Está en la página 1de 82

PROJECT REPORT

On

CONSUMER BUYING BEHAVIOUR IN FESTIVAL SESEON AT BIG BAZAAR


Submitted To:
B.I.M.T COLLEGE

Under the Guidance of: Faculty, Management

VIPIN KUMAR NAGAR


B.B.A VI semister,Roll no. 9011532

Submitted By:

BIMT COLLEGE
Department of Management Studies

KAMALPUR GARH ROAD MEERUT Affiliated to CCS UNIVERSITY, MEERUT SESSION 2007-10

-1-

Acknowledgement
A project is never the sole product of a person whose name has appeared on the cover. Even the best effort may not prove successful without proper guidance. For a good project one needs proper time, energy, efforts, patience, and knowledge. But without any guidance it remains unsuccessful. I have done this project with the best of my ability and hope that it will serve its purpose. To be or not to be is not anything which matters, how to be thankful is what really matters

It was really a great learning experience and I am really thankful to my faculties, who not only helped me in the successful completion of this report but also spread his precious and valuable time in expanding my knowledge base.

I wish to acknowledge my gratitude towards MS. ANJU PAL AND MR. AMIT SHARMA for his guidance and my friends and all those persons who are responsible for the successful completion of this project.

-2-

COMPANY CERTIFICATE

-3-

GUIDE CERTIFICATE

-4-

DECLARATION

I VIPIN KUMAR NAGAR a student of BBA VI Sem declare that the training project report titled Customer Buying Behavior at Big Bazaar at Big Bazaar Millanz Mall Meerut is my original work and the same has not been submitted for the award of any other diploma or degree.

Place: Meerut Date:

VIPIN KUMAR NAGAR

-5-

Executive Summary
As customers taste and preferences are changing, the market scenario is also changing from time to time. Todays market scenario is very different from that of the market scenario before 1990. There have been many factors responsible for the changing market scenario. It is the customers changing tastes and preference, which has bought in a change in the market. Income level of the people has changed; life styles and social class of people have completely changed now than that of olden days. There has been a shift in the market demand in todays world. Technology is one of the major factors, which is responsible for this paradigm shift in the market. Todays generation people are no more dependent on hat market and far off departmental stores. Today we can see a new era in market with the opening up of many departmental stores, hypermarket, shoppers stop, malls, branded retail outlets and specialty stores. In todays world shopping is not any more tiresome work rather its a pleasant outing phenomenon now. The study is based on a survey done on customers of a hypermarket named big bazaar. Big bazaar is a new type of market, which came in to existence in India since 1994. It is a type of market where various kinds of products are available under one roof. My study is on determining the customers demand for big bazaar and the satisfaction level of customers in big bazaar. The study will find out the current status of big bazaar and determine where it stands in the current market. This market field survey will help us in knowing the present customers tastes and preferences. It will help in estimating the customers future needs and wants.

-6-

TABLE OF CONTENT
1. CHAPTER-1 INTRODUCTION

2. CHAPTER-2 COMPANY PROFILE(including SWOT analysis)

3.CHAPTER-3. LITERATURE REVIEW

4.CHAPTER-4 4.1 4.2 OBJECTIVE OF THE PROJECT IMPORTANCE AND SCOPE OF THE PROJECT

5. CHAPTER -5. RESEARCH METHODOLOGY 5.1 5.2 5.3 RESEARCH DESIGN DATA COLLECTION LIMITATION

6. CHAPTER -6. DATA ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION 7.CHAPTER -7 7.1 CONCLUSION 8. LIMITATIONS 9. RECOMMENDATIONS & SUGGESTIONS APPENDIX BIBLIOGRAPHY

-7-

Chapter 1 Introduction
Retail is Indias largest industry, accounting for over 10 per cent of the countrys GDP and around eight per cent of the employment. Retail industry in India is at the crossroads. It has emerged as one of the most dynamic and fast paced industries with several players entering the market. But because of the heavy initial investments required, break even is difficult to achieve and many of these players have not tasted success so far. However, the future is promising; the market is growing, government policies are becoming more favorable and emerging technologies are facilitating operations. Retailing in India is gradually inching its way toward becoming the next boom industry. The whole concept of shopping has altered in terms of format and consumer buying behavior, ushering in a revolution in shopping in India. Modern retail has entered India as seen in Sprawling shopping centers, multi-storied malls and huge complexes offer shopping, entertainment and food all under one roof. The Indian retailing sector is at an inflexion point where the growth of organized retailing and growth in the consumption by the Indian population is going to take a higher growth trajectory. The Indian population is witnessing a significant change in its demographics. A large young working population with median age of 24 years, nuclear families in urban areas, along with increasing working-women population and emerging opportunities in the services sector are going to be the key growth drivers of the organized retail sector in India. Retailing is the final step in the distribution of merchandise -the last link in the Supply Chain -connecting the bulk producers of commodities to the final consumers. Retailing

-8-

covers diverse products such as foot apparels, consumer goods, financial services and leisure. A retailer, typically, is someone who does not effect any significant change in the product execs breaking the bulk. He/ She are also the final stock point who makes products or services available to the consumer whenever require. Hence, the value proposition a retailer offers to a consumer is easy availabilities of the desired product in the desired sizes at the desired times. In the developed countries, the retail industry has developed into a full-fledged industry where more than three-fourths of the total retail trade is done by the organized sector. Huge retail chains like Wal-Mart, Carr four Group, Sears, K-Mart, McDonalds, etc. have now replaced the individual small stores. Large retail formats, with high quality ambiance and courteous. Retailing is the interface between the producer and the individual consumer buying for personal consumption. This excludes direct interface between the manufacturer and institutional buyers such as the government and other bulk customers. A retailer is one who stocks the producers goods and is involved in the act of selling it to the individual consumer, at a margin of profit. As Such, retailing is the last link that connects the individual consumer with the manufacturing and distribution chain. Retailing is more than selling goods: Retailing consists of the sale of goods or merchandise, from a fixed location such as a department store or kiosk, in small or individual lots for direct consumption by the purchaser. Retailing is a well recognized business function which compromises making available desired product in the desired quantity at the desired time. This creates a time, place and form utility for the consumer. The success of retailing is highly dependent on an efficient supply chain management. A well-developed supply chain reduces wastages and transaction cost thereby reducing the cost of inventories to be maintained -9-

by the producers and the traders. A reduction in the cost of inventory management leads to a reduction in the final price to the consumer. Retailing has been identified as a thrust area for promotion of textiles, processed foods, agricultural and horticultural produce. Retail Sector can be divided into organized and unorganized sectors: Unorganized Retail: Unorganized retailing is characterized by a distorted real-estate market, poor infrastructure and inefficient upstream processes, lack of modern technology, inadequate funding and absence of skilled manpower. Therefore, there is a need to promote organized retailing.

- 10 -

Unorganized Retail: Unorganized retailing is characterized by a distorted real-estate market, poor infrastructure and inefficient upstream processes, lack of modern technology, inadequate funding and absence of skilled manpower. Therefore, there is a need to promote organized retailing.

Evaluation of Organized Retailing: American mass retailing began in the late 1800s with Montgomery Ward marketing its products through general merchandise mail order catalogs, which was very effective at that time for reaching a largely rural society. In the 1940s, the population began its movement to the suburbs as the economy shifted from an agricultural base to an industrialized nation. The first shopping center was opened, which would eventually be a significant factor in the decline of downtown Retailing in the 1960s and 70s. JC Penney and Sears began their national mass retailing expansion, and the use of credit cards as Major retail chains began. The 1950s witnessed the reaffirmation of the traditional family. The first planned mall and franchised food restaurant opened. As people continued to flock to the suburbs, the downtown areas began to decline. Larger suburban malls were created and anchored by traditional downtown department store merchants. Freeways were expanded and the sales of private automobiles grew, giving the consumer a wider accessible area in which to shop. Discounters were born, Korvetta being one of the firsts. The 1960s witnessed the growth of enclosed shopping centers, with department stores anchors and specialty retail chains. The baby boomers were teenagers at this point, leading to the growth of juniors-oriented stores and vendors. Women became targets not just as mothers or wives as they entered the workforce and consumers became more demanding in their expectation of quality and service. - 11 -

In the 1970s, promotional pricing started to pick up the department stores as off-price retailer emerged. The growth of retail space slowed, as sales increase came at the expense of competition, not of market growth. This competitive market led to the under performance of several retailers as gross margins experienced downtown pressure from increased competition. Retailers in large upscale markets recognized the time shortage created by dual-career families and began to offer more services to assist in saving time. The 1980s witnessed the growth of off price retailing as a distinct, enduring retail format. Retailers began to drop low profit lines. Acquisitions and mergers were actively utilized as growth strategies, private brands were redeveloped to enhance uniqueness and margins and offshore sourcing was developed to compensate for margins Broadly the organized retail sector can be divided into two segments, In-Store Retailers, who operate fixed point-of-sale locations, located and designed to attract a high volume of walk-in customers, and the non-store retailers, who reach out to the customers at their homes or offices. It was only in the year 2000 that the economists put a figure to it: Rs.400,000crore (1crore = 10 million) which is expected to develop to around Rs.800,000crore by the year 2005 an annual increase of 20 per cent. Retailing in India is unorganized with poor supply chain management perspective. According to a recent survey by some of the retail consulting bodies, an overwhelming proportion of the Rs.400,000crore retail markets are UNORGANISED. In fact, only a Rs. 20,000crore segment of the market is organized. As much as 96 per cent of the 5 million-plus outlets are smaller than 500 square feet area. This means that India per capita retailing space is about 2 square feet (compared to 16 square feet in the United States). India's per capita retailing space is thus the lowest in the world (source: KSA Technopak (I) Pvt Ltd, the India operation of the US-based Kurt Salmon Associates). Currently the retail landscape is filled with Supermarket chains with over 1000 outlets all over the country to increase to around 5000 by the 2005. The success of a couple of - 12 -

hyper marts indicating the evolution of hypermarkets in the country prominent among them is Giant, Metro, Big Bazaar models. While the average bill value at a supermarket is in the range of Rs.300 per bill, the average bill amount at a Hypermarket is in the range of Rs.750-1000, indicating that the model is in tune with the global models where the average spend is increasing with the shopping experience.

- 13 -

Impact of Organized Retail: Organized retailing is spreading and making its presence felt in different parts of the country. The trend in grocery retailing, however, has been slightly different with a growth concentration in the South. Though there were traditional family owned retail chains in South India such as Nilgiris as early as 1905, the retail revolution happened with the RPG group starting the Food world chain of food retail outlets in South India with focus on Chennai, Hyderabad and Bangalore markets, preliminarily. The experiment has reaped rich dividends and the group is now foraying into other territories as well. Owing to the success of Food world model of RPG group, several new models such as Trinethra, Subhiksha, Margin Free and others have made their foray into this sector albeit at regional levels. Today the food retail sector in India is about Rupees Ten Lakh Crores (USD 200 billions) of which the organized food retail segment is about 1 per cent and increasing at a pace of over 20% y-o-y. To be successful in food retailing in India essentially means to draw away shoppers from, the roadside hawkers and kirana stores to supermarkets. This transition can be achieved to some extent through pricing, so the success of a food retailer depends on how best he understands and squeezes his supply chain. The other major factor is that of convenience shopping which the supermarket has the edge over the traditional kirana stores. On an average a supermarket stocks up to 5000 SKUs against few hundreds stocked at an average kirana stores. In the organized retail industry, the gestation periods are long, institutional funding is difficult, and there is none or little Government support. But the belief among top retailer chains in the country is that the industry will see large investments coming once the current ban on foreign direct investment is lifted. But that could be two-three years away. Food and grocery retailing is a tough business in India with margins being very low, and consumers not dissatisfied with existing shops where they buy. For example, The next-door grocery shopkeeper is smart and delivers good - 14 -

customer service, though not value. As of now, while Chennai has about five organized food and grocery retail chains, other big cities such as Delhi, Bangalore, and Mumbai average only two-three such chains. Almost all food retail players have been regionspecific as far as geographical presence is concerned in the country. To illustrate with examples, the RPG Group's Food World, Nilgiris, Margin Free, Giant, Varkey's and Subhiksha, all of which are more or less spread in the Southern region; Sabka Bazaar has a presence only in and around Delhi; names such as Haiko and Radhakrishna Food land are Mumbai-centric; while Adani is Ahmedabad-centric. Industry topography in India is such that spreading presence across cities is a tough call. As pointed out by many experts, organized food and grocery retailing chains going national requires significant investments. Retailing within this sector is not just about the front-end, but involves complex supply chain and logistics issues as well. The trend and mindset of the present retailer chains in India can be best understood by studying Food World as an example, which came in first in the food and grocery retailing sector. The chain has no plans to venture beyond the Southern region just yet. Current plans are to focus on the Southern markets and achieve saturation. The intention is that by 2005, they could look at the other regions. Subhiksha, a Chennai based discount chain, too wants to be the principal store of purchase for at least 40 per cent of all consumers living within 500-750 meters of the store, that is, within walking distance. This makes the point very clear that the strategy among most existing retail chains of various formats is to completely saturate the markets where they are already established players and then move on to virtually untouched areas where the challenge of sourcing resources and extending their supply chain model to best suit the size and expanse of the market would be a challenging task. It can be explained that the obstacles of looking at a pan-India model for grocery are several. Given the federal nature of the country, the weak infrastructure and the major variances in eating habits in different parts of the country, one will have to replicate the - 15 -

retail administration costs for at least each region and therefore the gestation period of the project becomes huge. However, if a model is in place where the upfront store revenues scale very rapidly, then it is possible. Therefore, if one is to attempt a panIndian grocery foray, it will have to be in the hypermarket format with its attendant investment numbers and risk profile. If a close look is taken at the nature of the Indian Retail Markets, it can be seen that there is so much potential to extract from individual regions that players are in no tearing hurry to spread out. Based on a recent study by a renowned government institution in India, in the six major metros, Delhi has the highest per capita consumption of food and grocery, among supermarkets. Chennai, the Mecca of retailing, comes at fourth place. This shows the high potential the sector presents. Chennai has some five supermarket chains, and each of these is doing well for themselves. So there is enough scope to expand even in one single city in India. Sabka Bazaar, a supermarket chain restricted to Delhi alone, is now generating sales of about Rs.11 crore from its 19 stores which best illustrates the potential of each individual city. This explains the reason for delay in intentions of retailers to spread far and wide.

Benefits of Retailing: Retailing is good for national economies where it has positive influence on influence on inflation and product availability. It also creates fortunes for its owners and is a tremendous source of employment. INDIA has been virtually the only developing country in the world that has been extremely slow in adopting this organized pattern of retailing. Better quality products

Employment opportunities - 16 -

Better social infrastructure

Enhanced foreign exchange

Benefit to tourism

Better showcase for exports

Better realization of taxes

Indian Retail Scenario: Retailers in India have to experiment with formats maintaining scalability in terms of segments, along with deepening penetration levels. Traditionally Indian Retail can be traced back from Weekly Markets, Melas, and Village Fairs in Small towns and villages to Kirana stores, PDS outlets, Khaki Bhandaar, co-operative stores in Urban cities. The wave of retail began with various textile manufactures like Bombay Dyeing, Raymonds, S Kumars, and Grasim foraying into selling the product through their outlets and competition among FMCG players driving the forces towards retailing. The evolution of retailing lead to an emergence of various formats like Shopping malls, Super-marts, Hyper-marts, Departmental Stores, Apparel Stores, etc. catering to majority all sectors of society providing the all-important 3Vs Value, Variety and Volume. India is the country having the most unorganized retail market. Traditionally it is a Familys livelihood, with their shop in the front and house at the back, while they run the Retail business. More than 99% retailers function in less than 500 square feet of - 17 -

shopping space. Global retail consultants KSA Technopak, have estimated that organized retailing in India is expected to touch Rs 35,000 crore in the year 2005-06. The Indian retail sector is estimated at around Rs900,000 crore, of which the organized sector accounts for a Mere 2 per cent indicating a huge potential market opportunity that is lying in the waiting for the consumer-savvy organized retailer .Purchasing power of Indian urban consumer is growing and branded merchandise in categories like Apparels, Cosmetics, Shoes, Watches, Beverages, Food and even Jewellery, are slowly becoming lifestyle products that are widely accepted by the urban Indian consumer. Indian retailers need to advantage of this growth and aiming to grow, diversify and introduce new formats have to pay more attention to the brand building process. The emphasis here is on retail as a brand rather than retailers selling brands. The focus should be on branding the retail business itself. In their preparation to face Fierce competitive pressure, Indian retailers must come to recognize the value of building their own stores as brands to reinforce their marketing positioning, to communicate quality as well as value for money. Sustainable competitive advantage will be depended on translating core values combining products, image and reputation into a coherent retail brand strategy.

Growth of Organized Retail in Indian Cities: Organized Share of retail sector is expected to increase to 8-9 percent in 2010-11 from 6 percent in 2008. The Retail sector contributes to around 36 percent of GDP in India and is largest employment generator. The sector is dominated by small-scattered unorganized regional players, large players contributing to meager 10 percent of the total pie. Organized retail is at its nascent phase wherein the large organized retail groups are having aggressive expansion plans to penetrate the Metros and Tier I cities and establish themselves amongst rural masses of Tier I and Tier II cities. - 18 -

There lies a challenge for retailers to experiment with new value formats along with developing customer loyalties. Since there will be demographic shift in population growth, urbanization and migration due to transition in urban household growth and income distribution. The total retail market in the top 67 cities in India in 2006 was Rs. 2.55 trillion, which is expected to increase to Rs. 3.91 trillion in 2011. American mass retailing began in the late 1800s with Montgomery Ward marketing its products through general merchandise mail order catalogs, which was very effective at that time for reaching a largely rural society. In the 1940s, the population began its movement to the suburbs as the economy shifted from an agricultural base to an industrialized nation. The first shopping center was opened, which would eventually be a significant factor in the decline of downtown Retailing in the 1960s and 70s. JC Penney and Sears began their national mass retailing expansion, and the use of credit cards as Major retail chains began. The 1950s witnessed the reaffirmation of the traditional family. The first planned mall and franchised food restaurant opened. As people continued to flock to the suburbs, the downtown areas began to decline. Larger suburban malls were created and anchored by traditional downtown department store merchants. Freeways were expanded and the sales of private automobiles grew, giving the consumer a wider accessible area in which to shop. The 1960s witnessed the growth of enclosed shopping centers, with department stores anchors and specialty retail chains. The baby boomers were teenagers at this point, leading to the growth of juniors-oriented stores and vendors. Women became targets not just as mothers or wives as they entered the workforce and consumers became more demanding in their expectation of quality and service. According to CRISIL, around 87 percent of the retail opportunity comes from top 25 cities compromising Metro Delhi, Mumbai, Calcutta, Mini Metros Hyderabad, Chennai, Bangalore, Mini Metros Ahmedabad and Pune, Tier I cities of Kanpur , Nagpur, - 19 -

Surat and Ludhiana, Tier II cities Coimbatore, Chandigarh, Meerut, Kochi, Jaipur and Tier III cities Vadodara, Vizag, Indore, Vijaywada, Thiruvananthpuram, Bhopal, Nashik and Madurai. Organized retail has been established in Metros and Tier 1 cities, other cities having negligible level of penetration. Old Retail Formats: . Kiranas: These are food and non-food neighborhood counter stores, also called mom and pop stores in western countries. These are big chunks forming the segregated and unorganized retail segment. These are family-owned and-run retail-outlets picking the goods from wholesalers totaling to around 12 million stores across India.

. Mandis: These are the largest chunk of unorganized retail catering to urban and rural masses. Mandis are physically located at different regions to enhance convenient shopping. The sellers bring across various products like eatables, vegetables and fruits, pulses, cereals, spices etc. The most prominent of them are sabzi mandis found in most of the localities across India.

. Village Haats: This form is operating in rural areas where buyers and sellers gather once in a week or month from nearby villages and small towns to cater their livelihood and leisure needs. These haats are a source of entertainment and socialization among rural masses.

. Push Cart Vendors:

- 20 -

The are categories of vendors roaming from door to door in various localities selling fruits, vegetables, and other eatables, from which mostly housewives makes purchases that too on credit.

Upcoming Retail Formats

Modern Formats Area (sq. ft) Points of Differentiation Shopping Malls 60,000-7,00,000 Multi-format, multi-product, multi-brands &

Catering lifestyle needs. Hyper marts 50,000-70,000 Multi-verticals. Super marts 5,000-10,000 Single vertical. Department al Stores 20,000-50,000 Single Vertical. Apparel Stores 20,000-25,000 Multi-branded single verticals, focusing on high-end customers. Specialty format 2,000-5,000 Multi-branded, single vertical on specific needs of customers. Exclusive formats 500-5,000 Owned/Franchised single product

- 21 -

CHAPTER 2 COMPANY PROFILE BIG BAZAAR AT MILANZ MALL MEERUT!

First time a Discount Hypermarket opens at a Millanz Mall Pallav Puram Meerut Pantaloon Retail opens 2 Big Bazaars Pantaloon Retail (India) Limited, the countrys leading retailer, opens BIG BAZAARS in Meerut. The two BIG BAZAARS are located at the Wazirpur and Inderlok Metro Stations respectively. This is the first time a discount hypermarket has opened at a station and Big Bazaar is proud to be the first to offer a never-before shopping experience to the metro commuters. The national tally of BIG BAZAAR is now at 20 taking the total tally of BIG BAZAAR in NCR region to 4.Both BIG BAZAAR, PVS & BIG BAZAAR, Millanz have FOOD BAZAARS within the store. This takes the national tally of Food Bazaar to 32 and total tally of Food Bazaar in NCR to 5.

BIG BAZAAR will provide shoppers with a completely new shopping experience and make available -a range of products for every household need at never before prices Shoppers for the first time will have the widest range of products in every segment Womens Apparel, Mens Apparel, Accessories like belts and bags, Cosmetics, Gold Jewellery, Kids Wear, Stationary and Toys, Footwear, Plastics and Home Dcor products, Utensils & Home Appliances, Gift Articles, food and grocery items.Food Bazaar will offer services like Live Kitchen where customers can get vegetables cut and select gravies of their choice, Golden Harvest providing best quality grain, pulses & spices, Ready to cook and Hungry Kya the ready to eat - 22 -

food sections. In addition, regular Food Bazaar offerings of Grains and Provisions, Farm Fresh Fruits & Vegetables, Drinks & Beverages, Dairy Products, Fabric Care products, Music Cassettes and CDs, Chill Station, Home Care Products, Accessories, Kitchen Linen.

On the occasion of the launch, Mr. Kishore Biyani, Managing Director, Pantaloon Retail (India) Ltd., said, We are very proud to open BIG BAZAARS in Meerut. As has been the homemakers experience across the country, the store is a support to the homemakers untiring effort of saving the maximum while giving the best to her family. Our opening of the 2 stores in Meerut after the runaway success of the other stores at Meerut & Ghaziabad shows our commitment to this region. It also reflects the love and affection the people of this region have showered on us!

Living up to its motto of Is se sasta aur accha kahin nahin", all products in BIG BAZAAR will be available at prices lower than the MRP, often up to 60% discount. In addition to this, various offers, discounts and promotions will be regularly held at the store. The consumer will experience a new level of standard in price, convenience and comfort, quality, quantity, and store service levels. BIG BAZAAR in its true hypermarket model will offer all of the above for both leading brands as also for its private labels.

Layout chart of Big bazaar located at Millanz

LAYOUT INDEX
- 23 -

1. HELP DESK 2. KIDS ACCESSORIES 3. JACKETS 4. BABA SUITS 5. LADIES TOPS 6. TRIAL ROOM 7. PILLARS USED FOR DISPLAYING INFORMATION (SIZE CHART, SECTION DESCRIPTION) 8. WOOLEN CLOTHS FOR KIDS 9. WINTER WEAR 10. KIDS CASUAL WEAR 11. KIDS JEANS AND SHORTS 12. INFANT SHIRTS AND T-SHIRTS 13. MEN ACCESSORIES SUNGLASSES, WRIST WATCHES ETC 14. SOFT TOYS 15. HOME DECORATIVE ITEMS 16. MUSIC COUNTER 17. LADIES ETHINIC 18. LADIES WESTERN 19. LADIES FORMALS(OFFICE WEAR) 20. LADIES ACCESSORIES LINGERIES 21. LADIES PERFUMERIES 22. LADIES COSMETICS 23. LUGGAGE 24. FOOTWEAR 25. SPORTS - 24 -

26. SCHEME BASED PROMOTIONAL ITEMS 27. CASH COUNTER 28. HOME FURNISHING (CURTAIN CLOTHS, CARPETS) 29. MEN FORMAL SHIRTS 30. MEN TROUSERS 31. MEN SUITS AND BLAZERS 32. MEN FABRICS 33. MEN ETHINICS

- 25 -

DESCRIPTION
HELP DESK As you can see from the layout, the Help Desk is located in a place
where every one has their first sight that is in front of the entrance. This shows that when a person enters in to big bazaar it can get all information about the stores of big bazaar from the person sitting in the help desk. Help Desk uses paging service as a tool for the convenience of its employees and customers.

KIDS SECTION The kids section is located just at the left corner of the entrance
of big bazaar. In the kids section kids accessories like diapers, trolleys, suckers, water bottles are available in one part. Kids jackets and baba suits are available in another part. Kids casual wear (jeans and shorts) are placed in one part of it and infant shirts & t-shirts are also placed in another part. In this section the pillars are used for displaying information like size chart and section description. The apparels are available at a price of Rs59 onwards.

MENS SECTION Next to it is the mens section that is in the center. It is


divided in to five parts. At one part men formal shirts are available. In other parts men trousers, suits and blazers, fabrics and ethnics are available respectively. Here the price ranges from a minimum of Rs99 to Rs899.

LADIES SECTION Next to it is the ladies section that is in the extreme right
side. The ladies section is segregated in to seven parts. Ladies section starts from ladies ethnics, ladies western wear, ladies formals (office wear), ladies accessories lingeries, ladies perfumeries, and ladies cosmetics respectively. Here the price of the apparel ranges from Rs99 to Rs1000 approx.

- 26 -

Promotional scheme With an add on to the above products there are various
other products which are available with a promotional scheme. The various products under this scheme includes girl t-shirts, infant winter wear etc.

Non-Promotional scheme There are various other products available without


any promotional scheme which includes jeans, infant baba suits, infant t-shirts, kids night wear, kids salwar suits etc.

Sports Store At the extreme corner there is a sports store where various kinds of
sport items are available.

Food Bazaar The food bazaar is in the 1st floor of the building. Various kinds of
food items, fruits and vegetables are available there. Sitting arrangements are well made so that people can sit and take tea, coffee or snacks or any other food item and can relax.

Cash Counter The cash counter is located just near the exit

- 27 -

Product Layout Chart


Ground Floor First Floor

1. Ladies Western 2. Ladies Ethnic 3. Saree and Dress Materials 4. Night wear/Lingerie 5. Boys and Girls 6. Infants 7. Toys 8. Mens Formals 9. Mens Ethnic 10. Mens Casuals 11. Mens Accessories 12. Mens Party 13. Denim and T-shirts 14. Sportswear 15. Footwear 16. Home Linen 17. Luggage 18. Sunglasses and Watches

1. Fruits and Vegetables 2. Golden Items 3. Ready to eat 4. Ready to cook 5. Sweets and Farson 6. Spices 7. Beverage 8. Confectionaries 9. Tea and Coffee 10.Personal Cars 11.Plastics 12.Utensils 13.Crockeries 14.Appliances

- 28 -

BIG BAZAAR AT MEERUT

From today, housewives and compulsive shoppers in Meerut need not step elsewhere for shopping. With Big Bazaar, the hypermarket (discount store) from Pantaloon Retail (India) Ltd. opening its first outlet in North India, they have a lot to choose from. Spread over an area of around 50,000 sq ft, Big Bazaar offers a variety of products 2% to 60% lower than the corresponding market price. After consolidating its position in 4 cities namely Hyderabad, Kolkata, Bangalore and Mumbai (Lower Parel and Mulund), Big Bazaar is all set to win t! he hearts of people in Meerut and Meerut.

Speaking at the launch, Mr. Kishore Biyani, Chief Knowledge Officer, Pantaloon Retail (India) said, "The Company was the first in India to launch a hypermarket discount store - Big Bazaar. Seeing the tremendous response, today we are pleased to bring the same excitement to shoppers in and around Meerut in the form of Big Bazaar with its variety, discounts and shopping ambience. The main attraction at Big Bazaar is the product variety. The company will stock about 1,70,000 items. In short, there is something for everyone."

Big Bazaar has apparel and accessories for men, women and children besides Cosmetics, Toys, Home Needs, Household Appliances, Gift items, Jewellery, Luggage, Linen, and a lot more. Food Bazaar, with an area of around 10,000 sq ft is also a part of Big Bazaar offering products at wholesale rates below the MRP. To attract regular bazaar-goers, a mandi has been created within Food Bazaar where Consumers could touch, feel, pick & choose products. This choice has been supplemented by the provision of packaged food for the Westernized shoppers. Food Bazaar will stock around 10,000 stock keeping - 29 -

units (SKUs). These will include provisions, vegetables, fruits and fresh produce, FMCG products, bakery products, basic staples, cereals, pulses, cooking oils, flour, spices, dry fruits, health food, baby food, dairy products, drinks, beverages as well as ready-to-eat and ready-to-cook product! s. There are special purchase offers and discounts worked out with several leading brands exclusively for Food Bazaar customers making shopping at Food Bazaar highly affordable.

- 30 -

CHAPTER 3 Literature review


There was a study conducted by Sales & Customer Service Department of Texas Agricultural Extension Service Texas A&M University System College Station, Texas. According to this study the researchers find the tips to increase the impulsive sales of the flowers. The findings of the study were: Tips for Boosting Sales: Creating variety in the department with frequent changes of display and movement of regularly sold merchandise also entices customers. Recognizing items that typically make a minimal contribution to sales and replacing them with items that create "sales appeal" increases the likelihood of sales. Displays that tie in with a national slogan or storewide theme generate interest, as do displays that highlight special products and services. Tip 1: use color to create original, eye-catching displays. Tip 2: use themes to create interest in unusual products and renew interest in everyday items. Tip 3: keep undecorated plants available to attract consumers who are buying for themselves. Tip 4: create displays that emphasize special products or services. Tip 5: change stock and displays often so consumers are drawn into the department each week. Tip 6: be flexible enough to change an item or arrangement that isnt selling. Tip 7: have a person on hand to provide information and assistance at all times. Tip 8: create a friendly, comfortable atmosphere with accessible displays that encourage browsing. Tip 9: offer only quality plants and floral arrangements. Tip 10: situate the department so that customers know where it is and can see it from most areas of the store. A competitive product meets basic expected attributes, maximises performances attributes, and includes as many excitement attributes as financially feasible. In the model, the customer strives to move away from having unfulfilled requirements and being dissatisfied

- 31 -

The performance or spoken attributes (the central line of the model) are those expressed by customers when asked what they want from the product. Depending on the level of their fulfilment by a product or a service these requirements can satisfy or dissatisfy consumers. The basic or expected attributes (lower curve in the model) are basic attributes, which customers take for granted and they are so obvious that they are not worth mentioning. While the presence of these attributes is not taken into account, their absence is very dissatisfying. The surprise and delight attributes (upper curve in the model) lay beyond customers expectations. If they are present they excite the customer, but their absence does not dissatisfy, as customers do not expect them. A successful combination of expected and exciting attributes provides a company with an opportunity to achieve competitive advantage. A successful company will correctly identify the requirements and attributes and use them to document raw data, user characteristics, and important service or product attributes. To make information about the identified requirements about attributes understandable and useful for designers, a so-called Quality Function Deployment (QFD) approach is often being used. The goal of QFD is to assure that the product development process meets and exceeds customer needs and wants and that customer requirements are propagated throughout the life cycle of the product. The approach uses a number of matrices, which help translating customer requirements into engineering or design parameters, specifying product features, manufacturing operations and specific instructions and cont rols. QFD allows for the minimising of errors and the maximising of product quality for customers. The approach is probably the only existing quality system with such strong orientation to customer satisfaction. Innovation framework The process of adopting new products has also been studied within innovation adoption literature, and in particular the Rogers (1995) innovation framework. The framework suggests five steps, through which an adopter goes to the adoption of a new product or a service (Rogers 1995: 36): - 32 -

first knowledge of an innovation a forming an attitude toward the innovation decision to adopt or reject a implementation of the new idea confirmation of this decision Rogers model closely resembles the customer satisfaction model by Engel et al. (1995), see (Figure 3). The first knowledge is acquired when an individual is provided with the information about the innovation. The attitude is formed evaluating the features of innovation and a resolution on accepting or rejecting the product follows. Implementation corresponds to the consumption and confirmation refers to the need to reaffirm the decision about the innovation adoption. Rogers also maintained that people accept innovation differently, depending on their personality, their innovativeness, and interpersonal communication, and according to this could be classified into innovators, early adopters, early majority, late majority, and laggards (Figure 6). Innovators seek newness and value the time period that is passed since the product launch. Laggards seek reassurance and confirmation about product or service qualities through interpersonal communication and word-of-mouth. A large number of studies have analysed the differences between earlier and later adopters based on socio-economic, demographic, cultural, or psychological criteria (Tornatsky, Eveland et al. 1983), (Gatignon and Robertson 1985), (Frank, Sundqvist et al. 2001), Economists, for example, suggest that for social innovation to take place, innovators should first accept innovation and then create institutional framework that would trigger the acceptance of new practices. For the laggards to join in another mechanism the desire not to be left out of the group can be used to speed up dissemination of more sustainable practices. Besides adopter categories, Rogers also identified a range of factors affecting the rate of adoption:

- 33 -

The Kano et al. (1996) model of customer satisfaction classifies product attributes based on how they are perceived by customers and their effect on customer satisfaction (Kano, Serakuet al. 1996). According to the model, there are three types of product attributes that fulfil customer satisfaction to a different degree: 1) basic or expected attributes, 2) performance or spoken attributes, and 3) surprise and delight attributes.

A competitive product meets basic expected attributes, maximises performances attributes, and includes as many excitement attributes as financially feasible. In the model, the customer strives to move away from having unfulfilled requirements and being dissatisfied

The performance or spoken attributes (the central line of the model) are those expressed by customers when asked what they want from the product. Depending on the level of their fulfilment by a product or a service these requirements can satisfy or dissatisfy consumers.

The basic or expected attributes (lower curve in the model) are basic attributes, which customers take for granted and they are so obvious that they are not worth mentioning. While the presence of these attributes is not taken into account, their absence is very dissatisfying.

The surprise and delight attributes (upper curve in the model) lay beyond customers expectations. If they are present they excite the customer, but their absence does not dissatisfy, as customers do not expect them.

A successful combination of expected and exciting attributes provides a company with an opportunity to achieve competitive advantage. A successful company will correctly - 34 -

identify the requirements and attributes and use them to document raw data, user characteristics, and important service or product attributes.

To make information about the identified requirements about attributes understandable and useful for designers, a so-called Quality Function Deployment (QFD) approach is often being used. The goal of QFD is to assure that the product development process meets and exceeds customer needs and wants and that customer requirements are propagated throughout the life cycle of the product. The approach uses a number of matrices, which help translating customer requirements into engineering or design parameters, specifying product features, manufacturing operations and specific instructions and cont rols. QFD allows for the minimising of errors and the maximising of product quality for customers. The approach is probably the only existing quality system with such strong orientation to customer satisfaction.

- 35 -

Innovation framework

The process of adopting new products has also been studied within innovation adoption literature, and in particular the Rogers (1995) innovation framework. The framework suggests five steps, through which an adopter goes to the adoption of a new product or a service (Rogers 1995: 36):

first knowledge of an innovation forming an attitude toward the innovation decision to adopt or reject implementation of the new idea confirmation of this decision Rogers model closely resembles the customer satisfaction model by Engel et al. (1995), see (Figure 3). The first knowledge is acquired when an individual is provided with the information about the innovation. The attitude is formed evaluating the features of innovation and a resolution on accepting or rejecting the product follows. Implementation corresponds to the consumption and confirmation refers to the need to reaffirm the decision about the innovation adoption.

Rogers also maintained that people accept innovation differently, depending on their personality, their innovativeness, and interpersonal communication, and according to this could be classified into innovators, early adopters, early majority, late majority, and laggards (Figure 6). Innovators seek newness and value the time period that is passed since the product launch. Laggards seek reassurance and confirmation about product or service qualities through interpersonal communication and word-of-mouth. A large number of studies have analysed the differences between earlier and later adopters based on socio-economic, demographic, cultural, or psychological criteria (Tornatsky, Eveland et al. 1983), (Gatignon and Robertson 1985), (Frank, Sundqvist et al. 2001),

- 36 -

Economists, for example, suggest that for social innovation to take place, innovators should first accept innovation and then create institutional framework that would trigger the acceptance of new practices. For the laggards to join in another mechanism the desire not to be left out of the group can be used to speed up dissemination of more sustainable practices. Besides adopter categories, Rogers also identified a range of factors affecting the rate of adoption:

- 37 -

Chapter 4 OBJECTIVE OF THE STUDY:


Main objective of the study is to find out the customer buying behavior at big bazaar There are some extensive objectives for the study which are listed below. 1. To determine the current status of Big Bazaar and Bigbazaar 2. To find out the impact of Organize Retailers on unorganized Retailers

- 38 -

Research Methodology

- 39 -

CHAPTER 5 RESEARCH METHODOLOGY


Technology and customers tastes and preferences plays a vital role in todays generation. Research Methodology is a set of various methods to be followed to find out various informations regarding market strata of different products. Research Methodology is required for every industrial service industries for getting acquire knowledge of their products.

Period of Study: This study has been carried out for a maximum period of 7
weeks.

Area of study: The study is exclusively done in the area of marketing. It is a process
requiring care, sophistication, experience, business judgment, and imagination for which there can be no mechanical substitutes.

Sampling Design: The convenience sampling is done because any probability


sampling procedure would require detailed information about the universe, which is not easily available further, it being an exploratory research.

Sample Procedure: In this study convenience sampling procedure is used.


Convenience sampling is preferred because of some limitation and the complexity of the random sampling. Area sampling is used in combination with convenience sampling so as to collect the data from different regions of the city and to increase reliability.

Sampling Size: The sampling size of the study is 200 users.


- 40 -

Data Collection:

Data is collected from various customers through personal

interaction. Specific questionnaire is prepared for colleting data. Data is collected with mere interaction and formal discussion with different respondents

Tools of Analysis: - The market survey and the techniques for marketing and
investment of finance is carried out by physically interacting with the potential customers in big bazaar.

Research Design: - The research work is exploratory in nature, and is meant


to provide the basic information required by research objectives. It is a preliminary study based on primary data and the findings can be consolidated after a detailed conclusive study has been carried out.

- 41 -

Limitations

limitations
Preparation of a project report and concluding a research is a whole process which is carried out in a number of steps. Therefore through out the whole process of research there are a number of difficulties encountered by researcher, at every step. In the present study we may assume following limitation.

- 42 -

1. 2.

Data dont represent entire population behavior. It is very difficult to measure perception by means of mathematical calculation.

3.

This research was done in Meerut and Meerut city only hence this Conclusion is valid only for Meerut.

4.

It was assumed that respondent have the knowledge of the choice that were given in the questionnaire and respondent were compelled to choose only from given alternatives.

The respondent view point on the study/questionnaire purely judgment and may be induced by other reasons also.

- 43 -

Data Analysis

- 44 -

CHAPTER 6 DATA ANALYSIS & INTERPRETATION


The survey is done on big bazaar. Survey is done of 200 respondents of Meerut who come to visit big bazaar. A specific questionnaire is prepared for the customers and data is obtained from them by moving around big bazaar and personally interacting with them. The customers gave valuable information regarding their consumption pattern in big bazaar. All informations are collected and a proper analysis is done. All the analysis and its interpretations are discussed below. Each of the analysis is done as per the information obtained from the customers and a serious interpretation has been done to best of my effort.

- 45 -

Income wise distribution of customers coming to big bazaar

Higher Income Group Middle Income Group Lower Income Group No Income Group

5% 50% 20% 25%

I C M GOP NOE RU

5 % 2% 5 H h rI c m ig e n o e Gu r p o Md I cm id le n o e Gu r p o 5% 0 2% 0 L wr I c m o e no e Gu r p o N IcmG u ono e r p o

- 46 -

Analysis: The above diagram shows the distribution of income level of customers
coming in to big bazaar. Among the 200 respondents 50% of customers are of middle income level that is between Rs20000 60000. Least number of customers visiting Big bazaar are the higher income level people that constitute only 5%. The lower income level of people coming to big bazaar constitutes of 20%. 25% of people belong to no income group which mostly consists of students.

Interpretation: Big bazaar is the hub of shopping for middle level income group
people because of its reasonable price on its each product category. The higher-level income group people dont prefer to do shopping in big bazaar, as it doesnt deal with branded products. The higher-level income group people are very status conscious and their psychology is such type that they dont prefer much to visit big bazaar, as it is a discounted store. The lower income group people come in to big bazaar as they get goods at a discounted price. Hence big bazaar should include branded products in its product category, which will encourage higher income group people to come in to big bazaar. Probably not much of lower income group people come to big bazaar as they dont like to have any shopping experience rather they just go for near by store where they can get their necessity goods. Even they purchase goods on a regular basis on a small quantity. So they dont have much interest to come to big bazaar and do shopping.

- 47 -

Purpose behind visiting big bazaar

Shopping Outing Both

60 10 30
P R OE U P S

3% 0 Sop g h p in O tin u g 6% 0 1% 0 B th o

Analysis:

Out of the 200 respondents 60% of respondents visit big bazaar for

shopping, 10% for outing and 30% visit big bazaar for both the purposes.

Interpretation:

From this I interpret that big bazaar is purely a shopping

complex but it also facilitates a certain kind of ambience and decorum to the people that they also visit it for the purpose of outing. The infrastructure and ambience of big bazaar is so that people even like to go there even also they dont have to purchase anything. People enjoy doing shopping in big bazaar. This is very nice for it as often customers purchase some goods while moving I the building.

- 48 -

Garment Outlet Footwear Outlet Food Court Entertainment Gift Corner Jewellery and Watches Store

40% 15% 20% 10% 10% 5%

- 49 -

Demand for other retail outlets in a mall

garment outlet 10% 10% 5% foot wear outlet 40% food court entertainment 20% 15% gift corner jewelery and watches

Analysis: The above graph shows that 40% of people visit garment outlet in a mall
other than that of big bazaar. 20% of people also prefer to visit food court in a mall other than big bazaar. 15% of the people go to footwear outlet in a mall other than big bazaar. 10% of people also go to mall for entertainment purpose. Some people that are 15% each also visit gift corner store and jewellery & watches store in a mall other than big bazaar.

Interpretation:

From this analysis I come to know that most of the people tend

to visit garment outlets in a mall other than big bazaar as it has some exclusive branded outlets. People also go for footwear stores as malls have branded footwear stores in it. People go for watching movies to mall for entertainment. Yet a few people visits gift corners and jewellery stores in a mall. This is of course a threat for big bazaar that it is - 50 -

not able to attract customers from other retail outlets and retain them with it. Big bazaar should definitely include more of branded products in its product category in order to bring in the customers of mall to it and retain them with it. It can include some of the exclusive branded outlets of cloths and jewellery in it in order to attract the brand choosy customers.

Products mostly purchased by customers in big bazaar


Clothes Grocery Food Item Leather Item Electronic Item Gift Item Any other Item 60% 70% 50% 25% 15% 10% 10%

A yo e I m n th r te G I m ift te E c n I m le tro ic te La eI m e th r te Fo I m o d te G c ry ro e C th s lo e 0 % 2% 0 4% 0 6% 0 8% 0 S rie 1 e s

Analysis:

This chart clearly indicates that the demand for grocery that is 70% is

highest by the customers followed by clothes rated 60%. The next highest demand is for - 51 -

food items that is 50%. 25% demand is for leather items in big bazaar. Electronic items holds 15% of demand and gift items and other items has a demand of only 10% by the customers of big bazaar.

Interpretation: From this analysis I interpret that customers demand are high for
grocery and clothes followed by food items in big bazaar. Electronic items have a little demand by the customers. Gift items and other items are not much in demand by the customers. I can interpret that clothes, grocery and food items are the major products which hold maximum number of customers. So big bazaar should maintain its low pricing and product quality to keep hold of the customers and also it should keep more qualitative products of gift and leather items so that people would go for more purchase of these items from it. Big bazaar has many local branded products of grocery and cloths and it is successfully selling it. It should also include branded products so that more sales can take place.

Expenditure pattern of customers coming in to big bazaar

Below 500 500-1000 1000-1500 1500-2000 More than 2000

11% 16% 22% 22% 29%

- 52 -

E P N IT R P T E N X E D U E AT R

1% 1 2% 9 1% 6 B lo 5 0 e w 0 5 01 0 0- 00 10- 50 0 01 0 10- 00 5 02 0 M r th n2 0 oe a 0 0 2% 2 2% 2

Analysis: We can clearly see from this graph that majority of the customers spend a
lot in big bazaar that is 29% of people spend more than Rs2000 in a single visit to big bazaar. Equal number of people that is 22% of people each spend Rs 1000-1500 and Rs 1500-2000 respectively in a visit to big bazaar.16% of people spend Rs 500-1000 and only 11% of customers are there who spends less than Rs500 in their visit to big bazaar.

Interpretation: From this I interpret that most of the customers purchase goods
in bulk which leads them to spend a lot. Volume sales are high in big bazaar. Customers tend to purchase more goods from big bazaar as it provides goods at a discounted rate. Probably those persons who spend more in a visit to big bazaar are purchasing on a monthly basis. Those customers who are spending very less money that is below Rs 500 are mostly coming in just to move around big bazaar and spend time. In the process they used to spend money on food items and also purchase some products while roaming in it. Impulse buying behavior of customers comes in to play to a large extent. More discounts shall be provided to people who does bulk purchase. This will encourage people to purchase more products.

Time spent by customers in shopping in big bazaar


- 53 -

Less than half an hour Half an hour to 1 hour 1 hour to 1 1/2 hours 1 1/2 hours to 2 hours More than 2 hours

10% 30% 50% 40% 20%

M th 2 ho ore an urs 1 1/2 h rs to 2 ho ou urs 1 ho r to 1 1 h rs u /2 ou H lf an ho r to 1 ho a u ur Le tha h a ho r ss n alf n u 0 % 2 0% 4 0% 6 0% Se s1 rie

Analysis:

People spend a lot of time in shopping in big bazaar. Majority of the

respondents said that they spend at least 1 hour to 1 hours in big bazaar. 40% respondents also said that they spend 1 hours to 2 hours in their visit to big bazaar. Only 10% of people said that they spend very little time that is less than half an hour in big bazaar.

Interpretation: As per the given data I interpret that customers are very product
choosy now a days and thats why they spend a lot of time in shopping in big bazaar. Probably customers might even be spending more time in big bazaar as it provides a very nice ambience and atmosphere for the people to shop in. Hence those persons who spend half an hour or less than half an hour in big bazaar are those persons who just come to purchase limited products and come only because of low pricing of products. - 54 -

People also spend much time in it but purchase very few goods. The sales personnel should focus on the people who take long time in shopping and purchases a lot and provide special kind of service to them as they are the major customers.

Comparison of footfalls in weekdays and weekends


Weeks days Weekends 40% 60%

F OF L S O T AL

4% 0 We sd y ek as We e d ek ns 6% 0

- 55 -

Analysis: The above graph shows that more number of people comes to big bazaar
in weekends than that of week days .40% of people visits big bazaar in weekdays where as 60% of people visit big bazaar in weekends.

Interpretation: I can clearly interpret from this that most of the people tend to
visit big bazaar in weekends rather than that of week days. There are more footfalls in big bazaar in weekends than that of week days. Though there is not much difference as 40% of people visit big bazaar in week days hence in weekends the footfall increases by 10%. As people come more in weekends, so big bazaar should keep it open for more time in weekends. The infrastructure can be changed a bit in weekends so that customers can see more products clearly and can move around comfortably. In order to bring in more number of customers in week days big bazaar should provide some schemes in week days which will encourage people to come in to it in week days also. Hence the crowd is more in weekends and big bazaar should avail more parking spaces for its customers in weekends. It can make some temporary arrangement for parking every weekend. It should not spend much money in advertising and displaying of products in weekdays rather it should advertise and display products more in weekends as more number of people comes in weekends.

- 56 -

Customers preference of timing to visit big bazaar

10 A.M. - 6 P.M. 6 P.M. -10P.M.

42% 58%

T EP E E E C IM R F R N E

4% 2 5% 8

1 A . - 6P . 0 .M .M 6P . - 0 .M .M 1 P .

Analysis:

The above pie chart shows that most of the people prefer to visit big

bazaar in evening time than that of the daytime. Only 42% of people tend to visit big bazaar during daytime while 58% of people tend to visit big bazaar during evening time.

- 57 -

Interpretation: From the above analysis I interpret that evening time is the peak
time for big bazaar and daytime is the off peak time for big bazaar. There is more number of people found in big bazaar during evening time than that of daytime. Probably more of products are being sold during evening time in big bazaar than that of daytime. Big bazaar shall provide some special offerings during daytime so that more people should come in during daytime. It could offer some special kind of product in daytime, which will be not available during evening time. In this way it will bring in more number of people during day time for getting the special kind of products but along with that it will be able to sale other products as people do a lot of impulse buying at big bazaar.

Comparison of customers purchasing with planned list of products and purchasing products on an unplanned basis

Yes No

80% 20%

- 58 -

P A N DA DU P A N D LNE N NLNE B YR UE S

2% 0

Ys e N o

8% 0

Analysis:

As shown in the graph out of my total respondents of 200, 80% of

customers come to big bazaar with a planned list of products. Only 20% of people come in to big bazaar without any planned list of products to be purchased from big bazaar.

Interpretation:

As per the data obtained from the customers of big bazaar I

interpret that most of the customers comes in to big bazaar with a planned list of products. Few customers come to big bazaar without any planned list of products and purchases products depending on their selection. These people basically come to the mall and hence get in to big bazaar. Depending on the product category and brand and quality of products they purchases goods. Some couples come to mall and go to food bazaar to have food together and to have chit chat among them. The customer who comes with a planned list of products purchases more products than that of the customers who comes without any planned list of products. So big bazaar should provide more variety and essential goods so that more number of people should come in with a planned list of products.

- 59 -

Brand preference of customers in big bazaar

Yes No Depends on category

10% 50% 40%

BAD RFRNE RN P EE E C

1% 0 4% 0

Ys e N o 5% 0 D p n so eed n c te oy a gr

Analysis:

As seen in the above chart it is clearly known that only 10% of people

come in to big bazaar with a list of brands in advance. 50% of people completely deny that they dont prepare in list of brand in advance. 40% of people told that they prepare a list of brand depending on the product category.

Interpretation:

From this I interpret that customers dont opt for much brand

preference while purchasing products in big bazaar. A few customers search for brands but depending on the product category. Customers probably dont decide for brands on products as there are not much of known branded products available at big bazaar. On product categories like grocery and clothes, big bazaar has many local branded products. Customers purchase a lot of these, as its cheap in price even though its quality is not so good. As most of the customers belong to lower class and middle class people, they purchase those local branded products as it gives them value for money. Different products of the same category have different prices. Quality of products varies with the price. This enables customization of products for various types of customers. - 60 -

Customers search for brands mostly in apparel section. Some customers also pre decides the brand on the local manufactured grocery and food products of big bazaar.
Cloths Grocery Gift Items Electronic Items Leather Items Any Other Item 40% 40% 33% 25% 2% 12%

Big

bazaar

should include more branded of the

products in its each category so that customers have more options to choose among the brands. This will bring in more number of people to big bazaar, which will definitely increase the sales.

Comparison of brand preference on different product category

Ite m

It e m

ce ry

th s

Ite m

C lo

G ro

G if t

at h

le ct ro

Le

Analysis: This graph shows that cloths and grocery are the only two items on
which customers mostly prefer the brands that is 40% each. 33% brand preference is on gift items and 25% is on electronic items. Brand preference on leather items is 2% and 12% on any other item.

Interpretation:

From this I interpret that some of the products brand are

predecided in advance and for some of the products customers dont at all predecide any brand. As per electronic goods are concerned customers predecide the brand as many branded electronic products are available in big bazaar. The customers predecides - 61 -

ny

th er

er

ni c

It

em

45% 40% 35% 30% 25% 20% 15% 10% 5% 0%

Series1

brands on cloths and grocery most as big bazaar produces much of local brands and also have some well known branded products of clothes with it like flying machine jeans.

Cash Payment Credit Card Debit Card

73% 21% 6%

Mode of payment of customers in big bazaar

MD O P Y E T O E F AMN

6 % 2% 1 Cs Py et a h a mn C d Cr r it a e d Db Cr e it ad 7% 3

Analysis: As per my study is concerned, out of the total respondents 73% of people
make cash payment in big bazaar. 21% of them uses credit card as their mode of payment and 6% of the people makes payment in big bazaar through their debit card. - 62 -

Interpretation:

As per the obtained data I interpret that maximum number of

people makes cash payment in big bazaar. A fraction of people uses their credit card for payment in big bazaar and a very few people uses their debit card for payment. I can interpret that quick exchange of money for goods is done in big bazaar as most of the people mode of payment is cash payment. Hence some times big bazaar has to wait for a short time period as some of the customers make their payment through credit and debit card.

Customers mode of transport to big bazaar

Hired Vehicle Two-wheeler Four-wheeler Any Other


MD O T AS OT OE F RNP R

10% 40% 50% 0%

0 %

1% 0 He V c le ir d e h

5% 0 4% 0

T ow e le w- h e r F u- h e r o r we le A yO e n th r

Analysis: Around 50% of the total respondent of 200 that is 100 people comes in to
big bazaar with their own four wheelers. The second majority of people consist of people riding two wheeler and coming in to big bazaar. Only 10% of people of the total respondent visits big bazaar on hired vehicles. None of the customers of the total respondent comes in any other mode of transport. - 63 -

Interpretation:

From the above data I interpret that there are more number of

four wheelers coming found in big bazaar than that of two wheelers. People prefer more to go to big bazaar in four wheelers than that of two wheelers. A few people are found who comes in to big bazaar with a hire vehicle. Probably they might be the tourists.

Parking space availability in big bazaar


A I AI I Y F AK GPC V LB T OPRI SAE A L N

1% 0 Ls t a es hn aeut dqa e 4% 5 A qa d ut e e Mehn o ta r aeut dqa e

4% 5

Analysis: As it is shown in pie chart most of the people say big bazaar does not
provide adequate parking space. Equal number of people also says that adequate space is provided for parking big bazaar. Only 10% of people say that more than adequate space is available for parking in big bazaar.

Interpretation:

Analyzing the above data, I interpret that customers are not

satisfied with the parking space availability provided by big bazaar. Hence its a threat for big bazaar as it may loose its customers because of less parking space availability. Even though many customers say adequate space is available for parking in big bazaar but also it is a threat for big bazaar as it is seen more number of people are expected to come in to big bazaar. In holidays probably it will be very difficult for customers to park their vehicle in big bazaar. - 64 -

- 65 -

Customers preference towards Kirana store

Yes No

85% 15%

PREFERENCE TO A W RDS KIRA NA STO RE

15%

Yes N o

85%

Analysis: Out of my total respondent of 200 customers, 85% of them says they go
to their near by kirana store and 15% said that they dont at all go to any kirana store. This shows that majority of people go to kirana store even though they visit big bazaar. But some customers are there who never goes to any kirana store.

Interpretation: As per the given data I analyze that most number of people tend
to purchase goods from near by kirana store even if they come to big bazaar. I can conclude from this that a kirana store is a competitor of big bazaar. Some customers never go for shopping in kirana store as of it does not have much variety option available with it. Probably they are more interested in having a shopping experience rather than to just go and purchase goods from kirana store.

- 66 -

Comparison of Big bazaar with any Kirana store


Price Big bazaar Kirana store 70 30 Service 50 50 Variety 100 0 Quality 40 60 Convenience 25 75 Shopping Experience 90 10 Ambience 95 5

120 100 80 60 40 20 0
P ric e

100 70 50 30 0 75 60 40 25

90

95 Big bazaar Kirana store

10

Analysis: The above graph shows the comparison of different factors between big
bazaar and a nearby kirana store. 70% of people say big bazaar provides goods at a cheaper price as compared to that of a kirana store. 50% of people say big bazaar provides better service and another 50% of them say kirana store provides better service. Each and every customer that is 100% agrees that there are more variety of products available at big bazaar than that of kirana store. As per quality of goods is concerned 60% of the customer say kirana store provides better qualitative products while 40% of the customers say big bazaar also provides qualitative products. 75% people say it is more convenient for them to go to a kirana store while 25% of them say going to big bazaar is more convenient for them. 90% of respondents said it is a good shopping experience at big bazaar while 105 of them said that they also have a good shopping experience at kirana store. As per ambienc

ce ar ie ty Q S ho Co ua lit pp n in ve n y g E ien xp c er e ie nc A m e bi en ce V

er vi

- 67 -

e is concerned 95% of customers said big bazaar provides much nice ambience than big bazaar while 5% of them said that ambience provided by kirana store is also equivalent to that of big bazaar.

Interpretation: I interpreted from this that a kirana store is one of the competitor of big bazaar. It is a threat for big bazaar as some of the attributes of a kirana store provides more satisfaction to customers. Big bazaar should try to improve on each of its attributes and out compete the kirana store so that it can convert the customers of kirana store to be the customers of big bazaar.

- 68 -

CHAPTER 7 FINDINGS
Big bazaar is a major shopping complex for todays customers. It is a place where customers find variety of products at a reasonable price. Big bazaar has a good reputation of itself in the market. It has positioned itself in the market as a discounted store. It holds a huge customer base. The majority of customers belong to middle class family. The youth generation also likes shopping and moving around big bazaar. Volume sales always take place in big bazaar. Impulse buying behavior of customers comes in to play most of the times in big bazaar.

Big bazaar is a hypermarket as it provides various kinds of goods like apparels, grocery, stationary, food items, electronic items, leather items, watches, jewellery, crockery, decorative items, sport items, chocolates and many more. It competes with all the specialty stores of different products which provide goods at a discounted rate all through the year. It holds a large customer base and it seemed from the study that the customers are quite satisfied with big bazaar. As of now there are 34 big bazaars in different cities of India, it seems that there is a vast growth of big bazaar lying as customers demand is increasing for big bazaars.

Big bazaar is a hypermarket store where varieties of products are being sold on different product category. It has emerged as a hub of shopping specially for middle class people. Different types of products starting from a baby food to pizzas all are available under one roof. In Meerut it is the middle class people who mostly do marketing from big bazaar. Even most of the people do their monthly shopping from big bazaar.

- 69 -

SWOT ANALYSIS

- 70 -

SWOT Analysis of Big bazaar


A swot analysis is done to know the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats of any company. This analysis will explain about the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats of big bazaar.

Strengths of Big bazaar Large variety option Cheap price Huge customer Base Volume sales

Weaknesses of Big bazaar Lacks in branded products Low in product quality Unable to provide enough parking space to its customers

Threats for Big bazaar Opening up of other discounted stores like Vishal mega mart Convenience of customers to near by kirana stores Availability of products in other retail outlets

Opportunities for Big bazaar To open up more and more number of big bazaars in different cities of the country. To grab the rural market To bring in the customers of other retail outlet by dealing with branded products. Add more products to its product category - 71 -

Conclusion
People not only visit big bazaar to do shopping but also visit for outing purpose as it provides a very nice ambience to its customers. As people go to malls they just tend to move around big bazaar whether it is for shopping purpose or for outing purpose. Grocery, apparels and food items are the products which are demanded most by the customers of Meerut in big bazaar. The major drawback of big bazaar is that it lacks in providing enough parking space for its customers. This may discourage the customers to come to big bazaar and shop as they face difficulty in parking their vehicles. Even though some customers say that they dont feel problem in parking their vehicle, it is because of the parking space available to them by the mall. As it is surveyed it seems that the biggest competitors of big bazaar are the kirana stores and the discounted specialty stores like Vishal mega mart, Meerut bazaar etc.

- 72 -

Recommendation & Suggestions


Big bazaar should provide large parking space for its customers so that they can easily park their vehicles.

Big bazaar should include more of branded products its product category so as to attract the brand choosy people to come in to big bazaar.

It should make different cash counters for different customers. Cash counter and credit card payment counter should be placed differently in order to reduce the rush and save the customers time. This will be a kind of motivator for the customers of big bazaar.

The service of the sales person is needed to be improved. Personal care should be taken by the sales person for the customers so that the customers feel good.

- 73 -

ANNEXURE Questionnaire prepared for customers of Big Bazaar


1. How frequently do you visit Big Bazaar? a) Weekly b) Monthly c) Quarterly d) On a unplanned basis 2. Apart from Big Bazaar do you intend to visit any other retail outlet in a Mall? a) Yes b) No

3. If yes then what are the other retail outlets do you intend to visit in a mall? a) Garment Outlet b) Footwear Outlet c) Food Court d) Entertainment e) Gift Corner f) Jewellery and Watches store 4. What is the purpose behind visiting Big Bazaar? a) Shopping b) Outing c) Dating 5. What type of products do you mostly purchase in Big Bazaar? a) Cloths b) Grocery
- 74 -

c) Food Item d) Leather Item e) Electronic Item f) Gift Item g) Any other Item

6. On an average how much amount of money do you spend in a visit to Big Bazaar? a) Below 500 b) 500 1000 c) 1000 1500 d) 1500 2000 e) More than 2000 7. How much time do you spend in a visit to Big Bazaar? a) Less than half an hour b) Half an hour to 1 hour c) 1 hour to 1 hours d) 1 hours to 2 hours e) More than 2 hours 8. Which days of the week do you prefer to visit Big Bazaar? a) Week days b) Weekends 9. Which time of the day do you mostly prefer to visit Big Bazaar? a) 10am 6pm b) 6pm 10pm
- 75 -

10. Do you go with a planned list of products to be purchased from Big Bazaar? a) Yes b) No

11.Do you prepare a list of brands in advance when you visit to Big Bazaar? a) Yes c) Depends on category 12. In which categories of products do you pre-decide the brands? a) Cloths b) Leather Items c) Electronic Items d) Grocery e) Gift Items f) Any other Item b) No

13.

What is your mode of payment in Big Bazaar? a) Cash payment b)Credit Card

14.

What encourages you to visit Big Bazaar? a. Price b. Service c. Ambience d. Product Variety
- 76 -

e. Product Quality f. Convenience

15. How would you rate the services of the sales personnel in Big

Bazaar on a 1 5 scale? a. Very good b. Good c. Ok d. Poor e. Very poor

16.What is your convenience to Big Bazaar? a) Hired vehicle b) Two-wheeler c) Four-wheeler d) Any other 17. How is the parking space availability in Big Bazaar? a) Less than adequate b) Adequate c) More than adequate 18. Do you go to Kirana store? a) Yes b) No
- 77 -

19.Compare your nearest Kirana store with Big Bazaar on the following parameters. i. Price ii. Service iii. Variety iv. Quality v. Convenience
vi. Shopping Experience

.. 1. Name: 2. Age: 3. Sex: 4. Location/Address: 5. Qualification: 6. Profession: 7. Whats your monthly income? a) Below 10,000 b) 10,000 20,000 c) 20,000 40,000 d) 40,000 60,000 e) More than 60,000
- 78 -

- 79 -

Bibliography

- 80 -

BIBLIOGRAPHY
BOOKS-

KNOOTZO DONNEL Essentials of management concepts

PHILIP KOTLER Marketing Management

C .R. KOTHARI Research Methodology

WEBSITES www.bigbazaar.com

www.google.com

REFERENCE Big bazaar outlet in Meerut, Noida, Gazhiabad, Indralok, and

Wazirpur.

MAGAZINE Business World

The Economic Times


- 81 -

- 82 -