Wings Eat in only (Sold in Quantities of 10)
Monday — 5-10 PM Build a Burger $3.00
6-8PM 12oz. Miller Lite Drafts $1.00
JUNE ENTERTAINMENT
Friday, June 22nd - DJ Omar - 8pm
Friday, June 29th - Dave Williams - 8pm
CALL FOR DAILY LUNCH SPECIALS
AFFORDABLE FAMILY RESTAURANT
View Our Full Menu At: menusnepa.com/bobbyos1.html
HANDICAPPED ACCESSIBLE
Tues.-Thurs. 11 to 9 • Fri. & Sat. 11 to 10 • Closed Sun. & Mon.
Dine In • Take Out • Delivery 654-2200 Fax: 654-2265
300 MAIN ST., DUPONT
WE DELIVER
654-2200
(Formerly Kalmanowicz Corner Store)
VOTED BEST
CHEESESTEAK
2009-2012!
VOTED BEST
HAMBURGER
2011!
HOMEMADE FRIED CHICKEN
SICILIAN STYLE WHITE PIZZA $9.95
SICILIAN STYLE PIZZA $7.95
Includes Soup or Salad, Vegetable and Potato
4 PIECES $7.95
8 PIECES $11.95
12 PIECES $15.95
12 CUTS
12 CUTS
$
9.95
KNOWWHYSTEAKAND LOBSTER
DINNERS COST FIFTYBUCKS?
NEITHER DOWE.
$
29.99
COOPER’S STEAKAND
LOBSTER PLATTER
SERVED WITH CHOICE OF POTATO,
VEGETABLE & FRESH BAKED BREAD
WATERFRONT
304 KENNEDYBLVD.
PITTSTON • 654-6883
OUTDOOR CABANA
Open Daily
WHILE
SUPPLIES
LAST
6 oz. COLD WATER LOBSTER TAIL
AND 6 oz. FILET MIGNON
Ask About Our
Catering Menu For
GRADUATION
Or Any Occasion!
PRIME RIB OF BEEF $9.95
JUNE SPECIALS
Includes
Fries &
Cole Slaw
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www.CareGiversAmerica.com• info@caregiversamerica.com
Call 570-674-8500
We bill Medicare and
most Major Insurances
FREE DELIVERY
THE ULTIMATE IN
STYLE AND COMFORT
Your dad took great
care of you.
Return the favor...
Give Dad’s
Spirits A Lift!
2101 Memorial Hwy • Dallas, PA18612
7
4
1
0
9
5
SUNDAY
DISPATCH
www.omarscastleinn.net • 675-0804
Murder Mystery
June 24 & July 8
Audience Participation
VOTED #1 SHOW IN
LUZERNE COUNTY
Enjoy a cozy
dinner in front
of our
2 freplaces
SUNDAY
BRUNCH
$10.95
over 24
Homemade Items
Located at the
Thornhurst Country Club
143 Country Club Estates
Thornhurst, PA 18424
(570) 991-9040
OPEN WED THRU MON 11AM ‘TIL CLOSE
Pub Fare - Cocktails & Cold Beer
Nightly Dinner Specials • Available for Take-Out
Wed. Boneless Buffalo Chicken Wings
1/2 lb. Wings & Frosted Draft Mug of your choice.................$4.95
Thurs. “Bud Light Clam Night” 5-7 pm
1 1/2 doz. Clams & 1 Pint Bud Light......................................$4.95
Follow us on Facebook: thebrooksideeatery&pub
Biagio A. Dente, CEC,AAC, HOF
Blaise Alan Dente, CCC, HAAC
655-0801 • www.dentescatering.com
DENTE’S CATERING
TABLE TALK
Dente’s Tent and Rental Co.
It’s grilling time! Choose a different sweet
and savory side that will go great with
whatever you choose to grill. SWEET POTATO
FRIES. It is an easy preparation...simply cut
a sweet potato into strips to form the fries
and add your favorite seasonings. They will
be a nice compliment for any main dish-from
hamburgers and BBQ Chicken to pork chops,
fish, or steak.
Summer Help Needed
Various Positions Available
Please Call 655-0801
JOIN US FOR THE BROOKSIDE GOLF TOURNAMENT JUNE 24TH
SHOTGUN START, 11AM • GREENS FEES • LUNCH BUFFET • PRIZES
$30 per person - Call 991-9040 for details
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Eyewear performs better when made
by an expert – Thomas Engle
Mon-Thurs
10:45-7:00
Friday 10:45-5:00
Sat. 10:45-3:00
Plaza 315 • Wilkes-Barre (Across from the Woodlands)
208-1111
www.engleeyewear.com
Eye Examinations • Prescriptions Filled • Insurances Accepted
Contacts • Eyewear Handcrafted On-Site
y p
OUTDOOR
FURNITURE
& LANDSCAPE
ACCESSORIES
693-2586
Motorcycle
Swings,
Gliders,
Picnic Tables
Lighthouse
260 Wyoming Ave.,
Wyoming, PA
7
5
8
5
8
3
Churchbeginningnext weekend.
These baskets are only for use at
the “Fill-A-Bucket” Stand.
The assembled buckets are to
be returned no later than July 21.
If anyone would like to spon-
sor a band, please contact the
Parish Office at 655-8956. The
bands for the Festival this year
are Groove Train, Mason Dixon
and Jeanne Zano Band.
The committee is also looking
for soda donations: Pepsi, Diet
Pepsi, Caffeine-Free Pepsi,Caf-
feine-Free Diet Pepsi, Coke,
Diet Coke, Caffeine-Free Coke,
Caffeine-Free Diet Coke, Sprite,
Diet Sprite and Brisk Ice Tea.
Only brand-name sodas. You
may leave your donations in the
foyer of the Church.
The Banquet Hall is available,
655-8956.
Vacation Bible Camp
Vacation Bible Camp at St.
Maria Goretti Parish will be held
fromJuly 9 through July13 from
9:30 a.m. to noon. The theme for
this year’s camp is “The Olym-
pics”. The camp is open to chil-
dren grades K thru 5.
Pro-Life Center Booth
Volunteers are needed to sup-
port the Wilkes-Barre Pro-Life
Center at the Farmer’s Market
which is held on the square in
Wilkes-Barre from 10 a.m. – 3
p.m. every Thursday beginning
July 5.They need young adults to
assist the booth.
There will be a table contain-
ing pro-life materials such as
pamphlets, bumper stickers, fe-
tal models, etc. Passersby will be
encouraged to consider the in-
formation available and to take
what they want. An explanation
of the pro-life mission will be of-
fered to anyone interested. To
volunteer, please call Betty Caf-
frey at 826-1819.
Borough-wide garage sale
The Laflin Borough will hold
a borough-wide garage sale on
Saturday, June 23. All residents
are invited to participate.
ST. MARY’S POLISH
NATIONAL CATHOLIC
CHURCH
200 Stephenson St. Duryea
Rev. Fr. Carmen G. Bolock,
Pastor Phone: 457-2291
Email: padre@saintma-
ryspncc.org
Website: saintmaryspncc.org
Holy Mass: Sunday 9:30 a.m.
Weekdays: 8 a.m.
Holy Days: 8 a.m. & 7 p.m.
ST. MONICA’S CHURCH
363 West 8th Street, West
Wyoming, PA 18644
Office Hours - 9:00 a.m. to
4:30 p.m., Mon. – Fri.
Phone: 570-693-1991
Email: olos363@verizon.net
www.stmonicanepa.com.
Father Leo McKernan, Pastor
Mr. William Jenkins, Deacon
Mass Schedule
Saturday Vigil: 4:00 p.m.
OLOS
Sunday: 8:30 a.m. STJ; 11:00
a.m. OLOS
Daily Mass at OLOS – During
Summer Months. Mon-Tues-
Wed.-Fri: 7:00 a.m. (Please note:
no Thurs. p.m. Mass)
No Bible Study During Sum-
mer
First Friday Mass – 7:00 p.m.
followed by Eucharistic Adora-
tion until Midnight.
June Schedule:
June18, 7p.m., ParishPastoral
Council Meeting in Church Hall
June 19, 3 p.m. Cemetery
Committee Meeting in Hall
June 19, 7 p.m. Extraordinary
Ministers of Communion Eve-
ning of Reflection in Hall
June 21to July 4: Fortnight for
Freedom – a 14-day period of
prayer, education and action in
support of religious freedom.
The Bishop has requested this
voluntary period of prayer.
Beginning on Tuesday, June
26 and continuing for ten weeks
concluding on August 28 St.
Monica’s Parish and St. Barba-
ra’s Parish will host a series of
ten presentations on Catholi-
cism. St. Monica’s will be at
10:30 a.m. and St. Barbara’s will
be at 7 p.m.
For more information call St.
M’s at 693-1991or St. B’s at 654-
2103.
You can email: olos363@veri-
zon.net or stanthonyexe-
ter@comcast.net.
New Altar Servers:
Any one (from 3rd grade thru
high school – (boys and girls) in-
terested in serving in this role,
call the Parish Office at 693-
1991.
You may only serve once or
twice a month and it gives you an
opportunity to work with the ol-
der servers.
Lectors: the Parish is always in
need of new Lectors (Readers of
the Sacred Word.) If you are in-
terested, call Father McKernanat
693-1991.
If you feel you are called to
serve as Acolyte, Lector or Eu-
charistic Minister, please call Fa-
ther McKernan.
Music Ministry – as our choirs
and orchestra grow, they are in
need of music stands.
If you have one you no longer
use, please consider donating it
to the music ministry.
Contact the Parish Office at
693-1991. Pick-up can be ar-
ranged if needed.
ST. PETER’S EVANGELICAL
LUTHERAN CHURCH
100 Rock Street, Hughestown
Stpeters_elc@yahoo.com
654-1009
Summer Schedule
Worship Service Sunday 9
a.m.
Strawberry social will be held
June 30. Tickets are Adults $5,
children $3 that includes short-
cake and beverage.
Also available will be wim-
pies, hot dogs, variety of salads
and bake beans. Take-outs as
well 3 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. Serving
3:30 to 7 p.m.
Vacation Bible School is July
15-19, from 6 to 8:30 p.m. Clos-
ing exercise is July 20 at 7 p.m.
All are welcome ages 3 years
upto andincluding 6th grade.
Call Leslie at 762-1737 to reg-
ister.
QUEEN OF THE APOSTLES
PARISH
715 Hawthorne St.
(570) 457-3412
stmarysavoca@verizon.net
www.stmaryavoca.4lpi.com
Daily Masses: 8 a.m.
(Wednesday at 7 p.m.)
Eucharistic Adoration: Tues-
days from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m.
Miraculous Medal Novena:
Wednesday following the 7 p.m.
Mass
Weekends Masses: Saturday
at 4 p.m.; Sunday at 8, 9:30 and
11 a.m.
Confession: Saturdays 3-3:45
p.m.; anytime upon request by
Faith
Continued fromPage 19
See FAITH, Page 26
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PENN-LEE FOOTWEAR
(THE OLD FASHIONED SHOE STORE)
Open Mon. to Fri. 9-8 • Sat 9-5 • Sunday 12-5
161-163 E. Main St. (Miners-Mills Section) of Wilkes-Barre
Phone 825-5346
MENS DOCKSIDES
“OTHER STYLES
AVAILABLE”
B72757
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Attorney
John J. Terrana
400 Tird Avenue, Kingston
283.2990
My Father Wasn’t ALawyer
I didn’t come from a family of lawyers
or doctors. I came from a family of hard
workers, as anyone who knew my parents
can attest.
My parents met in the Wilkes-Barre dress
factory where they both worked. My father
was a dress cutter, and my mother was a
seamstress. Their hard work allowed me to
be the first member of my very large family
to earn a college degree.
I learned my work ethic watching my par-
ents work hard to raise their four children.
They both worked at manual labor jobs well
into their seventies. Retirement was never
an option. I’ll work just as hard for you.
My parents gave me the tools I needed
to work hard, study hard, and open my
own law practice that I started on the day I
graduated from law school.
I’ve been representing seriously injured
clients for 30 years. Call me today for a
free consultation.
You’ll not only be a client, you’ll be a
friend.
the family ever since – four gen-
erations now.
“She was born into it,” he said.
“My father did it and his father
before himdid it. For Jenn, it was
just a natural fit.”
On a job painting lines on
streets, Ben drives the truck and
Jennifer operates the airless
painter on the back of the rig.
Besides running the back of
the paint truck, Jennifer’s role
has expanded as she got older.
Some of her current duties in-
clude taking the lead in present-
ing work bids and making esti-
mates, keeping track of supplies,
doing paperwork and computer
work, talking with customers
and working on the company’s
drug testing and safety policies.
“I do it all,” she said. “It’s my
career now.”
Jennifer is a 2008 graduate of
Wyoming Area and recently re-
ceived a degree from Penn State
in administration of justice.
“I’m very proud of her,” her
dad said. “She can do anything
she wants. She could have gone
into the state police academy, but
she stayed here and stayed in the
family business.”
For Jennifer, going to work in
the morning is a pleasure.
“It’s not really work to me,”
she said. “It’s just hanging out
with me dad.”
Dad and daughter will paint
everything, including traffic
lines and markings, basketball
courts, tennis courts, signs,
poles, guard rails, bollards.
Yellow and white traffic paint
are their primary colors, but they
work in a rainbow of other hues.
“We’ll paint the Penn State
Nittany Lion on your tennis
court if that’s what you want,”
she said. “We can do any color.”
The Gadomskis seemtohave a
colorful future. Solid lines. Solid
business. Solid family. Blood,
thicker than paint.
TONY CALLAIO/FOR THE SUNDAY DISPATCH
Jennifer Ga-
domski care-
fully watches
her mark
while in con-
stant contact
with her fa-
ther on the
two-way ra-
dio.
Ben Gadomski has a steady hand while following his marks on
the road. It's critical to maintain accuracy while striping lines of
roadways all over the northeast.
Line
Continued fromPage 3
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Allison is a native of Somer-
set, in Western Pennsylvania, but
said she fully embraced moving
to Greater Pittston to raise her
family and practice law. “I was
aware of the Schillaci roots and
there was no way I’d stand in the
way of Rocco returning here,”
she said. “I found it a privilege to
be part of this family.”
The Schillaci roots in local
business go back to the late Roc-
co Schillaci
who operated
the dress facto-
ry Laura Fash-
ions on Main
Street, Avoca,
in a building
that was a for-
mer movie the-
atre. That busi-
ness thrived
from the 1950s
through the
‘80s, contin-
uing even after
Rocco’s un-
timely death. “I
still encounter
people who
worked for my grandfather and
tell me how much they cared for
him,” Rocco said.
A few years ago, Rocco’s dad,
Joseph Schillaci, moved his uni-
form, sportswear, promotional
products company, G.C. Sweats,
from its original locations in
Dickson City and Wyoming to
Avoca’s Main Street, near the
original locationof Laura’s Fash-
ions. Rocco and Allison have
since purchased the building
which still houses G.C. Sweats, a
day care center, and now their
law practice.
Rocco Schillaci said his plans
were always to open a small law
practice with Allison. “Along
with family values, I inherited an
entrepreneurial spirit from my
dad and grandfather,” he said.
“From the time I was little I
heard their horror stories and
their success stories and I think I
always knew I wanted to be on
my own.”
On his own, of course, in-
cludes Allison. “I saw my mom
and dad working together for
what seemed like forever,” Roc-
co said, “and I knew Allison and
I could do this.”
All duties at the office are
shared, the Schillacis said, “but
not at home,” they added simul-
taneously with a laugh.
Rocco said at any given time,
Allison might be the receptionist
and office manager while he is
seeing a client and at another
time, it couldbe vice-versa. “The
fact that we like each other
helps,” Rocco said, adding that
his father always told him if you
are planning to marry someone
“make sure you like her.”
The two ensured their liking
each other when they spent a se-
mester of law school studying in
Florence, Italy.
Rocco, who specializes in
worker’s compensation, Social
Security, disability and personal
injury, said it’s impossible to
keep work from coming home
with them, but neither minds.
“We’re trying to be conscien-
tious, to do the right thing, so
we’re always thinking about our
clients, talking about our cli-
ents,” Rocco said.
At the same time, it isn’t un-
usual for baby Maria to spend an
occasional hour at the office if
the situation warrants.
Allison specializes in family
law, real estate and municipal
law.
“We have the same philosophy
about the practice,” Rocco said.
“Our goal is toget the client from
Point Ato Point B. Amajority of
clients are scared. They just want
us to take the problemaway from
them. And that’s what we do.”
Both said they pride them-
selves on returning phone calls.
“And on being nice people,”
Rocco said. “We talk to people.
It doesn’t cost us anything to talk
to people. If we keep doing that
we know we’ll succeed.”
Schillaci
Continued fromPage 4
BILL TARUTIS/ FOR THE SUNDAY DISPATCH
Atty. Rocco Schillaci looks at his daughter Maria's photograph at his law office in Avoca. Six-month-
old Maria, who is now fine, was diagnosed with a heart problem at one month old and Rocco and his
wife, Atty. Allison Schillaci, spent a month at a hospital in Delaware, postponing the opening of their
practice until Maria was fully recovered.
Rocco said at
any given
time, Allison
might be the
receptionist
and office
manager while
he is seeing a
client and at
another time,
it could be
vice-versa.
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Pittston Animal Hospital
HOURS:
8 a.m. - 8 p.m.
Mon. - Fri.
Also Open
Weekends
And Holidays
(Subject To Doctor Availability)
Dr. I. H. Kathio
calling 457-3412.
The parish will have an altar
server training class at 9 a.m. on
Monday, June 18 in St. Mary’s
Church, 715 Hawthorne St. Chil-
dren in grades 4-12 are invited to
attend.
Call the rectory at 457-3412 to
reserve your space.
The parish will participate in
the “Fortnight for Freedom”
June 21-July 4.
This national 14-day period of
prayer, education and action is
being organized by the United
States Conference of Catholic
Bishops in response to the De-
partment of Health and Human
Services’ (HHS) mandate to
force employers – including reli-
gious charities – to provide con-
traceptives and abortion-induc-
ing drugs in their health plans,
for free.
The parish will pray the nove-
na to prayer to St. Thomas More
and a Prayer for Religious Free-
domfollowing the daily Masses.
Individuals who are unable to at-
tend daily Mass but who would
like to participate may get the
prayers in the church or by call-
ing the rectory office at 457-
3412.
The youth group will meet on
Sunday, June 24. New members
are always welcome. Call Lori
Ostrowski at 457-8840 for meet-
ing times and locations.
The building and grounds
committee will meet at 6:30 p.m.
onMonday, June 25inSt. Mary’s
School, 742 Spring St.
The worship committee will
meet at 7 p.m. on Monday, June
25 in the rectory, 715 Hawthorne
St.
The social concerns commit-
tee will meet at 8 p.m. on Mon-
day, June 25 in the rectory.
The finance council will meet
at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, June 26 in
the rectory.
The festival committee will
meet at 6:30 p.m. on Wednesday,
June 27 in St. Mary’s School.
Anyone who is interested in vol-
unteering at the picnic is invited
to attend.
The parish will have festival
set-up nights at 6 p.m. on Mon-
day, July 9 and Tuesday, July 10
on the festival grounds, corner of
Hawthorne and Spring Streets.
All volunteers are welcome to
attend.
The annual parish festival will
take place on July 19-21.
The parishioners are currently
seeking clean coffee cans with
lids and theme basket donations.
Cans and theme basket dona-
tions may be left on the back
porch of the rectory, 715 Haw-
thorne St.
For more information about
the theme baskets, contact Eliza-
beth Dessoye at 815-7635 or
edessoye@gmail.com.
Anyone who is interested in
volunteering at the festival may
contact at Tara Iovacchini at 954-
2456.
SECOND PRESBYTERIAN
143 Parsonage St., Pittston
654-1411
June 17 – 10 a.m. Worship
June 19 – 7 p.m. AA meeting
TRINITY EPISCOPAL
CHURCH
Spring Street and Montgom-
ery Avenue, West Pittston
Parish Mission:
“To live and build holy com-
munity.”
All welcome: Worldwide An-
glican Communion:
“We believe in one holy, Ca-
tholic apostolic church.” Web of
information and links at
www.trinityepiscopalchurch-
westpittston.org and www.dio-
beth.org.
Sunday Holy Eucharist: 11
a.m. every Sunday.
Food Pantry: June items need-
ed are kids’ instant drink mixes,
pasta and sauces and cereals.
Gerrity’s gift cards, cash dona-
tions and other non-perishable
foods also accepted.
The daily prayer is for those
with needs requesting prayerful
support.
Start Prayer network at parish
office 654-3261.
Youth Program: 10:45 a.m. ev-
ery Sunday.
Faith Forum for Adults:
Enrichment for adults seeking
spiritual renewal and opportuni-
ties for ministry and voluntee-
rism.
Parish Life Events Team:
Bi-monthly first Sundays.
Parish Council: Every second
Sunday.
Women of Trinity: Every third
Sunday. WOT Ministry Invita-
tion. The Women of Trinity have
undertaken a ministry to help
support Good Shepherd Episco-
pal Church of Scranton in their
outreach to the homeless of the
region. Each month after enjoy-
ing a home cooked meal at Good
Shepherd all who have needs
may “shop” for necessities like
clothing, shoes, toiletries in a
store-like setting in the church’s
refurbished basement of donated
items.
The Women of Trinity have
supported this ministry by deliv-
ering donations of clothing, new
undergarments and socks and
toiletries to the Scranton church.
WOTcollects trial size andho-
tel toiletries and invites the par-
ish community to join with them
in helping the less fortunate.
Donations of trial size and
sample size toiletries are wel-
come.
All dayrental of the newlyren-
ovated banquet room and kitch-
en is $100. Call 654-3261. The
next semester starts September
18 for Music Together Classes
for infants and children through
age five accompanied by a par-
ent or caregiver.
Visit www.musictogether.com
for details or call 654-3261.
Giant neighborhoodyardsales
will be run from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m.
every first Saturday through Oc-
tober.
Dozens of vendors, chili dogs
with homemade sauce, wimpies,
bake sale.
Vendor spots available, $10,
reservations required. Call 654-
3261.
UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH
Corner of Broad & Church
Sts.
Pittston
Rev. Dr. Michael Turner
Sunday Worship Service 9:30
a.m.
Children’s Sunday School:
9:30 a.m.
Holy Communion: 1st Sunday
each month
Choir Rehearsal: Thursday’s
at 7 p.m. unless told otherwise
United Methodist Women:
2nd Monday
Website www.umcpittston.org
Phone 655-4340
Guest speaker today is Rev.
Nancy Pitely, a former pastor of
the United Methodist Church
Pittston who currently serves as
the Chaplain of Wesley Village
United Methodist Homes.
Faith
Continued fromPage 23
to have unlimited emergency
service in the Borough of Hugh-
estown.
If you need transportation to
the hospital, the ambulance will
accept whatever amount is paid
by your insurance company as
payment in full for its services.
Non-subscribers are responsible,
however, for the entire payment
of the bill (which is usually close
to $1,000).
Furthermore, when you give
to the subscription drive, there is
no need for you to give or be-
come a member of any other am-
bulance association or company.
It is our understanding that the
Greater Pittston Ambulance and
the Pittston Township Ambu-
lance have been soliciting our
residents for some time nowand,
as long you live in Hughestown
Borough, there is no reason to
donate to them.
The subscription program is
not aninsurance contract andit is
not a solicitation for insurance
premiums.
Subscriptions are not refunda-
ble and cannot be transferred.
The start date for the subscrip-
tion programis April 1, 2012 and
the end date is April 1, 2013.
Finally, if the hose company
receives your subscription after
the start date, your subscription
takes place as of the time they re-
ceive your payment.
This subscriptiondDrive will
conclude on July 1.
Please make your return by
then. Your check can be made
payable to: “Hughestown Hose
Company.”
For more information or to
viewthe latest photos of the hose
company in action, log onto the
Hose Company’s website at
www.hughestownfiredept.us.
Members of the hose company
express sincere gratitude to all
residents and businesses that
support this annual major fund
raiser and who make the bor-
ough safer with their contribu-
tion.
Hughestown Hose
Company
Hughestown Hose Co.
Continued fromPage 15
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“Anzalone Law Offces congratulates Jamie J. Anzalone
on his selection to the 2012 Pennsylvania Rising Stars list.”
Jamie J. Anzalone William F. Anzalone
William F. Anzalone Jamie J. Anzalone Alana M. Anzalone
Patrick J. Doyle Jr.
Super Lawyers
®
honoree
2004 - 2012
Top 100 Lawyers
2007 & 2009
Rising Stars honoree
2012
Anzalone Law Offices
98 South Franklin Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702
(570) 825-2719
www.anzalonelaw.com
The Anzalone Law Offces
are pleased to report that
Jamie J. Anzalone, Esquire
has been elected to the 2012
Pennsylvania Super Lawyers
Rising Stars list. Attorney
Jamie Anzalone is a 2006
Graduate of the Penn State
Dickinson School of Law,
where he was a member of the
Order of Barristers.
He limits his practice to the
areas of personal injury,
negligent security, medical
malpractice, and products
liability. He has tried numerous premises liability, automobile negligence and medical malpractice cases to
verdict including obtaining a $1.35 million verdict for an injured motorcyclist. Attorney Anzalone currently
serves as a member of the board of directors with six different local charitable organizations. He is a member of
Pennsylvania Bar Association, Pennsylvania Association for Justice, American Association for Justice, Luzerne
County Young Lawyers Division and the Luzerne and Lackawanna Bar Associations.
Attorney William F. Anzalone has been selected for the 8th consecutive year as a Super Lawyer.Super Lawyers
represent the top 5% of the practicing attorneys in Pennsylvania. Attorney Anzalone was also selected as one
of the Top 100 PA Super Lawyers in 2007 and 2009.
Attorney William F. Anzalone has been litigating personal injury cases for over 35 years.He is certifed by the
National Board of Trial Advocacy with the American Board of Trial Advocates and recognized by the
American Association for Justice as a PA Top 100 Trial Lawyer. Bill served as the frst President of the
Northeastern Pennsylvania Trial Lawyers Association. Anzalone Law Offces prides itself on representing the
injured, whether it be in a simple motor vehicle accident or complex litigation ranging from medical malprac-
tice, bad faith, products liability, sexual assaults, or airplane disasters.
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cleaned
Customer Service
Is Our #1 Priority
freshly
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Don’t Worry
Daddy
We’ll Shine
It Up!
Happy Father’s Day
Love, Zach and Alek
The Pittston David Blight School of Dance will hold its annual
recital “From Dance to Doctor… Honoring One of our Finest” at
noon on Saturday, June 23 at the Wyoming Valley West High School
auditorium in Plymouth.
Tickets can be purchased in advance at the studio located at Rear
159 S. Main St., Pittston on June18 or 20 in the early evening. Tickets
can also be purchased at the door the day of the show. For further
information, call 654-5100.
Members of the 3-5 year-old ballet class are, from left, first row,
Joslyn Miller, Abigail Kovac, Leona Broda. Second row, Kayla
Coyne, Peyton Rusyn, Ava Pavlinchak. Third row, Nora Philbin,
Hanna Pearce.
David Blight dancers
present recital June 23
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rtur s
140 MAIN ST. DUPONT 570.299.5296
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WYOMING, PA
Members of the NEPACoast Guard Veterans Association were recently given a tour
of the U.S. Coast Guardheadquarters inWashington, DC. where theymet withAdmiral
Karl L. Schultz. The vets were also given a tour of the USCGAir Station at the Ronald
Regan International Airport. Fromleft, are Chester Kulesa, TomBetsko, Joe Keglovits,
Bill Corcoran, Admiral Karl L. Schultz, FrankMoran, BobYoungblood, NeilMorrison,
Jack Sidorek and George Fetchko
Coast Guard vets tour headquarters in Washington
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www.UltraCare-Dialysis.com
There’s a new choice in your dialysis care. A nighttime shift option. At Fresenius
Medical Care, the leading dialysis clinic network in the nation, this new option
in dialysis means you can have more of your days free. Nighttime dialysis can
provide longer, gentler treatments while you sleep, and many patients have
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Discover your days again with dialysis at night. Find out more today by
calling Fresenius Medical Care Pittston at 570-655-4115.
Is dialysis at night
right for you?
Call us to find out.
Happy Father’s Day to all the
dads! Moms and kids mean well
when they try to make you feel
special on your day. Some dads
have traditional activities they
like to do with their families.
Some find other ways to make it
“their day.”
Celebration can be fun and
healthy. Taking a hike, getting
the bikes out or even playing a
game of catch in the back yard is
a healthy alternative to watching
television.
If you haven’t purchased your
gift yet for your dad or your hus-
band, bypass the neck tie idea
and be creative with an idea that
will boost their health.
What about food? Are there
special foods that help dads stay
healthy or get healthier? The
University of Missouri has a list
of foods specific to keeping men
healthy.
So, if you still need to pur-
chase that gift, buy a bag of some
sort, that is a gymbag, a gift bag,
even a new golf bag and fill it
with these items: tomato juice,
fresh oranges, soy and other fa-
vorite nuts, a head of broccoli
and a container of chocolate
milk. Why these foods? Read on
to find out how they specifically
help keep men healthy.
Tomatoes
Tomatoes contain a variety of
compounds which offer protec-
tion against prostate cancer - the
leading cause of cancer deaths in
men, after lung cancer. The pow-
erful antioxidant, lycopene, is
one compound that has received
the most media attention. But re-
searchers at the University of Il-
linois say that tomato’s health
benefits are the result of more
than a single compound - once
again proving it’s often better to
get nutrients as part of a complex
mix in foods, rather than as sin-
gle, isolated compounds in pill
form.
Researchers at Harvard Uni-
versity found that men who eat at
least 10 servings a week of toma-
to-based foods sharply reduce
their risk of prostate cancer. Ly-
copene is most easily absorbed
fromcooked tomato products, so
enjoy ample servings of tomato
juice, sauce, ketchup and salsa.
Most meat-and-potato-eating
men turn their noses up at tofu.
However, adding a little soy to
Dad’s diet might be worthwhile
because of its heart and prostate-
protecting effects. About 25
grams of soy protein a day can
lower cholesterol levels by 5 to 6
percent. Soy may also help keep
blood vessels more flexible.
Mark Messina, a soy expert at
Loma Linda University in Cali-
fornia, believes in soy’s ability to
help in the fight against prostate
cancer. Messina explains that in
Asian countries, men tradition-
ally eat a diet rich in soy and their
incidence of prostate cancer is
significantly less than American
men.
Soy
Tofu isn’t the only source of
soy. In fact, soy nuts are one of
the tastiest and easiest way to get
beneficial soy compounds into
your diet. Soy nuts are available
in most grocery stores and you
can buy them roasted, salted and
flavored. Just one-fourth of a cup
delivers 12 grams of heart-pro-
tecting soy protein as well as a
variety of compounds called
“isoflavones” which appear to
deliver prostate protection. Your
best bet is to eat soy foods, rather
than take concentrated supple-
ments.
Nuts
Nuts are high in fat and calo-
ries, but they also deliver a pow-
erful dose of prevention against
heart disease - the number one
killer of American men. The nat-
urally occurring fat in nuts is
mostly unsaturated. Plus, nuts
are rich in fiber, protein, vitamin
E and an assortment of trace
minerals such as copper, zinc,
magnesium, and selenium.
Orange juice
Orange juice is our number
one source of folate, one of the B
vitamins that appears to offer a
wide range of protection against
heart disease and colon cancer.
Reach for a glass of 100% juice
instead of a soft drink.
Dairy
Men with high blood pressure
are at greater risk for stroke and
heart disease. Weight loss, phys-
ical activity and a low-sodiumor
salt-restricted diet is most com-
NUTRITION
CORNER
Mary Ehret, MS, RD, LDN
Penn State Cooperative Extension
Another neck tie?
Mary R. Ehret, M.S., R.D., L.D.N., is with Penn State Cooperative
Extension, Luzerne County, 16 Luzerne Ave., West Pittston, Pa., 18643.
(570) 825-1701/602-0600. Fax (570) 825-1709. mre2@psu.edu.
See NUTRITION, Page 47
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About 50 studen
from Scranton Prep
members from Pitt
worked in West P
the clean up from
floodwaters. Som
group tackled wer
move back into the
up roadways, clean
hanging dry wall, s
in homes that have
the flooding.
WEST PITTST
Kurt Kushner of Archbald carries a box of items out of a FEMA trailer at
Mount Lookout Mobile Home Park in Exeter.
Alison Berti of West Pittston, left, Jean Coyle of Scranton, and Alec Meta of
Archbald paint a roomin a home on Philadelphia Avenue in West Pittston.
Service trip coordinator and Pittston churches youth group director Maria
Donnelly, right, gives instructions to a teamof students before heading back
to clean up West Pittston homes impaced by the flood.
Lending a h
About 50 high school students fromScranton Prep and the youth group of the Pittston Catholic Ch
Avenue during their lunch break fromtheir cleanup efforts on Wednesday afternoon.
Some of the
flood debris
cleaned out
of a home
by student
volunteers
on Parke
Street in
West Pitt-
ston.
Photo
BILL TA
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nts and chaperones
p and youth group
tston area churches
Pittston continuing
m the September
me of chores the
re helping people
eir homes, cleaning
ning up yards and
spackling, painting
been restored from
TON CLEANUP
Evan Moritz of Old Forge, right, and Mike Swantek of Moosic load items onto
a pickup truck froma temporary FEMA trailer in Mount Lookout Mobile
Home Park in Exeter.
Bradley Shovlin of Dallas, right, and Matthew Anzelmi of Scott Township
move items back into a home on Linden Street.
Student volunteers Erin McGarry of Pittston, left, Marie Terese Fox, and
Megan Dougherty of Dupont clean mud fromitems at a home along Phila-
delphia Avenue in West Pittston.
elping hand
hurch Cluster, along with chaperones, post for a photo at the West Pittston playground on Exeter
Cleanup
coordinator
Maria Don-
nelly drives
a teamof
student
volunteers
and furni-
ture from
the Mount
Lookout
Mobile
Home Park
back to a
home in
West Pitt-
ston.
os by
ARUTIS
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AREAAGENCY on AGING:
LUZERNE &WYOMING COUNTIES
111 N. Pennsylvania Blvd. , Wilkes-Barre, PA 18701
570-822-1158 ext. 3539 • 800-252-1512 ext. 3539
AgingLW.org
NORTHEAST FAIR, Com-
merce Road in the Grimes In-
dustrial Park, Suscon Road.
June 19-24. Hours: June 19 to
June 21, 5 p.m. to 11:15; June
22, 9 a.m. to 11:15 p.m.; June
23, 1 to 11:15; Sunday, June 24, 1
p.m. to 10:30. Entertainment:
June 19, Original Music Show-
case; June 20, Cabinet; June
21, Start Making Sense, Talk-
ing Heads tribute band; June
22, Jam Stampede, Tribute to
the Gratetful Dead; June 23,
the Cast of Beatlemania; June
24, Shawn Klush, Elvis Imper-
sonator. Agricultural Exhibit
Departments, 25 rides by Re-
ithoffer Shows, petting zoo,
magician, motor sports, mul-
tiple food consessions and
more.
CORPUS CHRISTI PAR-
ISH, Holy Redeemer Church
grounds, Rt. 92, Harding , 30
and July 1; Friday, June 29
5:30-11, Saturday, June 30,
5:30-11, Sunday, July 1, 1-7.
Entertainment: Friday, 7-11,
Groove Train; 7-11, Saturday,
Flaxy Morgan; Sunday, 1-4,
Waterstreet (Joe Valenti & Bill
Payne); Sunday, 4-7 p.m.
Sweet Pepper and the Long
Hots.
St. PETER’S EVANGELI-
CAL LUTHERN CHURCH,
100 Rock Street, Hughestown
Strawberry social June 30.
Tickets are Adults $5, children
$3 that includes shortcake
and beverage. Also available
will be wimpies, hot dogs, va-
riety of salads and bake
beans. Take-outs as well 3
p.m. to 3:30 p.m. Serving 3:30
to 7 p.M.
NATIVITY OF OUR LORD
PARISH, 529 Stephenson St.,
Duryea. 6-11 p.m. July 6, 5-11:30
p.m. July 7, 4-10 p.m. July 8.
Entertainment: 7-11 p.m. July
6, Picture Perfect; 5-7 p.m.
Jude’s Polka Jets II, 7:30-11:30
p.m. Flaxy Morgan, July 7; 6-
10 p.m. July 8, The Sperazza
Band. Get things started early
with pre-picnic bingo in the
Sacred Heart Hall at 7 p.m.
The flea market also will open
early that day at 5 p.m. in the
church basement.
ST. JOSEPH MARELLO
PARISH, at Our Lady of
Mount Carmel church
grounds, 237 William St., Pitt-
ston. 5-11 p.m. July 13-15. Enter-
tainment: 7-11 p.m. July 13,
Flaxy Morgan; 7-11 p.m. July 14,
Jeanne Zano Band; 6-10 p.m.
July 15, Sweet Pepper and the
Long Hots. Big-ticket raffle:
2,000 $20 chances available
to win a Chevy Cruze or
$20,000.
GERMANIA HOSE COM-
PANY, will hold its annual fes-
tival July 17-21. There will be
rides, food and fun. Entertain-
ment TBA
QUEEN OF THE APOS-
TLES, 715 Hawthorne St.,
Avoca. 6-10 p.m. July 19, 6-11
p.m. July 20, 5-11 p.m. July 21.
Entertainment: 7-10 p.m. July
19, Millennium; 7-10 p.m. July
20, Hometown Boyz; 6-11 p.m.
July 21, Banana Hammocks.
The Bounce House is a main
attraction for little ones.
ST. BARBARA PARISH, on
the grounds of St. Anthony
Church, 28 Memorial St., Exe-
ter. 5:30-11 p.m. July 20-21, 5-10
p.m. July 22. Entertainment:
7-11 p.m. each evening. July 20,
Sweet Pepper and the Long
Hots; July 21, Jeanne Zano
Band; July 22, Flaxy Morgan.
Homemade tripe, a delicacy
that draws the crowds.
ST. MARIA GORETTI, 31
Laflin Road, Laflin. 5-10 p.m.
July 27-29. Entertainment: Ju-
ly 27, Groove Train; July 28,
Mason Dixon; July 29, Jeanne
Zano Band. Pony rides for ad-
venturous little ones.
SACRED HEART OF JE-
SUS PARISH, 215 Lackawan-
na Ave., Dupont. 6-11 p.m. Aug.
2-3, 5-11 p.m. Aug. 4. Entertain-
ment: Aug. 2, Joe Stevens
Kickin’ Polkas; Aug. 3, Joe
Stanky and his Cadets; Aug. 4,
John Stevens’ Doubleshot.
Homemade cheese, potato
and cabbage pierogies are a
draw.
ST. JOHN THE EVANGE-
LIST PARISH COMMUNITY,
Broad and Church streets,
Pittston. 5:30-10 p.m. Aug. 9-11.
Entertainment: Aug. 9, Some-
thin’ Else; Aug. 10, Hillbilly
D’Luxe; Aug. 11, Flaxy Morgan.
Seton auditorium becomes a
one-stop shopping center for
books, CDs, jewelry and more.
PITTSTON TOMATO FES-
TIVAL, Tomato Lot, Main
Street, Pittston. Aug. 16 – 19.
Over fifty thousand people
will attend the four-day event
that has been touted as one
of the best festivals in North-
eastern Pennsylvania. Deli-
cious food, a tomato fight,
sauce wars, a variety of live
entertainment, a parade, 5K
run, games, rides, arts and
crafts and bingo.
OBLATES OF ST. JOSEPH
FUNFEST: Seminary grounds
on Highway 315, Pittston. Sun-
day Aug. 26. “End of Sum-
mer” Outdoor Chicken Bar-
B-Q dinner on the seminary
grounds, from Noon – 5:00
p.m.. Mass at 11:00 a.m. Live
entertainment with Jeanne
Zano Band, raffle prizes, in-
stant bingo, specialty baskets
and kids’ corner with pony
rides, face painting, magic
show and bounce house.
EDITOR’S NOTE: Let us
know about your group’s sum-
mer bazaar and we’ll list them
throughout the summer.
Oh, how bazaar it is
Volunteers
cut out
pieogie
shells for
Nativity of
Our Lord
Parish bazaar
which will be
held July 6, 7,
and 8 at
Sacred Heart
church hall
and grounds,
Stephenson
St., Duryea.
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Social Security
Disability
Claimants represented by
attorneys are more successful
in obtaining benefits. Call me
for a FREE CONSULTATION.
I can help.
Janet A. Conser
Attorney At Law
1575 Wyoming Ave., Forty Fort
283-1200
Get The Benefits
You Deserve!
Member of the National
Organization of Social Security
Claimants’ Representatives
Over 25 Years Experience
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GRAND OPENING
THISFRIDAY
JUNE 22
11am-1pm
The Blooms and Bubbles Pitt-
ston Chapter of the Red Hats So-
ciety will hold its regular month-
ly meeting at 12:30 p.m. on
Wednesday, June 20 at The Ave-
nue Diner, 22 Wyoming Ave.,
Wyoming.
Anyone who has not been con-
tacted regarding a reservations is
asked to call Kay Thornton.
Northeast Fair tickets
The Pittston Twp. Recreation
Board will provide all children 2
to 14 years of age one free ad-
vanced admission ticket, includ-
ing unlimited free rides to the
2012 Northeast Fair. Tickets are
valid any day of the fair.
Residents of Pittston Town-
ship can pick up tickets between
8 a.m. and 4 p.m. until June 15 at
the Pittston Township Municipal
Building. Proof of residency
must be furnished at the time of
pick up.
Italian Americans
The Italian-American Associ-
ation Scholarship Dinner will be
held on Thursday, June 21at Ge-
netti’s, Wilkes-Barre. Arrival
time is 6 p.m. with dinner at 6:30
p.m. Dancing with Danny Argo
and Friends will be held until
10:15 p.m. Cost is $25 per per-
son. Reservation deadline is
June15. For reservations, call Ju-
dy Deice at 654-7600 or Louise
Castellani at 654-6454.
St. Joseph’s Social Club
St Joseph’s Senior Social Club
will meet at 1 p.m. on Thursday,
June 21in St. Rocco’s school au-
ditorium on Oak St. in Pittston.
There are still some seats
available for the Niagara Falls
trip Sept 5-7. The club is also go-
ing to Cape Cod Oct. 15-
19.There are two seats available
for the trip to Italy, Oct. 19-28.
The club’s third annual picnic
is scheduled for Thursday, July
19 at the Checkerboard Inn, 385
Carverton Road, Shavertown.
Members are reminded to
bringcannedgoods for St. John’s
food Pantry. Bingo and card
games will be played. Refresh-
ments will be served.
Hosts are Josephine Fasciana,
Gertie Kichilinsky, Evelyn Lev-
endowski and Marion Licata.
For information, call Theresa
at 654 2967.
AFSCME meeting
The Wilkes-Barre sub chapter
8720 of AFSCME and PA Reti-
rees of Luzerne County will
meet at 1 p.m. on June 21 at
Norm’s Pizza, North Sherman
Street, Wilkes-Barre. Dutch
treat lunch will be offered prior
to the meeting. Guest speaker
will be Pamela Zaremba of the
PA Alliance for Retired Ameri-
cans.
Craft show
Wyoming Hose Company #1,
East Eighth Street, Wyoming
will hold a craft show to benefit
the hose company from8 a.m. to
4 p.m. on June 23. Any vendors
interestedinrentinga table space
may call 693-1371.
Kids Art Camp
Children will have an opportu-
nity to learn about different art
mediums in downtown Pittston
beginning June 25 at the Kids’
Art Camp at the Arts Seen Gal-
lery, 71 S. Main St., Pittston.
The five-day camp is for chil-
dren ages 8 to12 and will be held
from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. is
June 25-29.
Each day a different profes-
sional artist will instruct in a dif-
ferent art medium. The schedule
is as follows: Day one – fused
glass with Maria Livrone; day
two, photography with John Le-
vandoski; day three, clay with
Sandy Trocki; day four, drawing
with JoAnne Raynis; and day
five, origami, the art of paper
folding, with Peter Uritz.
Cost is $110 and pre-registra-
tion is required. To register, call
654-1200.
Garbage schedule
Pittston city garbage schedule
for the July 4th holiday is as fol-
lows: Wednesday July 4 garbage
will be picked up on Thursday,
July 5. Thursday, July 5 garbage
will be picked up on Friday, July
6. Friday July 6 garbage will be
picked up on Monday, July 9.
There will be no change for recy-
cle pick up on Thursday, July 5
and Friday, July 6.
E V E N T S , M E E T I N G S , B R I E F S
Red Hats meet Wednesday; Italian Americans Thursday
See BRIEFS, Page 36
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Sisters graduate
Aubre Mary Mayorowski,
Old Forge, graduated on May 19
at the 86th annual commence-
ment ceremony at Misericordia
University with a Bachelor of
Arts in English and a certificate
in Secondary Education. She ob-
tained the dean’s list with a GPA
3.89 for the spring semester.
While at Misericordia Universi-
ty, she was a member of the Edu-
cation Club, English Club and
Campers Ministry and Orienta-
tion Leader. She is a member of
the Sigma Tau Delta Internation-
al English Honor Society.
Galen Marie Mayorowski,
Old Forge, graduated on June 1
from Holy Cross High School.
While at Holy Cross, she was a
four-year member of the tennis
team, serving as captain of the
team in her senior year, a mem-
ber of the Ceramics and Pro-life
Clubs. She plans to attend King’s
College in the fall and major in
biology pre-veterinarian.
Aubre and Galen are the
daughters of Attorney Gale and
Vanessa Mayorowski, Old
Forge and granddaughters of
Mary Kay and John Vitale, Pitt-
ston; the late Nicholas Pannun-
zio, Pittston; and the late Frank
and Mildred Mayorowski,
Blakely. They have a sister Oli-
via Ann, 16 years old.
Chatter
Continued fromPage 8
Galen Mayorowski Aubre Mayorowski
Big Band Society
The Big Band Society of
Northeastern Pa will hold its in-
door summer picnic on Friday,
July 6, at Genetti’s Hotel and
Convention Center Wilkes
Barre. This event is for members
only. The doors will open at 5:45
p.m. with dinner at 6:30 p.m.
Music is provided by Mike She-
ma.
For reservations, call Glen at
586-5359 or Herman at 654-
6454. Herman Castellani will
preside.
Masonic Lodge bus trip
Saint John’s Lodge #233 is
sponsoring its second annual bus
trip to Resorts Casino in Atlantic
City, Saturday July 28. Donation
is $40 and includes $25 in free
slot play (must be 21 to receive
the free play offer), movies down
and back, raffle and much more.
Photo ID required or use your
Resorts Player Card.
The bus will leave Wyoming
Valley Mall near Sears Automo-
tive promptly at 7:30 a.m. and
Atlantic City at 7 p.m. Reserva-
tions are a must. Payment is due
with reservation. Call Vince Te-
deschi at 371-9940.
PA Class of 1992
The Pittston Area Class of
1992 will celebrate its 20th anni-
versary reunion on Saturday,
Aug. 4 in the Seasons Ballroom
at the Mohegan Sun at Pocono
Downs, Wilkes-Barre. Tickets
are $55 each and can be pur-
chased via credit card, Pay Pal or
check. All interested classmates
are asked to send their e-mail ad-
dress or mailing address to Tara
(Turkos) Craig at Craig.ta-
ra@hotmail.com or Ryan Car-
wardine at rjcarwardine@veri-
zon.net. For more information,
call Class President Patti Pisano
at 540-3277 or Mary (Turco)
Arellano at (210) 831-4769 for
more details.
The reunionplanningcommit-
tee includes Patti Pisano, Mary
(Turco) Arellano, Jackie (Borth-
wick) Galvin, Lori (Braccini)
Cook, Ryan Carwardine, Alissa
(Costantino) Ranieli, Vicki Gui-
liano, Joe Hawk, Alex Schalles
and Tara (Turkos) Craig.
Masonic Lodge barbecue
Saint John’s Masonic Lodge
#233 and Tyre Square Club Ma-
sonic Lodge Golden Rule #15
have scheduled a joint open
house and barbecue for August
18 at Saint John’s Lodge Hall,
498 Yatesville Road, in Jenkins
Township. The barbecue begins
with cooking at 7 a.m. with serv-
ings from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. (or
until the food runs out, whichev-
er comes first.) The menu con-
sists of grilled and smoked
chicken and ribs, candied yams,
collard greens, bread, macaroni,
a soft drink or iced tea.
Prices are $10 for the chicken
or ribs and $25 for a rack of ribs.
For more information, call Jer-
ry Venetz at 654-9833 or Fred
Kotula at 655-1687.
WA Class of 1992
Wyoming Area Class of 1992
is planning its 20th anniversary
reunion for Saturday, Sept. 1 at
Rodano’s in Wilkes-Barre.
Those interested in attending
are asked to e-mail their address
andcontact informationbyJuly1
to wasclassof92@yahoo.com or
call 655-0238.
WA1982 reunion
The Wyoming Area Class of
1982 will hold a reunion from 1
to 6 p.m. on Sunday, Sept. 2 at
the Checkerboard Inn, 385 Carv-
erton Road, Trucksville with
food, refreshments and music by
“Old Friends.”
Cost is $50 per person. Make
checks payable to Patrice Yurek,
120 Butler St., Wyoming, PA
18644. For more information,
call Patrice at 881-0135.
PA Class of 1947
Pittston Area High School
Class of 1947 will hold its 65th
anniversary reunion on Saturday,
Sept. 22 at Cooper’s Seafood
Restaurant, Kennedy Boulevard,
Pittston. For more, contact Jas-
per Reggie at 287-3379 or Sam
DeSalvo at 299-5954.
Briefs
Continued fromPage 35
The Hughestown Lions Club
announces the recipients of this
year’s Clarence Hensley/Jerry
Chilipko Education Awards are
SarahE. KosikandAustynC. Pi-
varnik, both students at Pittston
Area High School and both resi-
dents of Hughestown.
These students have excelled
in the classroom and are excep-
tional role models.
President Steve Golya, the of-
ficers and members of the Hugh-
estown Lions Club will host a
special dinner meeting at 7 p.m.
on Monday, July 2 at the Hugh-
estown Fire Hall to present the
awards and honor these students
and their families.
Also, the Lions Club recently
held election of officers and they
will be sworn in during this din-
ner meeting. The officers are as
follows:
Steve Golya, president; Fred
Pierantoni, vice president; De-
nise Chilipko, secretary; Phil
Falvo, treasurer; and Frank Tier-
ney, Tail Twister.
Also noted, Steve Golya was
presented with the Hughestown
Lion of the Year Award during a
previous meeting.
The Hughestown Lions will
meet at 7 p.m. on Monday, June
18 at the Hughestown Hose
Company. President Steve Golya
will preside.
Hughestown Lions
education awards
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570-696-0723
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HappyFather’s
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LoveAnthony
and Paulie
The Greater Pittston YMCA
will kick off summer on the offi-
cial first day of the season, June
20, with Summer Palooza 2012,
hostedbySamSanguedolce, Mi-
chael Lombardo and Dion Fer-
nandes at the Open Space in Pitt-
ston at 73 South Main Street
from 6 to 10 p.m.
The cost $35 per person and
includes catering by Palazzo 53
and live music by Good to Go.
A cash bar will be available.
The proceeds will benefit the
Greater Pittston YMCA.
The Ywill be offering compli-
mentary babysitting to all at-
tendees from6 to 9 p.m. at the Y.
Reservations are recommend-
ed by calling the Yor registering
on-line.
The event is sponsored by Pa-
lazzo 53, Reilly Associates and
the Greater Pittston YMCA.
Y M C A B E N E F I T
Summer Palooza slated at
Open Space on Wednesday
Jordan Tarter sees her anti-
bullying awareness events as a
way to do something.
The 14-year-old Pittston Area
freshman and aspiring singer/
songwriter, will host an anti-bul-
lying event from 6 to 8 p.m. on
Thursday, June 28inthe Reading
Room at the Osterhout Free Li-
brary, 71S. Franklin St., Wilkes-
Barre on.
“There are going to be per-
formers, guest speakers and a ta-
ble of information about bully-
ing. All ages are welcome,” said
Alissa Lukasavage, Teen Librar-
ian at the Osterhout.
This is Tarter’s second anti–
bullying awarness event. In
April, she organized an Anti-
Bullying Awareness Concert at
the KISS Theater, Wyoming
Valley Mall.
Tarter got the idea toraise anti-
bullying awareness after wit-
nessing bullying. “It’s every-
where, everyday, on the bus, in
school,” she said.
There is no charge for admis-
sion, but there will be a donation
bucket. Tarter has been involved
with KISS (Kid Innovations
Stage and Sound), a community
theater for kids, for about four
years and calls it her second
home. She won the lead role in
the KISS production of “Foot-
loose.”
Tarter has performed at the
Pittston Tomato Festival, Saints
and Sinners in Pittston and the
Naked Grape in Plains, among
other venues.
“We want to let kids knowit is
alright to stand up for others or if
you see bullying happening or to
tell someone,” she said. Tarter
gets frustrated when she wit-
nesses bullying.
Sings against bullying
By JACK SMILES
jsmiles@psdispatch.com
Jordan Tarter
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The Wyoming Ice Hockey As-
sociation’s registration for in-
coming seventh through 12th
grade students residing within
the WA District is Monday,
June18, from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. at
the West Wyoming Borough
Building. A $100 deposit will be
required. For more information
contact Dawn Thomas at me-
jane134@aol.com
West Pittston Rams
The West Pittston Rams board
of directors will meet Wednes-
day, June 20 at 7:30 p.m. at Four
Seasons Golf Course.
JR Field hockey camp
The Lady Warriors Junior
Field Hockey Summer Camp is
June 18 through June 22 from 9
a.m. to noon at the WA Field
Hockey complex. This camp is
for student athletes entering
grades first through sixth and
new players in seventh and
eighth grade as of Fall 2012. For
more information, contact Nan-
cy at 417-4603ornalberi-
gi@comcast.net.
WA football parents news
The Wyoming Area Football
Parents Association will meet on
Thursday, June 21 at 7 p.m at
Cuz’s Catering Hall in Exeter.
All parents of players in 7th -
12th grade are encouraged to at-
tend.
Wyoming Area Football Par-
ents Association will run a coin
drop on Saturday, June 23 from8
a.m. – 2 p.m. All parents are re-
quired to participate for two
hours during the day. This is the
only fundraiser this year and par-
ticipation is mandatory. If you
cannot participate a $50 fee will
be payable to Meet the Warriors.
Any questions or concerns or to
sign up, contact Dan Resciniti,
President WAFPA at 814-5803.
WP Rams late sign up
The West Pittston Rams will
be holding one late sign up on
June 27 from 6 p.m. to8 p.m. at
the Club House at the Football
Field, Bell Tower Entrance. Reg-
istration is $110 per child which
includes 10 lottery tickets at $5
each. Additional children per
family are $10 each.
New football players will be
required to purchase a jersey.
Children ages 5-7 to 14 on Au-
gust 1 are eligible.
Every registrant must have co-
pies of the following: birth cer-
tificate, current picture, and two
proofs of residence, for exam-
ple- a valid driver’s license and a
utility bill.
This is the final registration.
Any child considered after this
date, will be assessed a late fee
andtheir registrationwill be con-
tingent upon open places on the
team roster.
Parents/ Guardians may also
use this time to drop off neces-
sary paperwork or pictures for
their child which has already
registered. Practices start the
week of July 15.Coaches will be
in touch with all registrants.
WWE Panthers sign ups
Registrations for the Wyom-
ing/West Wyoming/Exeter Pan-
thers Football-Cheerleading As-
sociation are June 30, 3 to 5 p.m.
the field house on Cedar Street
in Exeter. Registration is $65.00
per child or $75.00 per family.
WA Middle School
ice hockey
The WA Ice Hockey Middle
School League now taking
names of interested 5th and 6th
grade students for the 2012-2013
season residing within the
Wyoming Area School District.
Games and practices will be held
at the Revolution Ice Center in
Pittston. For more information
and if interested in joining the
Middle School League contact
Dawn Thomas atme-
jane134@aol.com
Walseki Camps
Registrations are being ac-
cepted for the Stan Waleski Bas-
ketball Camp to be held at the St.
Joseph’s Oblates gym in Laflin
from July 9 to July 27 for boys
and girls entering grades K
through 8. Call Coach Waleski at
457 - 1206 or Coach LoBrutto at
654 – 8030 or email stanwales-
ki@yahoo.com.
S P O R T S B R I E F S
Wyoming Area ice hockey lists sign ups tomorrow
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In the towns
Happy Father’s Day to all the
gentleman in Avoca. Whether
you are celebrating with your
dador fondlyrememberinggreat
times you shared, be sure to give
thanks for him! I know I’ll be
celebrating my dad’s memory in
a special waytodaywithmyfam-
ily.
VFW bingo
The V.F.W. Post 8335 Ladies
Auxiliary will sponsor a Bingo
party on Wednesday, June 27 for
the patients at the V.A. Medical
Center, Wilkes-Barre. The ladies
are collecting the following un-
wrapped items to give as prizes
or gifts: T-shirts (all sizes espe-
cially XXL and XXXL), slip-
pers, diabetic socks, blankets,
throws, afghans, books, maga-
zines, puzzles, games, cards,
shaving cream and deodorant.
Please note food, glass or
sharp objects cannot be accept-
ed. Donations canbe droppedoff
until 5p.m. onJune 27at the post
home, 915 Main St.. The ladies
will leave the post home at 5:30
p.m. to go to the V.A. Medical
Center. Transportation is availa-
ble to members who need it.
Happy birthday
Happy birthday to June Fitz-
gerald who will celebrate her
special day on Wednesday, June
20 fromall of your friends in the
Ladies Auxiliary of American
Legion Post 8335.
Avoca grads party
Several graduating classes of
the 1960s from Avoca High
School will have a pizza party in
August.
Interested classmates are
asked to call Marie Androscav-
age Payne at 709-5649, Cathy
Kiesinger Appnel at 457-7974or
Pauline Bartush Reedy at 817-
5125.
WildCats sign ups
Sign ups for Duryea WildCats
football or cheerleading will be
held from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. on
June 27 at the field.
Queen of the Apostles
Queen of the Apostles Parish
will have an altar server training
class at 9 a.m. on Monday, June
18 in St. Mary’s Church, 715
Hawthorne St. Children in
grades 4-12 are invited to attend.
Call the rectory at 457-3412 to
reserve your space.
The youth group will meet on
Sunday, June 24. Call Lori Os-
trowski at 457-8840 for meeting
times and locations.
The building and grounds
committee will meet at 6:30 p.m.
onMonday, June 25inSt. Mary’s
School, 742 Spring St.
The worship committee will
meet at 7 p.m. on Monday, June
25 in the rectory, 715 Hawthorne
St.
The social concerns commit-
tee will meet at 8 p.m. on Mon-
day, June 25 in the rectory.
The finance council will meet
at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, June 26 in
the rectory.
The festival committee will
meet at 6:30 p.m. on Wednesday,
June 27 in St. Mary’s School.
Anyone interested in volunteer-
ing at the picnic is invited to at-
tend.
The parish will have festival
set-up nights at 6 p.m. on Mon-
day, July 9 and Tuesday, July 10
on the festival grounds, corner of
Hawthorne and Spring Streets.
The annual parish festival will
take place on July 19-21. The
parishioners are currently seek-
ing clean coffee cans with lids
and theme basket donations.
Cans and theme basket dona-
tions may be left on the back
porch of the rectory, 715 Haw-
thorne St. For more information
about the theme baskets, contact
Elizabeth Dessoye at 815-7635
or edessoye@gmail.com. Any-
one interested in volunteering at
the festival may contact at Tara
Iovacchini at 954-2456.
The parish will participate in
the “Fortnight for Freedom”
June 21-July 4. This national 14-
day period of prayer, education
and action is being organized by
the United States Conference of
Catholic Bishops in response to
the Department of Health and
Human Services’ (HHS) man-
date to force employers – includ-
ing religious charities – to pro-
vide contraceptives and abor-
tion-inducing drugs in their
health plans, for free.
The parish will pray the nove-
na to prayer to St. Thomas More
and a Prayer for Religious Free-
domfollowing the daily Masses.
Individuals who are unable to at-
tend daily Mass but who would
like to participate may get the
prayers in the church or by call-
ing the rectory office at 457-
3412.
Yard waste reminder
Avoca Borough will have a
yard waste collection on Tues-
day, June19, weather permitting.
In addition to collecting grass
clippings and leaves, borough
workers will also collect other
yard waste, including shrubs,
hedge clippings and tree limbs.
Grass clippings and leaves can
be placed in the same container;
however, brushmust be placedin
a separate container. The recy-
cling center will not accept grass
and leaves that are combined
with yard waste.
Tree limbs should not exceed
three feet in length and one-half
inch in diameter.
Rocks, stones, dirt and animal
waste are not acceptable forms
of yard waste and will not be col-
lected.
A maximum of three open
containers, not exceeding 30
pounds, will be allowed per col-
lection. Please do not put collec-
tion items in plastic bags.
Collection items should be
placed curbside by 8 a.m.
Garbage fee due
Avoca Tax Collector Therese
Wrubel reminds all residents the
final days to purchase the 2012
Avoca Borough garbage stickers
and pay the 2012 Avoca Borough
and Luzerne Country tax bills
are Thursday, June 21 and Satur-
day, June 30, respectively.
Garbage stickers can be pur-
chased from9 to11a.m. on Tues-
day, June19 at the Avoca Munic-
ipal Building, 752 Main St. The
fee schedule for purchasing the
sticker in order to have up to
three bags collected weekly is
$190. Delinquent accounts will
be referred to district court after
June 21.
Tax bills may be paid in person
from 4 to 5 p.m. on Friday, June
29 at the Avoca Municipal
Building, 752 Main St.
Individuals who prefer to pay
their garbage fee and tax bills via
mail can submit them to Avoca
Borough, c/o Therese Wrubel,
129 Factory St., Avoca, PA
18641.
Individuals paying the gar-
VFW Auxiliary planning bingo party at VA
AVOCA
JACKIE BORTHWICK-GALVIN
457-3351
avocahappenings@verizon.net
See AVOCA, Page 42
Paul Boone, son of Carole and Chick Boone, of Avoca, was one of five members of the Boarder Patrol
serving in Laredo, Texas to receive the Commissioner’s Ambassador Award for excellent performance of
their duties in keeping with the standards set by the Department of Homeland Security along the Mexican
Border. Boone is a 1989 graduate of Pittston Area High School and King’s College where he received a
Bachelor of Arts degree in education. He entered the Border Patrol Academy as a member of the 826th
Session in 2008. He is pictured receiving the award fromJohn Esquibel, Acting Chief Patrol Agent of the
Laredo Sector.
Boone receives Ambassador Award
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Dupont Borough Council an-
nounced at its June meeting that
it has received funding in the
amount of $75,000 from the Of-
fice of Community Develop-
ment. Monies will be used for
the demolition of R. 310 Wyom-
ingAve. andpavingof Lidy’s Rd.
from Bridge at Sunset Lane to
351 Lidy Road and Oak Street
from Lackawanna to Wyoming,
including the triangle on Garden
Road to Walnut fromHill to Gill
Streets.
Dupont Borough received an-
other cash windfall of $34,441
from the real estate transfer tax
from the sale of Petro Truck
Stopplus another $20,000 from
the LLVSA for the 2012 grant.
The funds will be used as part of
the Atwell/Wood St project.
In other borough business:
Council awarded Penn State
Construction the contract to
build a pole barage to house bor-
ough vehicles. Penn State was
the lowbidder of the five bids re-
ceived at $89,600. Bob Naegle,
borough engineer, will review
the paperwork and notify the
contractor plus will prepare bids
specs for the fencing to secure
the new pole garage.
Solicitor Erik Dingle reported
at the meeting he has been re-
searching and talking to other
municipalities regarding a burn
ban ordinance for camp fire pits
as requested by Council. He
stated he is in the process of re-
viewing similar ordinances in
other areas and would report
back to Council at its next meet-
ing.
Solicitor Dingle asked Coun-
cil to approve the hiring of a con-
stable to serve residents who
would not accept mail regarding
their delinquent sewer accounts.
Council agreed and passed a mo-
tion to have a constable serve
property owners. The remaining
cases will be heard next week at
the magistrate level.
Council approved to advertise
for a part-time office clerk to
help assist Borough Manager
PattyMcDonald. The hourlyrate
will be $10 for approximately 15
to 20 hours per week. Applica-
tions are available at the munici-
pal office during regular busi-
ness hours.
The newtraffic lights at the in-
tersection of Main, Everhart,
Holden Street and Lackawanna
Avenue will become operational
on Thursday; June 21. Flashing
signs will be posted for a short
time to alert drivers that the new
traffic signals have been activa-
ted.
WildCats sign ups
Sign ups for Duryea WildCats
football or cheerleading will be
held from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. on
June 27 at the field.
Softball/teeball tourney
Dupont Softball/Teeball is
hosting the opening round of the
County Line Girls Softball
League playoffs beginning Mon-
day, June 18 at the Dupont Little
League Field on Elm Street. In
the 6 p.m. game, the No. 3 3 seed
Olexy Pharmacy of Taylor takes
on the No. 2 2 seed Liberty Tax
of Dupont. The 7:30 game pits
Taylor against the No. 1seed At-
lantic Propane of Dupont.
The battle of the unbeatens,
Bow Clinic of Dupont (3-0) vs.
Baloga Funeral Home of Dupont
(5-0), will be held at 6 p.m. on
Tuesday. These teams will battle
againat 7:30p.m. onThursdayat
7:30 as well as at 6 p.m. on Mon-
day June 25.
The Dupont teeball special
“under the lights” games will
kick off at 7:30 p.m. on Friday,
June 22 with Casey Kassa vs.
Bow Clinic. Saturday June 23 at
7:30pm is Pannunzio Law will
go against Dupont Monument at
7:30 p.m. on Saturday, June 23
and PACC will play Mark’s
Landscaping at 7:30 p.m. on
Monday, June 25.
In “Ponyball under the lights”
action at 7:30 p.m. on Tuesday,
June 26, Greater Pittston AM-
VETS will meet Dupont VFW.
Teeball wraps up on Wednesday,
Borough gets grant for demolition, paving
DUPONT
ANN MARIE PADDOCK
407-0231
dupont.news@comcast.net
See DUPONT, Page 42
Twenty-eight boys and girls received
the Sacrament of the Holy Eucharist for
the first time, during an11a.m. Liturgy on
May 5 at Holy Rosary Church in Duryea.
Rev. Andrew R. Sinnott, Administrator
and Rev. Charles W. Rokosz, Pastor con-
celebrated the mass. From left, first row,
are Emily Rain Dunn, Emma Jane Calvey,
Sydney Claire Chrobak, Gianna Hope
Slodysko, Kayleen Elena Dolan, Jillian
Margaret Rachko, Katie Lynn Albrecht,
Kalli Patricia Mahasky and Joan Waters,
sacrament teacher for the catechetical
program. Second row, Judy Lambert Co-
ordinator of Religious Education, Antho-
ny Thomas Singer, Chloe Morgan Anne
Ward, Jessica Marie Nawrocki, Morgyn
Elizabeth Jenkins, John Jacob Kravitz,
Mia Elianna Marriggi, Meghan Elizabeth
McDonnell, Kaylee Marie Kravitz, Olivia
Pauline Peet, MatthewSamuel Singer and
Rev. Andrew R. Sinnott. Third row, Rev.
Charles W. Rokosz, Andrew James Fran-
cis, Gavin Joseph Gruden, Matthew Jo-
seph Jasienski, Richard Joseph Kashuba
III, Hunter JacobAcernese, Tyler William
Copp, Matthew Nicholas George, Luca
Franco Guasto, DrewO’Malley, Lars Mi-
chael Thomas. Absent at the time of the
photo was Joan Dowd, who prepared
eight of the chiledren.
D U R Y E A N E WS
First Holy Communion celebrated at Holy Rosary
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201 Foote Avenue, Duryea
FREE DELIVERY! CALL 457-8881
OPEN DAILY: 6 a.m.-7 p.m. • Saturday & Sunday ‘til 5 p.m.
REHOSKI’S MARKET
DELI
Chuck Roast .......................................... $2.99 lb.
Lean Stewing Beef ................................ $2.99 lb.
Seasoned Butt Porketta......................... $2.59 lb.
Fresh Cut Minute Steaks........................ $4.99 lb.
Boneless Pork Chops............................. $2.99 lb.
Smoked Bacon...................................... $4.99 lb.
Bologna................................................ $3.99 lb.
Slicing or Stick Pepperoni ..................... $4.99 lb.
Clearfield White American Cheese........ $3.99 lb.
Happy Father’s Day to all the
gentleman in Duryea. Whether
you are celebrating with your
dador fondlyrememberinggreat
times you shared, be sure to give
thanks for him.
I know I’ll be celebrating my
dad’s memory in a special way
today with my family.
WildCats sign ups
Sign ups for Duryea WildCats
football or cheerleading will be
held from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. on
June 27 at the field.
VFW clambake
Members of the V.F.W. Post
1227 will have their inaugural
clambake from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.
on Saturday, June 23 at the post
home, 492 Stephenson St.
Tickets are $30 which in-
cludes breakfast, lunch, dinner,
drinks, games and, of course,
calms.
This event is open to the pub-
lic.
Call 457-9946 for tickets.
Family sends thanks
I recently received the follow-
ing note from
the family of
Diane Kozak:
The family of
the late Diane
Kozak would
like to express
our sincere
thanks and ap-
preciation to
everyone who helped in any way
to make the ziti dinner benefit
held recently in Diane’s honor at
the Polish Falcons a great suc-
cess.
Joe Ellen Kozak, Carrie Anne
Kozak and Wayne Hoover
Ambulance drive
The Duryea Ambulance Asso-
ciation membership drive is cur-
rently underway.
The membership fee is $30.
While lesser gifts are appreciat-
ed, they do not cover the mem-
bership fee. The fund drive will
conclude June 30.
Scout news
Best wishes to Ryan Burdick
of BoyScout Troop285whowill
meet with the council Eagle
Board.
Josh Houghtlin of Boy Scout
Troop285will conduct his Eagle
Scout project from 9 a.m. to
noon today, June 17, at K-Mart,
Pittston. He will collect items for
the SPCA of Luzerne County.
Following the collection time,
Houghtlin will also volunteer at
the Plains Animal Hospital.
Duryea Cub Scout Pack 375
will have its monthly pack night
at 7 p.m. on Monday, June 18 at
Sacred Heart of Jesus Hall, 529
Stephenson St. Plans for sum-
mer camp will be discussed at
this time. Membership is open to
boys in grades 1-5. The member-
ship fee is $16 per year. For more
information, contact Ann Ed-
wards at 457-8402.
Crime watch meeting
The Duryea Neighborhood
Crime Watch will have its
monthly meeting at 6:30 p.m. on
Tuesday, June 19 in the Duryea
Municipal Building, 315 Main
St.
BoyScout Troop285will have
its monthly meeting at 6 p.m. on
Thursday, June 21 at the Amer-
ican Legion Brennan Regan Post
585, 329 Main St. Boys in grades
6 and up are welcome to join. All
Scouts are reminded final prep-
Members of the Duryea Boy Scout Troop 285 assisted the American Legion Brennan Regan Post 585 in removing and replacing flags at Duryea cemeteries for Memorial
Days. Fromleft, first row, are Brandon Mickavicz, James Wilk, Scott Corti, Brandon Houghtlin and Post Commander Ed Matt. Second row, Ann Edwards, troop chairman;
AdamKilianyek, Post chaplain; Ryan Burdick, Scoutmaster; Bob Dzieciol, Brian Mlodzienski, Jonathan Kamor, Enrico Connors, Gregory Grabiec and Sherwood Grabiec,
assistant scoutmaster.
VFW inaugural clambake next Saturday
DURYEA
JACKIE BORTHWICK-GALVIN
457-3351
duryeahappenings@verizon.net
Diane Kozak
See DURYEA, Page 42
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bage fee should make the check
payable to Avoca Borough and
include a self-addressed
stampedenvelope withtheir pay-
ment.
Individuals paying tax bills
should send the bar coded copy
of the tax bill. If a receipt is re-
quested, please include both co-
pies of the tax bill and a self-ad-
dressed stamped envelope with
payment.
Following this payment peri-
od, Wrubel will be in her office
from 9 to 11 a.m. on Tuesdays.
For additional information, call
at 457-4891. The office will be
closed July 3 and 10.
Recycling news
Avoca residents are invited to
recycle newspaper and commin-
gled glass, plastic and metal bot-
tles, cans and jars every Wednes-
day from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. in the
Moosic Recycling Truck at the
Avoca Municipal Garage, 1106
Plane St.
All lids should be removed
and disposed of in home trash.
Containers should be rinsed,
plastics and metals should be
flattened and glass should not be
broken. Newspaper should not
be placed in bags. All recycla-
bles should be placed in the ap-
propriate compartment of the
truck.
Avoca residents can also recy-
cle corrugated cardboard from 8
a.m. to 8 p.m. on the first Thurs-
day of each month in the Moosic
Recycling Truck at the Avoca
Municipal Garage.
Avoca residents can also recy-
cle corrugated cardboard from 8
a.m. to 8 p.m. on the first Thurs-
day of each month in the Moosic
Recycling Truck at the Avoca
Municipal Garage.
Corrugated cardboard is card-
board with a ribbed section be-
tween two heavy layers of card-
board. All pieces should be col-
lapsed and flattened.
This collection does not in-
clude food contaminated non-
corrugated or coated cardboard
such as pizza, cereal or soda box-
es.
The recycling area will be
monitored and violators can be
fined or banned from future re-
cycling privileges. Recycling
calendars are available in the
lobby of the Avoca Municipal
Building and at the recycling
truck.
Avoca
Continued from Page 39
arations for Goose Pond summer
camp are underway and physi-
cals are due. The Boston Travel-
ing Camporee payments are also
due. For more information, con-
tact Ann Edwards at 457-8402.
Golf tourney
The Annual Care and Concern
Free Health Clinic Golf Tourna-
ment will take place on Friday,
July 13 at Emanon Country
Club, Falls.
Registration is at 11:15 a.m.
with a shotgun start at 12:30 p.m.
Format is captain and crew.
Cost is $85 per player or $340
per foursome. Price includes
lunch, dinner, awards and prizes.
Several sponsorships are availa-
ble: hole in one - $500, eagle -
$400, birdie - $300, par - $200
and bogey - $100.
Friends of the clinic sponsors
are also available and will be rec-
ognized in the dinner program.
All proceeds will benefit the
clinic.
For more information, call Jim
at 654-2585.
Germania festival
The Germania Hose Company
will have its annual festival July
17-21. There will be rides, food
and fun! Keep reading the Du-
ryea News for details as they be-
come available.
World Series trip
American Legion Brennan
Regan Post 585 will have its sec-
ond annual bus trip to the Little
League World Series on Thurs-
day, Aug. 23. The trip is open to
children ages 7-12 and their
chaperones.
Due to the success of last
year’s trip, the Legion members
plan to send two buses this year.
For more information, call the
post home at 457-4242.
Class of ‘57
The Duryea High School of
Class of 1957 is planning its 55th
anniversary class reunion for
Saturday, Nov. 10 at the Dupont
Hose Company. Interested class-
mates may call Judy at 457-3406
or Lois 457-9401for more infor-
mation.
Duryea
Continued from Page 41
June 27 with Paul Brady vs.
Konicki Pharmacy.
Pierantoni is on the road for
two games next week and returns
home at 7:30 p.m. on Thursday,
June 28.
Compost facility
Max Fence of Allentown will
begin construction of the barrier
at the compost facilityonJune 21
and should be done within two
weeks. The facility equipment,
including grinder, water buffalo
and front end loader should ar-
rive on June 25 and all the part-
time seasonal workers have been
hired. The Greater Pittston Com-
post Facility Committee will
meet at 7 p.m. on Wednesday,
June 27 at the Dupont Municipal
Council Chambers.
Lions Club
The Dupont Lions Club will
hold their final meeting at 6:30
p. m. on Monday, June 25 at the
VFW Post home. Installation of
officers for the Dupont Lions
and the Pittston Area Leo’s Club
will take place at this dinner
meeting. Governor Mimi Tosh
will install the newly-elected of-
ficers of both clubs and present
awards. Make reservations with
Lion President Bart Bryk by
Monday, June 18.
Masonic Lodge
Saint John’s Masonic Lodge
#233 and Tyre Square Club Ma-
sonic Lodge Golden Rule #15
have scheduled a joint open
house and barbecue for August
18 at Saint John’s Lodge Hall,
498 Yatesville Road, Jenkins
Township.
The barbecue begins with
cooking at 7 a.m. with servings
from11 a.m. to 6 p.m. The menu
consists of grilled and smoked
chicken and ribs, candied yams,
collard greens, bread, macaroni
and cheese, soft drink or iced tea.
Prices are $10 for chicken or
ribs and $25 for a rack of ribs.
For more information, call Jerry
Venetz 654-9833 or Fred Kotula
655-1687.
The lodge is sponsoring its
second annual bus trip to Resorts
Casino in Atlantic City, Satur-
day, July 28. Donation is $40 and
includes $25 in free slot play
(must be 21 to receive the free
play offer), movies down and
back, raffle and much more.
Photo ID or Resorts Player Card
is required.
The bus leaves Wyoming Val-
ley Mall near Sears Automotive
at 7:30 a.m. and leaves Atlantic
City at 7 p.m.
Reservations are a must. Pay-
ment is due with reservation.
Call Vince Tedeschi at 371-9940.
YMS of R barbeque
49thAnnual OpenPit Chicken
Barbecue sponsored by Branch
#2, YMS of Rof Holy Mother of
Sorrows will be held from noon
to 6 p.m. on Saturday, July 14 on
the church grounds.
Donation is $8. Dinner in-
cludes half a chicken, coleslaw,
French fries, roll, cake and bev-
erage. Tickets are available from
Arnold Borc at 654-8175 or at
the rectory.
Party t-shirts
Orders for 2012 “Party in the
Park” t-shirts can be made at the
municipal office or at the “Hub-
One.” Cost is $10 each with 2XL
and above at $12.00. There will
be a limited amount available for
sale at the party.
Gas service applications
Applications to request gas
service are available at the mu-
nicipal office during regular
business hours.
For more information about
gas service, contact Mike Trus-
sa, UGI representative at 829-
8664. Dupont Borough Council
discussed at its June meeting
working with UGI by providing
manpower requested by the util-
ity company at the April meet-
ing.
Sacred Heart of Jesus Church
Picnic Chairpersons will meet at
7 p.m. on Wednesday, June 20 in
the rectory’s lower level meeting
room. Apublicity picture will be
taken.
Polish American Citizens
Club will award a scholarship to
a student freshman enrolled in a
college or university for the
2012-2013 school year. Appli-
cants must be a direct descend-
ant (ie. son, daughter, grandson,
granddaughter) of an active
P.A.C.C. member, obtain and
submit proof of a G.P.A of not
less than 3.0, typed essay and un-
dergo an interview before the
scholarship board.
For information, contact Ed-
ward Romanko at 655-2137,
John Kulick at 655-2762 or Jack
Kuligowski at655-8672. All en-
tries must be received no later
than July 4.
Did you know?
If your refrigerator is older
than you, keep reading. If the re-
frigerator you recycle between
April 1 and August 31 turns out
to be the oldest from the PPL
electric Utilities service territory
in central and eastern Pennsylva-
nia, you will receive $250. To
take part in the contest, custom-
ers can simply sign up to have
their refrigerator or freezer recy-
cled through PPL Electric Util-
ities by calling 1-877-270-3522
or visiting www.pplelec-
tric.com/recycle between April
and August.
The winning PPL Electric
Utilities refrigerator will com-
pete against recycled iceboxes
fromother electric utilities in the
state for the title of Pennsylvania
Oldest Refrigerator where a
$1,000 prize awaits. Winners
will be announced in September.
Eco-tip
Here is Joey Jones’s Eco-tip of
the week: Whether your refriger-
ator is older than you or not, you
can take advantage of recycling
your old, inefficient refrigerator
through the E- power appliance
recycling program.
You save energy and money by
responsibly disposing of an ener-
gy-hogging appliance, plus you
get $35.
The appliance recycling pro-
gram is limited to two units per
address per calendar year.
Appliances must be in work-
ing order and between 10 and 30
cubic feet using inside measure-
ments.
Call 1-877-270-3522 or visit
the website: www.pplelec-
tric.com/recycle to make ar-
rangements for a pick-up.
Public works schedule
Dupont Public Works Dept.
service schedule for the week of
June 17 is as follows:
Monday, June 18 – refuse;
Tuesday, June 19 - yard waste;
Wednesday, June 20 - cans and
bottles.
Dupont
Continued from Page 40
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Acommunity yard sale will be
held at the Exeter Lions Little
League Complex on Cedar
Street from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30
p.m. on Sunday, July 1. Interest-
ed sellers can obtain space for
$10 by contacting Frank DeAn-
gelo at deangelos4@com-
cast.net. Spaces should be re-
served by Sunday June 24.
Sellers will be given an area
around the perimeter of the field
and will be able to display mer-
chandise on tables and in the
space between them and the
fence. Sellers must provide their
own tables. Sellers can set up be-
ginning at 6:30 a.m. on the
morning of the sale. All unsold
merchandise must be removed
from the grounds by 2:30 p.m.
that same day. Space will be lim-
ited to the first 25 vendors.
The concession stand will also
be open to sell coffee and break-
fast items.
Lions dinner
The Exeter Lions held their
annual Installation Dinner on
June 6 at Cuz’s restaurant. The
newdistrict governor for the year
2012-2013 Dennis Cook was the
installing officer for the evening.
Installed for the upcoming year
are Lion Rich Shields, treasurer;
Lion Mick Burke, financial sec-
retary; Lion Janet Serino, presi-
dent; Lion Steve Sokach, Lion
Tamer; and Lion Joseph White,
secretary.
SAT review classes
Wyoming Area is again offer-
ing SATVerbal and Math review
classes this summer. If interested
in enrolling in these classes or
learning more about them, call
Mrs. Rabel at 655-2836, ext.
2339. Each session will feature
10 hours of instruction. Cost for
non-residents will be $50. Cost
for residents will vary depending
on enrollment.
Friendly Circle Seniors
The Friendly Circle Seniors
will meet at 1 p.m. on Thursday,
June 21 in the Exeter Communi-
ty room on Schooley Avenue.
Eva Naples is the host. A lun-
cheon will be served and Bingo
will be played.
Golf Tournament
The Annual Care and Concern
Free Health Clinic Golf Tourna-
ment will take place on Friday,
July 13 at Emanon Country
Club, Falls and will feature a
Captain and Crew Format,. Reg-
istration is at 11:15 with a shot
gun start at 12:30 p.m.. Registra-
tion for a foursome is $340 or
$85 for individuals and includes
lunch, dinner, awards and prizes.
Sponsorships are Hole in One,
$500; Eagle, $400; Birdie, $300;
Par, $200; Bogey, $100. Friends
of the Clinic are also available
andwill be recognizedinthe din-
ner program.
For more information, call Jim
at 654-2585.
Strawberry Festival
First United Presbyterian
Church of West Pittston will be
hold a Strawberry Festival and
Flea Market from 11 a.m.. to 5
p.m. on Saturday, June 23 at St.
Cecelia’s Church, 1700 Wyom-
ing Ave.
Atlantic City trip
Saint John’s Lodge #233 is
sponsoring its second annual bus
trip to Resorts Casino in Atlantic
City on Saturday July 28. Dona-
tion is $40, and includes $25 in
free slot play (must be 21 to re-
ceive the free play offer), movies
down and back, raffle and much
more. Photo ID or a Resorts
Player Card is required.
The bus leaves Wyoming Val-
ley Mall near Sears Automotive
promptly at 7:30 a.m. and leaves
Atlantic City at 7 p.m. Reserva-
tions are a must. Payment is due
with reservation. Call Vince Te-
deschi at 371-9940.
Mason joint Open House and
Chicken and Ribs Barbecue is
slated for Aug. 18.
Borough reminders
Exeter Borough Police remind
citizens that anyone caught
dumping or littering along Pack-
er Avenue will be cited. Anyone
who sees such action is asked to
contact the Exeter Borough Po-
lice at 654-3301. Increased pa-
trols will be present.
All violators will be subject to
the issuance of a parking cita-
tion. This activity will be sched-
uled for the first Friday of each
month until November.
Exeter Police Department
warns all dog owners that it is a
violation of borough ordinance
to fail to clean up after your ani-
mal. Numerous complaints have
been filed and the police depart-
ment will begin aggressively en-
forcing the ordinance. Any and
all violators will be subject to a
fine of not less than $25 and a
maximumof 4300. Any resident
whowitnesses suchanevent is to
call the Exeter Borough Police
Department, Office of the Chief
of Police at 654-3001, ext 1.
Exeter Borough Police De-
partment reminds all residents
that any vehicle parked along the
roadway which is not currently
inspected or registered is in vio-
lation of Exeter Borough Aban-
doned Vehicle Ordinance and
subject to fine and costs along
with the removal of the vehicle at
the owner’s expense.
Exeter Borough will collect all
plastic household containers on-
ly numbers one through seven.
The number is located in the
chasing arrows on the bottom of
the household containers. All
lids can be placed in the recy-
cling also. Five-gallon plastic
containers are also acceptable.
No plastic toys, fencing or other
materials are acceptable.
Cosmopolitan Seniors
The Cosmopolitan Seniors
will meet againat 1p.m. onTues-
day, June 19 at St. Anthony’s
Center in Exeter. Hosts/hostess-
es are Mary Coleman, Evelyn
Naples, Joanne Naples Frank
Schall and Betsie Williams.
Dolores and Jonathon Sobo-
cinski were introduced as new
members at the previous meet-
ing.
President Vic congratulated
co-chairs of the Anniversary
Mass and Dinner Cheryl Pipher
and MaryAnn Markowski and
their committee of Frances Po-
luske, Bernadine Bednar, Jane
Mikolosko, Theresa Bekanich,
Marie Mantione and Marie Spe-
razza for the great job they did
both in church and the dinner.
Special mention was made to the
treats on the tables with candy
and special napkins and the des-
serts they prepared.
After the meeting, the group
enjoyed refreshments and Bingo
was played. 50/50 winners were:
Amy Alpaugh, Frank Fountain,
Marcella Fountain, Rose Gun-
sior, and Jane Mikolosko. Frank
Fountain also won the special
game prize and Florence Stan-
koski and Betsie Williams
shared the Bingo jackpot.
Cosmopolitan Seniors travel
coordinator Johanna is accepting
reservations for a trip to Sands
Casino on Wednesday June 13.
There will be pickups in Exeter
and Pittston. Non-members are
welcome. Details can be ob-
tained from Johanna at 655-
2720.
Yard waste reminder
Exeter Borough has begun
yard waste collection on Thurs-
days. Residents are asked to
place yard waste curbside by 6
a.m. and are encouraged to use a
mulching mower blade and
mulch grass weekly, leaving it on
the lawn. The benefits include
keeping fertilizer and pesticides
onthe treatedyard, thus reducing
the expense of additional treat-
ments.
Yard waste consists only of the
following materials: shrubbery
or grass clippings and tree limbs.
Tree limbs are not to exceed
three feet lengthor1/2-inchindi-
ameter. Limbs should be bun-
dled, tied and placed in an open
container. Rocks, stones, dirt
and animal waste are not accept-
able forms of yard waste. Any
yard waste containing unaccept-
able materials will not be collect-
ed.
St. Barbara’s Parish
The Feast of St. John the Bap-
tist will be celebrated on Sunday,
June 24. Masses will be held at
7:30 a.m., 9 a.m., 10:30 a.m. and
7 p.m. Anyone wishing to make
a donation for the flowers can ei-
ther send it to the office or drop it
Community-wide yard sale July 1 at Little League
EXETER
EILEEN CIPRIANI
287-3349
ecipriani@comcast.net
The Exeter Lions held their annual installation dinner on June 6 at Cuz's restaurant. Newly-elected
officers are, from left, Lion Rich Shields, treasurer; Lion Mick Burke, financial secretary; Lion Janet
Serino, president; District Governor Dennis Cook, Lion Steve Sokach, Lion Tamer; and Lion Joseph
White, secretary.
See EXETER, Page 47
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There will be a special meet-
ingfor West Pittstonresidents re-
garding the York Avenue Sewer
Project at 7 p.m. on Monday,
June18 at the nunicipal building.
For further information, call
Ellen in the borough office at
655-7782, option 1.
Strawberry Festival
The Session and Deacons of
the First United Presbyterian
Churchof West Pittstonare plan-
ning their annual Strawberry
Festival and Mini-Flea Market
for 11a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday,
June 23 at St. Cecilia’s, Wyom-
ing Avenue, Exeterrain or shine.
Tickets for the strawberries
and ice creamare available at the
door.
For more information, contact
Sharon Harding or James Thy-
ren at 654-8121.
Rams news
The West Pittston Rams will
hold one “late” sign up for the
upcoming 2012 season from6 to
8 p.m. on June 27 at the club-
house at the football field, Bell
Tower entrance. Cost is $110 per
child, which includes 10 lottery
tickets at $5 each. Additional
children per family are $10 each.
New football players will be
required to purchase a jersey.
Ages 5-7 will be D-Team, ages
7-9 will be C-Team, ages 10-11
will be B-Team and ages 12-14
will be A-Team. League age is
the age of a child on August 1st.
League restrictions will ac-
commodate age and weight. Ev-
ery registrant must have copies
of the following: birth certifi-
cate, current picture, and two
proofs of residence (for example
- a valid driver’s license and a
utility bill).
Parents/guardians may also
use this time to drop off neces-
sary paperwork or pictures for
children already registered.
Practices start the week of July
15.
WP Golf Open
The West Pittston Open is
scheduled for Sunday, Aug. 26 at
EmanonCountryClub, Harding.
This is a major annual fundraiser
for the Parks Committee
To join the fun, stop by or call
Ellen at the borough office at
655-7782, option 1. Cost is $80
and includes golf, cart, prizes,
and dinner. Fees are due no later
than August 17.
Young Run-4-Fun
The West Parks and Recre-
ation Board will host the Fourth
of July Young Run-4-Fun at 9
a.m. on Wednesday, July 4 at the
Sobeski Stadium.
Entry forms are available in
the West Pittston Borough of-
fice.
Special thanks go to the
Wyoming Area cheerleaders and
cross country team for volun-
teering for this event. Thanks al-
so to the following sponsors: Ar-
go’s, Superior Plus Energy, Don’
Machine Shop, Dance Theatre
of Wilkes-Barre, Work of Art
Learning Center, Yoga with Co-
rinne, Blue Cross, Independent
Graphics and the West Pittston
Rec Board.
For more information, call Gi-
na Malsky with any questions
332-7817.
Corpus Christi bazaar
Corpus Christi Church bazaar
will be held at the Holy Redeem-
er Church grounds Rt. 92 in
Harding from June 29 thru July
1. Hours are 5:30 to 11 p.m. on
Friday and1to 7 p.m. on Sunday.
Entertainment: Friday, June 29
- Groove Train, 7 to11p.m.; Sat-
urday, June 30 - Flaxy Morgan, 7
to 11 p.m.; Sunday, July 1 - Wa-
terstreet with Joe Valenti & Bill
Payne, 1 to 4 p.m.; Sweet Pepper
and the Long Hots, 4 to 7 p.m.
Class of l950 reunion
West Pittston High School
Class of 1950 is planning its
62nd anniversary class reunion
for Friday, Aug. 17 at Glenmaura
Country Club, Moosic. Class-
mates who have not received an
invitation should contact George
Miller.
All reservations must be in by
July 10. A class reunion meeting
will be held at 7 p.m. on Monday,
June 18 at Jasmine Chechele
Mikita’s home.
SAT classes
Wyoming Area is again offer-
ing SATVerbal and Math review
classes this summer. If interested
in enrolling in these classes or
learning more about them, call
Mrs. Rabel at 655-2836, ext.
2339.
Each session will feature 10-
hours of instruction. Cost for
non-residents will be $50. Cost
for residents will vary depending
on enrollment. Costs are expect-
ed to run between $20 and $30
per 10-hours of instruction.
WA Class of ‘77
The Wyoming Area Class of
1977 will hold its 35th anniver-
sary class reunion from 1 to 8
p.m. on September 29 at the
Checkerboard Inn, Carverton
Road, Trucksville. Cost is $40
per person.
Reservations can be made by
sending checks payable to: WA
Class of ’77, c/o Cindy Yudiski
Lynch, 355 Susquehanna Ave.,
Exeter, PA 18643 or visit the
Wyoming Area Class of ’77
Facebook page.
Street department
Yard waste will be picked up
from Montgomery Avenue to
Erie Street onMondays andfrom
Montgomery Avenue to Susque-
hanna Avenue on Tuesdays.
Residents are asked to place
yard waste in open containers.
No plastic bags will be picked
up.
Tree limbs should not exceed
four feet in length or 1/2-inch in
diameter and must be tied in
bundles.
Any resident requesting chip-
ping of tree limbs is asked to call
the Public Works Building at
655-7786 to be placed on a
schedule.
Taxes reminder
George L. Miller, tax collec-
tor, announces the 2012 county
and borough taxes have been
mailed.
The face period began May 1
and continue until June 30. Pen-
alty period will be honored
through December 15 when the
tax books will be closed.
Office hours during rebate are
from 6 to 8 p.m. Tuesday and
Wednesday.
It is the property owner’s re-
sponsibility to forward tax bills
to their financial institution for
payment.
If a receipt is requested, in-
Special sewer project meeting Monday
WESTPITTSTON
Tony Callaio
654-5358
tonyc150@verizon.net
See WEST PITTSTON, Page 47
TrinityEpiscopal Churchof West Pittstonrecentlycelebratedthe Sacrament of First HolyCommunion
with Angel Russick, Joshua Gustinucci, Jude Wielgopolski and Tyler Pencek. As part of the celebration
of HolyEucharist that day, the childrensharedtheir knowledge of the Lord’s Prayer andsangsongs for the
Communion meditation. The children were prepared for the sacrament by Sunday School teachers Cathy
Yurish, Annie Sonday, Charise Wielgopolski and music teacher Erica Kline. Fromleft, are Joshua Gusti-
nucci, Angel Russick, Tyler Pencek and Jude Wielgopolski, along with Trinity Episcopal Church Rector
the Rev. John C. Major.
Trinity Episcopal Holy Communion Class
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The Yurek family of West Wyoming gathered
over the Memorial Day holiday weekend to cele-
brate the 90th birthday of George Yurek.
The family members came from all corners of
the country to attend a cookout in George’s honor
at Frances SlocumState Park. George and his wife,
Ellie, are lifelong residents of West Wyoming and
have three children, George, Greg and Ann.
Compost yard
The compost yard will be open from10 a.m. to 2
p.m. on Saturdays.
Yard waste containers should not exceed 30
pounds. No plastic or recyclable bags, stones or
dirt are allowed.
Residents are asked not to dumb their yard waste
outside the fence.
Tax face period ends June 23
West Wyoming Tax Collector Robert Connors
would like to remind resident’s the 2012 County/
Borough face period will end on June 23. The of-
fice will be open on Wednesday June 20thfrom6 to
8 P.M. All county/borough taxes will be collected
at the penalty amount after this date. With ques-
tions, please call 693-0130.
Recycling reminder
West Wyoming recycling containers are located
behind Hose Company #1.
Recycling can be dropped off any day of the
week.
Yurek family holds party
for patriarch’s 90th
SUBMITTED PHOTO
The Yurek family of West Wyoming gathered
over the Memorial Day holiday weekend to cele-
brate the 90th birthday of George Yurek. George
and Ellie Yurek, seated, are shown here with
their three children. Fromleft, Greg Yurek, Ann
Gavlick and George Yurek.
WESTWYOMING
The Wyoming Monument As-
sociation will hold its annual
commemorative ceremony in
tribute to the Massacre and Bat-
tle of Wyoming at 10 a.m. on
Wednesday, July 4 at the Wyom-
ing Monument National Historic
Site, Wyoming Avenue.
The monument was founded
in 1878 to mark the 100th anni-
versary of the Revolutionary
War Battle of Wyoming.
This year’s event will be the as-
sociation’s 133rd annual observ-
ance.
The ceremony features a band
concert by the Wyoming Valley
Band, floral tributes and a key-
note speaker.
The event is free and open to
the public.
Borough news
Wyoming Borough is working
on a newsletter project. The
newsletter will be distributed to
all homes within the borough.
Businesses that may be interest-
ed in advertising in the first issue
should contact the borough of-
fice at 693-0291 for more infor-
mation.
The opening day of the Farm-
er’s Market in the Butler Street
Park is scheduled for June 30.
The market will run from 9 a.m.
to 2 p.m. on Saturdays during the
growing season.
Vendor space is available.
For information, call the bor-
ough office at 693-0291.
Wyoming, West Wyoming
Senior Citizens
The Wyoming/West Wyoming
Seniors will meet at1:30 p.m. on
Tuesday, June 19 at St Monica’s
meeting center with President
Frank Perfinski presiding.
At the last meeting, reports
were made by Acting Secretary,
Angie Masstruzzo and acting
treasurer Sam DeSalvo. Servers
are Marian Pocceschi, Theresa
Alexander and Donna Pocces-
chi.
Prize winners from the last
meeting are Stanley Mulesky,
Anne Koslosky and Howard
Kelley. The Jackpot winner was
Eleanor Seneski. Reservations
and payments can be made for
the annual picnic to be held July
17 at Daley Park, West Wyom-
ing.
The affair is catered by Ann
Voitek Catering Service. Guest
speaker will be Kathleen Kroll
who will speak on banking ser-
vices from the MT Bank. There
will be refreshments after the
meeting and Bingo will be
played.
New members and guest are
welcome to spenda relaxing af-
ternoon with other seniors and
there is noobligation. Call Angie
Mastruzzo at 693-1104.
SAT review classes
Wyoming Area is again offer-
ing SATVerbal and Math review
classes this summer. If interested
in enrolling in these classes or
learning more about them, call
Mrs. Rabel at 655-2836, ext.
2339.
Each session will feature 10
hours of instruction. Cost for
non-residents will be $50 Cost
for residents will vary depending
on enrollment.
Costs are expected to run be-
tween $20 and $30 per 10 hours
of instruction.
Compost yard schedule
The West Wyoming compost
yard will be open from10 a.m. to
2 p.m. on Saturdays for residents
of West Wyoming and Wyom-
ing.
The compost yard accepts
brush, branches, leaves and
grass. Residents are reminded to
take care that yard waste does
not contain plastic or recyclable
bags.
The compost yard does not ac-
cept stones or dirt. Compost is
also available free of charge to
residents of both towns.
Annual ambulance drive
The Annual Ambulance
Membership for June 2012 –
June 2013 registration is now in
progress.
Membership applications
have been sent to every house-
hold in Wyoming Borough. If
youhave not receivedyour appli-
cation, call 693-1371 and leave a
message with your name and ad-
dress. If the name on the applica-
tion is incorrect, please, correct
it on the form.
Anyone whodoes not paytheir
membership will be responsible
for payment in full if the ambu-
lance is used.
Grass cutting reminder
Wyoming Borough reminds
residents to cut their grass and
remove high weeds from their
properties as per ordinances.
Hose no. 1 Craft show
Wyoming Hose Co. #1 33 E.
Eighth St., Wyoming, will hold a
craft show to benefit the hose
company from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.
on June 23.
Any vendors interested in
renting a table space may call
693-1371 and leave a message.
Fund drive chairman is Kirk Ca-
rey.
St. Monica’s news
A 10-part series entitled “Ca-
tholicism” begins on Tuesday,
June 26 and continues each
Tuesday until Aug. 28. The pre-
sentations will be held at 10:30
a.m. at St. Monica’s and at 7 p.m.
at St. Barbara’s.
For more information, call St.
Monica’s at 693-1991 or St. Bar-
bara’s at 654-2103 or email
olos363@verizon.net or stan-
thonyexeter@comcast.net.
Vacation Bible School is being
held from June 25-29. Lillian
Dominici is coordinating the
week’s events which include
many indoor and outdoor activ-
ities.
Adult volunteers are needed as
are teen volunteers to help with
the games and creative activities.
Helpers may call Lillian at 693-
6227.
There is a Bulletin Board in
the Hall at O.L.O.S. site to “pick
a cloud” tohelpdefraythe cost of
the Bible School.
You might pick plastic dishes,
cups and utensils.
Vocation Golf Classic 2012
will be held on Monday, July 30
at Blue Ridge Trail Golf Club,
Mountaintop. Registration is 10
a.m., lunch is at 11a.m. and shot-
gun start at si at noon.
His Excellency Bishop Joseph
C. Bambera and the Seminarians
will add a special challenge to
the participants.
Reception and awards will fol-
low play.
For more information and reg-
istration, call 207-2250 or con-
tact Development@dioceseof-
scranton.org.
133rd Wyoming Monument commemoration July 4
WYOMING NEWS
EILEEN CIPRIANI
287-3349
ecipriani@comcast.net
See WYOMING, Page 46
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The Wyoming Area Thespian Troupe 4795 inducted its new members on May 20.
A candlelight ceremony was held with refreshments served afterward.
Newly-inducted thespians are, from left, first row, Zoe Laporte, Ashley O’Valle,
Julia Banas, Emily Smith, April Davis, Samantha Williams, Mia Perrino, Olivia Kat-
ula, and Stephanie Brown. Second row, Hannah Johnston, Kelsey Frank, Sara Roma-
nowski, Victoria Pennington, Kyle Brogan, Alex Krispin, Jared Saporito, Julia Gober,
Brittany Thomas and Lucy Williams.
Wyoming Area Thespian Troupe inducts members
WA ice hockey
The WA Ice Hockey Middle
School League now taking
names of interested fifth and
sixth-grade students for the
2012-2013 season residing with-
in the Wyoming Area School
District.
Games and practices will be
held at the Revolution Ice Center
in Pittston.
For more information and if
interested in joining the Middle
School League, contact Dawn
Thomas at mejane134@aol.com
Library news
Wyoming Free Library an-
nounces summer activities for
the children:
Fancy Nancy and the Friends
of the WyomingFree Librarysay
“Bonjour!” (that means “hello”
in French) and ask the pleasure
of your company at a Tea Party
from 10 a.m. to noon on Satur-
day, July 7.
Dress in your most glamorous
outfit and receive a “Cadeau”
(that means “gift” in French.)
Luke Fuller, our maitre d’, will
escort guests.
Boys and girls and a parent are
invited.
Nancy has invited a visitor
from France to join us – 16 year
old, Tatiana Enjovly from Lyon,
France.
A donation of $2 per child in-
cludes the cost of a photo. Call
the Library at 693-1364 or sign
up on Facebook by June 25 to re-
serve you place at the table.
“Bientot” (that means “see you
soon” in French.)
Teddy Bear’s Picnic is spon-
sored by Little Miss Library,
Grace Washney and her Court,
Abby Tirva and Eliana Para at
Butler Street Park from2 to 3:30
p.m. on Saturday, June 23.
Bring your blankets and your
favorite teddy bear (or stuffed
animal.)
Enjoy some teddy bear music,
games and snacks. Adonation of
$2 per family is asked. A photo
of your child will be taken with
the bear.
Call the library at 693-1364 to
sign up by June 18. In case of
rain, the event will be held at the
library.
An introduction to making
bracelets using “Memory Wire”
and an assortment of beads will
be held from10 to 11:30 a.m. on
Thursday, July19. “Mommy and
Me” is for Ages 4 and up and an
independent learning group for
ages 8 and up.
Follow-up classes can be ar-
ranged to make earrings and
necklaces.
The cost per bracelet is $5.
Call the Library by July 14 to
reserve a slot in the class.
Summer Adult Program
Monday, June 18 – 10 a.m.,
Summer Reading Club registra-
tion.
The top reader of the summer
will be awarded the grand prize
to be determined at a later date.
When you return your books, the
staff will mark your reading log
Friday, June 29–6p.m., movie
night, “The Artist”
Saturday, July 7 –1p.m., book
discussion, “Fifty Shades Dark-
er” by E.L. James
Sunday, July 22 - Field trip to
Movies14inWilkes-Barre tosee
“The Dark-Knight Rises Time,”
the first matinee showof the day.
Lunch and discussion after the
movie.
Saturday, Aug. 18 – Noon,
Book discussion, “Fifty Shades
Freed” by E.L. James
Friday, Aug. 29 – 6 p.m., Mo-
vie Night, “Fight Club”
Friday, Aug. 31 – 6 p.m., Mo-
vie and book discussion, “Fight
Club” by Chuck Palahniuk. Last
day to mark your reading log and
top reader announced
2012 Summer Reading Club
Activities
Register children at 693-1364.
Monday, June 18 – 10 a.m.,
Summer Reading Club registra-
tion
Thursday, July 5 – 11 a.m.,
Make your own glow in the dark
jewelry; ages 6 and up.
Friday, July 6 – 11 a.m., Make
your own glow in the dark jew-
elry; ages 6 and up
Monday, July 9 – 10 to 11:30
a.m., preschool story time; ages
3-5, “If You Give a Mouse A
Cookie” by Laura Numeroff
Library hours are 10 a.m. to 6
p.m. Monday and Friday; 9 a.m.
to 5 p.m. Tuesday through
Thursday; and 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Saturday.
Wyoming
Continued from Page 45
The Falls Senior Center spon-
sored by the Area Agency on
Aging for Luzerne/Wyoming
counties invites anyone 60+ to
the following activities:
Wednesday, June 20 - 9 a.m.,
warm up for walking; 9:20 a.m.,
walking; 11a.m., Garden Club; 1
p.m. Jodi Kashuba will give a
musical vocal guitar presenta-
tion.
There will be some sing along
as well.
Friday, June 22 – 9 to 11 a.m.,
Farmer’s Market Voucher distri-
bution.
Anyone wishing to join us for
a hot meal at noon for a suggest-
ed donation of $2 should RSVP
to Twila at 388-2623 by 12:30
p.m. the day before.
The center is located at 28132
Sullivan’s Trail, State Route 92,
West Falls and is open from 9
a.m. to 2 pm. Monday through
Friday.
FA L L S N E WS
Activities at
Senior Center
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clude a self addressed stamped
envelope with payment.
For appointments, call 655-
3801 or 655-7782 ext. 232.
Birthday notes
Celebrating this week: Sam
and Shaun Fuller, June 18; Jan
Morris Whelan, Sandra Nardell,
Bill Kelly, June 18; Stacey Red-
mond, Brian Redmond, Jr., Abby
Schwerdtman, June 19; Jamie
Sheridan, Lauren Maloney, June
20; Katrina Sapiego, Leeanne
Walsh, Jerry Zezza, Abby
Thornton, June 21; Mia Pagnotti,
Dion Fernandes, June 23.
Thought for the week
Humor is the best weapon
against sarcasm; laugh at it!
Quote of the week
“Sometimes by losing the bat-
tle you find a way to win the
war.” – Donald Trump
Bumper sticker
Friendships are discovered
rather than made.
West Pittston
Continued from Page 44
in the collection basket.
First Communion pictures and
DVDs are in. Call Denise to pick
them up.
Father’s Day envelopes are
available in the back of both
churches.
The Christian Women’s Orga-
nization is sponsoring an Italian
Basket for the Bazaar. Anyone
wishing to donate items for the
basket can drop them off at the
rectory between 9 a.m. and 2
p.m. Monday through Friday.
The last dayfor donations will be
Thursday, July 12.
During the summer months
we will watching and discuss a
series by Fr. Robert Barron
called “Catholicism.” If interest-
ed, call the parish office. The se-
ries of 10 presentations begins on
Tuesday, June 26 and continues
each Tuesday until Aug. 28. For
more information, contact St.
Monica’s at 693-1991 or St. Bar-
bara’s at 654-2103.
Volunteers are needed for set-
up and clean-up, kitchen, grill,
food service, and grounds for the
summer picnic July 20, 21 and
22.
Flea market: Time to start
cleaningout your basement, attic
and garage. All those treasures
you no longer need can be donat-
ed to our huge indoor flea mar-
ket. Items can be dropped off at
the parish center Friday Thru
Tuesday after noon. Drop-off is
at the side door by Pride. Please
do not leave anything in front of
the door. Items NOT accepted
are clothes, shoes, textbooks, en-
cyclopedias, or electronics that
do not work.
Basket baffle/Chinese auc-
tion: This year we are continuing
with the basket raffle and look
forward to your creativity and
basket theme ideas. Contact Ka-
ren Bernardi 655-6329 or Cyn-
thia Liberski 693-2349.
Band Sponsors: Anyone inter-
ested in sponsoring a band for
one night? If so, call Ray at 655-
6329.
Entertainment raffle: Items
are needed for this raffle. Dona-
tions could include new and
boxed: :iPod, notepad, Kindle or
Nook. Anything pertaining to
electronics or entertainment will
do. Call Barbara at 654-0645 for
details.
Exeter
Continued from Page 43
monly prescribed.
However, new research shows
that diets rich in fruits, vegeta-
bles and low-fat dairy products
give additional benefit. Low-fat
milkproducts fortifiedwithvita-
min D are best because Vitamin
D may also help protect against
prostate cancer. Our best sources
of vitamin D are sunlight, fatty
fish and fortified milk.
On the other hand, questions
have been raised recently about
dairy products and risk for pros-
tate cancer. The American Insti-
tute for Cancer Research be-
lieves that at this point in time,
“we can neither prove nor dis-
miss the possible link between
milk and prostate cancer. More
research needs to be done before
any changes are made to dietary
recommendations for dairy
products."
Fat andtotal calorie intake also
affect prostate cancer risk. Be-
cause of milk’s excellent nutrient
content and known health bene-
fits, AICR advises men to in-
clude small amounts of dairy
foods in the diet, but not to go
over 2000 mg of calciumper day.
Fish
Certain varieties of fish, in-
cluding salmon, tuna, mackerel
and sardines are rich in “ome-
ga-3 fatty acids.” This particular
kind of fat offers protection
against death from heart attack.
There is also evidence that these
fatty acids may help reduce risk
of prostate cancer. Try to eat two
fish meals per week.
Vegetables
Men who eat lots of vegeta-
bles, especially those in the cru-
ciferous family - broccoli, cauli-
flower, cabbage and kale - have
significantly lower rates of pros-
tate cancer. Vegetables and other
plant-based foods, including
whole grains and beans or leg-
umes, also offer protection
against heart disease and colon
cancer. Eat a variety of vegeta-
bles to ensure the best range of
protective components, includ-
ing powerful antioxidants, vita-
mins, minerals, and fiber.
Help your dad or husband stay
healthy by serving him these
easy-to-make smoothie.
Orange-Pineapple Smoothie
1 banana
2 cups pineapple chunks
packed in juice and drained
1 cup orange juice
1/4 cup nonfat milk
2 Tbsp. honey
4-5 ice cubes
Place in blender. Blend.
Serves 2
Nutrition
Continued from Page 31
The Pittston Library offers ba-
sic computer class for adults at
10:30 a.m. on Thursdays.
Crochet Club is at 10 a.m. on
Tuesdays and 6 p.m. on Thurs-
days.
The Monday Lego Club group
will meet on July 9 and the
Wednesday group will meet on
July 11.
Lego Club member may
switch days for the summer only.
The Child, Teen and Adult
Summer Reading Program is
currently in session. The pro-
gram will run June 18 to August
13. Each week participants can
choose a bedtime story. Bedtime
stories are wrapped books that
kids can take home and rate.
Each returned rate slip will be
entered to win prizes.
Submissions are welcome for
an Art Contest based on the
Dream Big theme. Submissions
can be in all art medium except
sculpture and must be no larger
than 15 inches Deadline for sub-
mission is July 23.
Volunteers from sixth grade
up are needed to help with book
logs. The hours can be used for
community service hours.
An Adult Baked Goods Book
Club will meet at 6 p.m. on June
18 to discuss the book, “The Par-
ticular Sadness of Lemon Cake”
by Aimee Bender
The Friends annual meeting is
set for Wednesday, June 20.
Those planning to attend are
asked to contact the library.
Basic computer classes offered at Pittston Library
Potholes filled
During Council session, it was
reported that potholes on Center
Street have been filled and grass
has beencut onRock, Center and
Parsonage Streets.
Runoff problems
Councilman Dave Stefanoski
toured the area on Parsonage
Street due topropertyowners ex-
periencing water runoff prob-
lems and added that Secretary
Treasurer Angela Acierno will
send letters to property owners
and businesses in the area.
Property damage
Kappa Graphics will be con-
tacted about resident complaints
due to property damage incurred
from truck traffic. Various signs
have been placed on Grandview
and Rock Streets.
Grass pickup
Grass will be picked up on
Wednesdays with a 3-bag limit.
Compost service
Councilmen Bob Gable and
Dave Stefanoski reported that
Greater Pittston Compost should
begin service in a few weeks.
Hose company news
Councilman Phil Falvo report-
ed the Hughestown Hose Com-
pany had three activated fire
alarms, one brush fire, 11 can-
celleden-route, 14EMS, twofire
police, five investigations, two
structure fires for a total of 38
calls. Councilman Bob Gable re-
ported that Police Chief Steve
Golya listed 45 incidents, 11traf-
fic citations, three criminal, two
K-9, two EMS and five accident
responses.
Picnic in the Park
The annual Picnic in the Park
will be held from noon to 5 p.m.
on July 21. Anyone wishing to
donate salads and baked goods
may do so by calling 654-2061.
The day will include games,
tug of war between Hughestown
Police and Hughestown Firemen
with the loser going into the
dunk tank, moonwalk, pony
rides from 1 to 3 p.m. food and
refreshments free of charge. Do-
nations are being accepted.
Softball schedule
The schedule for the Huges-
town Girls’ League is as follows:
Monday – Twigs at Daffodils;
Tuesday – Rosebuds at Violets;
Wednesday – Daffodils at Rose-
buds and Thursday – Violets at
Twigs.
Picnic in the Park set July 21
HUGHESTOWN
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Sports
Greater Pittston Majors
The Exeter Yankees won two
games during the week. They
finished with the best record in
the Greater Pittston Interleague.
The Tournament season begins
this week.
The brackets will be drawn to-
day, Sunday June 17.
Exeter Yankees 8
WP Pugliesi’s 4
In a close game at Exeter
Wednesday, Matt Wright jump-
ed on a 2ndinning pitch sending
it deep over the centerfield fence
for a 3-run HR. The Yankees ral-
lied for 6 runs in the 2ndafter
Mason Egan singled to start the
offense. Alex Gushka and CJ
Rome both doubled in the inning
and Aaron Zezza singled.
Wright’s triple in the first and
Anthony DeAngelo’s RBI single
put the Yanks up 2-0 early. Pugs
fought back in the 2ndoff a hit by
Chris Chipolis knocking in Jake
Switzer. Anthony Nardell kept
the Yankees bats quiet for sever-
YOUTH BASEBAL L AND SOF TBAL L
BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE SUNDAY DISPATCH
The Exeter Yankees, sponsored by Parini's WS Beverage finished the GP Interleague regular season with the top record at 16-1. The Yankees lost their only game last
week at West Pittston to a fine Cenera's teamled by PJ Angeli and Casey Orlando. Front row, fromleft, Jeremy Harman, CJ Rome, Aaron Zezza, Anthony DeAngelo, Ma-
son Egan. Second row, Thomas Brennan, Nick Semanek, Jacob Mikoliczyk, Alex Gushka, Ethan Rash, Dylan Harman, Matt Wright and Alex Ambruso.
Exeter Yankees take crown
West Pittston's
Antonio DeNardi
slides safely into
second base
ahead of the tag of
Jenkins Township
second baseman
Ryan Zelonis.
Pittston Knights finish hot; All-Star season up
See CROWN, Page 49
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al innings as Pugs came back
fighting. Nardell doubled and
scored a run in the 5thand Switz-
er and Chipolis struck again for
hits in the 6thwith some clever
base running.
Alex Ambruso made a clutch
catch for Exeter as they held on
for their 15thvictory. All players
from both teams were treated to
cookout following the game.
Exeter Yankees 2
Duryea 0
Matt Wright pitched a gem
Friday night in Duryea, striking
out 17-batters in a 2-0 shutout.
Wright scattered 3 hits over six
innings to close an unforgettable
season for Exeter, who finished
with a record of 16-1. CJ Rome
knocked in Wright to take a 1-0
lead in the first. Hunter Ralston
then held the Yankees in check
over the next 3 innings. Wright’s
triple in the 5thknocked in Aa-
ron Zezza, after his single, for an
insurance run. Ethan Rash added
a single for Exeter. Blake Brown
led the offense with 2 singles for
Duryea and K. Ralston added a
single.
Jenkins Yankees 13
WP Jacks 12
The last season game between
Jenkins Township Milazzo Yan-
kees and West Pittston Jacks un-
der Friday night lights was a
thriller to the end. Both teams
had top of the line offense with
Donovan O’Boyle 2 for 2, Ryan
Zelonis 2 for 3 and Cody Noone
2 for 3 leading Jenkins.
Single hitters were Dominic
Stella, Nick Scavo, Santo Insala-
co, Zach Mascelli and Dominic
Cerreta. Mark A had two home
runs for West Pittston Jacks and
Dylan turned in a 5 for 5 night at
the plate. West Pittston Jacks
threatened in the top of the sixth
but Kyle Mlodzienski made a su-
perb game ending catch.
Pittston Knights 10
Duryea Legion 0
C.J. Pisack hurled a no-hitter
in a shortened game at Duryea.
There was no shortage of hits
for Pittston. Pisack and Dylan
Spurlin led the hitting attack, go-
ing 3 for 3 each. Jimmie Dillon
and Michael Skutack had two
hits apiece, while A.J. Gorto,
Jake McCabe, and Brooklyn Pe-
dana each added a hit. Gorto
kept the no-hit bid alive by field-
ing a near-perfect bunt attempt
and getting the out at first.
Kyle Ralston provided strong
defense behind the plate for Du-
ryea.
JT Yankees 10
PT Phillies 0
Jenkins Township Milazzo
Yankees defeated the Pittston
Township Phillies 10-0 with the
pitching of Zach Mascelli, Nick
Scavo and Cody Noone who
combined for a no-hitter. Offen-
sive leaders for Jenkins were Co-
dy Noone who went 3 for 4 at the
plate with a triple, Santo Insala-
co who went 2 for 2 with a dou-
ble and Kyle Mlodzienski with a
double. Ryan Zelonis, Nick Sca-
vo, Tyler Mozeleski and Domin-
ic Cerreta also contributed with
singles for Jenkins.
Pittston Knights 11
WP West Side Auto 1
Dylan Spurlin jump-started
the game with a homerun in the
first inning, and followed it up
with a single and a second home-
run in the 4th at West Pittston.
John Brady pitched the 4-in-
ning game, surrendering only
one hit and striking out nine.
Alex Bouika and Jake
McCabe also had three hits.
Nathan Searfoss, C.J. Pisack,
and Brady each added a hit.
John Hogan had West Pitt-
ston’s only hit.
Pittston Knights 7
WP Moose 1
C.J. Pisack struck out 13 bat-
ters in 5 innings for the win,
while Dylan Spurlin led the of-
fense with a homerun and a dou-
ble.
Other hitters for Pittston were
Pisack, Nathan Searfoss, Jimmie
Dillon, and Alex Bouika with
singles. Jake McCabe pitched
the last 1 2/3 innings to close the
game.
West Pittston’s Eric Speicher
had two hits and Dylan Melberg-
er pitched a fine game.
Diamond wins two in final
week and ends the season with a
overall record of 14-3.
WP Cenera 7
WWW Diamond 10
Cenera’s took a four to nothing
lead in the first inning with key
hits from PJ Angeli, Brad Bar-
letta and Joey Bender.
Diamond had to come from
behind scoring four runs in the
third inning and five runs in the
fifth inning to get the win.
The offense was led by key
hits from Jim Kosco and Dimitri
DePietro along with doubles by
Matt Hindmarsh, Matt Silinskie
and Josh Cumbo. Jim Kosco
came in relief and pitched 5
strong innings to get the win.
PJ Angeli had two hits includ-
ing a home run and Brad Barlet-
ta had two doubles to lead Cen-
era’s.
WWW Diamond 16
Pittston Twp Phillies 5
Diamond was led by Matt Si-
linskie’s three hits including a
double and Matt Hindmarsh’s
two hits including a double. Josh
Cumbo got the win on the
mound. Pittston Twp Phillies
were led by John Delucca with
two hits including a double.
Jenkins Junior Softball
Jenkins 1 Kingston Misfits 0
Taylor Baloga won a pitchers’
duel Sunday at Jenkins, striking
out 15 in a shutout win. Baloga
also went 2-3 at the plate. Mindi-
na Lieback and Madison Ashby
also had hits for Jenkins.
Jenkins Township shortstop DomCerreta fields a grounder
against West Pittston.
BILL TARUTIS PHOTOS/FOR THE SUNDAY DISPATCH
Jenkins Township first baseman DomStella watches his drive go foul on Friday night.
Crown
Continued from Page 48
See CROWN, Page 53
West Pitt-
ston catch-
er Dylan
Kostak fires
to third
base on a
pickoff
attempt on
a Jenkins
Township
base run-
ner.
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When the crowd of 1,000 fans
encircling Riverside Park in the
Junction on July 21, 1908 heard
“pitching for Pittston, Mathew-
son of Factoryville” coming
from the announcer’s mega-
phone there must have been
quite a stir among them.
Of course, most of the fans
knew it wasn’t “Big Six” or
“Matty" as Christy Mathewson
was known, pitching for Pittston.
It was his little brother Nick,
who was only 18-years-old.
But big brother Christy was an
international celebrity of such
magnitude that even an appear-
ance by his kid brother was an
event, especially as it was the
kid’s professional de-
but.
That’s right, profes-
sional.
Historically, Pitt-
ston has a reputation
as a hotbed of ama-
teur baseball fromthe
Pittston Brothers
starring Merle and
Bucky Harris to the
Red Devils power-
house in the 40s and
50s which sent play-
ers to professional
leagues to the Subur-
ban League which
operated for 50 years from the
1910s into the 1960s.
But what is little known about
baseball inPittstonis that in1908
a professional Pittston team was
entered in the Atlantic League
which had been formed in 1907.
The sequence of events that
led up to Pittston fielding a pro-
fessional team in the Atlantic
League began in February of ’08
when league president J.W. Dob-
binvisitedPottsville andShamo-
kin to gauge support for entering
coal region towns in the league.
Later that month at a meeting
in Allentown an eight-team cir-
cuit was formed with 1907 hold-
overs Elizabeth, NJ; Easton, Ha-
zleton, Pottsville, and Allentown
and new teams from Shamokin,
Mt. Carmel and York. The salary
limit was set at $1,400. That’s per
team, not player.
The Atlantic had operated as
an “outlaw” league in 1907 and
Dobbins wanted to go legit in
’08. On outlaw league was one
that did not belong to the Nation-
al Association of Professional
Baseball Leagues which in 1903
set up a National Agreement
which protected teams with ter-
ritorial rights and salary limits.
In 1908 the Atlantic asked for
protection as a Class C league.
But because the Atlantic operat-
eda teaminWilliamsport, which
also had a teamin the Pennsylva-
nia-New Jersey League and
which also wanted protection,
the teams clashed, literally.
On a day in May when both
teams were rained out, the Penn-
sylvania-New Jersey
League team parad-
ed Willamsport
streets with a march-
ing band and ban-
ners, which led to a
brawl with the At-
lantic team. Players
and fans got in fist
fights and banners
were destroyed.
That fight may
have been even, but
in court the Atlantic
lost. Ajudge ordered
the Atlantic Wil-
liamsport team to
play several miles out of town
and gave protection to Pennsyl-
vania-New Jersey League team.
By the time the Atlantic sea-
son opened on May 6, the Eliza-
beth team had jumped to the
Union League and York had
folded leaving a six-teamleague,
all in Northeast and Central
Pennsylvania. But even with the
loss of two teams and the loss in
court, attendance was strong.
Crowds up to 2,500, likely an ex-
aggeration, were reported for
some games at a time when five
major league teams averaged un-
der 3,000.
With travel cost low, attend-
ance high the teams and league
making money Dobbins expand-
ed the league to eight teams in
July.
The only way to add two teams
in July was to end the season and
start over with a new schedule.
Pottsville was given the first half
pennant and agreed to play the
second half winner for the over-
all Atlantic League title. The
second half was set up with a 56
game schedule with 28 home
games for each team.
Dobbins wanted a team in
Wilkes-Barre, even though the
Wilkes-Barre Barons were es-
tablished in the New York State
League. That didn’t bother Dob-
bins as he was already consid-
ered an outlaw.
Speculation was Tamaqua
would get the second new team,
but onJuly1Dobbins announced
Pittston would get the eighth
team. The team owners were
Thomas McAndrewand the Pitt-
ston Baseball Association,
which owned Riverside Park in
the Junction. McAndrew said
within a day of the announce-
ment 50 men had applied for
tryouts.
Pittston took the nickname
Gamecocks and opened the sec-
ond half of the Atlantic League
season against the Wilkes-Barre
Whitecaps on July 21 at YMCA
Park in Wilkes-Barre. Wilkes-
Barre won 6-0 with a 1-hitter
pitched by McCarthy, who had
been lured from the Barons.
Martin Moughan fromPort Grif-
fith pitched for Pittston. Bleach-
ers had not yet been erected and
the crowd was small.
The next day Wilkes-Barre
and Pittston played again in Pitt-
ston at Riverside Park in Pittston
with Mathewson, seemingly out
of the blue, pitching for Pittston.
The rest of the Pittstoninfieldfor
that first ever professional home
game in Pittston was: catcher,
Reinhardt from Parsons; first
base, Jones, Lehighton; second
base, Willoughby, of the Inter-
state League; third base, May-
ock, Miners’ Mills and short
stop and manager Dr. James
O’Hara, Pittston.
The outfield was all local with
Burns from Avoca in right field,
Nolan fromDuryea in center and
Gordon from Hughestown in
left.
Mattewson, according to a
newspaper account in the Pitt-
ston Gazette, “Pitched his first
professional game and had a lot.
His speed and curves and cross-
fire delivery were hard for the
Whitecaps to solve.”
Pittston won 6-3. But that was
about as good as it got for Pitt-
ston’s first professional team.
Matthewson never pitched for
Pittston again. He surfaced later
that summer pitching for Moosic
in the Scranton League.
Pittston won only four more
games the rest of the season and
were 5-36 when -- unable to
compete for attedance with the
city’s two amateur teams -- they
were moved to Tamaqua in late
August. Thus ended Pittston’s
one and only season as a profes-
sional baseball city. The outlaw
Atlantic League ended its season
two weeks early and disbanded
in 1909.
Two post scripts. On August 11
the Barons played against a fu-
ture Hall of Famer when Stan
Coveleski played third base for
Shamokin. Coveleski was 18 and
in his first professional season.
He reached the majors in1912 as
a pitcher. He pitched 14 seasons
and won 215 games.
On January 14, 1909 less than
two years after he pitched for the
Pittston Gamecocks, Nick Cov-
eleski shot himself in the head
with a .32 caliber hand gun in a
barn at his family’s farm in Fac-
toryville.
He was taken to a hospital in
Scranton, but the next day, with
his brother Christy at his side, he
died. He was19. Just three weeks
earlier he had received an offer
of $3,000 a year to play for the
Detroit Tigers. He was weighing
that offer against returningtoLa-
fayette College.
The Scranton Republican
newspaper noted, “His record of
no defeats while the pitcher of
the Keystone Academyteamwas
not excelled by any scholastic
pitcher in the country.”
LOCAL SPORTS HI STORY
When Mathewson pitched for Pittston
Brother of Christy pitched
for city’s only pro team in ’08
This account of the Nick Mathewson game was in the Pittston
Gazette in 1908
By JACK SMILES
jsmiles@psdispatch.com
On January 14, 1909
less than two years
after he pitched for
the Pittston Game-
cocks, Nick Cov-
eleski shot himself
in the head with a
.32 caliber hand gun
in a barn at his
family’s farm in
Factoryville.
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The Greater Pittston Senior
Legion baseball team started
their season playing hot base-
ball and they continued their
strong start by winning three
more games last week to im-
prove to 5-0 in the early going.
Greater Pittston’s first game
of the week came on Monday
against Swoyersville. GP was
able to pull off a 6-5 win in
nine innings.
Dylan Maloney was the start-
er but could not muster out the
win. He pitched six innings,
gave up four runs, and struck
out five. Adam Romanowski
ended up with the victory as he
pitched three innings, gave up
one run and he had two strike-
outs.
Nick O’Brien contributed to
the win with three hits and Ko-
dy Nowicki had one of GP’s
two extra-base hits with a tri-
ple.
The big blow, though, came
from Ron Musto who had a
homerun along with two other
hits.
“All of the kids are playing
equally well,” said Coach Drew
Whyte. “Monday’s game was
the best game we played all
week.”
On Wednesday, GP took on
Mt. Top 1 and pulled off anoth-
er dominant win, 8-0.
Romanowski continued his
excellent pitching with a com-
plete game shutout with seven
strikeouts, three hits allowed,
and one walk. He earned his
third win of this season.
“That kid is a horse. He asks
for the ball every time out. Ob-
viously we have to be careful
not to pitch him too much but
he’s a tough kid,” Whyte said.
The offense from Wednes-
day’s was highlighted by a
three-hit game by P.J. Bone, in-
cluding a double for GP’s only
extra-base hit, and two hits
from Trent Grove.
Greater Pittston also played
on Friday at Wilkes-Barre and
won their fifth straight, 7-6.
Because of all of their recent
games, GP had to dive into
their pitching depth. Eric Walk-
owiak started the game and
gave Pittston exactly what they
needed. He pitched a complete
game, giving up six runs and
ten hits while picking up the
win.
Kody Nowicki had two hits,
including a triple, and Nick
O’Brien contributed three hits.
Greater Pittston was sched-
uled to make up a rained out
game from Tuesday on Satur-
day, June 16. The game ran past
the Dispatch deadline but re-
sults can be found in today’s
Times Leader or at timesleader-
.com.
“[After Saturday] there are 12
games left in the season. Even
if we split those games we still
have a good shot of making the
playoffs so the good start is
important. The kids are playing
hard,” Whyte said.
GP has four games this
week: Sunday, June 17, and
Tuesday June 19, are regularly
scheduled games but on Thurs-
day, June 21, they will be mak-
ing up a game against Nanti-
coke at the Honeypot field. GP
also will be playing a game on
Friday, June 22, which will be
played at the Atlas Field in
Exeter but Mt. Top will be the
home team.
AMERI CAN L EGI ON BASEBAL L
Above, Adam Romanowski
tossed a great game on the
way to defeating Mt. Post
from Mountaintop, 8-0.
GP improves
to 5-0 with
three victories
Pitchers lead way to three
solid victories last week
By TOMMY ROMANELLI
Dispatch correspondent
Left, Greater Pittston 2nd
basemen, Mike Carey lays
down a bunt to advance
runners against Mt. Post.
Coleman - Chiavacci Capture Emanon
Founders DayChampionship.The teamof
Len Coleman and Dr. Gene Chiavacci
captured the 5th Annual Emanon Country
Clubs Founders Day 3-Day tournament
last weekend.
Coleman Chiavacci had a three-day to-
tal of 198 highlighted by a 8-under par 62
on Saturday which gave them a two shot
advantage heading into the final round.
Runners up of Bill and David Mecca
match the winners score of 67 to finish
with a score of 200 two strokes back. The
tournament highlight was a Friday after-
noon hole in one on # 9 by Wes Stelevich.
Championship Flight
1st - Len Coleman - Dr. Gene Chiavacci
198
2nd - Bill Mecca - David Mecca 200
3rd - Ted Matthews - Brandon Mat-
thews 205
4th - Alan Brown - Rich Brown 209
1st Flight
1st - Joe Coleman - Mike Carroll 216
2nd - Bob Lampman - Mike Matute 217
3rd - Charlie Shugdinis - John Petrosky
218
4th - Steve Selenski - Jim Breck 218
2nd Flight
LOCAL GOL F
Coleman-Chiavacci capture Founders Day trophy
Brandon Matthews tees off on the first hole.
Brandon just graduated fromPittston Area .
Rick Laneski attempts to chip in
on No.3.
Longtime Emanon member Joe Gentile
putts from20-feet out.
Joe Angelella has an easy putt to
finish out an early hole.
TONY CALLAIO PHOTOS/FOR THE SUNDAY DISPATCH
Joe Coleman digs his way out of a bunker on No.3.
Duo in annual
Falls event take
victory with 198
See FOUNDERS, Page 53
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1st - Len Benefante - Guy Fas-
ciana 216
2nd - Rick Barge - Mike Am-
itia 223
3rd - Rocco Barge - Pete Be-
zak 224
4th- Joe Biago- JohnMulhern
225
3rd Flight
1st - Adam Schoonover - Joe
Colangelo 232
2nd - Mike Chiampi - Rob
Belza 232
3rd - Joe Renzi - Matt Renzi
233
4th - Clem Parulis - Kevin
McCracken 234
4th Flight
1st - Jerry Zezza - David Zezza
247
2nd - JimJoseph - Mike Busch
248
3rd - Norm Naughton - Mike
Naughton 249
4th - Tony Petrucci - Hyzenski
249
Len Benfanti sinks a putt with his partner Guy Fasciana looking
on.
Brandon Matthews poses with his former high school golf coach
Len Benfanti.
Founders
Continued fromPage 52
Nanticoke 6
Jenkins 5 (9 innings)
Jenkins fell behind early, go-
ing down 3-0 in the second. But
they battled back to take a 5-3
lead in the fifth inning. Nanti-
coke tied it up in the bottom of
the seventh.
The game stayed tied at five,
until, with two outs in the bot-
tom of the ninth, Nanticoke
scratched a run across for the
win.
Taylor Baloga went the dis-
tance for Jenkins, striking out
eleven in the tough loss. Mia
Barbieri, Rachel Kochanowski,
Madison Ashby, and Shelby
Gardner had hits for Jenkins.
Jenkins 9
Back Mountain 1
Mia Barbieri led the offensive
attack for Jenkins going 3-4
with two singles and a triple
while scoring twice. Julie Lie-
back went 3-4 at the plate. Min-
dina Lieback added two hits in-
cluding a homerun, also scoring
twice.
Taylor Baloga went 2-3. Ta-
ryn Ashby, Vicky Steinetz and
Jennifer Loughneyeachaddeda
hit. Dominique Quaglia was the
winning pitcher.
Dupont County Line Softball
14u Bow Clinic 11
National Furnace 4
Bow Clinic blasted thirteen
hits in their win over National
Furnace. Nina Cencetti and
Mindina Lieback each had three
hits while Mia Barbieri, Adison
Hazlet and Morgan Hewitt add-
ed a pair of hits. Cencetti and
Dominique Quaglia combined
for the win, eachpitcher striking
out three.
Bow Clinic 19
Rita’s 1
The hits just kept on coming
as every player had at least one
hit as Bow Clinic exploded for
fifteen of them against Rita’s.
Dominique Quaglia was the
winning pitcher in the short-
enedfour inninggame. Mindina
Lieback, Nina Cencetti, Kassity
Roche and Rachel Kochanow-
ski all had two hits.
Mia Barbieri, Vicky Steinetz,
Dominique Quaglia, Adison
Hazlet, Shelby Gardner, Taryn
Ashby and Morgan Hewitt each
added a hit.
Sharon’s Place 11
Atlantic Propane 2
Atlantic Propane (Dupont)
12u lost it’s first game of the
County Line Girls Softball
League season dropping a 11-2
decision to Sharon’s Place (Tay-
lor)
For Dupont Karaffa had two
hits and Zbegner, Shamnoski
and Williams one each.
Atlantic Propane 13
Sharon’s Place 4
Atlantic Propane bounced
back from iits first loss by tak-
ing the second game of a double
header with
Sharon’s Place13-4. Macken-
zie Gable making her first start
of the season scattered five hits
and pitched a complete game,
striking out seven. Jordan
Zbegner led the offense with a
double and triple. Kerri Sham-
noski had a 2 run triple, Bailey
Loyack, Breanna Yaskus and
Shayla Williams each hit and
scored two runs apiece.
Atlantic Propane finishes the
season 10-1 and seeded # 1 for
playoffs.
Liberty Tax 6
Arcaro’s 0
Liberty Tax (Dupont) in 10u
ended the season with a 6-0 vic-
tory over Arcaro’s of Taylor.
Liberty Tax finished 5-4 and is
# 2 seed in
playoffs.
Baloga Funeral Home 15
Rita’s 0
In 14u action Baloga Funeral
Home beltedout 18hits incruis-
ing to a 15-0 victory over Rita’s
of Scranton on Monday. Vicki
Remley pitched a 4 hit shutout
and went the distance.
Nina Minnelli, Vicki Remley
and Taylor Baloga each had
three hits, while Jenna Harrison,
Jordan Cegelka and Lexi Al-
ward chipped in with two hits
apiece.
Emma Brieling, Abbey Bra-
digan and Carly Warnagiris also
had hits.
Baloga is now 5-0 on the sea-
son.
Other Dupont scores
Pierantoni 17u lost to Ply-
mouth 18-7.
BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE SUNDAY DISPATCH
West Pittston's Marc Minichello delivers a pitch against Jenkins Township Friday night.
Crown
Continued fromPage 49
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The13 annual Blue -n- Gold Skate
Charity game was held at the Revo-
lution Ice Center in Pittston between
Wyoming Area and Pittston area ice
hockey teams.
Wyoming Area Ice Hockey hosted
this year’s charity event. The game
raised $2,500 for Faith Stoshak, a 5-
year-old twin from West Wyoming,
who is battling leukemia.
The Wyoming Area team would
like to commend the extraordinary
effort with security and parking by
the staff and general manager Ed
Von Lumm of Revolution Ice Cen-
ter.
The Wyoming Area 2011-12 ice hockey teamhelped raise $2,500. Front row, fromleft, Billy Weiss, Mark Paluski. Second row, Brittani Shearer, Aaron Dobbs, Aaron Lee,
Allyson Tokar, Tyler Porfirio, David Alberigi, Zachary Lahart, Keegan Thomas. Third row, Jeremy Stach, Daulton Shearer, David Hawk, Eric Smith, Alex Chronowski, Dak ta
Thomas, Brain McNew, Michael Dolan. Fourth row, Coach Frank Hawk, Zachary Scrobola, Tyler Yarick, Dalton Thomas, Coach Mike Kopec, Evan Rider, Billy Romanowski,
coach Rich Terrran.
Blue ‘n’ Gold Skate Game raised $2,500 for Faith
The Red Mill regained the
lead of the Emanon Thursday
Night Golf League with a 3 - 0
win over Adonizio’s.
Rick Mazar’s 35 and Guy
Fasciana’s 36 led the winners,
while Frank Smaka had 38 for
Adonizio.
O’Connor Plumbing beat
previous leader Ashley Ma-
chine 2 - 1 with Ted Matthews
carding a 37 and Jerry Gavin
40 for the winners and John
Mulhern had 35 for Ashleys.
Powers defeated Bryan
Construction 2.5 - .5 with
Clem Parulis and Jim
McCann leading the way with
38 and 43 respectively, while
Gary Rosencrans had 41 for
Bryans.
Selenski Insurance defeated
Hoffman Electric by a 2 - 1
margin with Tom Jorda lead-
ing the winners with a 40 and
Jamie Bresenhan had 36 for
Hoffman.
L O C A L G O L F
Red Mill takes back lead win 3-0 win over Adonizio’s
Mazar leads the way with a 35
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Before I get into the meat and
potatoes of my article I want to
share a few thoughts about Fa-
ther’s Day. I’m going to steal the
chance to drop a plug in for all of
us dads out there. I have, over the
years, written several articles
about my father and the fact that
I grew up in a hunting and fish-
ing family. I love my dad and I
wish him many more happy Fa-
ther’s Days in the future. The rest
of my little tribute to this day is a
little bit of a rude awakening.
This will be the first time I’m
celebrating it without my daugh-
ters. You see, Brianna said yes to
her boss and is working a double
shift to help cover a few vaca-
tioning employees. Kristen, who
nowlives away, does a lot of trav-
eling for her work and I insisted
she stayed put in her new home-
town Hummelstown near Her-
shey.
The situation is all good
though. They are both wonderful
children with good jobs. Kristen
and I talk every morning on the
phone and Brianna is living with
me. I am truly blessed to have
such wonderful children on this
Father’s Day and I can feel their
love even if they are miles away.
So for you father’s out there who
are celebrating this day with
nothing more than a phone call
from your kids, be happy. I have
found a way to look for and find
the silver lining in any situation
and I believe you can too. Happy
Father’s Day!
Hunting Licenses sale
Pennsylvania hunting and fur-
taker licenses for the 2012-13
seasons are available through the
Game Commission’s Pennsylva-
nia Automated License System
(PALS), over-the-counter at all
Game Commission region offic-
es and the Harrisburg headquar-
ters, as well as the more than 600
in-state and out-of-state issuing
agents. Licenses also are availa-
ble through the PALS web-
site:https://www.pa.wildlifeli-
cense.com.
The Commission emphasizes
that senior lifetime hunting and
furtaker license holders, as well
as senior combination license
holders, must renewtheir licens-
es at this time. While senior life-
time license holders neednot pay
a license or transaction fee, they
must obtain the current year’s li-
cense and harvest tags.
The costs associated with the
2012-13 licenses are the same as
they have been since 1999.There
is a 70-cent transaction fee at-
tached to the purchase of each li-
cense and permit, which is paid
directly to Active Outdoors, the
Nashville-based company that
runs PALS. Returning PALS
customers are encouraged to
provide their Customer Identifi-
cation Number (CID) to speed
up processing.
If you don’t want to buy it on
line all license-issuing agents
now are part of an integrated, re-
al-time, cyber network that al-
lows them to offer some special-
ty licenses that prior to 2009
could not be provided by all issu-
ing agents under the old license
system. All license agents now
can issue senior lifetime licens-
es; reduced fee military licenses;
Mentored Youth Hunting Pro-
grampermits; elk drawing appli-
cations; bobcat and fisher per-
mits; even resident landowner
reduced-fee huntinglicenses and
Deer Management Assistance
Program Harvest (DMAP) per-
mits.
Hunters also can purchase the
special spring gobbler license,
which allows them to harvest a
second gobbler in the 2013
spring gobbler season. You may
want to consider getting your li-
cense now because the first
round of the doe license process
begins on Monday, July 9.
Get Ready to Celebrate the
Susquehanna
The Wyoming Valley River
Fest is set for next Weekend. The
three day event, June 22-24, is
bigger and better than ever. Or-
ganizers have been working
since last year to capitalize on
the beauty of the River Com-
mons and the majesty of the riv-
er. This event occurs along the
banks of the Susquehanna River
and each year, thousands of river
enthusiasts turnout to paddle,
kayak, canoe and recreate on the
waterway. The annual event at-
tracts more than 5,000 people
and features musical entertain-
ment, children’s activities and
educational programming. Here
is the schedule:
Friday, June 22, 2012 – Awak-
en the Dragon. It all starts on the
Wilkes-Barre River Commons
from 5:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. Join
the opening ceremonies and the
Dragon Boat Teams as the
Awaken the Dragon.
Also Concerts on the Com-
mons, Free Family Fishing on
the pier, Paint a Community Mu-
ral, food vendors and more. Also
hear Live musical performances
from Three Imaginary Boys,
Tribes and George Wesley.
But, perhaps the biggest draw
is the three days of paddling be-
ginning on Friday. You can get
involved by paddling the Sus-
quehanna River from West Pitt-
ston to Wilkes-Barre. It starts at
5:00 p.m. and takes about two
hours.
The Festival at Nesbitt Park
On Saturday, June 23 The Fes-
tival at Nesbitt Park begins at
noon and continues through the
afternoon wrapping up at 5 p.m.
Enjoy an afternoon of fun and
activities for all ages including
children’s art and nature pro-
grams, live mammals and birds
of preyprograms, live music per-
formed by Don Shappelle and
the Pick-Ups.
There will be a kid’s tree
climb, pony rides. The day also
includes nature hikes, kayaking
demonstrations and Dragon
Boat training. Once again this
event is highlighted by a paddle
trip down the Susquehanna Riv-
er from Harding to Wilkes-
Barre. It starts at 8 a.m. and
should wrap up by 2 p.m. The
daywraps upwitha car showand
live concerts at the River Com-
mons from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.
Sunday, June 24 – Dragon
Boat Racingonthe Susquehanna
River takes place from10 a.m. to
3p.m. This day’s river paddle trip
starts in Wilkes-Barre and ends
up in Hunlock creek. It starts at 8
a.m. and should wrap up around
2 p.m.
This is by far one of the best
ways to celebrate River’s Month-
.Whether you are a novice to
paddling or an experiencedkay-
aker, everyone is invited to join
one of the three trips. Shuttle
busses are available for paddlers
but you must register to partici-
pate. You can get all of the infor-
mation on the internet at river-
frontparks.org.
ToRegister for one of the three
River Trips contact one of the
following outfitters:
Endless Mountains Outfitters
– 570-746-9140
www.emo444.com
Susquehanna River Adventur-
es – 570-328-4001 www.susq-
paddle.com
Susquehanna Kayak and Ca-
noe Rentals – 570-388-
6107www.kayaktheriver.com
I plan on spending time at the
Wyoming Valley Riverfest.
Maybe I’ll see you there.
Be sure to watch Pennsylvania
Outdoor Life tonight at 6:30 on
WNEP. We’ll have more on the
Riverfest and a river cleanup
project planned for later this
month. Have a great day!
Happy Father’s Day and Riverfest
OUTDOORS WITH JAKE
With Don Jacobs
AIMEE DILGER/FILE PHOTO
Kayakers make
their way to
Nesbitt Park on
day 2 of the
River Sojourn,
part of Riverfest
2011 in Wilkes-
Barre.
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The Wyoming Area cheer-
leaders Annual Car Wash was
Saturday, May19, from9:00a.m.
to 2:00 p.m. at Dileo’s Service
Station, Wyoming Avenue,
Wyoming.
The girls washed cars for $5
and made $200 for the cheer pro-
gram.
The coaches are Josette Cefa-
lo, and Krista Baines.
WA cheerleaders clean machines
Pictured are the WA cheerlead-
ers at their car wash, front row,
fromleft, Dominique Denisco,
Alexa Malloy, Anna Malsky,
Oscar, Alex Dougherty, Rachel
Leandri, Brittany Lemardy,
Ivan, Danielle Bulgar, Hannah
Begley
Second row, Maria Pelliccia,
Kayla Radle, Alli Sitkowski,
Brittney Eramo, Abby Gibbs,
Jennie Skursky, Nickarena
Gilpin, Erin Maloney, Mari Tag-
gart, Kiersten Gregorio, Emily
Connors, Karyssa Gregorio,
Julianna DeNardi, Jaclyn De-
Nardi.
WA cheerleaders, Danielle Bulgar and Lauren Maloney
Fromleft, WA Cheer Captains Alex Dougherty, Rachel Leandri,
Brittany Lemardy, and Anna Malsky are ready to scrub.
Mari Taggart, Abby Gibbs, and Kayla Radle help Alexa Malloy was
the top of a vehicle.
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As swim season approaches,
the Greater Pittston YMCA re-
minds children and adults about
theimportanceof practicingsafe-
ty when in and around the water.
The Y offers a variety of swim
programs in the Greater Pittston
area where swimmers can have
funwhiledevelopingconfidence,
engaging in physical activity and
learningsafetyskills that cansave
lives.
“The Pittston YMCA is com-
mitted to providing as many op-
portunities as possible for every-
one to learn basic swimming les-
sons and water safety practices,”
saidMichael Labagh, Senior Pro-
gram/Aquatics Director, Greater
Pittston YMCA. “We encourage
kids and adults to have fun when
in and around the water, but to al-
ways make safetytheir first prior-
ity.”
The Ywill hold Learn to Swim
week where any family, Y mem-
bers or not, can bring their chil-
dren to learn howto swimand be
safe in the water. Learn to Swim
weekwill be heldfromJune 25to
June 29, daily Monday thru Fri-
day. The Ywill offer two classes;
ayouthclass(6-14yearsold) from
1 p.m. to 1:45 p.m. and a pre-
school class (3-5 years old) from
1:45 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. The cost of
this program is only $40 for the
week.
In honor of National Water
Safety Month this May, the Grea-
ter Pittston YMCA recommends
children and adults practice the
following safety tips when in and
around the water:
• Only swim when and where
there is a lifeguard on duty; never
swimalone.
•Adults shouldconstantlyand
actively watch children in and
near the water. If multiple adults
are in the vicinity, designate a
“water watcher” so everyone
knows who is on duty.
• Inexperienced swimmers
should wear a Coast Guard-ap-
proved life jacket when in, on or
around the water.
• Parents or guardians of chil-
dren who are non-swimmers or
beginninglevel swimmers should
be in the water and within arm’s
reach of their child.
•hildren and adults should not
engage in breath-holding activ-
ities in the water.
Asaleadingnonprofit commit-
tedtoyouthdevelopment, healthy
living and social responsibility,
the Yhas been a leader in provid-
ingswimlessons andwater safety
for more than 120 years. The
Greater Pittston YMCA contin-
ues tohelpyouthandadults expe-
rience the joy and benefits of
swimming, sotheycanbehealthy,
confident and secure in the water.
To register for Learn to Swim
week, stopbythePittstonY(10N.
Main St., Pittston) or call us at
655-2255. To learn more about
the Greater Pittston YMCA’s
swim programs, contact Michael
Labagh at 655-2255 ext. 104 or
email at mlabagh@greaterpitt-
stonymca.org.
YMCA swim programs teach confidence, safety
David Getz , who attends the Greater Pittston YMCA summer camp, poses at the Y pool.
R.J. Emmett, former baseball, basket-
ball and football standout at Pittston Ar-
ea, was awarded the Board of Trustees
Student-Athlete Academic Excellence
Award by Lackawanna College at the an-
nual spring banquet on May 1.
The award is given annually to a return-
ing freshman who has demonstrated edu-
cational excellence while participating in
sports. The individual selected to receive
this award must have achieved the high-
est grade point average of all freshmen
student/athletes. The recipient of this
award also receives a scholarship to be
applied toward student’s sophomore aca-
demic expenses at Lackawanna College.
Emmett, who played on the Lackawan-
na College baseball team, is the son of
Ralph and Juliann Emmett of Pittston.
He attained a GPA of 3.66 in his major of
Life Science.
He plans to continue his education to-
wards a degree in optometry.
Emmett is shown receiving the award.
Pittston Area’s R.J. Emmett
gets student/athlete award
The Dyller law firm won
both matches to take over first
place.
The lawyers are led by Capt.
Tony Reino, Paul Minichelli,
Bob Barbacci and Barry Dyll-
er.
Blandina Apartments won
three matches to remain in con-
tention in the first half.
The men of Wyoming are
Paul Santarelli, Pat Williams,
Frank Ridolfi and Jim Blandi-
na.
In one of Blandina Apart-
ments’ matches a very strange
event occurred.
Their opponent hit the polli-
na in an attempt to gain three
points but the pollina bounced
off the bocce and went back to-
ward the hitter to give Blandina
Apartments four points.
With one ball a seven point
swing took place.
A unique occurrence indeed.
Standings
....................................points
Dyller Law Firm 9-4 .....128
Bassler Equipment 8-5.. 139
Roberts’ Repairs 8-5 .....139
Blandina Apartments 8-6
............................................139
Cuz’s Bar & Grill 7-6 .....131
Old Forge Chiropractic 6-8
............................................129
KWIK’NEZ Market 6-8111
JetSurge Power Cleaning 4-9
............................................118
Atlas Realty 4-9 .............115
BOCCE BAL L
Dyller rolls into first
place in Yatesville
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OBITUARIES
Grace M. Guiliano, 92, West
Pittston, passed away Wednesday,
June 13, 2012 at home surrounded
by her family.
Born in Pittston on February 12,
1920, she was a daughter of the late
Victor and Philomena Serpe Pom-
pino.
She attended Pittston Township
schools and was employed in the
local garment industry.
She was a member of St. Barba-
ra’s Parish at St. Anthony of Padua
Church, Exeter.
She was a loving wife, mother,
grandmother, great-grandmother,
sister and aunt and will be greatly
missed.
In addition to her parents, she
was preceded in death by siblings,
Angelo Pompi-
no, Carrie Bori-
no and Charles
Pompino.
Surviving are
her husband of
68 years, Angelo
M. Guiliano; sons, Michael and
Jeanne Guiliano, Philadelphia,
and Victor Guiliano, Pittston. Also
surviving are five granddaughters,
Susan Guiliano, Philadelphia;
Vicki Marie Guiliano, Wyoming;
Santina Guiliano, Los Angeles,
Calif.; Cheryl Higgins and her
husband, Tim, Pittston; andJanelle
Guiliano and Dave Nelson, Du-
ryea; six great-grandchildren,
Timmy, Brennan, Nathan, Gianna,
Braiden and Colin; two sisters,
Rose Stochmal, West Pittston, and
Mary Kozinski, Pittston; a brother,
Michael Pompino, Florida; nu-
merous nieces and nephews.
Funeral services will be Mon-
day, June 18, 2012, at 9 a.m. from
the Peter J. Adonizio Funeral
Home, 251 William St., Pittston
with a Mass of Christian Burial at
9:30 a.m. in St. Barbara’s Parish at
St. Anthony of Padua Church, Me-
morial St., Exeter, with the Rev.
Paul McDonnell, OSJ, to officiate.
Interment will be held at West Pitt-
ston Cemetery. Friends may call
today, June 17, 2012, from 4 to 8
p.m. at the funeral home.
Online condolences may be
made at www.peterjadoniziofun-
eralhome.com.
Grace M. Guiliano
June 13, 2012
Joseph (Poppy) Casey Jr., 68,
of Pringle, passed away Saturday
April 14, 2012, at the South Bay
Hospital in Florida. He and his
wife were snowbirds and had a
winter home in Ruskin, Fla.
He was born on October 2,
1943, to Joseph Casey and the
late Gertrude Casey. He was a
graduate of Kingston High
School, and was employed at
Wyoming Valley West School
District for 28 years.
Surviving are his wife of 19
years, MaryBeth (Martin) Casey;
his father, Joseph Casey Sr., and
stepmother, Evelyn Casey; broth-
er, Thomas Casey, and wife Syl-
via; former wife,
Frances Casey;
daughters, Nan-
cy Kotulski, Lisa
Potoeski and
Sandra Casey;
and eight grand-
children, Samantha, Justin, Sarah,
Todd, Abigayle, Jarrid, Bradley
and Adam; sister-in-law, Stella
Martin; nephew Nikki and wife
Cristin; many other cousins, niec-
es and nephews. A granddaught-
er, Kayla Marie Casey, preceded
him in death.
He was a member of the Imma-
nuel Baptist Church on Zerby
Avenue, Kingston; The Sons of
the American Legion, the Moose
Lodge. He also loved his time at
the LCP Little League fields. He
enjoyed cheering for Notre Dame,
the Dodgers, and the New York
Giants and the Boston Celtics.
Memorial donations can be
made to the Immanuel Baptist
Church on Zerby Avenue, King-
ston.
The family is following the
wishes of Joseph to be cremated
in Florida. A memorial service
will be held in June or July 2012
in Pennsylvania.
Happy Father’s Day in heaven,
from his loving wife, MaryBeth,
and his children.
Joseph (Poppy) Casey Jr.
April 14, 2012
Joel E. Gurley, 48, of Duryea,
passedawaySaturday, June9, 2012,
at CMC Hospital Scranton, due to
injuries related to a motorcycle ac-
cident.
He was born in Springfield,
Mass., on July18, 1963 and was the
son of Celine (Gurley) LaRose and
the late Joel Gurley and stepfather
Vincent Judge.
Joel was a 1981 gradate of Pitt-
ston Area High School. After high
school he joined the U.S. Marine
Corps servingfrom1981-1985. Joel
was a self-employedcarpenter, ma-
sonandarborist, andhe was anavid
outdoorsmen who enjoying hunt-
ing and fishing. He will be greatly
missed by his family and friends.
In addition to his mother and
stepfather, he is survived by his sib-
lings, Charlene and her husband,
Gary Gaudette, of Springfield,
Mass.; Lynn and husband, Ray
Naugle, of Myrtle Beach, S.C.; Da-
vid Trombly, of Duryea; Doreen
andhusband, Michael Moughan, of
Hughestown; Eddieandhis fiancée
Judy O’Boyle, of Pittston, and Lori
Gurley, of West Wyoming. Also
surviving are 23 nieces and neph-
ews and eight great-nieces and
great-nephews. And his dog Lucky
“7.”
∝A memorial service was held
Wednesday, June 13, 2012, at Kies-
inger Funeral Services Inc., 255
McAlpine St., Duryea, with Father
James J. Alco of the Church of the
Holy Redeemer, Harding, officiat-
ing. NMemorial contributions may
be made to the family of Joel Gur-
ley. Online condolences may be
made to www.kiesingerfuneralser-
vices.com.
Joel E. Gurley
June 9, 2012
Jennifer Lynn Alles, 32,
of Pittston, passed away
late Thursday evening,
June 7, 2012, at the Win-
chester Medical Center,
Virginia, as a result of in-
juries she suffered from
being struck by a vehicle
on Fairfax Pike in Ste-
phens City, Va.
She was the daughter of
George and Marlene Alles.
Jen was a 1998 graduate of
Bishop O’Reilly High
School, Kingston. She was
also a graduate of Empire
Beauty School, Wilkes-
Barre.
She was previously em-
ployed by Sassy Shears,
Kingston, and Policare’s
Hair Salon, Edwardsville.
Most recently, she worked
for Ed’s Antiques and
Hauling. She traveled fre-
quently to Alabama for
various antique auctions.
Jen was also an avid Penn
State fan.
In addition to her par-
ents, Jen-
nifer is
survived
by sister,
Karen
Smith,
and hus-
band attorney Kevin
Smith, Pittston; brother,
George, Forty Fort; mater-
nal grandparents, Mr. and
Mrs. Leonard Zera, Lu-
zerne; paternal grandpar-
ents, Mr. and Mrs. George
Alles, Dallas; godmother,
Susan Seitz, Swoyersville;
godfather, Joseph Alles,
Dallas; several aunts, un-
cles, cousins and her best
friend, Ed Kuloszewski.
Funeral services was
Wednesday, June 13, 2012,
at the Hugh B. Hughes Fu-
neral Home, 1044 Wyom-
ing Ave., Forty Fort, with
a Mass of Christian Burial
from Holy Family Parish,
Luzerne. Interment servic-
es followed at St. John’s
Cemetery, Courtdale.
Jennifer Lynn Alles
June 7, 2012
David “Haz” Havard Jr.,
60, of Wilkes-Bare, passed
away suddenly on Thurs-
day, June 14, 2012 at Geis-
inger Wyoming Valley
Medical Center, Plains,
Township.
He was a son of the late
David and Rita Schumach-
er Havard. David was edu-
cated in the Wilkes-Barre
area schools and was em-
ployed by Norwood Agen-
cy. He was an avid San
Francisco 49ers fan and
was a member of the F.O.P
Lodge #36, Hanover, and
President of Faces of Pride
Motorcycle Club.
He was preceded in death
by his son, Nicholas Ha-
vard; and nephew, Scott
Bell. Surviving are daugh-
ters, Sandy Havard, Ed-
wardsville; Stephanie
Ankner, Sugar Notch;
Heather Kelly, Hanover
Township; sons, David Jr.
and Jason, both of Wilkes-
Barre; Derek, Ashley; sev-
en grandchildren; brothers,
Jeff, Pittston; Larry, Jerry
(Hoagie) and Richard
(Chicky) all of Wilkes-
Barre; sisters, Jeannie Rit-
tel, Colleen Parise and Nan-
cy Havard, all of Wilkes-
Barre, Cathy Morio, Ha-
nover Township, Michelle
Lamoreaux, Nanticoke;
nieces and nephews.
Funeral services will be
at 9 a.m. Monday, June 18,
2012, from the Yeosock Fu-
neral Home, 40 S. Main St.,
Plains Township, with
Mass of Christian Burial at
9:30 a.m. at St. Andrew
Parish, (formerly St. Pa-
trick’s Church) with Father
McGahagan officiating.
Friends may call today,
June 17, 2012, from 3 to 7
p.m.
David “Haz” Havard Jr.
June 14, 2012
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OBITUARIES
Heidi A. Mitchneck Seeher-
man, 40, of Laflin, died sud-
denly, Thursday morning, June
14, 2012, in Geisinger Medical
Center, Danville, with her lov-
ing family at her side.
Born in Kingston, she was a
daughter of Joseph and Bed-
onna Levine Mitchneck of Ha-
milton Ave., Kingston.
She was a graduate of
Wyoming Valley West High
School, class of 1990, and Indi-
ana University of Pennsylvania,
class of 1994, with a Bachelor’s
Degree in Education.
Heidi was employed as a
MH/MR caseworker for Lu-
zerne County, was a member of
Temple Israel Synagogue, its
school board, the Jewish Com-
munity Center and other civic
and religious organizations.
Heidi was preceded in death
by her paternal grandfather,
Francis Mitchneck; maternal
grandparents, Irving and
Blanche Berkowitz Levine.
She is survived, in addition
to her parents, by beloved hus-
band, Jay Seeherman; daugh-
ters, Samantha and Nora, at
home; paternal grandmother,
Aronita Daskovsky Mitchneck,
Coconut Creek, Fla.; twin sis-
ter, Ivy Frajerman and her hus-
band, Eric, Richboro, Pa.; sister
Robyn Finberg and her hus-
band, Brad, Macungie; uncle,
Hal Levine, Wilkes-Barre; aunt
and uncle, Sandie and Bob
Buller, Warminster, Pa.; moth-
er-in-law and father-in-law, Ste-
ven and Sheila Seeherman, La-
flin; brother-in-law and sister-
in-law, Scott and Maria Seeher-
man, Laflin; nieces, nephews
and cousins.
Funeral service was held
Friday, June 15, 2012, in the
Rosenberg Funeral Chapel Inc.,
348 S. River St., Wilkes-Barre.
Interment was in Temple Israel
Cemetery, Swoyersville, with
Rabbi Larry Kaplan officiating.
Shiva will be observed 2 to 4
p.m. and 7 to 9 p.m. today,
June 17, 2012, through Wednes-
day, June 20, 2012, at 27
Creekside Drive, Laflin.
Memorial contributions, if
desired, may be made to charity
of donor’s choice. Condolences
may be emailed by visiting
Heidi’s obituary at www.rosen-
bergfuneralchapel.com.
Heidi A. Mitchneck Seeherman
June 14, 2012
Marie J. Dominick, of
Ridgewood Road, Keystone,
Plains Township, passed away
on Wednesday, June 13, 2012.
She was born on June 24,
1924, daughter of the late Gui-
seppe and Linda Minelli Man-
cini.
She attended Plains Town-
ship High School. She, along
with her husband, Anso
(Amos), owned and operated
Marie’s Diner, Conyngham
Ave., Wilkes-Barre. She had
been employed by McDonalds
Restaurant, Wilkes-Barre.
In addition to her parents,
she was preceded in death by
her husband, Anso (Amos),
and sister Fannie Ledoretti.
Surviving are her daughters,
Charlotte Dominick and Linda
Dominick, both of Plains
Township; three grandchil-
dren, Amy Adamczyk Taylor
(Greg), Louisville, Ky.; Joy
Adamczyk Harris (Michael),
Philadelphia, and Aaron Nora-
kus, Philadelphia; sister Alvi-
ra Dominick.
A celebration of life was
held at Saint Maria Goretti
Parish, Laflin, on Saturday,
June 16, 2012.
Marie’s family would like to
extend a special thank you to
Erwine Home Health and Hos-
pice and to Wesley Village.
In lieu of flowers, donations
may be made to Erwine Home
Health and Hospice Inc., 270
Pierce St., Suite 101, King-
ston, PA. Funeral arrange-
ments made by the Corcoran
Funeral Home Inc., Plains
Township. Online condolenc-
es may be made at www.cor-
coranfuneralhome.com.
Marie J. Dominick
June 13, 2012
Wanda A. Braccini, 95, of
Exeter, passed away Wednes-
day, June 13, 2012 in Golden
Living Center East Mountain,
Plains Township.
Born in Plymouth on Decem-
ber 25, 1916 and raised in Exe-
ter, she was a daughter of the
late Frank and Victoria Soriani
Paolucci. She attended Exeter
schools and was a life-long
member of St. Anthony of Pa-
dua Church, Exeter. In her
younger years, Wanda had
worked at Consolidated Cigar,
West Pittston and Grico’s Res-
taurant, Exeter. She loved to
cook and garden and led a full
life until the death of her
youngest son, Louis last year.
She was preceded in death by
her husband of 62 years, Gino
Braccini; sons, Frank and Louis
Braccini; stepfather, whom she
took exceptional care of until
the endof his life, AngeloCam-
peotto; sister, Vilma Zurla and
brother, Metello Paolucci.
Surviving are her daughters-
in-law, Ann Braccini and
JoAnn Braccini; grandchil-
dren, Lisa and
her husband,
Ben Barletta;
Donna and
her husband,
Frank Bitt-
mann, and
Lori and her husband, Tony
Cook; great-grandchildren,
Alyvia Marie and Nicholas
Louis Cook; Andrew Ryan and
Paige Lauren Bittmann; Victo-
ria, F.J. and Brianna Braccini;
two nieces and one nephew.
A Mass of Christian Burial
was held Saturday, June 16,
2012, in St. Barbara’s Parish at
St. Anthony of Padua Church,
Memorial Street, Exeter, with
the Rev. Paul McDonnell, OSJ
officiating. Entombment was
in Denison Mausoleum.
In lieu of flowers, memorial
donations may be made to the
Hospice of the Sacred Heart,
600 Baltimore Drive, Wilkes-
Barre, PA 18702. Funeral ar-
rangements are entrusted to the
Peter J. Adonizio Funeral
Home, 251 William St., Pitt-
ston.
Wanda A. Braccini
June 13, 2012
Sandra L. Nocera, Old Forge,
died Friday, June 15, 2012 at the
Evergreen Skilled Nursing Cen-
ter, Scranton.
She was married to Joseph
"Bobo" Nocera. The couple cel-
ebratedtheir 53rdweddinganni-
versary on April 29.
Born in Old Forge, she was a
daughter of the late Williamand
Leona Neipert Brown. She at-
tended the Old Forge Public
Schools. Prior to her retirement,
she was employed by WEA
Manufacturing and the Old
Forge school cafeteria. She was
a member of the Prince of Peace
Church, Old Forge. Sandra was
a devoted and loving wife,
mother and grandmother. She
enjoyed camping and trips to the
casino.
The family extends a special
thankyoufor the compassionate
care given by the staff at the Ev-
ergreen Skilled Nursing Center,
Dr. Armondo Sallavanti, Denise
Talerico and her best friend, Al-
bina Ciliberto.
Sandra was
preceded in
death by a sis-
ter, Rosella
Warpus.
Surviving
are two sons, William, Joseph
and wife, Christine, all of Old
Forge; daughter, Jo-Ann Fisher
and husband, Rod, Duryea; two
brothers, William"Bud" Brown,
Ransom; James Brown, Clarks
Summit; nine grandchildren,
Brittany and Joey Fisher; Bill,
Nico, Alexandra, Cassandra,
and Joey Nocera, Brian and Eric
Wrubel; nieces, and nephews.
The funeral will be Monday,
June 18, 2012, at 9:30 a.m. from
the Louis V. Ciuccio Funeral
Home, 145 Moosic Road, Old
Forge, followed by a 10 a.m.
Mass at St. Lawrence’s Church,
Old Forge. Interment will be
held at Holy Cross Cemetery.
Friends may call today, June 17,
2012, from 5 to 8 p.m.
Sandra L. Nocera
June 15, 2012
Ruth M. Tomalis, 80, of Ed-
wardsville, went to be with her
Savior, Jesus Christ, on June
13, 2012. She spent her final
days in Celtic Healthcare Hos-
pice at Geisinger South
Wilkes-Barre surrounded by
family.
She is survived by five chil-
dren, Bill Hummel and wife
Karen of Dallas, Don Hummel
and wife Irene of Oviedo, Fla.,
Sue Spencer and husband Glen
of Centermoreland, Fran Crisa-
fulli and husband Tom of King
George, Va.,
Mike Tomalis
and wife
Theresa of
Harveys Lake;
and eight
grandchildren.
She was preceded in death
by her mother and father,
Adolf and Mildred Widman;
and brother, Bill Widman.
Ruth was a loving mother
and grandmother who loved
spending time with her family.
She was previously employ-
ed by Fran Tomalis and Son
Inc., a food distribution com-
pany in Pittston.
A Memorial Service was
held Saturday, June 16, 2012,
at Vernon Baptist Church on
Demunds Road in Centermore-
land. Interment was in Forty
Fort Cemetery.
In lieu of flowers, donations
can be made to the Polycystic
Kidney Disease Foundation,
8330 Ward Pkwy, Suite 510,
Kansas City, MO 64114-2000,
www.pkdcure.org.
Ruth M. Tomalis
June 13, 2012
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OBITUARIES
Monsignor F. Allan Conlan,
Pastor Emeritus of Saint Eula-
lia’s Parish, Elmhurst, and a resi-
dent of Clearwater, Florida, died
on Tuesday, June 5, 2012.
Monsignor Conlan, son of the
late Dr. Francis J. and Mary Al-
lan Conlan, was born in West
Pittston on April 17, 1929.
He graduated from Wyoming
Seminary, Kingston, and began
his priestly formation at Saint
Mary’s Seminary and University
in Baltimore, Md., and complet-
ed his studies at the North
American College in Rome, Ita-
ly. He was ordained to the priest-
hood on December 8, 1954, in
Rome by Archbishop Martin J.
O’Connor, D.D., rector of North
American College and former
Auxiliary Bishop of Scranton.
Father Conlan received a Li-
centiate in Sacred Theology
from Gregorian University,
Rome, Italy, in 1955, and his
Ph.D. from Catholic University
of America, Washington, D.C.
in 1958.
Father Conlan served as as-
sistant pastor at Our Lady of
Sorrows, Wyoming; Christ the
King, Dunmore; Saint Lucy’s,
Scranton; Saint Thomas the
Apostle, Elkland; Saint Paul’s,
Scranton; and Saint Matthew’s,
East Stroudsburg.
He was administrator of Holy
Cross, Scranton, and Pastor of
Holy Child, Mansfield; Immac-
ulate Conception, Scranton;
Saint Ignatius, Kingston; and St.
Eulalia’s, Elmhurst. Upon his re-
tirement he was named Pastor
Emeritus. After his retirement,
Monsignor Conlan served as
chaplain of Saint Francis Chap-
el, Eagles Mere; Saint Mary’s
Villa, Elmhurst; and after his re-
tirement as Chaplain of the Ma-
rywood Generalate of the
I.H.M. Sisters.
Monsignor Conlan was
named a Prelate of Honor by His
Holiness on July 10, 1990.
Along with his pastoral duties
Monsignor Conlan was associ-
ate editor of The Catholic Light
from 1958 to 1961, when he be-
came editor-in-chief, a position
he held until January 1970. Dur-
ing his tenure as editor of The
Catholic Light, Monsignor Con-
lan produced several of the
largest editions in the annals of
The Catholic Light, including
the Diocesan
Centennial in
1968.
In addition,
he personally
directed the
production of
special supplements on Sacred
Scripture, Advent and Vatican
II. As an editorial writer, Mon-
signor Conlan’s columns were
reprinted on several occasions
by Religious News Service of
New York in samplings of com-
ments on topics timely to the life
of the church.
As a scholar, Monsignor Con-
lan’s editorial perspective was
based on a desire to informread-
ers on the nature of the changes
and new directions taken by the
church after the Second Vatican
Council. He was cited for his
contributions to The Catholic
Light by Bishop J. Carroll
McCormick in 1970. Monsignor
was presented with the Bishop’s
Communication Award in 1993.
The Award was established by
the Scranton Diocesan Commu-
nication Advisory Commission
to honor individuals and organi-
zations for “excellence in over-
all achievements in communica-
tions.”
Monsignor Conlan served the
Diocese as a Professor at Saint
Pius X Seminary; a Judge in the
Diocesan Tribunal; a member of
the College of Consultors and as
Dean of the Kingston Area. He
was Director of Campus Minis-
try at Mansfield State Teachers
College while Pastor of Holy
Child Parish in Mansfield.
Monsignor Conlan is survived
by two sisters, Eileen Conlan
and Betty Floro, both of Clear-
water, Fla.
He was preceded in death by
two sisters, Ann and Mary Kath-
erine Conlan.
A Vigil Mass was celebrated
on Thursday, June 14, 2012, at
Immaculate Conception
Church, West Pittston, with
Monsignor John J. Bendik,
Dean, presiding. A Pontifical
Mass of Christian Burial was
celebrated by the Reverend Jo-
seph C. Bambera, D.D., J.C.L.,
Bishop of Scranton, on Friday,
June 15, 2012, in Immaculate
Conception Church, West Pitt-
ston. Interment was in Mount
Olivet Cemetery, Carverton.
Monsignor F. Allan Conlan
June 5, 2012
John Klimek, of Hughes-
town, passed away on Friday
evening, June 8, 2012 in Re-
gional Hospital, Scranton.
He was born in Dupont on
September 17, 1930, and was a
son of the late Andrew and An-
na (Lacomis) Klimek.
He was educated in Sacred
Heart of Jesus Parochial School
and Dupont High School.
He was a U.S. Army veteran
during the Korean Conflict.
Prior to his retirement, he was
employed at A and L Cutting/
Sta-Right Fusing, Duryea.
He was a member of St. Jo-
seph Marello Parish, Our Lady
of Mount Carmel Church, Pitt-
ston.
John was a great outdoors-
man who enjoyed many sports,
mainly trout
fishing and
rafting on the
Delaware Riv-
er in upstate
New York.
Gardening
was another one of his favorite
pastimes.
John was a very special son,
husband, father, brother, uncle
andfriendandwill be sadlymis-
sed.
He was preceded in death by
his sisters, Mary Clark and
Theresa Rindos.
Surviving are his wife of 55
years, the former Antoinette
Rubin; daughter, Ann and her
husband, attorney Nicholas
Bollo of San Francisco, Calif.;
sisters, Dorothy Lokuta, Moos-
ic; Helen Swan, Old Forge; Ann
Marie Kosik, Trinity, Fla; Eve-
lyn Mecca, Trinity, Fla.; Geral-
dine Scaccia, Old Forge; nu-
merous nieces and nephews.
∝Funeral services were
Tuesday, June12, 2012, fromthe
Peter J. Adonizio Funeral
Home, 251 William St., Pitt-
ston, with a Mass of Christian
Burial in St. Joseph Marello
Parish, Our Lady of Mount Car-
mel Church, Pittston. Entomb-
ment followed at Mount Olivet
Mausoleum, Carverton.
Memorial donations may be
made to the charity of the do-
nor’s choice.
Online condolences may be
made at www.peterjadonizio-
funeralhome.com
John Klimek
June 8, 2012
Leroy W. Janson, P.E., of
Wesley Village United Metho-
dist Homes, Brooks Estate, Pitt-
ston, formerly of Clarks Green,
died Tuesday evening, June 12,
2012, at Wilkes-Barre General
Hospital.
He was the husband of Joyce
H. Janson. Theyhave celebrated
67 years of marriage.
Born in Stoughton, Mass., he
was a son of Carl Eric Janson
and Florence Canning Janson.
He attended high school in
Franklin, N.H. He enrolled in
Northeastern University in Bos-
ton, but soon volunteered for
service in the U.S. Army Air
Corps during World War II. He
flew 35 combat missions as a
bombardier/navigator in the Eu-
ropean Theater of Operations.
He was awarded the Air Medal
and three oak leaf clusters.
After separation fromthe ser-
vice, he enrolled as an engineer-
ing student at the Massachusetts
Institute of Technology and
graduated as a mechanical engi-
neer withhonors in1948. He be-
came a Registered Professional
Engineer in 1955.
Before settling in the Abing-
tons in 1954 with his family, he
had worked in Ohio and West-
ern Pennsylva-
nia. From1954
to 1989, he
held engineer-
ing/manufac-
turing man-
agement re-
sponsibilities at Sprague and
Henwood, and later at Acker
Drill Co. In this period he ob-
tained five U. S. patents. He was
active in national and interna-
tional standards committees in-
volved with minerals and soils
exploration, and held member-
ship in several professional or-
ganizations. He is a Life Mem-
ber of the A.S.M.E.
After retirement from Acker
Drill Co. in 1989 he operated a
part-time engineering consult-
ing service under the name of
Arjay Engineering and contin-
ued on a reduced basis into his
late 80s.
He was active in the First
Presbyterian Church of Clarks
Summit and had served there as
an elder. He was active in sever-
al Masonic organizations and
was a 30-year member of Wa-
verly Lodge F & A M.
He was preceded in death by
two sisters, Dorothy Weiler and
Evelyn Barrett.
In addition to his beloved
wife, Joyce, he is survived by a
son, Carl Edgar, Philadelphia;
two daughters, Denise and hus-
band Gary Zampano, Dalton;
and Maj. Vicki (retired) and
husband Maj. Dave Howell (re-
tired), Church Creek, Md.; four
grandchildren, Chris Janson,
Dr. Kim Janson Campbell, Lori
Zampano and Steve Zampano;
great-grandson, Benjamin
Campbell.
∝A memorial service was
held Saturday, June 16, 2012, at
the First Presbyterian Church of
Clarks Summit, 300 School St.,
Clarks Summit, by the Rev. Wil-
liam Carter, pastor. Interment
was in Ft. Indiantown Gap,
Annville, Pa.
Memorial donations in Le-
roy’s name may be made to the
First Presbyterian Church of
Clarks Summit, 300 School St.,
Clarks Summit, PA 18411, or
Wesley Village, Brooks Estate
Office, Pittston, PA18640.
Arrangements are entrusted
to the care of the Lawrence E.
Young Funeral Home, 418 S.
State St., Clarks Summit.
To leave an online condo-
lence, please visit www.lawren-
ceeyoungfuneralhome.com.
Leroy W. Janson
June 12, 2012
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Ba lo ga Funera l Ho m e, Inc.
1201 Ma in Street,Pittston
655-7333
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Su sa n L . Ba loga - Su pervisor
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OBITUARIES
John Philip Barrett Jr., 55, of
Sweet Valley, formerly of Lee
Park, passed away peacefully
at home, surrounded by his
loving wife, family and friends
on Wednesday, June 13, 2012,
after a courageous two-year
battle with Parotid Adenocarci-
noma.
Born in Wilkes-Barre on
March 20, 1957, he is a son of
John P. Barrett Sr. of Hanover
Township and the late Joan
Woodburn Barrett.
John was a 1976 graduate of
Hanover Area High School,
and he proudly served as a
Staff Sergeant in the Pennsyl-
vania National Guard 109th
Field Artillery, C Battery, for
21 years, where he formed un-
breakable bonds with his fel-
low servicemen.
John was employed at Proc-
ter & Gamble in Mehoopany
for the past 28 years where he
made many lifelong friends.
John enjoyed traveling, rafting
the Grand Canyon, hiking
through Yosemite National
Park and cruising through Gla-
cier Bay in Alaska.
John and his wife, Nancy,
are members of Our Lady of
Mount Carmel Church in Lake
Silkworth, where they formerly
served as youth ministers.
They were ac-
tive in the Boy
Scouts Organi-
zation for
many years,
where John
served as
Scoutmaster for Troop 166 in
Hanover Township. He was a
loyal Penguins, Bears and Bos-
ton Red Sox fan, and recently
attended games at Fenway Park
and spring training at Jet Blue
Park in Florida.
Most of all, John treasured
spending time with his wife,
Nancy, and their precious kit-
ties, Blackie, Patches and
Packy Sandra, at their home on
North Lake, entertaining fam-
ily and friends, fishing, boat-
ing, ice skating, working on
the house and observing the
many different species of birds
that frequented their backyard.
The family would like to
thank all who visited and spent
time with John and Nancy
throughout this trying time.
John was preceded in death
by his beloved sister, Linda
Barrett Cooper; grandparents,
James and Emma Nicolodi
Barrett, and Harold and Ade-
laide McQuewn Woodburn.
Surviving in addition to his
father, are his devoted wife of
16 years, Nancy Schlosser Bar-
rett, formerly of Lyndwood;
son, Ryan Barrett (an Eagle
Scout), and companion Jacke-
lyn Shields, Lyndwood; broth-
er, Patrick Barrett, and wife
Robyn, Plymouth; sisters,
Kathy Hurn and husband Paul,
Trucksville; Susan Barrett; Du-
ryea; and numerous nieces and
nephews.
∝Family and friends are in-
vited to go directly to Our
Lady of Mount Carmel
Church, 2011 State Rt. 29,
Lake Silkworth, on Monday,
June 18, 2012, to attend a Mass
of Christian Burial at 10 a.m.,
with the Rev. Richard Fox offi-
ciating.
Friends may call today, June
17, 2012, from 2 to 4 p.m. and
6 to 8 p.m. at the Curtis L.
Swanson Funeral Home Inc.,
corners of routes 29 and 118,
Pikes Creek.
In lieu of flowers, memorial
donations may be made to Vet-
eran Housing Catholic Social
Services, 33 E. Northampton
St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18701, or
Homes for Our Troops, 6 Main
St. Taunton, MA 02780, or to
the charity of your choice.
Online condolences can be
made at clswansonfuneral-
home.com.
John Philip Barrett Jr
June 13, 2012
The Sunday Dispatch publishes obituaries of local individuals
who reside, formerly resided or have family living in the Greater
Pittston area.
Obituaries should be submitted by noon Saturday to ensure pub-
lication in the same week’s edition.
Email obituaries to sd@psdispatch.com; Fax obituaries to
570.602.0183; or mail themto109NewSt., Pittston, PA18640. For
more information call the obituary desk at 570.602.0170, or to
place a memorial ad call 570.602.0168.
Obituary Policy
Nancy J. Bedner Warren, 79,
of Brielle, N.J., passed away
peacefully at home on Wednes-
day, June 6, 2012, after losing a
courageous battle with cancer.
Nancy was born in Exeter and
moved to New Jersey after grad-
uating from East Stroudsburg
College with a degree in Phys-
ical and Health Education.
She retired from Toms River
East High School in 1995 and
was an employee of Van Heu-
sen, Manasquan, N.J., for the
past 15 years.
She was best known for her
love of the Manasquan Beach,
N.J. She was a lifelong faithful
Communicant of St. Denis RC
Church, Manasquan, N.J.
Nancy is survived by her be-
loved husband
of 52 years, Jo-
seph C. War-
ren; her three
children, Scott
Warren and
wife, Suzanne,
Pennsylvania; Leigh A. Zipf,
and Wendy Novack and hus-
band, Thomas Gough, Brielle,
N.J.; her six grandchildren, Dr.
Shannon Zipf Ursu and hus-
band, Marius Ursu; Michael
Zipf, Jake and Erika Novack,
and Brielle and Joseph Warren;
her brother, Edward Bedner,
Boston, Mass.; her sister, Jac-
queline Namutka, West Pittston;
and a niece, Karol Bird and hus-
band, Robert; and Karol’s two
sons, Kristopher Anderson and
Ryan Napier; and Nancy’s neph-
ew, Gary Namutka and wife, Ju-
lia.
Private cremation will be at
the convenience of the family
with committal in the NJ Veter-
ans Cemetery, Arneytown, N.J.
Arrangements are by the
O’Brien Funeral Home, 2028
Highway 35 at New Bedford
Road, Wall, N.J.
In lieu of flowers, the family
requests donations to Meridian
Health Foundation, 1345 Cam-
pus Parkway, Suite A2, Nep-
tune, NJ 07753, in memory of
Nancy Warren.
For further information or to
send condolences to the family
please visit, www.obrienfuner-
alhome.com.
Nancy J. Bedner Warren
June 6, 2012
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OBITUARIES
Rosemary Pedley, 80, for-
merly of Avoca, passed away
Saturday, June 2, 2012, in
California, where she was
currently residing. Born in
Scranton, she was a daughter
of the late Barney and Alice
Machinski.
She started her career as a
bookkeeper for the original
Rocky Glen Park, then went
on to Consolidated Cigar and
eventually Topps Chewing
Gum, from where she retired.
Besides her parents, she
was preceded in death by her
sister, Alice; husband, George
D. Pedley; and her beloved
grandson, Michael B. Pedley.
Surviving Rosemary are her
daughter Barbara and hus-
band George Margula, Gaith-
ersburg, Md.; son, Bruce, and
wife Marie Pedley, West
Wyoming; daughter Beverly
and husband Mary Martinez,
San Marcos, Calif. Also sur-
viving are her granddaughter,
Melissa Pedley Mercado and
husband Rich, Forks Town-
ship, Pa.; her grandson, Tho-
mas Martinez, Calif.; several
niece and nephews.
Funeral services were held
Friday, June 15, 2012, in Leh-
man-Gregory Funeral Home,
281 Chapel St., Swoyersville.
A Christian Blessing followed
and then entombment at
Mount Olivet Mausoleum,
Carverton Road, Dallas.
In lieu of flowers, memorial
contributions may be given to
The Michael B. Pedley Me-
morial Scholarship fund.
Rosemary Pedley
June 2, 2012
Michael Ryan Carr, born Sep-
tember 18, 1980, passed away
June 9, 2012 at the age of 31.
Michael was the son of Cindy
Pugh Carr of Kingston, and Ga-
ry Carr of West Chazy, N.Y.
He was predeceased by his
grandmother Jeanne L. Pugh of
Dallas.
Surviving him are his son,
Devin Michael Carr of Pittston;
his loving fiancée, Lauren
Zdancewicz of Swoyersville,
along with his mother, Cindy,
and father, Gary; brother Chris-
topher Carr of Kingston; grand-
father Louis Pugh of West Pitt-
ston and grandparents, Robert
and Dorothy Carr of Platts-
burgh, N.Y, along with many
aunts, uncles and cousins as
well as his fiancée’s parents,
Jeff and Lisa
Zdancewicz,
his fiancée’s
brother Jeffery
and wife, Ni-
cole, and their
three children.
Michael was a loving and de-
voted father who loved life and
always lived for the moment. He
and Lauren were planning the
wedding of their dreams and he
was excited about their future.
Michael always had a new idea
or plan, but it was his smile and
laugh that made its way to your
heart.
Michael loved adventure, ex-
treme sports and was an avid
Pittsburgh Steelers fan.
He will be missed by those
who loved him more than words
could ever express. So look for
Mike in the rainbows, high up in
the sky or the evening sunset,
when the day is through. The
snowflake that drifts down from
above will be Michael blessing
you with all of his love. Think
of him and love him and he’ll be
close to you. This is not good-
bye, for he will be forever in our
hearts as every day goes by.
A memorial service was on
Wednesday, June 13, 2012 at St
Paul’s Lutheran Church, Route
118, Dallas.
In lieu of flowers, contribu-
tions for the benefit of Mi-
chael’s 3-year-old son may be
mailed to the Devin Michael
Carr Fund in care of Vantage
Trust Credit Union, 881 Mundy
St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702.
Michael Ryan Carr
June 9, 2012
Americo Domenic Pizzella,
formerly of Academy Street,
Wilkes-Barre, passed away Sun-
day evening, June 10, 2012, at
the VA Medical Center, Wilkes-
Barre.
He and his wife, Theresa Nar-
done Pizzella, celebrated their
32nd wedding anniversary on
July 26, 2011.
Born in Pittston, he was a son
of the late Americo and Beatrice
Taylor Pizzella. Domenic was
educated in the Jenkins Town-
ship School District. He was a
U.S. Marine Corps veteran, hav-
ing served during the Korean
War.
In his earlier years, he was
employed by C. Nardone &
Sons Bakery, Wilkes-Barre.
He was a member of St. John
the Evangelist Church, and the
Knights of Columbus, both of
Pittston.
The family would like to
thank the dedicated doctors and
staff of both the VA Medical
Center and Timber Ridge Nurs-
ing Home for their compassion-
ate care over the years.
Surviving in addition to his
wife; sisters-in-law, Dolores
D’Elia and her husband, Antho-
ny, Pittston; Millie Nardone,
Kingston; brothers-in-law, Lu-
cas Nardone,
Thomas Nar-
done and his
wife, Rachel,
and Saverio
Costantino, all
of Wilkes-
Barre; many nieces and neph-
ews, great-nieces and great-ne-
phews.
He was preceded in death by a
brother and three sisters.
∝A Mass of Christian Burial
was held on Wednesday, June
13, 2012, in St. John the Evange-
list Church, William Street, Pitt-
ston.
Interment was in St. Mary’s
Cemetery, Hanover Township.
In lieu of flowers, memorial
contributions may be made to
the Care and Concern Ministries
of Saint John the Evangelist Par-
ish Community, 35 William
Street, Pittston, PA 18640.
Arrangements have been en-
trusted to Baloga Funeral Home
Inc., 1201 Main St., Pittston
(Port Griffith).
To send an online condolence,
please visit www.BalogaFuner-
alHome.com.
Americo Domenic Pizzella
June 10, 2012
D u pon tM on u m en tShop,In c.
R o u te 315,D u p o n t,P A • 654-0561
V isit U sAt: w w w.d up ontm onum entshop .com
Servin g N ortheastPA
For O ver 60 Years
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In Loving Memory
Shirley A. Shandra
June 18, 2009
Gone and not forgotten
Sadly missed by
Husband James and Son Jimmy,
Family and Friends.
7
6
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M a tth ew
(Bu tch )
D em ich Jr.
Ou rdad passed awayoneyear
ago Ju ne16,2011.
H ewasagreatrolem odel,
teach erand ou rh ero. Th e
pain nevergoesaway. Daddy,
you will neverb ereplaced b y
no one,and h ewasvery
special to everyone,and th e
b estfath erever. Dad you
areou rh ero. RIP Daddy.
W eloveyou ,m issand th ink
ab ou tyou everyday.
H appyFath er’sDayin H eaven
S a dly m issed by M om ,Don n a ,
Debbie,L isa ,Ty lera n d a ll
of theDem ich Fa m ily a n d
Frien ds.
7
6
2
5
8
4
Jessiah James
Tisdel Jr.
12-15-1971 to 6-18-2009
Happy 3rd Anniversary in Heaven
They say there is a reason,
they say that time will heal.
But neither time nor reason,
will change the way we feel.
For no one knows the heartache,
that lies beneath our smiles.
No one knows how many times,
We broken down and cried.
We want to tell you something,
so there isn’t any doubt.
You’re so wonder to think of,
but so hard to be without.
We cannot bring the old days back,
When we were all together.
The family chain is broken now,
but memories live forever.
Deeply and sadly missed by,
Mom, Dad, sisters Tracie and Donna,
brother Carl, wife Lisa, daughters
Emily and Katie, nephews and many
more family and friends.
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F U N E R A L S E R V I C E S I N C .
255 MCALPINE STREET, DURYEA, PA 18641 (570) 457-4387
MARK KIESINGER,
FUNERAL DIRECTOR and SUPERVISOR
Th e Villa Foglia
Restau ran tan d C aterin g
“ Fea tu ring Th e Bes tin Ita lia n/Am erica n Cu is ine”
Prou dly Serving th e W yom ing Va lley For Over 40 Yea rs
H ou rs :Tu es da y-Sa tu rda y from 4:30 p.m .
1 1 33W yo m in gAven u e,Exeter•654-1 20 6
FE ATURING:
Pa s ta • Ch icken
Sea food • Vea l
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Pizza • Finger Foods
Ca tering for a ny event.
Ca ll for Berea vem entL u nch eon info.
Funeral Home, Inc.
211 LUZERNE AVENUE
WEST PITTSTON, PA
Helena A. Morris, Supervisor
(570) 654-3471
451 N. MAIN STREET
WILKES-BARRE, PA
H. Merritt Hughes, Supervisor
Ryan M. Wagner, Licensed Associate
(570) 823-6511
OBITUARIES
Ann Marie McHale, 77, of
Shavertown, died peacefully at
home on Friday, June 8, 2012,
with her devoted husband, Wil-
liam “Buddy,” at her side.
Born February 6, 1935 in Pitt-
ston, Ann was the daughter of
the late Michael Francis andEd-
na Collins Golden. She was a
graduate of St. Johnthe Evange-
list High School, class of 1952.
She was a full-time home-
maker who enjoyed reading and
was an avid Yankees fan. A de-
voted mother, grandmother and
great-grandmother; her greatest
pleasure was found in the many
accomplishments of her grand-
children, and in recent years, the
stories of each
of her great-
grandchildren.
A dedicated
and loving
wife, Ann and
her husband,
Buddy, would have celebrated
their 60th wedding anniversary
on July 4. Ann was a member of
Gate of Heaven Church, Dallas.
Preceding Ann in death, in
addition to her parents, were her
daughter, Michele Dixon;
brother, James Golden, and his
wife, Marilyn.
Surviving, in addition to her
loving husband, Buddy, are chil-
dren, WilliamJ., Jr. andhis wife,
Donna, Ramsey, N.J.; AnnEllen
and her husband, Kevin, Seattle,
Wash.; Sharon Resetar, Eliza-
bethtown; Jeanne Rosengrant,
Trucksville; Cathy Prater and
her husband, Scott, Shavertown;
16 grandchildren; six great-
grandchildren.
Funeral services were held
Tuesday, June12, 2012, fromthe
Harold C. Snowdon Funeral
Home Inc., 140 N. Main St.,
Shavertown. A Mass of Chris-
tian Burial will followed in Gate
of Heaven Church, 40 Machell
Ave., Dallas, with the Rev. Da-
niel A. Toomey officiating. En-
tombment was in Mount Olivet
Cemetery, Carverton.
Ann Marie McHale
June 8, 2012
Paulette M. Bellumori, 56, of
Woolwich, N.J., and formerly of
Mountain Top, died Thursday,
June 7, 2012 after a six-and-a-
half year battle with cancer.
Born in Wilkes-Barre, she
was a daughter of Carmela (Sa-
racino) Rovinski of Mountain
Top and the late Joseph Rovin-
ski.
Paulette was a graduate of
Bishop Hoban High School,
class of1973, Wilkes-Barre, and
College Misericordia, Dallas.
Paulette brought sunshine
wherever she went. Strangers
became friends and conversa-
tions flowedeasily. She andhus-
band, David, met while in col-
lege and they moved 13 times
since they married 34 years ago.
Paulette left a legion of friends
along the way and continually
added to her Christmas card list.
As she collected friends, so
did she collect discarded ani-
mals. She took
them in and
made them
part of her
family. She
took her sunny
smile and blue
eyes tothecancer treatment cen-
ter. There, she took that bad sit-
uation and became a cheerlead-
er for other patients, making a
bad situation palatable. She
fought that lung cancer battle
for six-and-a-half years, always
with optimism.
When she went shopping for
herself she always came back
with things for the children in-
stead.
In addition to her father, she
was preceded in death by her
brother, Gary Rovinski, E01
USN SeaBees.
Surviving are her husband,
David; children, Dino, Manas-
sas, Va.; MariaandGina, bothof
Newark, Del; mother, Carmela
Rovinski, Mountain Top; sister,
Mary Catherine Costigan,
Mountain Top; brothers, Joseph
Rovinski, Mountain Top, An-
thony Rovinski, Pittston, and
Thomas Rovinski, Las Vegas,
Nev.; and many close cousins.
A Mass of Celebration of
Paulette’s life was held Wednes-
day, June 13, 2012, in St. Maria
Goretti Church, 42 Redwood
Drive, Laflin.
Arrangements were by the
Corcoran Funeral Home Inc.,
20S. MainSt., Plains Township.
Memorial donations may be
made to Cooper University
Cancer Center, 900 Centennial
Blvd., Voorhees, NJ 08043, or
the American Lung Associ-
ation, 630 Churchmans Road,
Suite 202, Newark, DE19702.
Online condolences may be
made at www.corcoranfuneral-
home.com.
Paulette M. Bellumori
June 7, 2012
John (Jack) Moughan, 62, of
Avoca, passed away Sunday,
June 10, 2012 in Geisinger
Transplant Center, Danville.
Surviving are his wife of 33
years, the former Linda Davis;
brother, George Moughan; sis-
ters, Ann Marie Healey and Ma-
ry Ellen Moughan; a niece and
nephews.
Private funeral services will be
held at the convenience of the
family. Memorial donations may
be made to the American Asso-
ciation for the Study of Liver
Diseases, 1001 North Fairfax
Street, Suite 400,Alexan-
dria,Virginia, 22314.
Funeral arrangements are en-
trusted to the Peter J. Adonizio
Funeral Home, 251 William
Street, Pittston. On-line condo-
lences may be made atwww.pe-
terjadoniziofuneralhome.com
John (Jack) Moughan
Sunday, June 10, 2012
Edward J. McArdle, 81, of
Rahway, N.J., passed away Tues-
day, June 12, 2012, in RWJUH-
Rahway Hospital.
Born in Hughestown, on April
13, 1931, he came to Rahway in
1962.
He was employed by AT&T/
Western Electric, Clark, N.J., for
30 years before retiring in 1989.
He was a communicant of St.
Mary’s RCChurch, Rahway, and
a member of the Rahway Retired
Men’s Club.
Ed was an accomplished base-
ball and basketball player in the
Hughestown/Pittston, he was
recruited to play professional
baseball for the Boston Red Sox.
Surviving is his beloved wife
of 50 years Ann (nee Moughan)
McArdle; a sister Ann McArdle
of Hughestown; and his nieces
and nephews, Bob McArdle, Jim
McArdle, Maureen Stellmach,
Bill McArdle, Mary Kay Bena-
vente, Ellen Larisey, Anne Rye,
Joanne Custer, Jack Jordan and
Jack Moughan.
In lieu of flowers, donations
may be made in his memory to
the Alzheimer’s Association.
Edward J. McArdle
June 12, 2012
Inaneffort tocleanupthedebris
and garbage from the devastation
of the September flooding and il-
legal dumping, the North Branch
Land Trust, Endless Mountains
Heritage Region, Pennsylvania
Environmental Council, North
Branch Water Trail and Paddle
Without Pollution are organizing
the first paddling cleanup of the
waterway and islands in the La-
ceyville and Tunkhannock areas
of the Susquehanna River.
Volunteers are asked to register
at www.OperationNorthBranch-
.com. Supplies will be provided
andtherewill befoodandrefresh-
ments. For more informationor to
register for the cleanup, visit
www.operationnorthbranch.com
or email OperationNorth-
Branch@comcast.net.
Susquehanna River cleanup set
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C M Y K
SUNDAY DISPATCH SUNDAY, JUNE 17, 2012 PAGE 1B
Social Section
Inside
Kingergarten grads.........2,3
Birthdays............................4
Community ....................5-7
Classified......................8-14
S E C T I O N B
➛ S O C I A L
Mr. and Mrs. Paul Zaffuto, Pittston Township, announce the
engagement and approaching marriage of their daughter, Aman-
da Rose Zaffuto, to Stephen Furedi, son of Robert and Ann Fure-
di of Wapwallopen.
The bride-to-be is a 2000 graduate of Pittston Area High
School and received Certificates of Specialization in Pastry Arts
and Food Production Management at Luzerne County Commu-
nity College. She is presently employed by Redner’s Markets Inc.
The prospective groom is a 2004 graduate of Crestwood High
School. He graduated fromLuzerne County College with an As-
sociates degree in Computer Information Systems. He is present-
ly employed by C3i, Inc.
The couple will exchange vows and be united in marriage on
July 28, 2012 at the Stroudsmoor Country Inn, Stroudsburg.
Stephen Furedi, Amanda Zaffuto
Zaffuto, Furedi set to marry
Lorenza Galella and MatthewDunnigan, united in marriage on
Saturday, June 18, 2011, will celebrate their first wedding anni-
versary. The ceremonytookplace onFisher Island, Miami Beach,
Florida, and was officiated by Rev. Paul Underhay.
The bride is the daughter of Lorenzo and Patricia Galella,
Harding. She is the granddaughter of the late Joan Morgan,
Plains; the late JackMorgan, Wilkes-Barre; andthe late Henrietta
and Pasquale Galella, Plains.
The groomis the sonof KimDunnigan, Hughestown; andMatt
Dunnigan, Huntersville, North Carolina. He is the grandson of
the late Bronwen and Martin Miglionico, Hughestown; and Jack
and Mary Dunnigan, Forty Fort.
The bride was escorted down the aisle and given in marriage by
her loving father, Larry Galella. She chose her sister, Christina
Galella, as maid of honor. Bonnie Miglionico, grandmother of
the groom; KimDunnigan, mother of the groom; and Patti Galel-
la, mother of the bride, were also honored during the ceremony
procession.
Following the ceremony, an evening cocktail hour and dinner
reception took place at Fisher Island Club.
The couple enjoyed a beautiful honeymoon throughout Thai-
land and currently resides in Philadelphia.
The bride is a 2003 graduate of Wyoming Area Secondary
Center and a 2006 graduate of Susquehanna University where
she earneda degree increative writingandpublic relations. She is
currently employed in student life marketing at Community Col-
lege of Philadelphia.
The groom is a 2002 graduate of Wyoming Area Secondary
Center and 2006 graduate of Bucknell University where he
earned a degree in business and economics. He is currently pur-
suing an MBAat The Wharton School at the University of Penn-
sylvania and is employed at a hedge fund in New York, NY.
Mrs. and Mrs. Matthew Dunnigan
Dunnigans wed one year
Michael Robert DeAngelo, son of Michael and Melanie
DeAngelo, Dupont, was baptized on May 20 at Nativity of our
Lord Parish (Holy Rosary Church), Duryea. Michael is the
grandson of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Gable, Hughestown; Mrs. and
Mrs. Joseph DeAngelo Sr., Avoca; and Ms. Darlene Jamieson,
Duryea. He is the great-grandson of Ann Marie Gable, Pittston.
Michael’s godparents are his aunt, Mallory Gable, and his uncle,
Joseph DeAngelo Jr. Acelebration was held at Agolino’s Restau-
rant in his honor.
Michael Robert DeAngelo
DeAngelo baby is baptized
Herman and Louise Sickler Lewis, of Forkston, formerly of
Falls, will celebrate their 60th wedding anniversary on June 21.
The couple was marriedinthe Falls Methodist Churchbythe Rev.
Everett Eccleston.
Mrs. Lewis is the daughter of the late Albert and Frema Sickler,
Falls. She worked for Advanced Home Health Care in Pittston
before retiring.
Mr. Lewis is the son of the late Jay and Anna Smerdon Lewis of
Moosic. He worked at the A&P for 35 years before retiring to
open his own grocery and bait shop, Lewis’ Market in Falls.
The Lewises have three children: Wayne and his wife, Susan,
Falls; the late Mark Lewis, Colorado Springs, CO; and Marsha
and her husband, Ted Grohoski, Plymouth. They also have six
grandchildren: Kevin and his wife, Allie, Orlando, FL; Heather
Lewis Thurston and her husband, Mark, Gwinn, MI; Eric Lewis,
Colorado Springs, CO; Katie Grohoski, Wilkes-Barre; Cassan-
dra Grohoski, Plymouth; Ryan Campbell, Falls; and two great-
grandchildren, Nolan and Andy Thurston, Gwinn, MI.
The family is hosting a party this month at the Lewis residence
in Forkston to celebrate the occasion.
Herman and Louise Sicker Lewis
Wed 60 years
Anthony James Grabo, son of Drs. Dan and Janet Ramos Gra-
bo, Blackwood, N.J., was baptized on May 20 at Our Lady of
Hope Catholic Church, Blackwood. Acelebration was held at the
family home. Godparents are Jason and Jackie Alvarez of New
Jersey, friends of the family.
Anthony is the grandson of Dan Sr. and Theresa (Stuccio) Gra-
bo, Pittston and Pedro and Gladys Ramos, Vineland, N.J.
Anthony’s brother, Daniel is 5 years old and graduated from
kindergarten at Our Lady of Hope Catholic School on June 7. He
will enter first grade at Holy Angles School in Arcadia, Cali-
fornia where the family will relocate in July.
Anthony and Daniel’s dad, a Pittston native, is serving in the
U.S. Navy and recently completed a fellowship in critical care
medicine and trauma surgery at the Hospital of the University
Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. Dr. Dan will serve as assistant pro-
fessor at USC, teaching trauma surgery and as an attending trau-
ma surgeon at Los Angeles County Hospital. Anthony and Da-
niel’s mother is a native Vineland, N.J. and was formerly employ-
ed as physical therapist at Nova Care in New Jersey.
Anthony James Grabo
Grabo baby is baptized
The Music Box Youth Play-
ers will present “Fiddler on the
Roof Jr.” at 7 p.m. on Friday,
June 22; at 2 and 7 p.m. on Sat-
urday, June 23; and at 2 p.m. on
Sunday, June 24 at the Music
Box Dinner Playhouse, 196
Hughes St., Swoyersville.
This classic junior adapta-
tion will feature over 25 young
performers ages 8-20. Four of
the actors are Greater Pittston
residents. Carley Yuhas, Alys-
sa Reed and Jonathon Vojtko
are from Wyoming. Denise
Pinto is from Jenkins Town-
ship.
Inthe little village of Anatev-
ka, Tevye, a poor dairyma tries
to instill in his five daughters
the traditions of his tight-knit
Jewish community in the face
of changing social mores and
the growing anti-Semitism of
Czarist Russia.
“Fiddler on the Roof Jr.” will
be presented as a special show-
only production. For ticket in-
formation, call the box office at
283-2195.
Greater Pittston residents Carley Yuhas, left, and Denise Pin-
to, second fromleft, will appear in "Fiddler on the Roof Jr." at
the Music Box Playhouse. Also picture Anna Markoch, Alyssa
Reed and Abbigail Schultz.
Four locals in ‘Fiddler’
at Music Box theater
Jonathan Vojtko, left, Alyssa
Reed and Ben Steltz rehearse.
Joseph Pearce, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Barry Pearce, of Belle-
fonte, graduated with honors
from Slippery Rock University.
He will pursue his Master’s de-
gree from Indiana University of
Pennsylvania in the fall. He is
the grandson of Peter and Mary
Ann Jadus, of Avoca; and Joyce
Gurto, of Conneaut, Ohio.
Jessica Krawczyk, daughter
of Mr. and Mrs. Kevin Krawc-
zyk, of Dupont, graduated from
Luzerne Coun-
ty Community
College with
honors. She
will attend
King’s College
in the fall. She
is the grand-
daughter of Pe-
ter and Mary Ann Jadus, of Avo-
ca; and Tony and Cathy Krawc-
zyk, of Taylor.
Tony Jadus, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Peter Jadus, Jr. will gradu-
ate with honors from Valley
View High School, Millersville.
He will attend Millersville Uni-
versity in the fall. He is the
grandson of Mrs. Paulette Mag-
giolo, Woodstock, VA; and the
late Tony Maggiolo and Mr. and
Mrs. Peter Jadus, of Avoca.
Cousins graduate high school, college
Pearce Krawczyk Jadus
C M Y K
PAGE 2B SUNDAY, JUNE 17, 2012 SUNDAY DISPATCH
➛ S C H O O L S
The Wyoming Area School Dis-
trict Kindergarten Celebrations were
held on Monday, June11. The follow-
ing students are pictured from Mont-
gomery Avenue Elementary, Sarah J.
Dymond Elementary, Tenth Street
ElementaryandJohnF. KennedyEle-
mentary. Mr. Robert Kaluzavich and
Mr. Jon Pollard are the school princi-
pals.
It’s on to 1st grade for WA kindergarteners
Sarah J. Dymond Elementary
Mrs. Bitter's kindergarten class.
Row1, seated, Alyssa Stepanski, Alyvia Yatsko, Jason
Elvidge, Benjamin Byers, David Holl, Jr., Krystal Kile,
Ryan Martin, Matthew Rusinchak. Row 2, Colton Kro-
gulski, Addison Grieshaber, Lily Byron, Joseph Cola-
russo, Nicholas Giamusso, David Bryk, Jr., Austin
Berretta, Trinity Campbell. Row 3, Mrs. DePrimo,
Christian Hoover, Emilee Tomsak, Mckenzie Oliver,
Cody Meade, Chase Reynolds, Rhys Atherton, Ayden
Tilley, Jenna Alder, Mrs. Bitters. Absent are Cadance
Cable, Haley Coolbaugh and Dane Schutter.
Montgomery Avenue Elementary
Mrs. Burdett and Mrs. McHale kindergarten class.
Row1 - seated: Elijah Trapanese, Isabella Vogel,
Olivia Engle, Ava Bertocki, Samantha Jacokuwicz,
Paul LaNunziata and Patrick Weidman. Row 2 -Do-
minic Donati, Aiden Sheperis, Haley Shock, Mia
Belles, Patrick Golden, Kyle Sheridan, Emily Jacien
and Mrs. Saralyn McHale. Row 3 -Alice Le, Colton
Reichart, Andrew Evans, Andrew Ruddy, Marissa
Gacek, Karamia Marranca and Makayla Miller
Montgomery Avenue Elementary
Mrs. Augello kindergarten class
Row1 - seated: Drew Dixon, Anthony Forlenza, Tanner
Alfano, Mikayla Cresho, Hailey Papelski, Zoey Demp-
sey, Nina Angeli. Row 2 - Mrs. Augello, Alivia Maroni,
Morgan, Slusser, Christopher Read, Rayven Conner,
Anthony Acernese, Samara Campenni. Row 3 -Jenna
Saunders, Daniel Feeney, McKenna Granahan, Ethan
Naugle, Nicholas Scalzo, Logan Downey, Angelina
Garcia.
Absent fromphoto Maeghan Warren.
Montgomery Avenue Elementary
Mrs. Kachmarsky kindergarten class
Row1 - seated: John Chiampi, Houston
Brice, Samantha Adams, Adison Yankov-
ich, Cameron McCormick, Dominic Colavi-
to. Row 2 -John Getzie, Hannah Gibbs,
Starr Williams, John Williams, Hannah
Fairchild, Logan Mitchum, Mrs. Ann Marie
Kachmarsky. Row 3 -Briseus Shupp, Ma-
kenzie Galgoci, Ava Busch, Christine Car-
ter, Michael Steinberger, Natasha Velaz-
quez.
Absent fromphoto Anna Musto.
C M Y K
SUNDAY DISPATCH SUNDAY, JUNE 17, 2012 PAGE 3B
➛ S C H O O L S
JFK Elementary
Mrs. Reino kindergarten class. Row1,
seated: Henna Mora, Kimberly Edwards,
AdamFath, Macy Waters, Ericka Rosen-
grant, Jeffery Hivish, Kaitlyn Reedy. Row 2,
James Hizynski, Avery Hughes, Allie Rese-
tar, Zackary Zurn, Jacob Gustitus, Ty Kizis,
Olivia Garbush, Rylee Marcy. Row 3, Miss
Reino, Gage Martinez, Samuel Rau, Hay-
den Reid, Jordan Shields, Brayden Ro-
sencrans, Aaliyah Swartwood, Elizabeth
Stoss, Mrs. McCabe. Absent fromphoto
are Jack Mulhern, Lily Brown, Brady
Noone.
JFK Elementary, Mrs. Sviatko kindergarten
class. Row1, seated, Melissa Dolman, T.J.
Kearns, Krista Sadowski, Kylie Nalewajko,
LiamBurke, Abigail Houston, Gianna Pel-
legrino. Row 2, Jaden Jones, Makayla
Swingle, Nathan Mills, Ty Sciandra, Liam
Hizynski, Avery Rash, Jacob Krulick, Dylan
Davison. Row 3, Mrs. Spriggs, Jayden
Reedy, Emma Sutton, McKenzie Smith,
Owen Lutz, Yadriel Rivera, DeAngelo Ty-
son, Timothy Moderski, Aiden Hooper,
Mrs. Sviatko.
Tenth Street Elementary
Mrs. Lukesh kindergarten class. Row1,
seated, Jonathan Stone, Benecio Carpen-
tier, Grace Gilroy, Maisara Abdul-Alim, Cali-
sta Stella, Louis Ciampi, Claire Bailey. Row
2, Luke Barhight, Steven Maywood, Dylan
Calvey, Abigail Butler, Brianna Cheskiewicz,
Braydon Crossley, Joshua Williams. Row 3,
Mrs. Blannett and Mrs. Lukesh
Tenth Street Elementary, Miss. Dileo kin-
dergarten class. Row1, seated, Katherine
Potter, Ashad Williamson, Seria Haines,
Kieu Bui-Phom, Xavier Williams, Sophia
Sands. Row 2, Niko Napkora, Kaylynn
McCroskey, Aaron Crossley, Joseph Kole-
sar, Trevor Kruszka, Lisa Chinikaylo, Lako-
ta Caines. Standing, Miss Dileo
Tenth Street Elementary, Mrs. An-
drewscavage kindergarten class. Row
1, seated Magdalyn Hallman, Taylor
Zakseski, Emma Kuharchik, Kailey
Ryan, Nehemiah Rivera, Kinley Poc-
ceschi. Row 2, Anthony VanAuken,
Travis Fenner, Roger Orlandini, Car-
son Crossley, Kaden Shotwell, Victo-
ria Krupkevich. Standing, Mrs. An-
drewscavage and Mrs. Stefanelli.
C M Y K
PAGE 6B SUNDAY, JUNE 17, 2012 SUNDAY DISPATCH
➛ S C H O O L S
7
4
9
1
8
5
Holy Redeemer High School
held its fifth annual commence-
ment for 167 students at the F. M.
Kirby Center in Wilkes-Barre on
May 30.
The Most Rev. Joseph C.
Bambera, Bishop of the Diocese
of Scranton, conferred diplomas
and made closing remarks and
Dr. Kathleen Hanlon, Diocesan
Secretary for Catholic Schools/
Superintendent of Schools, also
addressed the class.
Student speakers were Vale-
dictorian Els-
beth Turcan
and of Exeter
and Salutator-
ian Allison
Muth. Candi-
dates for grad-
uation were
presented by
Holy Redeemer Principal Anita
Sirak and Vice Principals Mi-
chael Booth and Abe Simon.
Senior class officers are Mario
Adajar, president; Cole Kebles,
vice president; Zachary Evans,
secretary; and Michael Brown,
treasurer.
Ninety-six percent of the
members of the Class of 2012
will attenda college or university
next year, and four percent will
enter the military or other post-
secondary school. Graduates
merited nearly $17,000,000 in
college scholarship awards.
GRADUATI ON 201 2
167 Holy Redeemer students graduate
Members of the Holy Redeemer High School Class of 2012 are, fromleft, first row, Mario Adajar IV, Michael Ambrulavage, Stephanie Amendola, Kara Anders, Michael Banas, Allison Banks, Kathleen
Bell, Daniel Belsky, Ashley Bernardi, Lauren Bernardi, David Bertram, Veronica Bezak, Morgan Biscontini, Michael Bish, Tessa Boyle, Casey Brelsford, Ariana Brennan, Michael Brown, Jordan Cad-
walader, Kyle Callahan, Jeffrey Capaci. Second row, Sara Cavanaugh, WilliamCavanaugh, Sarah Cease, Patrick Chmielewski, Christian Choman, Shannon Claherty, Patrick Condo, Angela Costigan,
Matthew Craven, Ryan DeRemer, Amber Desiderio, Patrick Dockeray, Shaina Dougherty, Thomas Doyle, Michelle Druby, Brandon Drust, Patrick Duffy, Michael Duprï, Dalton Ell, Ryan Endler, Ryan En-
glish, Mary Katherine Evans, Zachary Evans. Third row, Zoe Evans, Megan Ferrell, Elizabeth Finnegan, Tyler Floryan, Ronald Foy III, WilliamFulton, David Gawlas, Nadia Gentilesco, Matthew Geraghty,
Arisa Gereda, Anthony Gialanella, Erika Lynn Graham, Kelly Grebeck, Alexandra Griswold, Erin Gruber, AdamGryziec, Sarina Hall, Alexandra Heck, Ryan Heck, Francis Hickey, Jr., WilliamHon. Fourth
row, Katie Jabyac, Nathan Janiczek, Zachary Janusziewicz, Eric Jones, Kurt Jones, Christopher Kabacinski, Kristen Kabacinski, Alexa Kalafut, Cole Kebles, Abigail Keefe, Brian Kelly, Jr., Elizabeth
Knaub, Kassie Krasucki, Courtney Kreidler, Jessica Kreidler, Jared Kukosky, Jessica Kupetz, Brianna Ligotski, Connor Linden, Dillon Loeffler, Rebecca Makar, Paige Makowski. Fifth row, Michael Mar-
tin, Mary Claire Materna, Ronald May III, Kara McGrane, Daniel McGraw, Amy McLaughlin, Joseph Melf, Christopher Miko, Alyssa Miller, Megan Mirra, Nicole V Mirra, Christie Mocion, Livia Montante,
Aidan Morda, Robert Morgan, Jr., Shannon Murray, Thomas Murray IV, Allison Muth, Dylan Myslowski, Elizabeth Nicholas, James Nixon, Jill Olenik. Sixth row, : Gabriel Olivarez, Brianna O'Rourke, Jar-
rod Pavelitz, Joel Peterlin, Devin Sullivan-Phillips, Nicole Phillips, Christina Pino, Michael Pitcavage, Dominick Policare III, Alexandra Pugh, Meagan Hallie Rexer, Eric Ringsdorf, Danielle Rose, Jessica
Ruppert, Michael Rychwalski, Leah Santucci, Vera Sedlak, Alexandra Serra, Collin Shandra, Rachel Simon, Matthew Sipsky, Kirby Smith, Abigail Staskiel. Seventh row, Raymond Anthony Stemrich,
Tara Stephens, Emily Suchocki, Sarah Suchoski, Stephanie Sullin, Margaret Sullivan, Seth Tarselli, Michael Terninko, Monica Theroux, Christopher Thoma, WilliamTrimblett, Cody Tsevdos, Elsbeth
Turcan, Mary Urbanski, Michael Vamos, Rachel Vidumsky, Olivia Vitali, Ian Wagner, Lindsee Waldron, Marissa Walker , Meeghan Walton, Stacey Warga. Eighth row, Marissa Warnick, Kimberly Waters,
Jackson Welch, Julia Wignot, Erin Williams, Robert Wingert, Dominick Zarola, Noah Ziomek, Andrea Zupko, Olivia Zurad. Absent at the time of the photo were Robert Arensmeyer III, Rebecca Henry,
Haley Kazmierski and Derek Rajza.
Officers for the Holy
Redeemer High School
Class of 2012 are, from
left, Mario Adajar, presi-
dent; Cole Kebles, vice
president; Zachary
Evans, secretary; and
Michael Brown, trea-
surer.
Valedictorian is Exeter’s Elsbeth Turcan
Turcan
The Pittston Area High
School National Honor Society
didn’t just donate $685 to pur-
chase flowers to be planted
downtown.
Members actually got their
hands dirty by helping volun-
teer downtown landscaper Jim
Norris with the planting. The
NHS members gave up a Sat-
urday morning to help beautify
downtown Pittston. They plant-
ed flowers in tree plots on
North Main Street.
Brother and sister Anthony and Cara Capozucca, members of the
Pittston Area National Honor Society, plant flowers on Main
Street.
PA NHS students Julia Shandra, left, and Elizabeth Mikitish pitch
in to help plant flowers on Main Street.
PA NHS students
get their hands dirty
SUNDAY DISPATCH SUNDAY, JUNE 17, 2012 PAGE 8
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
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08 SaturnVUE FWD $12,995
08 HHR LS $9,995
08 Malibu Hybrid, 44K $11,995
08 Pontiac G-5 In Stock $10,995
07 Malibu 38K $9,995
06 Lucerne CX $10,995
07 Impala Police Car 47K $9,995
TRUCKS
07 Uplander Cargo $7,995
05 Uplander Cargo, 3 Pass $8,995
05 Uplander Passenger Van $9,995
03 GMC 2500 8 Passenger, 58K $9,995
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02 Silverado 2500 3/4Ton
CNG or Gas 6.0V-8 Auto, 2WD $11,995
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100
ANNOUNCEMENTS
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Vitos & Ginos
Anytime
288-8995
135 Legals/
Public Notices
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby
given that Letters
Testamentary have
been granted in the
Estate of EUGENE J.
LAFRATTE, a/k/a
EUGENE LAFRATTE,
late of the Borough
of Dupont, who died
May 13th, 2012. All
persons indebted to
said Estate are
requested to make
payment and those
having claims to
present the same,
without delay, to the
Executor, LOUIS
LAFRATTE and his
Attorneys. Saporito,
Saporito & Falcone
490 North Main
Street Pittston, PA
18640
135 Legals/
Public Notices
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby
given that Letters
Testamentary have
been granted n the
Estate of JEAN M.
LOFTUS, late of
the City of Pittston,
who died
May 22, 2012.
All persons indebt-
ed to said Estate
are requested to
make payment and
those having claims
to present the
same, without
delay, to the
Executrix, ANN
LOFTUS and her
Attorneys.
SAPORITO,
SAPORITO &
FALCONE
490 NORTH
MAIN STREET
PITTSTON, PA
18640
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
135 Legals/
Public Notices
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby
given that Letters
Testamentary have
been granted in the
Estate of WILLIAM
J. JAMES, late of
the Township of
Exeter, who died
April 1, 2012.
All persons indebted
to said Estate are
requested to make
payment and those
having claims to
present the same,
without delay, to the
Executrix, KATH-
LEEN A. JAMES
and her Attorneys.
Saporito, Saporito
& Falcone
490 N. Main St.
Pittston, Pa 18640
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
150 Special Notices
P PA AYING $500 YING $500
MINIMUM
DRIVEN IN
Full size 4 wheel
drive trucks
ALSO PAYING TOP $$$
for heavy equip-
ment, backhoes,
dump trucks,
bull dozers
HAPPY TRAILS
TRUCK SALES
570-760-2035
542-2277
6am to 8pm
150 Special Notices
NEPA-AIRSOFT
North Eastern PA
Airsoft
WHAT IS AIRSOFT?
Airsoft is a military
simulation sport in
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tary-style replica
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Come visit us at:
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A Web Site
Dedicated to the
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surrounding areas.
Home of the
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We are always
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Contact us today
at:
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Find Something?
Lose Something?
Get it back where it
belongs
with a Lost/Found ad!
570-829-7130
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ADOPTION:
Loving couple
hopes to adopt a
baby. We
promise a lifetime
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Please call
Lori and Mike at
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310 Attorney
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B A N K R U P T C Y
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SOCIAL SECURITY
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570-655-4410
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Free Consultation.
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Dalessandro
570-823-9006
360 Instruction &
Training
Certified Personal Certified Personal
T Trainer seeking rainer seeking
part-time position part-time position.
Also certified in
older adult training,
CPR and AED.
contact
Mryc426@aol.com
403 Aircraft
TRAVELCRAFT ‘93
28’ Motorhome
52,000 miles
$12,000 negotiable.
570-333-5110
409 Autos under
$5000
DODGE `98
AVENGER
Rebuilt engine, new
transmission, cus-
tom 3” exhaust.
Weapon R intake,
Blitz front bumper
and side skirts,
custom Evil 8 paint
job, vertical doors,
after market wheel
and tires, over
$10,000 invested.
Asking $4,000.
Call 570-287-8410
or 570-855-2699
Let the Community
Know!
Place your Classified
Ad TODAY!
570-829-7130
FORD ‘01 TAURUS
Wagon V6, loaded,
leather interior, 3rd
row seat, alloy
wheels, new tires,
brakes, oil, 93k,
very well maintained
$4500 neg wt war-
ranty call 570 855-
8514-570 388-6008
409 Autos under
$5000
MERCURY `79
ZEPHYR
6 cylinder
automatic.
52k original miles.
Florida car. $1500.
570-899-1896
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
412 Autos for Sale
DODGE ‘02
VIPER GTS
10,000 MILES V10
6speed, collec-
tors, this baby is
1 of only 750 GTS
coupes built in
2002 and only 1 of
83 painted Race
Yellow it still wears
its original tires
showing how it
was babied. This
car is spotless
throughout and is
ready for its new
home. This vehicle
is shown by
appointment only.
$40,900. call
570-760-2365
412 Autos for Sale
& Auto Sales
519 Wyoming Ave
Scranton
570-961-5945
www.tomsgarage
andsales.com
CHEVY ‘10
CAMARO SS
11,100 miles Gray
$29,499
DODGE ‘09
CALIBER SXT
SXT 29,200 miles
Red $12,995
GMC ‘08
SIERRA SLT
LOADED w/ Plow
25,600miles White
$31,495
FORD ‘08
EXPLORER
Eddie Bauer
36,000 miles, Black
$20,995
FORD ‘08 EDGE
LIMITED AWD
28,000 miles, Red
$22,995
HYUNDAI ‘07
SANTA FE
FWD 74,000 miles
Gray, $13,495
TOYOTA ‘06
SIENNA LE
34,000 miles
Light Blue, $15,900
CHEVY ‘03
SUBURBAN LT
85,000 miles
Silver, $10,900
MERCEDES ’00
BENZ ML320
70,000 miles,
Black, $8,899
HONDA ‘00
PASSPORT
Black, 88,000 miles
DOMESTIC &
FOREIGN
SALES & SERVICE
Specializing in Specializing in
A/C Ser A/C Ser vice vice
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
FORD `07 FOCUS
SES Sedan
Alloy wheels, heat-
ed seats, CD play-
er, rear spoiler, 1
owner, auto, air, all
power, great gas
mileage, priced to
be sold immedi-
ately! $6,995 or
best offer.
570-614-8925
412 Autos for Sale
FORD ‘02 MUSTANG
GT CONVERTIBLE
Red with black
top. 6,500 miles.
One Owner.
Excellent Condi-
tion. $17,500
570-760-5833
WANTED!
ALL
JUNK
CARS!
CA$H
PAID
570-301-3602
MERCURY GRAND
MARQUIS ‘99 GS
Silver, 4.6L, V8,
Auto, power steer-
ing, power brakes,
power windows &
locks. 104k, New
Inspection! Great
Condition! Call
570-823-4008
PORSCHE `01
BOXSTER S
38,500 miles. Black
with beige interior. 6
speed transmission.
Air & CD player.
Excellent condition.
$17,600. Call
570-868-0310
SUBARU `07 LEGACY
62K miles. Original
owner. Maintenance
regularly performed.
Excellent condition.
Fully loaded. AWD.
No mechanical
issues ever. $13,500
570-237-5882
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
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Classified’s got
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TOYOTA ‘04 CELICA GT
112K miles. Blue,
5 speed. Air,
power
windows/locks,
CD/cassette, Key-
less entry, sun-
roof, new battery.
Car drives and
has current PA
inspection. Slight
rust on corner of
passenger door.
Clutch slips on
hard acceleration.
This is why its
thousands less
than Blue Book
value. $6,500
OBO. Make an
offer! Call
570-592-1629
PAGE 9 SUNDAY, JUNE 17, 2012 SUNDAY DISPATCH
COCCIA
CALL NOW 823-8888 or 1-800-817-FORD
SATURDAY SERVICE HOURS 7 A.M.-1 P.M.
Overlooking Mohegan Sun
Just Minutes from
Scranton or W-B
577 East Main St.,
Plains, PA
WWW.COCCIACARS.COM
FREE STATE INSPECTION AS LONG AS YOU OWN THE CAR!
24/7 ROADSIDE ASSISTANCE
FULL TANK OF GAS
WARRANTY IS FULLY TRANSFERABLE
6 YR./100,000 MILE COMPREHENSIVE
LIMITED WARRANTY COVERAGE
200-POINT INSPECTION
VEHICLE HISTORY REPORT
M
O
S.
FRESH OIL & FILTER
NEW WIPER BLADES
FORD - LINCOLN
LEASE
FOR
24
Mos.
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied. **Lease payments based on 24 month lease 21,000 allowable
miles. First months payment, $645 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 6/30/12.
VIN #3LCR812015
COCCIA
Leather Seats, Personal Safety
w/Anti-Theft Sys., Fog Lamps, CD, SYNC, Side
Air Curtains, Message Center, PDL, PW,
0
$
2000
60
%
CERTIFIED PRE-OWNED BENEFITS INCLUDE:
2
.
9%
FINANCING
AVAILABLE
FOR UP TO
APR
60
M
O
S
Most with Parking
Sensors, Moonroof,
Pwr. Leather
Seats, SYNC,
Keyless Entry
with Keypad
Most with All Wheel
Drive, Pwr. Leather
Heated Seats,
Moonroof, CD,
Memory Seats,
Keyless Entry,
SYNC
STARTING AT
TO
CHOOSE
FROM
CERTIFIED 2007-2010
LINCOLNMKXAWD
NEW2012 LINCOLNMKZ HYBRID
PRICE INCLUDES 4YR/50,OOO
MILE LIMITED MAINTENANCE PLAN
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month lease 21,000 allowable
miles. First months payment, $645 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 6/30/12.
NEW2012 LINCOLNMKT AWD
All Wheel Drive, 3.5L V6, , SYNC, Heat/Cool Leather
Seats, Trailer Tow Pkg., Keyless Entry w/Keypad, Push
Button Start, THX Audio Sys., Blind Spot Monitoring
Sys., Reverse Camera Sys.,
VIN #2LCBL53605
PRICE
INCLUDES
4YR/50,OOO
MILE LIMITED
MAINTENANCE
PLAN
24
Mos.
, 3.7L V6, ., Auto.
Temp Control, 18” Alum. Wheels, Advanced Trac,
Leather Heated/Cooled Seats, Keyless Entry
with Keypad, Satellite Radio, Side Air
Curtains, Reverse Sensing Sys., Pwr.
Liftgate, CD,
VIN #2LCBL16258
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month lease 21,000 allowable
miles. First months payment, $645 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 6/30/12.
NEW2012 LINCOLNMKX AWD
PRICE INCLUDES
4YR/50,OOO
MILE LIMITED
MAINTENANCE PLAN
24
Mos.
VIN #3LCR827357 Leather Seats, Message Center, Side Air Curtains,
PW, PL, Fog Lamps, AM/FM/CD,
Personal Safety with Anti-Theft
System, SYNC,
VIN #1LDG604456
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied. **Lease payments based on 24 month lease 21,000 allowable
miles. First months payment, $645 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 6/30/12.
PRICE INCLUDES
4YR/50,OOO
MILE LIMITED
MAINTENANCE PLAN
24
Mos.
NEW2013 LINCOLNMKS AWD
3.7L V6, Remote Keyless
Entry, Reverse Sensing, HID Headlamps, THX
Sound Sys with CD, 19” Premium Alum.
Wheels, Dual Zone Electronic Auto
Temp Control, Pwr. Heat/Cool
Leather Seats, Personal Safety
Sys., Safety Canopy Sys., SYNC,
Anti-Theft Sys.,
STARTING AT
TO
CHOOSE
FROM
CERTIFIED 2008-2009
LINCOLNMKZAWD
0
$
2500
60
%
SUNDAY DISPATCH SUNDAY, JUNE 17, 2012 PAGE 10
554 Production/
Operations
539 Legal
554 Production/
Operations
539 Legal
554 Production/
Operations
LEGAL SECRETARY WANTED
PRIOR SALES & COLLECTION
EXPERIENCE PREFERRED
* AGGRESSIVE * TAKE CHARGE *
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work efficiently & independently.
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MACHINIST MACHINIST
INDUSTRIAL INDUSTRIAL ELECTRICIAN ELECTRICIAN
MAINTENANCE MECHANIC MAINTENANCE MECHANIC
MAINTENANCE TRAINEE MAINTENANCE TRAINEE
Fabri-Kal Corporation, a major thermoforming plastics company
has immediate full-time benefited openings.
Machinist: Traditional machine shop methods & equipment,
repair/modification of tooling & production components, fabrication
of parts. Formal Machine Shop training by a technical school,
state certification or a minimum of 6 years experience required.
Industrial Electrician: Conduit, EMT and ridged pipe; Equip-
ment testing; AC/DC motors and drives; PLC systems. 3 Yrs
Exp. HS/GED required, vocational/trade school preferred.
Mechanic: Troubleshooting, hydraulic/pneumatic, machine shop,
plumbing, welding, rebuild mechanic devices, schematics, test
equipment, basic electrical systems. 3 Yrs Exp. HS/GED
required, vocational/trade school preferred.
Maintenance Trainee: Associates Degree in Electronic field or
Technical Certification in Electronics to include AC/DC Fundamen-
tals, Industrial Electricity, Motor Controls, AC/DC Drives, PLC’s,
Basic testing equipment/Multi-meter/Amp probes.
Drug & Alcohol screening and background checks are conditions
of employment. Competitive wage and benefits package: Health
Insurance, Prescription, Dental & Vision, Disability, 401K, Educa-
tion, Paid Leave.
Apply on site: Monday-Friday 8AM-5PM;
or forward resume to:
Fabri-Kal Corporation
ATTN: Human Resources
Valmont Industrial Park
150 Lions Drive, Hazle Township, PA 18202
FAX: (570) 501-0817
EMAIL: HRPA@Fabri-Kal.com
www.f-k.com
EOE
Find Your Ideal
Employee! Place an
ad and end the
search!
570-829-7130
ask for an employ-
ment specialist
542 Logistics/
Transportation
542 Logistics/
Transportation
542 Logistics/
Transportation
EVERY
THURSDAY
IN JUNE
from
Noon-4pm
at the
Tunkhannock
Public Library
Interested Applicants can Apply Online at www.XLCServices.com.
Interviews scheduled Monday thru Friday. Call 800-472-1013 or
walk-ins welcome at Job Fairs.
Hiring Experienced Forklift Operators $12.25 hourly,
after completion of 90 day probation period.
***STRAIGHT DAY SHIFT OR NIGHT SHIFT
(12 hour shifts ave. 42 hours per week)
***75 cent night shift pay differential offered.
***Pay increase based on skill development.
Take charge...LEARNAND EARN!
XLC Services, LLC (Logistics) is seeking experienced
Forklift Operators - MUST HAVE 1 YEAR FULL
TIME EXPERIENCE - with great employment
history to work at their Mehoopany, PA location.
The following skills are necessary for
these positions.
• High School Diploma/GED
• Computer Skills
• Valid Driver’s License
• Criminal Background Check
• Pass Pre-Employment Drug Screen & Physical
All full-time positions come with the following benefits:
medical, 8 paid holidays, 401k after 1 year, and paid
vacation. Pay increases based on skill development.
746 Garage Sales/
Estate Sales/
Flea Markets
415 Autos-Antique
& Classic
CHEVY ‘30 HOTROD COUPE
$49,000
FORD ‘76 THUNDERBIRD
All original $12,000
MERCEDES ‘76 450 SL
$24,000
MERCEDES ‘29
Kit Car $9,000
(570) 655-4884
hell-of-adeal.com
CHEVY ‘30 HOTROD COUPE
$49,000
FORD ‘76 THUNDERBIRD
All original $12,000
MERCEDES ‘76 450 SL
$24,000
MERCEDES ‘29
Kit Car $9,000
(570) 655-4884
hell-of-adeal.com
MAZDA `88 RX-7
CONVERTIBLE
1 owner, garage
kept, 65k original
miles, black with
grey leather interior,
all original & never
seen snow. $7,995.
Call 570-237-5119
MERCEDES-BENZ `73
450SL
Convertible with
removable hard top,
power windows, AM
/FM radio with cas-
sette player, CD
player, automatic, 4
new tires. Cham-
pagne exterior; Ital-
ian red leather inte-
rior inside. Garage
kept, excellent con-
dition. Reduced
price to $26,000.
Call 570-825-6272
421 Boats &
Marinas
SILVERCRAFT
Heavy duty 14’ alu-
minum boat with
trailer, great shape.
$1,000.
570-822-8704 or
cell 570-498-5327
427 Commercial
Trucks &
Equipment
CHEVY ‘08 3500
HD DUMP TRUCK
2WD, automatic.
Only 12,000 miles.
Vehicle in like
new condition.
$19,000.
570-288-4322
439 Motorcycles
BMW 2010 K1300S
Only 460 miles! Has
all bells & whistles.
Heated grips, 12 volt
outlet, traction con-
trol, ride adjustment
on the fly. Black with
lite gray and red
trim. comes with
BMW cover, battery
tender, black blue
tooth helmet with
FM stereo and black
leather riding gloves
(like new). paid
$20,500. Sell for
$15,000 FIRM.
Call 570-262-0914
Leave message.
HARLEY ‘10 DAVIDSON
SPORTSTER CUSTOM
Loud pipes.
Near Mint
174 miles - yes,
One hundred and
seventy four
miles on the
clock, original
owner. $8000.
570-876-2816
HARLEY DAVIDSON `07
Road King Classic
FLHRC. Burgundy /
Cream. 6 speed.
Cruise control. Back
rests, grips, battery
tender, cover. Willie
G accessories.
19,000miles. $13,250.
Williamsport, PA
262-993-4228
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘80
Soft riding FLH.
King of the High-
way! Mint origi-
nal antique show
winner. Factory
spot lights, wide
white tires,
biggest Harley
built. Only
28,000 original
miles! Never
needs inspec-
tion, permanent
registration.
$7,995 OBO
570-905-9348
439 Motorcycles
SUZUKI ‘01 VS 800
GL INTRUDER
Garage kept, no
rust, lots of
chrome, black with
teal green flake.
Includes storage
jack & 2 helmets.
$3600
570-410-1026
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
YAMAHA ‘97
ROYALSTAR 1300
12,000 miles. With
windshield. Runs
excellent. Many
extras including
gunfighter seat,
leather bags, extra
pipes. New tires &
battery. Asking
$4,000 firm.
(570) 814-1548
442 RVs & Campers
FOREST RIVER`08
5TH WHEEL
Model 8526RLS
Mountain Top,PA
$18,500
570-760-6341
SUNLINE `06 SOLARIS
Travel Trailer. 29’,
mint condition, 1
slide out a/c-heat.
Stove, microwave,
fridge, shower
inside & out. Many
more extras, includ-
ing towing, hitch
equipment & sway
bars. Satellite dish
& stand. Reduced.
$10,900. Selling
due to health
issues.
570-842-6735
WINNEBAGO ‘81
LOW LOW MILES
42,000+
ALL NEW TIRES
GREAT PRICE
$4000
CALL
570-825-9415
AFTER 5 PM
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
CHRYSLER `02
TOWN & COUNTRY
Luxury people
mover! 87,300 well
maintained miles.
This like-new van
has third row seat-
ing, power side &
rear doors. Eco-
nomical V6 drive-
train and all avail-
able options. Priced
for quick sale
$5,495. Generous
trade-in allowances
will be given on this
top-of-the-line vehi-
cle. Call Fran
570-466-2771
Scranton
FORD ‘02 EXPLORER
Red, XLT, Original
non-smoking owner,
garaged, synthetic
oil since new, excel-
lent in and out. New
tires and battery.
90,000 miles.
$7,500
(570) 403-3016
MERCURY `03
MOUNTAINEER
AWD. Third row
seating. Economical
6 cylinder automat-
ic. Fully loaded with
all available options.
93k pampered miles.
Garage kept. Safety /
emissions inspected
and ready to go. Sale
priced at $6995.
Trade-ins accepted.
Tag & title process-
ing available with
purchase. Call Fran
for an appointment
to see this out-
standing SUV.
570-466-2771
Scranton
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
MITSUBISHI `11
OUTLANDER SPORT SE
AWD, Black interi-
or/exterior, start/
stop engine with
keyless entry, heat-
ed seats, 18” alloy
wheels, many extra
features. Only Low
Miles. 10 year,
100,000 mile war-
ranty. $22,500. Will-
ing to negotiate.
Serious inquires
only - must sell,
going to law school.
(570) 793-6844
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
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A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
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You’re in bussiness
with classified!
460
AUTOMOTIVE
SERVICE
DIRECTORY
468 Auto Parts
All Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Wanted
Highest
Prices
Paid In
CA$H
FREE
PICKUP
570-574-1275
507 Banking/Real
Estate/Mortgage
Professionals
COMMUNITY OFFICE
MANAGER
First Keystone Com-
munity Bank is
recruiting a manag-
er to direct and
organize the sales
and service func-
tions of their
Hanover Office
located at 1540 San
Souci Highway,
Hanover Township.
The successful can-
didate will be
responsible for
developing cus-
tomer relationships
and providing cus-
tomers with direct
service relating to
all bank products in
order to meet
growth, sales, and
profit objectives.
Previous experi-
ence in related bank
operations and/or
management posi-
tions required.
Must be self-moti-
vated and possess
excellent interper-
sonal and communi-
cation skills. We
offer a competitive
compensation rate
and an excellent
benefit package.
Please send resume
and cover letter
with salary require-
ments or submit
application to:
First Keystone
Community Bank
Human Resource
Department
111 West Front
Street, Berwick,
PA 18603
EO/AA Employer
509 Building/
Construction/
Skilled Trades
CARPENTER
Experienced
Full-time position
Please fax resume
to 570-718-0661
or e-mail to
chrissiegel@
ruckno.com
522 Education/
Training
YOUTH COACHES/
MENTORS
FT & PT position
available for
youth programs.
Requires enthusias-
tic individual that
enjoys working with
children, dedication
and vision.
BS/BA in education
or related fields,
bi-lingual a plus.
Send resume to
sdoyne@voapa.org
or fax to 570-825-
4746 attn: Shannon
EOE
533 Installation/
Maintenance/
Repair
AUTO MECHANIC
Excellent wages.
No weekends. Must
have experience
with own tools and
Inspection & Emis-
sions License.
Call Jerry @
570-650-7265
TRUCK WASHER
5-7pm M-F + Flex
Weekend. Will wash
trucks, check oil
and coolant levels
and other duties.
CALL FOR APPLICATION.
542-5330. HARVIS,
INC. WORK LOCATION IS
IN SWOYERSVILLE.
VARSITY.HARVIS@
GMAIL.COM
536 IT/Software
Development
PHP WEB DEVELOPER
Growing distributor
seeking a full-time,
qualified PHP Junior
Developer to join a
programming team
that creates and
maintains multiple
ecommerce web-
sites. Bachelors in
an IT related field is
preferred. Experi-
ence with OOP in
PHP, as well as
XHTML, JavaScript,
and CSS are
required. Benefits
include health,
vision and 401K with
match. To apply,
send your resume
to
devjobs@newglobal.com
Windows based
Computer
Network
Specialist
in Wilkes-Barre/
Scranton Area.
Email resume to:
nepacomp
netw@gmail.com
538 Janitorial/
Cleaning
JANITORIAL
Retail Cleaning
Part-time, early AM
shift. Basic cleaning
duties at Pittston
location. Minimum
2 years retail
cleaning experience
is required.
Call 267-218-4363.
Pay starting at
$8.50 per hour.
WWW.KBS-CLEAN.JOBS
542 Logistics/
Transportation
Drivers: Co. Great
Pay/Hometime! No-
Touch! 80% D&H.
CDL-A with 1 year
experience.
888-377-7019 x107
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
Drivers: Home EVERY
Weekend! Great
pay, excellent bene-
fits! Safety bonus
$2500. CDL-A 2
years experience
required. Clean
MVR. Annette:
800-852-9190
Drivers: $2,500
Sign-On Bonus!
New Pay Increase!
Home Nightly
Hazleton, PA Dedi-
cated Run. CDL-A, 1
year experience
required. Estenson
Logistics. Apply:
www.goelc.com
1-866-336-9642
548 Medical/Health
LPN
Part time LPN need-
ed for busy special-
ists office. Flexible
hours required, no
evenings or week-
ends. Mail resume
with references to:
c/o Times Leader
Box 4055
15 N. Main Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18711
548 Medical/Health
RESIDENTIAL STAFF
FT-PT shift positions
available for serving
female youth in
24 hour/7 day a
week residential
treatment program.
Experience with
youth MH/MR popu-
lation is a plus
BS in social work or
related field is pre-
ferred. Excellent
compensation,
benefits, salary.
Fax resume to:
570-825-4746
or e-mail
skrochta@voapa.org
EOE
554 Production/
Operations
MANUFACTURING
NIGHT SHIFT
MACHINE OPERATORS
NEEDED
$9.00/hour to start.
60-90 day evalua-
tion with $ increase
$ based on YOUR
performance, atten-
dance etc. Benefit
Package includes:
Medical, Dental,
Vision, Life Insur-
ance, Vacation, Hol-
iday pay PLUS
Full-time 12 hour
shifts on alternating
3 & 4 day work
weeks. Every other
weekend a must.
Previous manufac-
turing experience
preferred. Some
heavy lifting.
Accepting applica-
tions at:
AEP INDUSTRIES,
INC.
20 Elmwood Ave.
Crestwood Ind’l Pk
Mountaintop, PA
18707. EOE
We are a drug free
workplace.
To place your
ad Call Toll Free
1-800-427-8649
566 Sales/Retail/
Business
Development
MRG
EXCLUSIVE CASINO
RESORT RETAILER
IS LOOKING FOR
SUPERVISOR
& SALES
ASSOCIATES
WE OFFER A
GREAT BENEFITS
PACKAGE!!!!
QUALIFIED CANDI-
DATES CAN APPLY IN
PERSON AT OUR MAR-
SHALL ROUSSO STORE
IN MOHEGAN SUN
CASINO, ON-LINE AT
www.marshall
retailgroup.com
OR FAX YOUR RESUME
TO 609-317-1126
A PHENOMENAL
PLACE TOWORK!
600
FINANCIAL
610 Business
Opportunities
JAN-PRO COMMERCIAL
CLEANING OF
NORTHEASTERN PA
Concerned about
your future?
BE YOUR OWN BOSS
Work Full or
Part time
Accounts available
NOW throughout
Luzerne &
Lackawanna,
Counties
We guarantee
$5,000.to $200,000
in annual billing.
Investment
Required
We’re ready –Are
you?
For more info call
570-824-5774
Jan-Pro.com
LIQUOR LICENSE
For Sale Luzerne
County / City of
Wilkes-Barre, PA
Asking $25,000.00
Call: 201-315-2210
630 Money To Loan
“We can erase
your bad credit -
100% GUARAN-
TEED.” Attorneys
for the Federal
Trade Commission
say they’ve never
seen a legitimate
credit repair opera-
tion. No one can
legally remove
accurate and timely
information from
your credit report.
It’s a process that
starts with you and
involves time and a
conscious effort to
pay your debts.
Learn about manag-
ing credit and debt
at ftc. gov/credit. A
message from The
Times Leader and
the FTC.
720 Cemetery
Plots/Lots
WEST PITTSTON
CEMETERY
2 lots, prime loca-
tion. Retail price
$500/each. Selling
for $800/both.
570-654-4534
744 Furniture &
Accessories
BEAUTIFUL
PENNSYLVANIA HOUSE
King sized sleigh
bed, with end
table, mirror, 2
dressers, 1 with
mirror. Excellent
condition,
Asking $2,900.
Please call
570-592-7532
ENTERTAINMENT
CENTER. OAK
$50. 570-824-9607
FURNI SH FURNI SH
FOR LESS FOR LESS
* NELSON *
* FURNITURE *
* WAREHOUSE *
Recliners from $299
Lift Chairs from $699
New and Used
Living Room
Dinettes, Bedroom
210 Division St
Kingston
Call 570-288-3607
Mattress:
A Queen Size
Pillow Top Set
Still in Plastic
Can Deliver
$150
570-280-9628

MOVING SALE MOVING SALE
White Canadelx
counter height
kitchen set with 4
swivel chairs, enter-
tainment center,
coffee table, dining
room set with serv-
er, living room blue
Drexel sofa, 2 wing
back chairs and
tables, large oak
cherry entertain-
ment center, new
black leather reclin-
er, sofa & loveseat
& much more. Call
570-288-5555
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
SOFA & loveseat
Benchcraft $500.
Twin blankets $2.
each. Children’s Wii
activity support sys-
tem $30. Purses $3.
DVD/VHS combo
player $5. Digital
weight scale $5. 5
board games in 1
block $5. VHS play-
er $3. DVDs $1.
each. VHS 5 for $1.
570-854-3996
SOFA & LOVESEAT
black leather $400.
2 white stone &
glass coffee & end
tables $100. Dining
room set, table,
leaf, 6 chairs, hutch
& buffet $200. Desk
with filing cabinet
$50. 570-825-4186
WEST WEST WYOMING WYOMING
6th Street
OPEN YEAR ROUND
SP SPACE ACE
A AV VAILABLE AILABLE
INSIDE & OUT INSIDE & OUT
Acres of Acres of
parking parking
OUTSIDE
SPACES
- $10
Saturday
10am-2pm
Sunday
8am-4pm
BEST PRICES
IN THE AREA
CA$H ON THE $POT,
Free Anytime
Pickup
570-301-3602
570-301-3602
CALL US!
TO JUNK
YOUR CAR
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
BUYING SPORT CARDS
Pay Cash for
baseball, football,
basketball, hockey
& non-sports. Sets,
singles & wax.
570-212-0398
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
VITO’S
&
GINO’S
Wanted:
ALL
JUNK
CARS &
TRUCKS
Highest
Prices
Paid!!
FREE PICKUP
288-8995
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
800
PETS & ANIMALS
805 Birds
GREEN CHEEK CONURES
babies, 3 months
old. Very loveable.
Cage & Starter kit
included. (30x18x18).
$250 each. Call
570-823-6962
810 Cats
KITTENS 2 free to
good homes only,
references re-
quired. 457-5398
815 Dogs
BLACK LABRADOR
PUPPIES
Ready now, home
raised. Very
loveable. Parents
on premises, asking
$250. Call Jill at
570-899-2116
COCKAPOO
11 weeks old.
Male, $500
570-250-9690
Golden Retriever
Female, 9 months
old, great with other
dogs, kids, active,
very friendly. $300.
Call
570-709-4631
LAB PUPS
Parents AKC family
pets. 2 chocolate
females, 1 chocolate
male. $400.
570-401-7213
LABRADOR
RETRIEVERS
AKC registered.
Chocolate & black.
Vet certified.
females, $475,
males, $425.
Ready 6/22/12.
Deposit will hold.
570-648-8613
815 Dogs
MINI SCHNAUZER PUPS
Pedigree, with 1st
shots, hypoaler-
genic, great tem-
perments, parents
on premises.
Females $450.
Males $425. Leave
message
570-401-0630
SAINT BERNARD PUPS
Pure bred - no
papers. Born April
21st. Parents on
premises.
3 females, 1 male.
Vet checked. First
shots and
dewormed.
$300.00 each. Call
(570) 825-0745
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
900
REAL ESTATE
FOR SALE
906 Homes for Sale
Having trouble
paying your mort-
gage? Falling
behind on your
payments? You
may get mail from
people who promise
to forestall your
foreclosure for a fee
in advance. Report
them to the Federal
Trade Commission,
the nation’s con-
sumer protection
agency. Call 1-877-
FTC-HELP or click
on ftc.gov. A mes-
sage from The
Times Leader and
the FTC.
906 Homes for Sale
EXETER
Nice size 4 bed-
room home with
some hardwood
floors, large eat in
kitchen with break-
fast bar. 2 car
garage & partially
fenced yard. Close
to everything!
$83,000
Call
Christine Kutz
570-332-8832
EXETER
OPEN HOUSE
Sunday
12pm-5pm
362 Susquehanna
Ave
Completely remod-
eled, spectacular,
2 story Victorian
home, with 3 bed-
rooms, 1.5 baths,
new rear deck, full
front porch, tiled
baths and kitchen,
granite counter-
tops, all Cherry
hardwood floors
throughout, all new
stainless steel
appliances and
lighting, new oil fur-
nace, washer dryer
in first floor bath.
Great neighbor-
hood, nice yard.
$174,900 (30 year
loan, $8,750 down,
$887/month, 30
years @ 4.5%)
100% OWNER
FINANCING
AVAILABLE
Call Bob at
570-654-1490
HANOVER TWP.
New Construction.
Lot #2, Fairway
Estates. 2,700
square feet, tile &
hardwood on 1st
floor. Cherry cabi-
nets with center
island. $399,500.
For more details:
patrickdeats.com
(570)696-1041
JENKINS TWP.
$56,000 $56,000
1252 Main St.
3 Bedrooms
1 Bath.
Finished Walk-Out
Basement.
Single Car
Garage.
Call Vince
570-332-8792
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
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It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
LUZERNE COUNTY
Secluded 3 level
home on 15 acres
located in Black
Creek Township
(near Hazleton).
Detatched garage.
Private gated drive-
way. Call
570-459-8658
906 Homes for Sale
JENKINS TWP.
Highland Hills
8 Patrick Road
Magnificent custom
built tudor home
with quality
throughout. Spa-
cious 4 bedrooms,
3.5 baths, 2 story
living room with
fireplace and library
loft. Dining room,
family room and 3
season sunroom
which overlooks
professionally land-
scaped grounds
with gazebo and
tennis/basketball
court. Lower level
includes recreation
room, exercise
room and 3/4 bath.
Enjoy this serene
acre in a beautiful
setting in Highland
Hills Development.
Too many amenities
to mention.
Taxes appealed
and lowered con-
siderably for year
2013. For more
info and photos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-723
$399,900
Call Terry
570-885-3041
Angie
570-885-4896
PITTSTON
175 Oak Street
New furnace,
3 bedrooms, 1.5
baths, 1st floor
laundry room, 3
season porch,
fenced yard and off
street parking.
MLS#12-721
$84,900
Call Patti
570-328-1752
Liberty Realty
& Appraisal
Services LLC
PITTSTON TWP.
110 Front St.
This well-maintained
3 bedroom, 1.5
baths bilevel home
is in move in condi-
tion. Spacious eat-in
kitchen with custom
cabinets, tile floor
and counters.
Unique lower level
family room with
wood burning fire-
place, office space.
laundry/bath combo.
Plenty of storage
including an 8X6
cedar closet. Out-
door space has
covered patio,
columned carport
and well manicured
partially fenced
yard. Detached
large garage.
For more info &
photos, go to
www.atlasrealty-
inc.com
$205,000
MLS# 12-2053
Call Angie at
570-885-4896
Terry at
570-885-3041
906 Homes for Sale
TAYLOR
OPEN HOUSE
SUNDAY, JUNE 10
12 - 2PM
Featured on
WNEP’s Home &
Backyard. Move
right into this 3
bedroom, 2 bath
immaculate home
with custom maple
eat in kitchen,
stainless steel
appliances, hard-
wood floors,
Jacuzzi tub, 2 fire-
places, abundance
of storage leading
outside to a private
sanctuary with
deck/pergola & Koi
pond. Off street
parking. LOW
TAXES! For more
info and photos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-733
$189,900
Call Keri
570-885-5082
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
WEST PITTSTON
NEW LISTING
951 Wyoming
Avenue
Bright and cheery,
well kept home.
Oak kitchen, hard-
wood floors, large
family room. One
year home trust
warranty. MLS# 12-
1858 $144,900
Call Tracy Zarola
570-696-0723
WEST WYOMING
438 Tripp St
OPEN HOUSE
Sunday
12pm-5pm
Completely remod-
eled home with
everything new.
New kitchen, baths,
bedrooms, tile
floors, hardwoods,
granite countertops,
all new stainless
steel appliances,
refrigerator, stove,
microwave, dish-
washer, free stand-
ing shower, tub for
two, huge deck,
large yard, excellent
neighborhood
$154,900 (30 year
loan @ 4.5% with 5%
down; $7,750 down,
$785/month)
100% OWNER
FINANCING
AVAILABLE
Call Bob at
570-654-1490
746 Garage Sales/
Estate Sales/
Flea Markets
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
Need a Roommate?
Place an ad and
find one here!
570-829-7130
PAGE 11 SUNDAY, JUNE 17, 2012 SUNDAY DISPATCH
7
6
0
4
0
0
7
6
0
4
0
0
2012 CHEVY EQUINOX LS FWD
Stk. #12613, 2.4L DOHC
4 Cylinder, 6 Speed Automatic,
Remote Keyless Entry,
Power Windows, Power Door
Locks, Power Mirrors, 17” Wheels,
AM/FM/CD, Cruise Control,
OnStar w/ Turn-By-Turn
Navigation, XM Satellite
Radio, Tilt Steering Wheel
MSRP $
24,355
LEASE
FOR
ONLY
$
219

PER
MONTH
For
24 Mos.
2012 CHEVY TRAVERSE LS FWD
MSRP $
30,775
LEASE
FOR
ONLY
$
249

PER
MONTH
For
24 Mos.
Stk. #12665, 1.8 ECOTEC VVT
DOHC 4 Cylinder, 6 Speed
Auto, Air Conditioning, Power
Windows, Power Door Locks,
Power Mirrors, Bluetooth, OnStar
w/ Turn-By-Turn Navigation,
XM Satellite Radio, Front Bucket
Seats, USB Audio Interface
MSRP $
18,865
LEASE
FOR
ONLY
$
149

PER
MONTH
For
24 Mos.
50
AVAILABLE MSRP $
22,890
LEASE
FOR
ONLY
$
169

PER
MONTH
For
24 Mos.
0
%
APR
For 60 Mos.
LS • LT • LTZ
Available
Stk. #12683
Stk. #12588, 2.4L DOHC,
6 Speed Automatic Transmission,
Air Conditioning, Power
Windows, Power Door
Locks, OnStar w/
Turn-By-Turn Navigation,
Remote Keyless Entry,
AM/FM/CD/MP3,
XM Satellite Radio
2012 CHEVY SILVERADO
1500 REGULAR CAB
Stk. #12525, Vortec 4.3L V6 MFI 4 Speed Automat-
ic, Air Conditioning, Locking Rear Differential, 17”
Steel Wheels, 40/20/40 Split Bench Seat, Stabilitrak
$
20,999
*
Starting At
Stk. #12063, 3.5L V6 Automatic, Dual Zone Air
Conditioning, Stabilitrak, Six-Way Power Driver
Seat, PW, PDL, Tilt, OnStar, XM Satellite Radio
$
22,499

*
20
AVAILABLE
Starting At
0
%
APR
For 60 Mos.
MSRP $
24,175
2012 CHEVY SONIC LT
Stk. #12680, 1.8L Ecotec-VVT DOHC 4 Cyl, Auto,
Stabilitrak, XM Radio, AM/FM/CD, PDL, A/C,
Rear Wiper Washer, Spoiler, OnStar
$
15,999
*
12
AVAILABLE
Starting At
35
MPG
hwy
2012 CHEVY IMPALA
LS SEDAN
30
MPG
hwy
0
%
APR
For 72 Mos.
MSRP $
26,665
*Price of vehicle plus tax and tags. Prices include all rebates. * Price also includes Trade-In Bonus Cash (see dealer for qualification). *† Price includes AARP incentive (See dealer for details); SILVERADO - Lease for $299 per month plus tax & tags, 39 month
lease, 10K miles per year; $1,299 due at leasing signing. Lease payment includes GM competitive lease incentive (must currently lease a 1999 or newer non-GM vehicle to qualify, GM competitive lease can be transferred in same household; LowAPR in lieu of
rebates; †CRUZE- $149 per month plus tax, 24 month lease, 12K miles per year, Total due at signing $2418.38=includes tags and 1st payment; †MALIBU- $169 per month plus tax, 24 month lease, 12K miles per year, Total due at signing=$2198.83. Includes tags
and 1st payment; †EQUINOX- $219 per month plus tax, 24 month lease, 12K miles per year, Total due at signing=$2354. Includes tags and 1st payment; †TRAVERSE - $249 per month plus tax, 24 month lease, 12K miles per year, Total due at signing=$1514.
Includes tags & 1st payment; Lease Specials are to well qualified buyers (S-Tier 800+) Artwork for illustration only. Must take delivery by July 2, 2012. Not responsible for typographical errors.
$
23,450
8
AVAILABLE
Starting At
30
MPG
hwy
Stk. #12702, 2.4L DOHC 4V ECOTEC, 6 Speed
Automatic Tapshift Manual Trans., Air, PW, PDL, Onstar w/
Turn-By-Turn Navigation, Remote Keyless Entry, XM Satellite
Radio, AM/FM/CD/MP3 Format,
$
18,999
*
Starting At
Stk. #12606, Vortec 5.3 SFI V8
6 Speed Automatic, 2nd Row
Bench, Power Options,
F/R Air, XM Satellite
Radio, Onstar, Luggage
Rack, 3rd Row Seat,
Assist Steps, Remote
Start Pickup Package
$
41,999
*
Starting At
Stk. #12584, 5.3L
V8, AT, A/C, Power
Windows, Power
Door Locks, EZ
Lift Tailgate, Lock-
ing Rear Differen-
tial, Alum. Wheels,
OnStar Turn-by-
Turn Navigation,
XM Satellite
$
29,999
*
Starting At
2012 CHEVY CAMARO
COUPE
1LT • 2LS • 1SS • 2SS
CONVERTIBLE Stk. #12610
2012 CHEVY MALIBU
LS
MSRP $
22,890
0
%
APR
For 60 Mos.
2012 CHEVY SUBURBAN
LS 4X4
MSRP $
46,105
0
%
APR
For 60 Mos.
0
%
APR
For 60 Mos.
MSRP $
36,560
25
AVAILABLE
2012 CHEVY CRUZE LS 2012 CHEVY MALIBU LS
Sale Price
Starting At
$
30,999
O
R
$
299
LEASE
FOR
ONLY
PER
MONTH
For
39 Mos.
2012 CHEVY SILVERADO 1500 EXTENDED CAB LT 4WD Z71
This Is No
“Plain Jane” Truck
Z71 ALL STAR
EDITION
Stk. #12242, 5.3L SFI V8 6 Speed Automatic, 18” Aluminum
Wheels, Climate Control, Keyless Entry, PW, PDL, Off-Road
Z71 Suspension Package, & More!
OVER
100
SILVERADO
AVAILABLE
OVER
100
SILVERADO
AVAILABLE
2012 CHEVY SILVERADO
1500 4WD CREW CAB
Must own/lease 1999 or newer
Saturn vehicle to qualify.
We Want Your Trade! We Want Your Trade!
$ Top Dollar $ Offered! $ Top Dollar $ Offered!
ATTENTION
SATURN
OWNERS
$1000 BONUS
CASH AVAILABLE.
$1000 BONUS CASH
AVAILABLE.
33
MPG
hwy
SHOP 24/7 WWW.VALLEYCHEVROLET.COM
0
%
APR
For 60 Mos.
MSRP $
36,955
CELLPHONES FOR SOLDIERS DROP OFF!
Donate gently used cell phones here!
VALLEY CHEVROLET SERVICE COMPLEX
221 Conyngham Ave.,Wilkes-Barre
CALL 822-2772 FOR MORE INFO.
23
AVAILABLE
BEATING
THE
COMPETITION
SALE
SALE
SALE
SALE
TRADE-IN
BONUS
CASH
on select
trucks
SUNDAY DISPATCH SUNDAY, JUNE 17, 2012 PAGE 12
906 Homes for Sale
412 Autos for Sale
468 Auto Parts
906 Homes for Sale
412 Autos for Sale
468 Auto Parts
906 Homes for Sale
412 Autos for Sale
906 Homes for Sale
412 Autos for Sale
906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale
WE L L MA I N T A I N E D 3
BEDROOM, 1 1/2 BATH BI
L E V E L I N M O V E I N
CONDITION. SPACIOUS EAT
I N KI T CHE N, CUST OM
CABINETS, UNIQUE LOWER
LEVEL FAMILY ROOM WITH
FIREPLACE, OFFICE AND
LAUNDRY. MLS# 12-2053
CALL ANGIE 885-4896 OR
TERRY 885-3041
DIR: NORTH ON MAIN ST,
RGHT ONTO PINE ST, RIGHT
ON FRONT, PROPERTY ON
LEFT.
BEAUTI FUL 5 BEDROOM 2
FULL, ONE 3/4 AND ONE 1/2
BATH, 2 YEAR OLD HEALEY
CONSTRUCTI ON, FAMI LY
R O O M W I T H G A S F P ,
KITCHEN WITH TILE FLOOR,
GRANITE COUNTERTOPS AND
CENTER ISLAND, PARTIALLY
FINISHED BASEMENT WITH
WAL K OUT , OVERSI ZE D
DECK. ETC. MLS# 11-4084
CALL LUANN 602-9280
D I R : P H O E N I X S T T O
BLUEBERRY DR, LEFT ON
HUCKLEBERRY, HOME ON
RIGHT.
TRADITIONAL 4 BEDROOM
H O M E W I T H L A R G E
MASTER BR & BATH WITH
WALK- IN CLOSET, STONE
F I REPL ACE I N F AMI L Y
ROOM, MODERN KITCHEN
& BATHS, LIGHTED DECK IN
GREAT LOCATI ON. MLS#
11-3071
CALL COLLEEN 237-0415
D I R : P H O E N I X S T T O
BL UEBERRY RI GHT ON
RASPBE RRY, L E F T ON
HUCKLEBERRY HOME ON
RIGHT.
3 BEDROOM, 2 BATH HOME WITH ULTRA MODERN KITCHEN WITH GRANITE COUNTERS, HEATED TILE FLOOR &
STAINLESS STEEL APPLIANCES. DINING ROOM HAS BRAZILIAN CHERRY FLOORS, HUGE YARD, GARAGE, PARTIALLY
FINISHED LOWER LEVEL. BUILT FOR WHEELCHAIR ACCESSIBILITY WITH EXT RAMP AND EXTRA WIDE DOORS &
HALLWAYS. MLS# 11-4079
CALL CHARLIE 829-6200
DIR: MAIN ST AVOCA, TURN WEST ONTO MCALPINE, RIGHT ON FOOTE AVE, JUST PAST STEPHENSON ST HOME ON
LEFT.
CHARMI NG CAPE COD
H O M E I N Q U I E T
N E I G H B O R H O O D ,
INCLUDES ECONOMICAL
GEOTHERMAL ENTERGY
SYSTEM WHICH LOWERS
Y O U R H E A T B I L L 4
BEDROOMS, 2 BATHS.
MLS# 12-265
CALL JOE 239-9663
D I R : M A I N S T . T O
SWALLOW, CONTINUE TO
TEDRICK, RIGHT ON PINE,
RIGHT ON FRONT CORNER
OF LEWIS.
V E R Y W E L L K E P T
T O W N H O U S E W I T H
NEWLY DONE BATHROOM
BY REBATH, NEW CARPET
I N LI VI NG ROOM, NEW
VINYL FENCE, READY TO
MOVE IN. MLS# 12-2084
CALL FRED
D I R: BA CK R OA D T O
RIGHT ON PACKER, RIGHT
T O W I L D F L O W E R
V I L L A G E , R I G H T O N
LAUREL CT.
G R E A T H O M E W I T H 3
BEDROOMS, 2 1/2 BATHS,
DRI VEWAY, SCREENED I N
P O R C H O V E R L O O K I N G
F E N C E D I N Y A R D , A L L
LAMINATE FLOORS, FRESH
PAINT, NEWER WINDOWS,
GAS F URNACE . GOOSE
ISLAND SECTION. MLS# 12-
845
CALL COLLEEN 237-0415
DIR: SOUTH MAIN JUST PAST
BLACKMAN TO LEFT ON E.
DIVISION, LEFT ON VINE ST,
RIGHT ON SCHULER, HOME
ON RIGHT.
10 ROOM HOME WITH
FOUR BEDROOMS, 2
BATHS, 2 CAR GARAGE,
GR E A T D RI V E WA Y ,
C E N T R A L A I R ,
HARDOOWD FLOORS,
GREAT YARD A MUST
SEE HOME. MLS# 12-
477
CALL TOM 262-7716
DIR: MAIN ST. PITTSTON
HEADING NORTH HOME
IS ON RIGHT.
ATTRACTIVE, 3 BR TWO
STORY, MODERN KITCHEN
W/GRANITE COUNTERS,
SS APPLI ANCES, SLATE
FLOOR, MODERN TI LE
BATHS, 1ST FLR LAUNDRY,
LAMINATE FLOORS IN LR &
DR, NEW WINDOWS, NEW
CARPETING ON STEPS & IN
BEDROOMS. MLS# 12-915
CALL LUANN 602-9280
DI R: TRAVEL NORTH ON
MAIN ST PITTSTON, RIGHT
ON UNION, 3RD LEFT ON
GREEN, HOME ON RIGHT.
TOM SALVAGGIO, FORMALLY FROM WEST
PITTSTON AND WYOMING AND NOW RESIDES IN
BIRCHWOOD HILLS, PLAINS. TOM IS IN HIS 19TH
YEAR WITH ATLAS REALTY. TOM HAS BEEN
FINDING HOMES FOR BUYERS AND SELLING
LISTINGS ON A CONSISTANT BASIS. AN AVID
GOLFER, TOM HAS BEEN A MEMBER OF FOX HILL
COUNTRY CLUB FOR MORE THAN 40 YEARS. TOM
AND HIS WIFE MARIE ARE THE PROUD PARENTS
OF DAWN AND JACQUIE AND GRANDPARENTS OF
CHRISTIAN, JENNA AND BRENDAN.
ATLAS REALTY INC.
570-829-6200
ASK FOR TOM 262-7716
TAX REFUND?? USE IT FOR YOUR DOWNPAYMENT ON THIS GREAT HOME WITH 2 LARGE
BEDROOMS, MODERN KITCHEN, BUILT IN GARAGE WITH DRIVEWAY, PRIVATE YARD AND
ENCLOSED SUN PORCH. MLS# 12-41
CALL COLLEEN 237-0415
DIR: PIERCE ST TO RIGHT ON N. DAWES, HOME ON LEFT.
MOVE IN READY, FRESHLY PAINTED 2 STORY HOME
WITH PRIVATE DRIVEWAY, SCREENED IN BACK
PORCH, NICELY LANDSCAPED, 4 BEDROOMS. MLS#
12-2124
CALL MELISSA 237-6384
DIR: SOUTH ON MAIN ST, RIGHT ON UNION, LEFT ON
CLIFF ST.
PRI CE I NCLUDES DOUBLE BLOCK HOME PLUS
SINGLE FAMILY HOME IN THE REAR. VINYL SIDING,
OFF STREET PARKING, GREAT INCOME POTENTIAL.
MLS# 12-1989
CALL TERRY 885-3041 OR ANGIE 885-4896
DIR: MAIN ST. PITTSTON TURN ONTO SWALLOW ST.
HOME ON RIGHT.
VERY NICE DUPLEX, FULLY RENTED WITH
GOOD RETURN IN A GREAT NEIGHBORHOOD.
MLS# 12-2028
CALL CHARLIE 829-6200
DIR: WYOMING AVE TURN WEST ON YATES
ST, LEFT ON MURRAY, HOUSE ON LEFT.
LARGE HOME WITH PLENTY OF ROOM, NICE YARD WITH
DETACHED GARAGE AND OFF STREET PARKING. FORMALLY
A 2 FAMILY WITH OLD KI TCHEN ON 2ND FLOOR WI TH
LOADS OF POTENTIAL. HOME IS WELL MAINTAINED. MLS#
12-2096
CALL COLLEEN 237-0415
DIR: SANSOUCI TO LEFT ON KOSCIUSZKO, RIGHT ON E.
UNION FOLLOW TO W. UNION, HOME ON RIGHT.
BUYING JUNK
VEHICLES
$375 AND UP
ALSO BUYING
HEAVY EQUIPMENT
NOBODY Pays More
570-760-2035
Monday thru Saturday 6am-9pm • Happy Trails!
H
906 Homes for Sale
WILKES-BARRE
220 Stanton St.
For Sale by Owner
Large home,
1 or 2 families.
Driveway &
garage, $70,500.
WILKES-BARRE
Parsons Section
5 bedroom, 1 bath.
Garage. Corner lot.
Nice location. Out of
flood zone. $30,000
negotiable. Call
570-814-7453
906 Homes for Sale
WILKES-BARRE
For sale by owner
Located in Wilkes
Barre city.
Currently rented
with a great tenant.
Entire home was
remodeled 10
years ago, including
new plumbing,
electric, drywall,
and is appraised
at $55,000.
Features 3 bed-
rooms, 1.5 baths,
6 rooms total.
Partial unfinished
basement, with
gas heat, and yard
with wood deck.
All this for $40,000
Great investment
property.
owner will help with
closing!! Call
570-825-3313
909 Income &
Commercial
Properties
PITTSTON
FOR SALE
5 Unit
Money Maker
Available immedi-
ately. Fully rented,
leases on all five
units. Separate
utilities, new roof
in 2007, 3 new
gas furnaces, off
street parking for
6 vehicles, 3 bay
garage. Over
$29,000 in rents.
A true money
maker for the
serious investor.
Must Sell!
$145,000.
Call Steve at
(570)468-2488
PITTSTON
Newly renovated
Main Street
location right in
the heart of the
booming section.
commercial space
available with with
front prime win-
dow. Perfect for
anything in the
beauty industry,
nail salon, bou-
tique store, etc.
Call
570-654-6737,
570-212-2908
or 570-362-4019
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
915 Manufactured
Homes
HUNLOCK CREEK
3 bedroom, 2 bath
home in great con-
dition in park.
$18,000. Financing
available with
$3,000 down. Call
570-477-2845
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
AVOCA
Very large,
remodeled, 2
bedroom
apartment, some
utilities & stove
included. Nice
backyard. Available
immediately
$725.00 a month
Call 570-842-0740
no calls after 8pm.
DUPONT
Completely remod-
eled, modern 2 bed-
room townhouse
style apartment.
Lots of closet
space, with new
carpets and com-
pletely repainted.
Includes stove,
refrigerator, wash-
er, dryer hook up.
Nice yard & neigh-
borhood, no pets.
$595 + security. Call
570-479-6722
Line up a place to live
in classified!
EDWARDSVILLE
21 Pugh Street.
Quiet, one way
street, half double,
cleaned and freshly
painted, 2.5 bed-
rooms, living room,
dining room,
kitchen, with
washer/dryer
hookup. Gas heat.
Small yard, small
pets considered
with additional rent.
$530.00 per month
+ security & last
months rent. No
section 8.
Call 570-793-6566
JENKINS TOWNSHIP
Studio, refrigerator
& stove, all tile
flooring, off-street
parking. $500/
month + utilities,
security & 1st
month. Call
570-655-0539
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
FORTY FORT
51 DANA STREET
First Floor spacious
2 bedroom apart-
ment. Wyoming
Avenue near Cross
Valley. New mod-
ern eat-in kitchen
and bathroom,
Hardwood and new
carpet. Includes
stove, refrigerator,
dishwasher, washer
/dryer hookup +
coin-op laundry.
All utilities included
except phone and
cable with off street
parking.
$675/month. No
pets, No smoking.
570-954-1746
FORTY FORT
COMING
UNITS
(check availability)
America Realty
Efficiencies
$500+ utilities
288-1422
Remodeling in
progress, all 2nd
floors, all new
kitchen appli-
ances, laundry,
parking. 2 year
leases, No pets
or Smoking,
Employment
application
mandatory.
KINGSTON
Beautiful, over-
sized executive
style apartment
in large historic
home. Two bed-
rooms, one bath,
granite kitchen,
hardwood floors,
dining room, liv-
ing room, base-
ment storage,
beautiful front
porch, washer/
dryer. $1,100
monthly plus util-
ities. No smok-
ing. Call
570-472-1110
NANTICOKE
Completely renovat-
ed 1 bedroom apart-
ment. $450 + 1st,
security & electric.
516-216-3539
or 570-497-9966
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
LARKSVILLE
Very clean 2nd
floor. 2 bedrooms.
Heat included.
$500/month.
Call 570-696-2357
Say it HERE
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
PITTSTON
3 rooms, 1 large
bedroom, com-
pletely renovated,
corian counters, off
street parking.
$550/per month.
Utilities by tenant.
Call 570-654-5387
WEST PITTSTON
1 bedroom, 2nd
floor. Stove & refrig-
erator included.
Newly remodeled.
$450 + utilities.
Call (570) 357-1138
WEST PITTSTON
2 bedrooms, refrig-
erator & stove,
washer/dryer
hookup, off-street
parking, large yard.
No pets. $600/
month, plus utilities
& security.
570-237-2076
WILKES-BARRE
155-159 South
Meade Street,
Beautiful 1 large
bedroom with addi-
tional room for
office/computer
space. $600 per
month, is located
on 2nd floor, car-
peted, plus wash-
er/dryer hookup,
dishwasher, central
air & heat, tenant
pays gas heat &
electric.
Off street parking.
Safe & secure
building. Income
verification, plus 1
month security.
570-824-8517
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
WILKES-BARRE
Mayflower
Crossing
Apartments
570.822.3968
2, 3 & 4
Bedrooms
- Light & bright
open floor plans
- All major
appliances included
- Pets welcome*
- Close to everything
- 24 hour emergency
maintenance
- Short term
leases available
Call TODAY For
AVAILABILITY!!
www.mayflower
crossing.com
Certain Restrictions
Apply*
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
WILKES-BARRE
2 Apartments
available.
Both located on
2nd floor,
spacious, clean, 2
bedroom apart-
ments.Screened
porch and deck,
all appliances
included,
$600+utilities plus
1 month security,
no pets. 2nd
apartment
$550+utilities and
security, not all
appliances includ-
ed. Both have
Garage available,
and are in walking
distance to
Wilkes University.
570-650-3008 or
570-881-8979
WILKES-BARRE
NEAR ASHLEY
1st floor, 2 bed-
rooms, living &
dining rooms &
kitchen. Refrigera-
tor & gas stove,
washer/dryer
hookup, off-street
parking, no pets.
$475/month + utili-
ties, security &
references. Call
(570)655-4298
WYOMING
2nd floor.
Completely remod-
eled. Large, 2 bed-
room + den/com-
puter room/office.
Hardwood floors,
new carpeting in liv-
ing room & dining
area. Washer/
dryer hookup, off-
street parking, no
pets. Great loca-
tion! $750/month +
utilities, security &
references. Call
(570) 885-1922
944 Commercial
Properties
MEDICAL OFFICE
Suite for lease in
modern building in
Avoca. Designed
for 2 physicans.
2,800 sq ft, 6 exam
rooms, large recep-
tion area, break-
room/kitchen, file
room, 2 restrooms,
lab area, 2 private
offices. Excellent
condition. Close to
I-81. 50+ parking
spots available.
570-954-7950
OFFICE SPACE
Located on Main St.,
Avoca, within pro-
fessional building.
Small Office. $650,
all utilities included.
570-457-2945
PITTSTON
Office Space & Liv-
ing Quarters
$525/month
Call (570)883-1062
950 Half Doubles
ASHLEY
Carey’s Patch
Nice yard, quiet
area. 2 bedroom.
Carpeted. Washer /
dryer hookups. Gas
heat / water. $600 +
security & utilities.
570-821-7005
DURYEA
2 bedrooms, 1 bath,
washer/dryer hook-
up, off-street park-
ing, no pets, totally
remodeled. $500/
month, + utilities &
security. Available
immediately.
Call Brian
570-299-0298
KINGSTON
Newly renovated 2
bedrooms, 1 bath,
off street parking, all
appliances, internet,
satellite included.
Large rooms &
basement. $700 +
utilities + security. 1
year lease. Call
570-417-9540
950 Half Doubles
PITTSTON TWP.
MAINTENANCE FREE!
2 Large Bedrooms.
Off-Street Parking
No Smoking.
$575 + utilities,
security, last month.
570-885-4206
WILKES-BARRE
247 Barney St.
Recently remodeled
large 1/2 double. 3
large bedrooms, 1
bath, oil heat, par-
tially finished attic.
Nice place, needs
nice tenants.
Absolutely no pets.
$600/month
+ utilities & 1 month
security. Refer-
ences checked.
Call Jeff
570-472-9453
WILKES-BARRE
Parsons Section
3 bedroom half dou-
ble. Off street park-
ing. Pets welcome.
$550/mo. Credit /
Criminal check
required. Call
570-266-5333
953Houses for Rent
BACK MOUNTAIN
Beautiful 2 bed-
room house, Back
Mountain area,
adjacent to
Friedman Farms.
1200/month +
utilities, call Lois at
570-822-2992
DALLAS
FOR SALE
OR RENT
Single home in
gated retirement
village. 3 bedroom,
2 bath, 2 car
garage. Granite
countertops, hard-
wood floors, gas
fireplace, appli-
ances included.
Quiet 55 plus com-
munity. No Pets.
One year lease.
$1675/mo + utilities
& security. Monthly
maintenance fee
included.
570-592-3023
959 Mobile Homes
DUPONT
House trailer on
permanent foun-
dation, 4 rooms &
bath, full cellar,
yard, off street
parking. No pets.
$400/month +
utilities, security &
lease.
570-654-4398
1000
SERVICE
DIRECTORY
1015 Appliance
Service
ECO-FRIENDLY
APPLIANCE TECH.
25 Years Experi-
ence fixing major
appliances: Washer,
Dryer, Refrigerator,
Dishwasher, Com-
pactors. Most
brands. Free phone
advice & all work
guaranteed. No
service charge for
visit. 570-706-6577
1024 Building &
Remodeling
1st. Quality
Construction Co.
Roofing, siding,
gutters, insulation,
decks, additions,
windows, doors,
masonry &
concrete.
Insured & Bonded.
Senior Citizens Discount!
State Lic. # PA057320
570-606-8438
1039 Chimney
Service
COZY HEARTH CHIMNEY
ALL CHIMNEY
REPAIR
Chimney Cleaning,
Rebuilding, Repair,
Stainless Steel
Lining, Parging,
Stucco, Caps, Etc.
Free Estimates
Senior Discounts
Licensed-Insured
1-888-680-7990
570-840-0873
1135 Hauling &
Trucking
ALWAYS READY
HAULING
Property &
Estate Cleanups,
Attics, Cellars,
Yards, Garages,
Construction
Sites, Flood
Damage & More.
CHEAPER THAN
A DUMPSTER!!
SAME DAY
SERVICE
Free Estimates
570-301-3754
S & S HAULING
& GARBAGE
REMOVAL
Free estimates.
Clean out attics,
basements, estates
& more.
570-472-2392
PAGE 13 SUNDAY, JUNE 17, 2012 SUNDAY DISPATCH
906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale
545 Marketing/
Product
906 Homes for Sale
545 Marketing/
Product
971 Vacation &
Resort Properties
971 Vacation &
Resort Properties
BLACK LAKE, NY
Come relax & enjoy
great fishing & tran-
quility at it’s finest.
Housekeeping
cottages on the
water with all the
amenities of home.
NEED A VACATION? Call Now!
(315) 375-8962 www.blacklake4fish.com
daveroll@blacklakemarine.com
$50 off Promotion Available Now!
Great home for summer entertaining! Large rooms,
inground pool, private fenced yard, large deck, new baths, OSP.
12-1682
MARY M. 714-9274
Wyoming Avenue, Wyoming, to 4th Street, home on L.
Great for summer entertaining! Above ground pool,
deck, patio, Koi pond, nightscaping, large modern kitchen, MBR
Suite & OSP! 12-1923
MARY M. 714-9274
Wyoming Avenue, Wyoming, to Tenth St, home on L.
Magnificient masterpiece. Hand carved wood
& stone FP, stairways, baths, pillars & handcrafted kitchen. 12-
2032
DEANNA 696-0894
N side of 8th St. between Shoemaker Ave & Carverton Rd.
Unique 2BR Ranch w/HW thru-out. Amenities include:
24.9x34 recreation rm, surround sounds, 24" above ground
heated pool, Trex deck, detached fully equipped bldg can be
addt’l 2 car garage or workshop. 12-354
MARIE 881-0103
315 to Main St, Avoca, L on McAlpine, cross over Foote
Ave, L into Blueberry Hills, L on Cranberry Terrace, house on L.
Beautiful 3BR home w/modern eat-in kitchen w/
Island, 1st floor laundry room, FR w/gas FP, 2 full baths & 1 3/
4 bath. Finished LL w/FR & gas FP. 2 car garage. Fenced in lot.
12-1150
MATT 714-9229
From Main St, Avoca, turn on McAlpine, follow to Blueberry
Hill Estate, L onto Cranberry Terrace.
Wonderful home on a huge Country size lot
240x150 in a private setting, just off the beaten path plus
a terrific view from the front porch! Dual furnace system,
2 baths, C/A & Ductless system, FP & more.
DEB ROCCOGRANDI 696-6671
11-3733
Don’t miss out on this large 3 bedroom
home, beautiful yard, nice back porch, definite must see!
JAIME 585-0609
12-1641
Pristine gem! Totally renovated from studs up.
2BR, 1.5 bath, HW floors, 2 car garage, private patio, new
eat-in kitchen. Bonus room on 3rd floor!
LESLIE 696-0841
12-401
Need a 5 car garage? Beautiful 3BR, 2 bath
home w/gar in great neighborhood. 5 minutes to
shopping, PA Turnpike & 81. C/A on 1st flr, new electrical
service, plumbing, maybe HW under carpet.
SHIRLEY 714-9272
12-1722
Pretty starter home w/exceptional interior. Oak
floors, carved woodwork, modern stainless kitchen.
DEANNA 696-0894
12-2186
Nice 3BR, 1 bath home with recent updates in
a quiet neighborhood. Large backyard & 1 car carport.
ANDY 714-9225
12-1594
Lovely 3BR home with large kitchen in a nice
neighborhood. 1st floor laundry & bonus room on 2nd
floor!
MARY M. 714-9274
11-3825
Priced to sell 1/2 Double - 4BRs, 1 bath,
partial new roof, finished attic, recent enclosed porch.
Great view!
SUSAN K. 696-0872
11-3852
3BR, 1.5 bath 1/2 double needs some work.
Priced to sell "as-is". 2 porches, house is fully carpeted.
SUSAN K. 696-0872
11-4075
Absolute Masterpiece! This dream home
combines great living & excellent entertaining. Enjoy
entertaining in the DR, piano rm or grand living. A 1st flr
MSTR Ste exercise rm, office & kitchen are all luxurious
but perfectly suited for everyday life.
CHRISTIAN 585-0614
12-448
Beautiful home & great corner lot. Move
right into this 4BR wonderfully spacious home. You will
love everything about it!
PEG 714-9247
12-890
Brand new roof, newer windows & siding on this
cozy 3BR, 1 bath Cape Cod w/breezeway, garage & re-
finished HW floors too!
NOEL 696-0721
12-2065
Charming, well maintained 2 story w/detached
garage, nice yard, front & rear porches, eat-in kitchen,
closets & storage area. Ready for new owner! Priced to
sell.
BOB 650-3008
12-1702
2-Story, 3BR home w/spacious room sizes on
a very large lot. Oversized 24x27 garage w/loft area.
Ample parking & sunroom.
DEBORAH ROCCOGRANDI 696-6671
12-397
A little bit of updating will make this a
wonderful place to call home. Move-in ready. Beautiful
neighborhood.
TRACY 696-0723 OR MARK 696-0724
12-1079
Well maintained 3BR, 2 bath home
with private drive. Living room w/fireplace. Large level lot
with above ground pool.
JENNIFER 715-9350
12-788
Very roomy 2 story w/deep lot & 2 car
detached garage on a nice street. Lots of room for all.
Previously a duplex.
DEB ROCCOGRANDI 696-6671
12-512
3BR, 1.5 bath 2 story in very good
condition. Fenced yard, large roof, very well kept, oak
kitchen.
TRACY 696-6674
12-1858
Pretty home w/new cabinetry, laminate
floors, 3 BR’s, kitchen w/dining area.
DEANNA 696-0894
12-1419
Beautifully decorated home w/new
appliances, laminate floors, front porch & small yard.
DEANNA 696-0894
12-1420
1-800-273-7130 for Local Pros
The Dispatch
LOCAL PROS
To Place Your Ad
Call 1-800-273-7130
TTTTTTTTooooooooo PPPPPPPPPPlllllllaaaaaaaaacccccccceeeeeeeeee YYYYYYYYooooooooouuuuuuuuurrrrrrrr AAAAAAAAAdddddddddd
CCCCCCCCCCCaaaaaaaaaalllllllllllllll 11111111------8888888888000000000000000000000------22222222227777777733333333333-----7777777711111113333333333300000000000
MOVING
J. CAWLEY MOVING, LLC
JASON CAWLEY, PITTSTON
Local & long distance moves.
Residential, Offices & Institutional moves.
(570) 299-7852 jcawleymoving@yahoo.com
LAWNCARE
LAWN
MAINTENANCE
Lawns cut, shrubs, pruned, small landscaping
projects & odd jobs.
570-654-1557
LANDSCAPING
P.A. Landscaping & Lawn Services, Inc.
Serving NEPA for 24 Years
Complete Landscaping Design &
Lawn Maintenance
Free Estimates/Fully Insured
570-287-4780
BEE CLEAN
Power Wash & Landscaping
Lawn Service • Trees • Hedges • Shrubs • Mulch
Stone • Retaining Walls & Pavers • Gutter Cleaning & More
Bruce Moluski 570-457-1840
MARTIAL ARTS
ROTHROCK’S KUNG FU &TAI CHI
ACADEMY
Call Today for 2 Free Private Classes
Kung Fu - Self Defense - Kickboxing - Tai Chi
Women’s Self Defense & Kickboxing Classes
Helps Children Develop Concentration, Discipline,
Leadership, Patience, Respect & Goal Setting
Tai-Chi Classes
Slow Motion, Low-Impact Exercise,
Improves Balance, Joint Flexibility, Blood Flow,
Leg Strength, Relieves Stress &
Promotes Well Being.
417 Main Street, Duryea, PA 18642
570-457-2591
www.rothrockskungfu.com
TRAVEL
Tuesday, July 10 & 11
Complementary room, transportation
& baggage handling. Food, Beverages
& Snacks served on bus.
$25 per person.
Al Lispi: 570-814-3137
or 570-823-9578
Overnight Junket to
Atlantic City’s
Taj Mahal!
PRESSURE WASHING
CONSTRUCTION
CHRIS LATONA
General Contractor
Ceramic Tile Work - Kitchens
- Bathrooms - Garages
- Replacement Windows
- New Homes - Additions - Doors -
Complete Remodeling
FREE Estimates - Insured
457-8145 or 655-0777
Quality Works at Affordable Prices
PA008322
Complete Home
Remodeling, Kitchens,
Baths, Drywall, Windows,
Siding & Roofs.
570-457-0087
PA# HIC EA 18685
JOHN
PREGMON
CONSTRUCTION
No Job Too Small
Residential ≈ Commercial
New & Emergency Services
Licensed & Insured
PA032422 570-602-7840
Call 24 HOURS!
ECONOLECTRIC - SINCE 1988
ALL PHASES OF
ELECTRICAL
ELECTRICAL
NORTHEAST
WINDOW, INC.
Locally Owned & Operated Since 1987
Exterior Home Improvements By
FREE ESTIMATES
570.654.4220
www.northeastwindow.com
• Windows
• Siding
• Enclosures
• Fiberglass Doors
• Storm Doors
• Vinyl Railings
• Roofing
• And More
PA018418
HOME IMPROVEMENT
GUTTERS & DOWNSOUTS
GUTTERS &
DOWNSPOUTS
Cleaned, Unclogged &
Washed Out.
Also Painting of Aluminum
Siding, Awnings, or Eaves.
Licensed & Insured,
References Available.
570-654-8432
DUMPSTER
NEED A DUMPSTER?
Call Danny Nicheporchek
Owner Operated
10 yard, 20 yard & 30 available.
570-335-4755
ADVANCED PRESSURE WASH SYSTEMS
Take Advantage of the Spring Weather!
Get black and green mold & moss removed
from your roof • Pressure Wash Homes
• Concrete Reconditioning
570-212-8390
Prompt Service
7 Days a Week
“SMALL PROJECT SPECIALIST”
CARPENTRY • DRY WALL
PAINTING • PLUMBING
GRAB BARS • CROWN MOLDING
CEILING FANS • PICTURE HANGING
ELECTRICAL FIXTURES • ETC.
(Senior Citizens Discounts)
877-262-8360
NOW OFFERING:
DRIVER,
TRANSPORTATION
AND ERRAND SERVICES
Community Advocate
LUZERNE COUNTY HEAD START, INC. is
seeking a full time COMMUNITY ADVO-
CATE to research and write grants, promote its
programs and services, and to oversee commu-
nity relations and event planning. This position
is responsible for the research and development
of new funding opportunities. In addition to out-
standing interpersonal communication and
organizational skills, including some website
management, qualified candidates must possess
a Bachelor’s Degree at a minimum, and have
extensive public relations, grant writing, techni-
cal writing skills and event planning experience.
LCHS offers an excellent compensation and
benefit package in addition to an excellent work
environment. To be considered, please submit a
resume, cover letter describing experience,
salary requirements and three letters of refer-
ence from employers to:
Lynn Evans Biga, Executive Director, PO Box
540, Wilkes-Barre PA 18703-0540. Fax #570-
829-6580. Current ACT 34, ACT 151 and FBI
Clearances are required for employment.
E.O.E. M/F/V/H. NO PHONE CALLS
1183 Masonry
CONCRETE
& MASONRY
Brick, block, walks,
drives, stucco, stone,
steps, porches,
chimneys & repairs.
Quality craftsmanship
by an affordable
professional.
570-283-5254
Wanna make a
speedy sale? Place
your ad today 570-
829-7130.
1252 Roofing &
Siding
H O S CONSTRUCTION
Roofing specialist,
call today and
save$$$
570-574-4618
1252 Roofing &
Siding
J & F
CONSTRUCTION
All types of roofing.
Repairs & Installation
25 Years Experience
Licensed/Insured
Free Estimates
Reliable Service
570-855-4259
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
C M Y K
PAGE 14B SUNDAY, JUNE 17, 2012 SUNDAY DISPATCH

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