WILKES-BARRE, PA $1.

00 Sunday, October 30, 2011
All you need to
get ready for the
big PA-WA game.
>> INSIDE
FloodFest at WA
stadium supports
flooded library.
>> PAGE 32
45th annual
Goalpost
Raisin’ bucks
for the books
COUPON SAVINGS INSIDE WORTH $410.43
PHOTO BY TONY CALLAIO
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Call Karen Fiscus at 970-7291
Advertising deadline is Thursday at 3 P.M.
Impressions Media
Fax: 602-0184
Chickie Redbird sits atop the
bookshelf in my office at the
college right where he’s been
for more than 20 years.
As the name implies, he’s a
bird and he’s red. And he wears
a baseball uniform. A St. Louis
Cardinals baseball uniform.
Chickie Redbird is a bobble
head. He didn’t have a name
when Mike Cotter, a fellow
journalist and fellow Cardinals
fan, gave him to me back in the
late ’80s but that didn’t last
long. My daughter Greta, 5 or 6
at the time, quickly slapped the
tag Chickie Redbird on him and
that was that.
Greta has always known her
dad is a huge Cardinals fan and
has always known Cardinals
fans refer to their team as the
Redbirds.
Actually, Greta knew I was a
Cardinals fan before Greta
knew much of anything. She
was nine days old on June 15,
1983, when her mother raced
out of the kitchen of our apart-
ment in Allentown screaming,
“What happened to the baby?”
right after I, by then standing in
the middle of the living room
having leaped from the couch,
had just let out a heart-wrench-
ing cry of anguish.
“Nothing,” I said. “The Car-
dinals traded Keith Hernandez
to the Mets.”
Keith Hernandez was my
favorite player having led the
Redbirds to the World Series
title the summer before and I
was crushed.
Despite her mother’s reaction,
Greta slept right through my
outburst, but I knew she some-
how felt my pain.
With few exceptions, guys of
my generation have a baseball
team they’ve rooted for most of
their lives. The tales of why we
picked this team or that vary
but there is one constant: once
we have a team it’s for life.
Take my friend Tony Fino, he
with the Pennsylvania license
plate “BALTOS.” It stands for
Baltimore Orioles. When they
started this past baseball season
on fire, I said to myself I must
call Tony. And then I ran into
him the very next day and
didn’t have to.
When Harmon Killebrew
died earlier this year, I immedi-
ately called my buddy Joe Le-
one, a longtime Minnesota
Twins fans. When the San Fran-
cisco Giants won it all last year,
I was elated for my friend Mike
Caputo.
And now that the Cardinals
are champs once again I know
those fellas are happy for me.
It’s a guy thing. Better still, a
little boy thing.
I didn’t start out a Redbirds
fan. Truth is I started out kinda
wishy-washy. I vividly recall
lying on the floor in front of the
TV doing my times tables dur-
ing the 1957 World Series when
the Milwaukee Braves beat the
New York Yankees and in-
stantly becoming a Braves fan.
That lasted two years. The
Chicago White Sox made it to
the Series in ’59 and, even
though they lost, they were my
new team.
Until the following October.
When Bill Mazeroski hit a
home run to beat the Yankees in
the seventh game of the ’60
series, well, there was no bigger
Pittsburgh Pirates fan than I.
I turned 11 that year and de-
cided to have a serious talk with
myself. I knew I needed to pick
one team and stay with them. I
set down two rules: I couldn’t
pick the Yankees, Phillies or
Dodgers because everyone I
knew rooted for them; and I
couldn’t pick any recent World
Series champs.
The Cardinals not only filled
the bill on both counts but also
had cool uniforms.
That was the summer of ’61.
Little did I know that within
just a few years they would
reward me mightily.
In 1964, the Redbirds over-
took the Phillies in the final 12
games of the season to win the
pennant and later beat the in-
vincible Yankees in the World
Series. Future Hall of Fame
players Bob Gibson and Lou
Brock are given credit for that
miracle but I’ve always known
it was my heartfelt prayers,
especially those during a cru-
cial three-game sweep of the
Phillies in St. Louis in late
September, with me again lying
on the floor in front of the TV
living and dying with every
pitch, that made all the differ-
ence.
While five of the Redbirds 11
World Series titles have come
during my stretch of fandom,
none – even this improbable
one – comes close to the thrill
of 1964. It probably has to do
with lost innocence, but my
wife Mary Kay deserves some
of the credit as well. When I
told her Saturday morning the
Cardinals had won the World
Series while she slept, her re-
sponse was a sweet but poi-
gnant reminder of the vicarious
nature of a fan’s role in a team’s
success. “I’m so happy for
you,” she said evenly. “I’ll bet
you’re getting tired of taking
bows for that team.”
Well I’m not, actually, but her
point was well taken.
Unlike ’64, I had little to do
with this year’s championship.
Ed Ackerman, optimist
eackerman@psdispatch.com
Not ’64, but I’ll take it
Go Kart Champ.................................................3
Harry Potter Party...........................................4
More Jobs..........................................................5
Local Chatter ....................................................8
Matters of Faith ...............................................10
Editorial /Letters.............................................14
Nutrition............................................................15
Party in Duryea Park ......................................16
Peeking into the Past .....................................16
FloodFest .........................................................32
Town News ......................................................39
Sports ..............................................................45
Obituaries .......................................................58
Anniversaries .........................................Social 1
Birthdays................................................Social 3
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When Jordan Thomas was
five years old, his father Jeff put
him in a go kart and entered him
in the Pennsylvania Dirt Karting
Series races in the Kid Kart
class.
Fast forward to the summer of
2011. Now in his ninth and final
season, Jordan, 13, racing in the
Junior Sportsman II Champ
class, went out as the Pennsylva-
nia State Champion.
In the six -race series, he won
two races, finished second once,
third once and sixth once to out-
point the field of 16 karts, racing
at the Selinsgrove, Shellham-
mers, Cove Valley and Path Val-
ley Speedways in Central and
South Central Pennsylvania.
In fact, Jordan was so far
ahead he clinched after the fifth
race. Karts in his class can reach
70 to 80 miles per hour. His team
consists of his father and a fam-
ily friend Mike Atkinson.
He will get his championship
trophyat the PDKSAwards Ban- quet at the Holiday Inn Hershey in Harrisburg on Feb. 4. “It will
feel good because I hadn’t won
other championships,” Jordan
said.
Jordan, a Wyoming Area
eighth grader, lives in Harding
with his father and mother, De-
nise.
Having graduated from karts,
Jordan’s logical next step would
be up to what are called potent
sprint cars, but right nowhe’s not
certain what he will do next rac-
ing season.
Besides, he’s into another
sport. He’s a quarterback/receiv-
er for the West Pittston Rams Ju-
nior A football team. Next year
he’ll join the Wyoming Area
high school freshman football
program.
As much as he likes football,
he said he likes racing better.
“It’s more of a thrill.”
The thrill is enough to over-
come the danger. In fact he’s
been hurt more in football than
racing, though he has been in-
volved in a couple wrecks. “It
was kind of scary,” he said, “but I
was fine.”
Kart racer goes out as a state champion
Jordan Thomas began racing go karts when only five years old
By Jack Smiles
Associate Editor
Jordan Thomas, 13 from Harding, won a state championship in kart racing last summer.
Grand Knight Gregory R. Ser-
fass, of the JFK Council 372,
Knights of Columbus, Pittston,
facilitated a donation by Scran-
ton Council 208 to Corpus
Christi Parish, West Pittston and
Harding, to aid in the Outreach-
ing Phase of their flood relief ef-
forts.
Donations to the flood ou-
treach are being accepted at the
Pittston Council at 55 South
Main Street or by calling Serfass
at 655-1114.
K of C donates to Corpus Christi flood relief progam
Pictured from left at a
Knights of Columbus check
presentation for the Corpus
Christi flood outreach are
Larry Hewitt, Grand Knight,
Scranton Council 208; Gre-
gory R. Serfass, Grand
Knight, Pittston Council 372
accepting a check from Je-
rome Walsh, Treasurer,
Scranton Council 208 and
Jerry Reichle, Financial Sec-
retary, Scranton Council 208.
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ome 100 children (of all ages) attended the Harry Potter & Friends Party at the Wyoming Free
Library on Saturday, Oct. 22. Volunteers from the Wyoming Area Key Club and Drama Club
provided assistance with decorations, games and activities for the children.
Sponsoredas a free gift tothe Communitybythe Friends of the Library, the event receivedsupport from
several volunteers along with monetary gifts from an anonymous donor and from the U.F.C.W. Federal
Credit Union.
A highlight was a magic show by John Graham.
PHOTOS BY TONY CALLAIO
Friends and workers of the library, left to right, Veronica Spliethoff, John Roberts, Library Director, Maureen Carey, Susan Doty, Pat Quinn, Lindsay Rysz, Roe Anusoewicz
at the Harry Potter Party.
It’s a Harry Potter Party at Wyoming Free Library
Jacqui Vogel and Thomas Figura, both 6-years old, create their magic wands at the Harry Potter
Party at the Wyoming Free Library.
Professor Albus Dumbledore himself showed up... make that
herself, played by Donna Serza.
Victoria Larson, 2 1/2-years old, gets a coloring tip fromLindsay
Rysz at the Harry Potter Party.
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Farrell
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Wyoming Area School Board
Te Right Person for the Job
at the Right Time
Six years ago, 1,800 acres in
Pittston Township and Jenkins
Township off Oak Street and Rt.
315 was a forgotten area of
played-out strip mines and quar-
ries
In 2005, Mericle Commercial
Real Estate Services began de-
veloping the area. Today it is
known as CenterPoint Com-
merce & Trade Park and there
are 27 businesses there scattered
among 19 commercial buildings
providing about 2,700 jobs.
Among the tenants are
Lowe’s, the largest employeer;
The Men’s Wearhouse, Boden,
FedEx Ground, The Home De-
pot, Bimbo Bakeries and Corn-
ing Life Sciences.
Bath Fitter – North America’s
leading acrylic bathtub, shower
enclosure, and tub-to-shower
conversion company – is the lat-
est tenant. Bath Fitter leased
10,000 square feet of space for
an office, showroom, and distri-
bution center at 145-173 Center-
Point Boulevard and expects to
add 10 to 20 jobs over the next
year.
Bath Fitter combined an oper-
ation that had been in Hanover
Township and a similar oper-
ation in Upstate New York in
CenterPoint.
Jim Cummings, Vice Presi-
dent of Marketing for Mericle,
said the company did virtually
all the work at CenterPoint on
speculation and from scratch.
“We built the roads, the utilities
and physically built all the
building except Lowe’s. We
played a key role for Lowe’s
building roads and utilities and
grading the land so they could
come in and start pouring their
foundation and putting up the
building.”
CenterPoint can accommo-
date companies needing any-
where from 6,000 to more than
a million square feet. Every
building in the park receives a
10-year, 100% real estate tax
abatement on improvements via
the Local Economic Revitaliza-
tion Tax Assistance (LERTA)
program.
CenterPoint also has Foreign
Trade Zone (FTZ) status, which
provides potentially significant
savings to companies that im-
port products from outside the
United States.
Bath Fitter adding jobs as CenterPoint’s 27th tenant
Some 2700 jobs now at commerce and trade park in Pittston Twp., Jenkins Twp.
By Jack Smiles
Associate Editor
Bath Fitter now occupies this space at CenterPoint Commerce & Trade Park.
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BC Kiddie Campus is a good place for kiddies to learn
their ABCs and it’s also a good place for classroom
quality, teacher education and safety.
The ABC Kiddie Campus on Main Street in Pittston, across
from the Fort Jenkins Bridge, was awarded a STAR 4 desig-
nation by Keystone STARS, an initiative of the Pennsylvania
Office of Child Development and Early Learning.
ABC is one of only five centers out of more than 150 in
Luzerne County and the only center in the Greater Pittston area
to get the STAR 4 designation.
Keystone STARS is acronym for Standards, Training/Profes-
sional Development, Assistance, Resources and Support
ABC Kiddie Kampus has two locations. The other on Main
Street in Old Forge is also a STAR 4 center.
President Scott Verdine said the staffs at the centers are the
key to quality. “We’ve been in business for more than 20 years
and have always operated with a child first mentality with a
loving, caring, and compassionate staff,” Verdine said.
ABC Kiddie Kampus accepts children from 6-weeks to 12
years. It’s a licensed preschool program that also offers before
and after school care. Brittany Noss, on left, and preschool teacher Jenna Glynn with the fall pre-K class at ABC Kiddie
campus, Pittston, which received a STAR 4 designation.
Stars for kiddies
at ABC centers
Pittston, Old Forge campuses
get STAR 4 designations
By Jack Smiles
Associate Editor
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For-profit small businesses in
West Pittston, Jenkins Township
or any municipality in Luzerne
County listed by FEMA in the
most recent disaster declaration
that sustained damage from ei-
ther Hurricane Irene or Tropical
Storm Lee may be eligible for a
grant fromthe Pennsylvania De-
partment of Environmental Pro-
tection (DEP).
DEP’s Small Business Om-
budsman Office is providing a
special “Storm Relief Advan-
tage Grant Program.” Affected
small businesses may apply for
50-percent matchinggrants upto
$9,500 for projects including
damaged HVAC, high-efficien-
cy lighting, solvent recovery sys-
tems, waste recycling systems,
and auxiliary power units de-
ployed as anti-idling technology.
Additionally, because DEP
recognizes the urgent need to get
assistance to the state’s small
business community, submis-
sion of registration to the Energy
Star Portfolio Manager will be
deferred at point of application,
provided the applicant offers a
valid reason in a statement with
their application, and that they
will provide evidence of registra-
tion prior to executing the agree-
ment.
Contact the Pennsylvania
Small Business Development
Center’s (SBDC) Environmental
Management Assistance Pro-
gram (EMAP) for help with the
application process at 1-877-
ASK-EMAP, by e-mail at ques-
tions@askemap.org, or online at
www.askemap.org. Their servic-
es are both free and confidential.
Applications are most quickly
obtained from DEP’s website at
www.depweb.state.pa.us, key-
word: SBAdvantage.
Applications are also available
by contacting DEP’s Small Busi-
ness OmbudsmanOffice bymail
at P.O. Box 8772, Harrisburg, PA
17105-8772; by e-mail at epad-
vantagegrant@state.pa.us; by
telephone at 717.772.8909; or by
fax at 717.705.5401.
Applications will be accepted
until December 31 or until funds
are exhausted.
Small business grants
available from DEP
It is time for Fall II Sports and
Aquatics programs at the Grea-
ter Pittston YMCA and many of
the Y’s favorite programs are
back as well as some newevents.
The Fall II Sports Session be-
gan October 23 at the YMCA
and registration is still underway
for the organization’s steadfast
programs like Gymnastics and
Adult and Youth Boxing.
“Gymnastics is a favorite
among the kids,” said Fitness Di-
rector Kelly McCabe. “Boxing
has really grown. The kids love it
and we have a programfor adults
as well.”
Preschool, beginner and inter-
mediate gymnastic classes are
held each Saturday morning at
the YMCA. Cost for family
members is $50; individual
members is $60 and non-mem-
bers is $75. Youths learn the fun-
damentals of gymnastics during
the six week session and have a
chance to test their abilities on
the floor mats, uneven bars and
balance beam.
“This is an instructional pro-
gram; it is not competitive,” said
McCabe. “Youths do not have to
have a back ground in gymnas-
tics to sign up for the program.”
Boxing is headed by trainer
JimScarantino and runs Tuesday
and Thursday from 7 to 9 p.m.
Sports, aquatics
programs at YMCA
By Laura Musto Kapalka
Special to the Dispatch
See Y SPORTS, Page 24
LOCALCHATTER
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What are you chattin’ about? Call 602-0177 or email sd@psdispatch.com and let us know.
Elsbeth Turcan of Exeter is
one of two Holy Redeemer High
School seniors that have been
named semi-finalist in the 2010
National Merit Scholarship Pro-
gram.
Turcan,
along with Al-
lison Muth,
earned the rec-
ognition on the
basis of their
scores in the
Preliminary
SAT/National
Merit Scholar-
ship Qualifying Test (PAST/
NMSQT) taken as juniors. They
represent less than one percent
of high school seniors in the U.S.
and are now eligible to advance
to finalist level. Finalists will be
selected based on SAT scores,
academic record, and endorse-
ment by their school.
Elsbeth is the daughter of Wil-
liam and Elaine Turcan of Exe-
ter. Both students were honored
at a school assembly, where they
received their certificates.
Vinyl for Sale
Looking for some old vinyl re-
cords to spin on your turntable?
Gloria Pelliccia of Wyoming
is looking to get rid of her collec-
tion of records which she says,
“comes from her era.”
Some of the titles include mu-
sic fromGlen Miller and Tommy
Dorsey.
If you are interested, give Glo-
ria a call at 693-2928 for more
info on the classic records.
King’s Career Day
Tina Lispi, a resident of Pitt-
ston, Vito Rinaldi, a resident of
Inkerman, and Omar Tasgin, a
resident of Dupont, were among
51 King’s College students who
recently traveled to the nation’s
capitol to participate in the third
annual Career Day sponsored by
King’s Washington, D.C., Area
Alumni Club.
Lispi is a human resource
management major, Rinaldi is a
criminal justice major, and Tas-
gin is an international business
major.
The program featured 17
speakers, more than half of
whom are King’s graduates
working in the Washington,
D.C., area. Topics covered in the
general sessions included an
overview of private industry in
the area, applying for federal
jobs, ethical standards of govern-
ment service, the value of public
service, and career opportunities
in the Department of Defense,
FBI, and Veterans Affairs. Stu-
dents also had an opportunity to
participate in breakout sessions
on job opportunities in the fields
of insurance, financial research,
corporate finance, banking, in-
formation technology, account-
ing, marketing, lobbying, busi-
ness management, political
media and acquisitions and con-
tracting.
Enrolled
Sheryl Ann C. Klus of West
Wyoming is enrolled at Lebanon
Valley College in Annville. Klus
is a junior early childhood edu-
cation and special education ma-
jor. Klus will graduate in May
2013 with a Bachelor of Science
degree in early childhood educa-
tion and special education.
Vintage Hat Display
Mad About Hats, a selection
of historic headwear from the
collectionof the Luzerne County
Historical Society is currently on
display at the Society’s museum
in Wilkes-Barre. The exhibit, as-
sembled by Society volunteer
and guest curator, Sandra Skies
Ludwig, features 53 hats “from
the simple to the sublime”, ac-
cording to Museum Curator,
Mary Ruth Burke.
Men’s, women’s and children’s
headwear, dating from the early
19th century through the late
20thcenturyillustrate the chang-
es in taste and style which took
place over time. Included in the
display are a felt hat worn by
Colonel Robert Bruce Ricketts
during the Civil War, a straw
wedding hat from the 1820s and
a1921felt beanie that was part of
the Wilkes-Barre High School
girls’ basketball team uniform.
Other items of interest are a
Pennsylvania Railroad conduc-
tor’s cap, an Edwardian mourn-
ing hat trimmed with tulle and
ostrich feathers and an early 20th
century polka-dotted bathing
cap. Special cases also house
hair ornaments and hat-related
accessories, as well as babies’
and children’s bonnets and caps,
some of which show excellent
examples of period needlework.
Mad About Hats will remain
on display through Saturday,
Nov. 12.
The Luzerne County Histori-
cal Society Museumis located at
69 South Franklin Street (behind
the Osterhout Free Library),
Wilkes-Barre. The Museum is
open Tuesday through Saturday
from noon to 4:00 p.m. Admis-
sion is $4.00 for adults, $2.00 for
children 6 to 12, free for Histor-
ical Society members and chil-
dren 5 and under.
Performs
On Sunday, October 16, the
Choirs of Lock Haven Universi-
ty, under the direction of Ronald
E. Miller, performed a concert at
the university’s Price Perform-
ance Center. The concert, entit-
led “The Bright Side of Life,”
featured the Cantori Ensemble,
University Choir, Vocal Jazz En-
semble, Men’s Ensemble, and
Women’s Ensemble.
James Vesey, an LHUstudent,
directs the Women’s Ensemble.
Linda Rubino, a senior from
West Wyoming majoring in
Communication Media, per-
formed with the University
Choir and Cantori.
Jazz Ensemble
The Wyoming Seminary Up-
per School Jazz Ensemble has
been selected by the Pennsylva-
nia Music Educators Associ-
ation (PMEA) as the best jazz
ensemble in the state and will
perform at the 2012 PMEA All-
State Conference to be held in
April in Lancaster.
The first concert of the year
for the ensemble will be Tuesday,
December 13 at 7:00 p.m. in the
Buckingham Performing Arts
Center on the Upper School
campus. The concert is free and
open to the public.
Happy Birthday
Happy birthday to Tammy
Satkowski of Avoca who will be
celebrating today.
Happy birthday to Jim Sarti,
Hughestown, who celebrated on
October 26.
Exeter student is named Merit semifinalist
PittstonArea students delivereda message tofellowstudents ina language theywill understand. Ona fence onthe grounds of the
high school in Yatesville, the message reads: DNT TXT N’ DRV!
From students to students
Turcan
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MATTERS OF FAITH
email items for this page to sd@psdispatch.com; fax to 602-0183
St. John’s Lutheran Church,
located at 9 Wood Street, Pitt-
ston, will present its annual roast
pork dinner on Saturday, Nov. 5.
Take-outs begin at 4 p.m. and
dinner seating is from 5-7 p.m.
Tickets are $9.00 for adults
and $5.00 for children under the
age of 12. To place your ticket or-
der, or for more information,
please call 655-2505.
PIZZA SALE
The First United Methodist
Church of West Pittston will of-
fer a pizza sale on Friday, Nov. 4.
Pizzas can be ordered baked or
unbaked with or without onions.
Cost for a tray of pizza is $11.
Toppings of sweet red peppers,
pepperoni or sausage canbe add-
ed for $2 each. Specialty pizzas,
broccoli and tomato and garlic
are $14per tray. A vegetable piz-
za for $13 includes tomatoes, on-
ions, broccoli, red peppers and
mushrooms but no cheese.
Orders can be called in to the
church office at 655-1083.
TRUNK OR TREAT
A Trunk or Treat will be held
on Halloween night, Monday,
Oct. 31 from 6 to 8 p.m. at the
Immaculate Conception Church
parking lot, 604, Luzerne Ave-
nue, West Pittston. Games, re-
freshments, prizes and plenty of
treats for kids. Vote for the best
decorated trunk. Immaculate
Conception is part of Corpus
Christi Parish.
WIMPIE SALE
St. Peter’s Lutheran Church,
100 Rock Street, Hughestown,
will offer a take-out only sale of
wimpies on Nov. 8 from 11 to 1
p.m. Donation is $1.50. Orders
must be placed by Nov. 1, bring
your own containers.
Nut roll and poppy seed will
be sold by St. Peter’s Lutheran
Church on Nov. 21, Donation is
$7.75. Deadline to order is Nov.
13. Pick up will be Nov. 21 from
12 to 4 p.m.
For both of these sales contact
Carolyn 654-1849 or Ruth 654-
1594.
DAY OF RECOLLECTION
The Ladies of Charity, Dio-
cese of Scranton, have scheduled
their annual Day of Recollection
for Saturday, Nov. 5 at the King’s
College Chapel. The doors will
open at 9:30 a.m. and a message
fromMsgr. Joseph Kelly will be-
gin at 10, followed by Mass and
celebration of the Eucharist with
Msgr. Kelly at 11. Thereafter, a
luncheon will be served in the
Fitzgerald Room at King’s Col-
lege. The cost for is $16. Reser-
vations are required. Deadline is
October 29.
Make checks payable to La-
dies of Charity and mail it to
President, Christine Palmiter, at
440 Ice Harvest Drive, Moun-
taintop, Pa. 18707. Call 868-
3959 with any questions.
PASTA DINNER
A homemade pasta and sau-
sage dinner will be held at St.
Maria Goretti Church, Laflin
Road, on Sunday, Nov. 6, from
noon to 5 p.m. Tickets will be
sold at the door for $9. Children
5years andunder are free for eat-
in only. Facilities are hand-
icapped accessible. There is am-
ple free parking.
PEDIATRIC CLINIC
The Care and Concern Pediat-
ric Health Clinic will be open the
first and third Thursday of each
month. The clinic is located in
the former Seton Catholic
School Building on William
Street, Pittston.
Free healthcare is providedfor
infants through age 11. Registra-
tion is from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m.
Please bring your child’s immu-
nization records with you. Par-
ents or guardians must be pre-
sent to have their child examin-
ed.
All services are free andconfi-
dential.
The clinic is sponsored by the
Care and Concern ministries of
the Parish Community of St.
John the Evangelist, Msgr. John
Bendik, Pastor. For more infor-
mation call 855-6035.
ROAST BEEF DINNER
The Lutheran Brotherhood
and St. Paul’s Lutheran Church
will hold its last Roast Beef Sup-
per for the fall on Nov. 5, at St.
Paul’s Lutheran Church, Route
118 Dallas. Take outs from 3:30
p.m.; serving 4 – 6:30 p.m.
Adults $8.50; children $3.50.
Reservations encouraged. For
tickets call 675-3859 or pur-
chase at the door.
BIBLICAL STUDY
Origins - The Foundation of
Creation and Man, a study on the
Biblical perspective or origins,
will be held at the Christian and
Missionary Alliance Church,
317 Luzerne Avenue in West
Pittston on Sunday evenings
from6 to 7:30 p.m. through Sun-
day, Nov. 13.
This study is open to the seri-
ous Bible student as well as in-
terested individuals on a love of-
fering basis, regardless of church
affiliation.
Pre-registration is recom-
mended and can be done by call-
ing the church office at 654-
2500.
CRAFT, GIFT FAIR
A Craft and Gift Fair will be
held on Saturday, Nov. 5, from
9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. at the Ob-
lates of St. Joseph on Rt. 315 in
Pittston.
40+ vendors will be offering a
wide variety of handmade crafts
and quality gift ware perfect for
gift giving for the Holiday sea-
son. Theme baskets and a raffle
along with refreshments will al-
so be available.
There is plentyof free parking.
This event is sponsored by St.
John’s P.M. ChurchinAvoca. For
info, please call Judy at 655-
8860
AMERICAN
PRESBYTERIAN
1700 Wyoming Avenue, Forty-
Fort
Morning Worship: 10:30 a.m.
Bible School: 11:45 a.m.
Visitors are welcome. For ad-
ditional information call 570-
693-1918
BENNETT PRESBYTERIAN
501 Bennett Street, Luzerne
Everyone is welcome. The
church is handicap accessible.
BETHEL UNITED
METHODIST
Main St., Avoca
11:15 a.m. Worship
BRICK UNITED
METHODIST
905 Foote Ave., Duryea
Pastor Michael Shambora
Service: Sunday 9:45 a.m.
CORPUS CHRISTI PARISH
605Luzerne Ave, West Pittston
Through Nov. 4 an Outreach-
ing Phase to parishioners and
neighbors affected by the flood
will continue. This phase will of-
fer new items such as sheets,
towels, blankets, household
items, dry goods, etc. Those af-
fected will have the opportunity
to sign up for the holiday help.
To be eligible for this Outreach-
ing Phase you must present your
FEMA number of show proof
that you were affected by the
flood.
Volunteers will be present to
help you register on Monday,
Wednesday and Friday from 5 to
7 p.m. and Tuesday, Thursday,
and Saturday from10 a.m. to 12.
If you need additional informa-
tion call the parish office at 654-
2753.
All children are welcome to
join the Youth Choir. Practices
are Tuesdays from 6 to 7 p.m. in
ICC. Contact Mary Supey at
237-2275
Adult choir practices are Sat-
urdays, following the 4 p.m.
Mass in ICC.
There will be a Trunk or Treat
on Halloween night, Monday,
October 31, from 6 to 8 p.m. at
the Immaculate Conception
Church parking lot, 604, Lu-
zerne Avenue. Games, refresh-
ments, prizes and treats for kids.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Pittston
Rev. James H. Breese, pastor,
First Baptist Church, Water
Street, Pittston
Sunday 9:30 a.m. Worship and
praise service/Children’s Sunday
school, adult/teenSundayschool
immediately following service.
Wed. 7:15 p.m. Bible Study
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL
UCC
500 Luzerne Avenue
West Pittston
Sunday, 11 a.m. Worship Ser-
vice
Mr. Mark Obrzut will lead the
worship today.
Pork dinner Saturday at St. John’s Lutheran
St. Mary’s/SS. Peter and Paul’s Parish will
have a special Mass on Sunday, Nov. 6, at 2 p.m.
at St. Mary’s Church, 715 Hawthorne St. The
parishwill openunder its future name, Queenof
the Apostles Parish, at this time.
Any person who would like to make a dona-
tion for the opening Mass may place it in the
collection basket at any weekend Mass or mail
them to the rectory. Please mark “QAP Memo-
rial Donation” on the envelope.
Also, any person who would like to donate a
bakedfor the receptionfollowingthe Mass, may
bring it to St. Mary’s School Auditorium Sat-
urday, Nov. 5 from 2-4 p.m.
For more information, please call Marilyn
Redington at 457-4316.
Opening Mass next Sunday in Avoca
See FAITH, Page 11
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NickDeAngelo andToni Valenti
for WyomingArea School Board
We both voted NO to increased taxes at the June 2011 Budget Meeting.
We believe, in these challenging times of declining resources, the
answer for our School district is in cutting expenditures, not
increasing your taxes.
Family coverage for a district employee, husband, wife and child costs the district over
$21,000 per year. We propose to cut expenditures by asking that teachers take part in
contributing to their own health care, as we do, and as all other professionals and
members of the private sector do.
We think that is fair!
Wyoming Area Healthcare Costs
and Teacher Contributions
2.8 Million
$0
$1 Million
$2 Million
$3 Million
Teacher
Contributions
through the years:
0%
“The greatest source of our success as a District lies in its people,
our outstanding teachers and dedicated employees of the District.”
Our pledge to you is that during these difficult economic times, all of our decisions will be made in
the best interest of students, always keeping in mind our already overburdened taxpayers, without
compromising the quality education that Wyoming Area students and our community expect.
On November 8th Re-Elect
Challenging times need proven and ethical officials
to make the difficult decisions:
Cutting expenditures, not increasing your taxes.
Paid for by the Wyoming Area Concerned Candidates
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH
14 Broad Street Pittston
Sunday Worship 9:15 a.m.
with Rev. William N. Lukesh.
FIRST UNITED
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
West Pittston
The Sessionof the First United
Presbyterian Church of West
Pittston announces the following
schedule:
Sunday, October 30 - 10 a.m.
Sunday School,11a.m.Worship,
12 p.m. Choir
Services are being held at St.
Cecilia’s Roman Catholic
Church, Wyoming Ave., Exeter,
as the church recovers from the
flood of September 2011.
FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
West Pittston
Sunday, Oct. 30 - 10 a.m. Wor-
ship; 11:15 a.m. Sunday School
Monday, Oct. 31 - 7 p.m. Boy
Scouts
Wednesday, Nov. 2 - 10 a.m.
Mommy & me; 5 p.m. strings
and wings, 6:30 TOPs, 7 p.m.
Choir
Thursday, Nov. 3 - 5 p .m. Ho-
listic Moms Network, 6 p.m.
Girl Scouts, 7 p.m. Weight
Watchers,
Friday, Nov. 4 - Pizza Sale
FULL GOSPEL CHAPEL
Avoca
Weekly church schedule is:
Adult Sunday School, 9:30;
Sunday morning worship at
10:30 a.m.; Wednesday evening
Bible study and prayer service at
7:00.
Sunday, Oct. 30, at 10:30 a.m.,
the church will host guest speak-
er Andrew Selvarajan from In-
dia. The church also hosts the
Rose of Sharon Church with
Rev. Vincente Torres on Sunday
afternoon at 3:00 p.m. for the
Hispanic community.
GLENDALE GOSPEL
CHURCH
105 Church Drive
Glendale/Pittston Township
Sunday Service 10:45 a.m.
HARDING CHURCH OF
CHRIST
RR 1 Box 187A, Falls
Sunday services: 10:00 a.m.
Sunday School and 11:00 a.m.
Church Service. Call 388-6534
www.hardingchurchofchrist.org
HOLY MOTHER OF
SORROWS PNCC
212 Wyoming Avenue, Dupont
Rev. Zbigniew Dawid, Pastor
Sunday Masses: 8:00 a.m.
Traditional Mass;10:30 Tradi-
tional High Mass; 9:15 a.m.
School of Christian Living and
Confirmation Class; 2:00 p.m.
All Souls Day - Cemetery Ser-
vice will be held at the Parish
Cemetery. If it rains, prayer will
be at the cemetery chapel.
Daily Masses: 9:00 a.m. Mon-
day; 9:00 a.m. Tuesday All
Saints Day with Memorial Read-
ings; 9:00 a.m. Wednesday, All
Souls Day with Memorial Read-
ings; 9:00 a.m. Thursday
through Saturday.
The Ladies ANS Society will
make pierogies on Nov. 11 and
12. To order pierogies, call Regi-
na Bahaly at 457-2378. Deadline
for ordering is Nov. 6. The ladies
are making only potato cheese
pierogie.
On Nov. 20, a Community
Thanksgiving Service will be
held at Holy Mother of Sorrows
Church. Sacred Heart of Jesus
choir will also participate in this
service. Everyone is welcome to
attend.
INKERMAN
PRESBYTERIAN
Main St., Inkerman
Services: Sundays, 8:30 a.m.
LANGCLIFFE
PRESBYTERIAN
Main Street Avoca
The Langcliffe Church is
handicap accessible. Sunday
school is also provided for young
children during worship service.
MOOSIC ALLIANCE
CHURCH
608 Rocky Glen Road, Moosic
Pastor: DougJensen457-6020
maccma2@verizon.net
Saturday evening Bible Study
at 6:00 p.m. Saturday evening
Worship at 7:00 p.m.
Sunday morning Sunday
School for all ages at 9:30 a.m.
Sunday morning Worship at
10:45 a.m.
Prayer meeting, Wednesdays
at 7:00 p.m.
Celebrate Recovery Ministry,
Thursdays at 7:30 p.m.
OBLATES OF ST. JOSEPH
Highway 315, Pittston
Masses are held daily in the
seminary chapel at 7:00 a.m.
(Monday – Friday) and on Sat-
urday mornings at 8:00 a.m.
There are no weekend Masses.
Confessions are heard daily
from 9:00 a.m. - noon and from
3:00 - 6:00 p.m.
Office hours are Monday –
Friday: 9:30 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.,
evenings and weekends by ap-
pointment. Office phone num-
ber is 654-7542.
Every Wednesday evening
Mass is celebratedat 7:00p.m. in
conjunction with the Novena to
St. Joseph &St. Joseph Marello.
Novena prayers and the blessing
Faith
Continued from Page 10
See FAITH, Page 12
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PA Lic. #PA 002952
Licensed & Insured
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GENERAL CONTRACTOR
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HEARING LOSS?
We Accept: GEISINGER GOLD
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75 William Street., Pittston
Professional Hearing Aid • 45th Year
655-3078
FACTS OF
LAW
Brought to you as a paid public service by
the Law Offices of Dominick P. Pannunzio,
294 Main Street, Dupont, 655-5541
By
Dominick P.
Pannunzio, Esq.
New Connecticut law with exceptions added {see
(b)}:(a) No person shall own or harbor a dog or
dogs which is or are a nuisance by reason of vicious
disposition or excessive barking or other disturbance,
or, by such barking or other disturbance, is or are a
source of annoyance to any sick person residing in
the immediate vicinity. Violation of any provision of
this section shall be an infraction for the frst offense
and such person shall be issued a summons and fned
not more than one hundred dollars or imprisioned not
more than thirty days or both for each subsequent
offense and the court or judge may make such order
concerning the restraint or disposal of such dog or
dogs as may be deemed necessary. (b) The provisions
of subsection (a) of this section shall not be deemed
to apply to any dog engaged in any of the following
activities: (1) Romping on the beach, (2) frolicking
in a dog park, (3) participating in doggie day care,
(4) dog sledding, (5) tracking a person, (6) treeing a
raccoon, (7) chasing rabbits or butterfies, (8) riding
on fre-fghting vehicles, or (9) herding livestock.
***
A new California state law requires that all homes
with attached garages or fossil-fuel heating systems
have carbon monoxide detectors installed. Wood, oil
and gas are considered fossil fuels.
***
A recent US Supreme Court ruling paves the way for
monetary damages when companies misrepresent
changes they make to employee pension plans.
***
Kentucky has passed a new law reducing some felony
drug crimes to misdemeanors as a way to reduce jail
crowding.
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All proceeds will go to The Salvation Army in Wilkes-Barre and will be dispersed to residents of
Luzerne County who were affected by the September 2011 Flooding.
Over 50 silent auction items including one night stay at a Caesar’s
Resort with meals and a 2 night stay for four at Woodloch Resort.
Sun., Oct. 30, 2011 1:00pm-5:00pm
The Genetti Hotel & Conference Center
77 East Market Street • Wilkes-Barre
Dinner Buffet and Live Emtertainment by Windfall Duo,
DJ Mo, Magician Bill Dickson & Silent Auction
of the first-class relic of St. Jo-
seph Marello, Founder of the
Oblates of Saint Joseph Congre-
gation, immediately follow the
Mass.
Tune into Catholic Radio 750
AM. The radio studio is located
in the seminary building and is
broadcast daily from dawn to
dusk. For more information
about this station, contact Ed
Niewinski at 287-4670.
OUR LADY OF
MT. CARMEL
ST. ROCCOS
Pittston
Today, Sunday, Oct. 30, the
Harvest Festival and Halloween
Family Pasta Dinner will take
place after the 11:00 a.m. Family
Mass for children, families, and
friends. Bring your child/chil-
dren to the Mass dressed as a
saint or an angel as a Halloween
costume. $8.00 for adults, $ 3.00
for students. First Holy Commu-
nion children and younger free.
Tickets will also be available at
the door. Dinners will be served
from noon to 4:00 p.m. Raffle
drawing will be at 4:00 p.m.
Religious Education Program:
Confirmation Classes for grades
6-7-8 are held every Sunday at
9:45a.m. After class the students
will attend the 11:00 a.m. Mass.
Classes for kindergartentograde
5 are held on Wednesday from
4:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m.
Mt. Carmel Senior Choir will
rehearse on Mondays from 7-
8:30 p.m. St. Rocco Senior
Choir will resume weekly re-
hearsals on Tuesdays at 7:30
p.m. in the choir loft of St. Rocco
Church. New members are wel-
come.
Tuesday, Nov. 1, is All Saints
Day. This year the Feast of all
Saints is a Holy Day of Obliga-
tion. At Mt. Carmel Church
Masses will be celebrated on
Monday at 7:00 p.m., on Tues-
day 7:30 &11:30 a.m. and 7:00
p.m. At St. Rocco Church, Mass
will be celebrated on Tuesday at
11:30 a.m.
Wednesday, Nov. 2, is All
Souls Day. At Mt. Carmel
Church, Masses will be celebrat-
ed at 7:30 &11:30 a.m. and 4:45
p.m. and 7:00 p.m. At St. Rocco
Church, Mass will be celebrated
at 11:30 a.m.
Friday is the First Friday of the
month. Masses will be celebrat-
ed at 7:30 a.m. and 11:30 a.m.
with devotion to the Sacred
Heart of Jesus. Confessions will
be heard before all Masses.
Saturday is the First Saturday
of the month. Mass will be cele-
brated at 8:00 a.m. with prayers
to the Blessed Mother.
A Mass of Remembrance will
be celebrated at St. Rocco
Church on Sunday, Nov. 6, at
1:00 p.m. At Mt. Carmel Church
on Sunday, Nov. 13, at 1:00 p.m.
The Mass will be offered for all
deceased members who entered
into the eternal life the past year.
If you wish to have a member of
your family to be remembered,
please call the Rectory at 654-
6902.
Weekday Masses: Monday
through Friday at 7:30 & 11:30
a.m. at Our Lady of Mt. Carmel
Church.
Every Tuesday after the- 7:30
& 11:30 a.m. Mass, Novena
prayers to the Miraculous Medal
and Mother Cabrini.
Every Tuesday at 7:00 p.m.
Holy Hour at our Lady of Mr.
Carmel Church.
Every Wednesday after the
7:30 &11:30 a.m. Mass, Novena
prayers to Saint Joseph and St.
Joseph Marello.
Weekend Masses: At Our La-
dy of Mt. Carmel Church, on
Saturday at 4:00 &7:00 p.m. and
on Sunday at 8:00 & 11:00 a.m.
At St. Rocco Church, on Satur-
day at 5:30 p.m. and on Sunday
at 9:30 a.m.
OUR LADY OF THE
EUCHARIST PARISH
535 N Main Street , Pittston,
PA 18640
Mass Schedule:
Saturday Vigil: 4:00 p.m.
Sunday: 8:30 a.m. and 10:30
a.m.
Daily Mass: 8:00 a.m.
Sacrament of Reconciliation
(Confessions):
Saturday from 3:30 p.m. to
Faith
Continued from Page 11
Sunday School students, parents and parishioners from Trinity
Episcopal Church of West Pittston recently took part in an ou-
treach project to bring some seasonal cheer to some West Pitt-
ston residents affected by the September flooding. The group
walked through neighborhoods near the church to visit with resi-
dents and to give them potted mums provided courtesy of Ciam-
pi's on Tunkhannock Avenue, as well as pumpkins. They also
handed out information about an upcoming furniture distribution
event scheduled for November 18, 19 and 20 at the former CVS
site on the corner of Fourth Street and Boston Avenue. On those
days, residents with a valid drivers license showing an address in
the West Pittston flood zone will be able to pick up dressers,
lamps, and other furniture donated by Genetti's Hotel & Conven-
tion Center in Wilkes-Barre. Limited quantities of new women's
clothing will also be available. Distribution hours will be from10
a.m. to 5 p.m. on November 18 and 19 and from1 p.m. to 4 p.m. on
November 20. Shown are members of the Trinity Sunday School
class, from left to right Lara Whyne, Daria Whyne, Shane Sonday,
Jake Wielgopolski and Jude Wielgopolski.
See FAITH, Page 13
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with Gold Card with Gold Card with Gold Card
with Gold Card with Gold Card
PRICES EFFECTIVE
OCTOBER 30
TH
THRU
NOVEMBER 1
ST
PRICES EFFECTIVE WITH GOLD CARD ONLY
TO ASSURE SUFFICIENT SUPPLY OF SALE ITEMS, WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO LIMIT THE PURCHASE OF SALE ITEMS. EXCEPT WHERE
OTHERWISE NOTED. NONE SOLD TO DEALERS OR WHOLESALERS, NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS. ARTWORK FOR
DISPLAY PURPOSES ONLY. THANK YOU FOR YOUR COOPERATION. *PURCHASE REQUIREMENTS ON GOLD CARD ITEMS DO NOT INCLUDE
MILK, CIGARETTES OR PRICE OF THE GOLD CARD ITEM.
401 Kennedy Blvd., Pittston, PA • 570-655-8000
www.quinnsmarkets.com
SAVING YOU MORE EVERYDAY!!
with Gold Card
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ICEBERG
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CAMPBELL’S
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BANANAS
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The First Congregational U.C.C.
Of West Pittston will hold a
Roast Beef Dinner & Bake Sale on
Saturday, Nov. 5, 2011
Donation: $9.00
Children under 12: $4.00
Serving: 5:00 P.M. - 7:00 P.M.
Take Outs: Starting at 4:00 P.M.
For tickets, please call Jean Williams (654-0588).
Address:
500 Luzerne Avenue
West Pittston, PA
(corner of Luzerne and Washington Sts.)
3:45 p.m. and by appointment
All Religious Education class-
es are held for Grades 1 thru 7
from 9:15 a.m. to 10:15 a.m. in
the Religious Education Center.
The members of the Prayer
Shawl Ministry meet every
Thursday from7:00 to 8:00 p.m.
in the Religious Education Cen-
ter. New members are always
welcome.
The address for the parish
webpage is: www.eucharist-pitt-
ston.org.
On the first Friday of each
month Communion is brought to
those who are unable to partici-
pate in Sunday Mass because of
age or health. The Sacrament of
the Anointing of the Sick is cele-
brated with anyone seriously ill,
anticipating a serious operation,
or quite elderly.
PRINCE OF PEACE PARISH
Old Forge
St. Mary’s Church, Lawrence
Street, Saturday Vigil 4 p.m.
Sunday, Mass 8 and 10 a.m.
St. Lawrence’s Church, Main
Street, Saturday Vigil 5:30 p.m.
Sunday Mass 11:15 a.m.
SACRED HEART OF JESUS
Lackawanna Ave., Dupont
Weekly mass schedule: Mon-
day through Friday at 7:00 a.m.,
Saturday at 7:30 a.m. and 4:00
p.m., and Sunday at 8:30 a.m.
and 10:30 a.m. The Mass sched-
ule for All Saints Day is Monday,
Oct. 31 at 4:00 p.m. and Tues.,
Nov. 1 at 5:30 p.m.
There will not be any CCD
class on Mon., Oct. 31.
The next Bible Study session
will be held on Wednesday, Nov.
16, at 7 p.m. in the meeting room
in the lower level of the rectory.
All are welcome. The focus will
be on St. Paul’s letter to the
Ephesians.
The Senior Outreach Group
will hold a Bake Sale following
all the masses on Oct. 30.
Cemetery Sunday will be cele-
brated on October 30. All
prayers will be offered in church
at 1 p.m. Following prayers, Fa-
ther Verespy will go through the
cemetery and bless the graves
with holy water (beginning in the
area of the chapel around 1:45
p.m.). Parishioners are invited to
bring a framed photograph of
your deceased loved one to
church, where it will be placed
near the baptismal font for Cem-
etery Sunday.
ST. BARBARA PARISH
28 Memorial Avenue, Exeter
Phone 654-2103
Parish Office Hours: Monday
– Friday 9:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.
Evenings, by appointment.
St. Barbara’s Parish will not
have Religious Education class-
es on Monday, Oct. 31. Classes
will resume on Monday, Nov. 7.
The American Red Cross will
conduct a Blood Drive at St. Bar-
bara’s Parish on Wednesday,
Nov. 9 from 1:00 p.m. to 6:00
p.m.
ST. JOHN THE
EVANGELIST PARISH
COMMUNITY
Pittston
The parish office will be
closed Nov. 1 in observance of
All Saints Day
Care and Concern Committee
will be collecting for Thanksgiv-
ing food baskets for the month of
November,
All parents anticipating the
Baptism of their first child are
required to attend baptismal in-
struction. The next session will
be held on Tuesday, Dec. 6 in the
parish center from 7:30 to 8:30
p.m.
The Greater Pittston Food
Pantry is sponsored by the Care
and Concern Committee of
St.John the Evangelist Parish. If
you are in need of food please
Faith
Continued from Page 12
See FAITH, Page 18
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Though it’s been 34 years since the last
high school Thanksgiving game in these
parts, we’re still nostalgic for Turkey Day
games.
Heck we’re still nostalgic for Pittston
Panthers – St. John’s Johnnies games and
the last of those was in 1963.
But it’s okay, because we still have the
Pittston Area – Wyoming Area football ri-
valry on the last week of the regular sea-
son and we still consider it the premier
high school sports rivalry in NEPA.
We believe it’s so compelling because
as we’ve heard said over and over “they’re
the same kids.”
It’s true. It’s not unusual to see the sons
or daughters of Wyoming Area bred
mothers and fathers playing and cheering
for Pittston Area and vice versa and there
are plenty of “mixed marriages” too of
West Siders and Pittstonians.
And kids fromeach of the schools often
swim, run and play baseball together.
The games these days may not draw
crowds of 10,000 as they did in the past,
but we’ll get maybe 5 to 6,000 and when
the players strap on the helmets the com-
petitive juices flow.
Beating WA or PA can make a season.
And that’s the way it should be.
We love the game, as readers well know,
because for 45 years we’ve been publish-
ing our special section “Goal Post” as a
tribute to the game.
You’ll find this season’s Goal Post in-
serted in today’s Dispatch and you’ll find
“The Game” at Wyoming Area on Friday
night.
If you haven’t been to a game in years
we urge you to go.
You’ll see some very special players,
PA’s Jordan Houseman and WA’s Nick
O’Brien, to name two.
And you’ll see some pageantry.
We loved it when Pittston Area fans met
at the YMCA parking lot and marched in
mass to West Pittston for the game as they
did two years ago. There were some kids
who understood tradition and honored
history.
And we love the colorful “Warrior Na-
tion” as the enthusiastic student section at
Wyoming Areas is called.
And how about our stadiums? The two
best in the Wyoming Valley we say.
There’s another reason to get to the
game Friday night: to treat yourself.
You won’t be sorry.
By the way, St. John’s won that last
Thanksgiving game against old Pittston
High in 1963, 16-0.
The Game
still matters
Junior Cebula was a licensed electrician, a great hunter and a
fisherman, "an everything man". He served his country, family,
church and community alike.
He was one of those people who had an intuitive understand-
ing of anything electrical or mechanical. He had a garage and
cellar filled with tools and his door was always opened to any
person who needed his help or advice.
It’s not that people like John Cebula Jr. are so rare in the United
States, if you take the time to look, you can find them in just
about every community.
What is instructive though, is that men like him are seldom
mentionedwhenlists of great Americans are compiled. The lives
men like Junior make better do not extend past the borders of
their towns or counties. Their names are unknown in the power
center of the nation. Yet howis greatness defined? Who touches
the lives of his or her neighbors more than a person like Junior?
John Cebula Jr. touched the people of his town in ways so pro-
found and so lasting that his life, although not the stuff of history
books, was apparently a lesson in things that really count; Junior
has served his country, his family and his community with honor
and respect. May he rest in peace.
The Cebula family would like to thank all of Junior’s friends
and family and also the staff at Geisinger Hospice Care.
The Cebula Family
Family says Junior Cebula was a great man
OUROPINION
YOUROPINION
The American Legion Auxiliary Pittston Post 477 held an Oc-
tober fundraiser which was a success.
We would like to thank all of the people who sold and pur-
chased the lottery tickets and would especially like to thank
Quinn’s Market for allowing us to set up at their store.
The ladies of the
American Legion Auxiliary
Post 477
Legion ladies send thanks for fundraiser success
The Susquehanna River looks lazyandharmless inthis photoona nice fall Sundaya fewweeks ago. Diane Smiles tookthis picture
from Council Cup which overlooks Heller’s Orchard near Mocanaqua.
YOUR SPACE
View of the Susquehanna from Council Cup
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If you have college aged kids, or have friends that do, you might
have seen a bit of a change in their appearance these past fewweeks.
Many times it’s this time of year that we see clothes fitting just a bit
differently then when they starting their newcollege career late sum-
mer.
Freshman year is a time of many changes — new school, new
friends, newclasses, and newfreedoms. For some students, the tran-
sition to college life often means more stress and poorer eating habits
— which can lead to weight gain.“The good news is that the ‘fresh-
man 15’ is a bit of an exaggeration according to Penn State Depart-
ment of Nutritional Sciences. “Several studies within the last few
years showthat not everyone gains weight during their freshman year
— some people actually lose weight or stay the same. For those who
do gain weight, the average is closer to 5 pounds, instead of 15. But
college is still a time where you can learn lifelong healthy eating
habits, which, for some people, can be used to keep off unwanted
weight gain.”
Try discussing a few of these tips from Penn State:
Be aware of the environment. Many dining commons provide buf-
fet-style, “all you care to eat” service, and research indicates that if
you put food in front of someone, they’re probably going to eat it.
Portion control — limiting the volume you’re eating — is important
if you want to keep of weight gain.
Knowhowactive they are. This will determine howmany calories
they should be eating in a day. Someone who exercises several times
per week, for example, might needthe energyof sugarydrinks tohelp
energize their body during exercise.
Be aware of stress levels. For many people, food provides comfort.
In a newenvironment —which can be stressful —people often turn
to comfort as a way to cope. Many comfort foods, although delicious,
tend to be loaded with sugar or fats, which are the enemy of weight
loss. Have a planfor choosingyour meal. Encourage themtoimagine
what their plate will looklike before stockinguponfoodat the dining
commons. Focus on non starchy vegetables; these should make up
about half of your meal. Especially those that are dark and leafy —
contain many nutrients that help keep your body running. Slower
eating can also help with digestion and prevention indigestion in the
short term. Weigh yourself regularly.
When getting ready to pack care packages, fill the box with dried
snacks like soy chips, canned three bean salads, canned hummus,
prepackaged nuts and whole grain crackers. Round the meal out with
applesauce and other prepackaged fruit cups just in case they miss
dinner. If candy is their favorite, pick smaller amounts of chocolate
and skip the sugary favorites.
Here is a recipe to include in a healthy care package for those late
night munchies
Whole Grain Trail Mix
1/4 cup raisins
1/4 cup dried cranberries
1/4 cup dried tart cherries
1/4 cup chopped dried apricots
3/4 cup whole grain crunchy cereal
1/4 cup whole almonds
Mix together and place in pint size individual servings. Substitute
favorite dried fruits as needed.
NUTRITION
CORNER
Mary Ehret, MS, RD, LDN
Penn state Cooperative Extension
The Freshman 15
Mary R. Ehret, M.S., R.D., L.D.N., is with Penn State Cooperative
Extension, Luzerne County, 16 Luzerne Ave., West Pittston, Pa., 18643.
(570) 825-1701/602-0600. Fax (570) 825-1709. mre2@psu.edu.
YO U R O P I N I O N
I was an employee of Wyoming Area and now I
have the honor of representing the people of the
district as a school director. I believe WA is one of
the best districts in the state. However, we have
some problems that need to be addressed: 1) we
have a small tax base, 2) we have a huge deficit, 3)
we have buildings in need of repair and 4) in my
opinion, we have a present majority that has ne-
glected over time to act responsibly on behalf of
taxpayers.
Historically, Toni Valenti and Nick DeAngelo
have voted for tax increases, except in election
years. These same directors have hired their family
and friends. They have not developed plans for re-
pairs or the systematic replacement of equipment.
The superintendent and board president have a re-
sponsibility to share this information not only with
other board members, but also with the public. At a
board meeting, I asked for information on the heat-
ing and lighting costs in every building, the num-
ber of teachers, the number of students in each
class, and the number of classrooms used and un-
used in each school. This information was never
provided to me.
WA needs your help now.
Vote Campenni, Degnan, Gober-Mangan and
Yorina. All four candidates for WA School Direc-
tor are college graduates who will act in the best
interest of the community and make no. 1not 47 in
the state.
Dr. Frank P. Casarella
WA School Director
Casarella says it’s time for a change on WA board
Fellow Citizens of Exeter Township it is with a
deep humility that we – incumbent supervisor Do-
nald Hoffman and past supervisor Jack Ruane --
ask you to support us as we seek the office of town-
ship supervisors. We have always considered it a
great honor and privilege to serve the taxpayers of
our township. Our experience will serve us as we
address the many problems that face our township.
You will hear and read many false accusations
directed against our candidacy. These are nothing
more than the desperate actions of desperate men
trying to win your support. Their charges are so
false and mean spirited that we don’t intend to dig-
nify them with an answer.
We will not dishonor our township by letting
themdrag us down to their level. Our taxpayers de-
serve better. In our campaign we have taken the
high road and presented our plans for what we in-
tend to do if elected.
Presently everyone is struggling with a difficult
national economy. Many have lost their jobs. Gro-
cery, gasoline and heating fuel prices are through
the roof. Our township has again seen much dam-
age and destruction fromthe latest floods. The last
thing we need right now is to spend beyond our
means and burden our residents with higher taxes.
Our pledge toyouis that we will worktoholdour
taxes down and to be as conservative as possible in
our spending. Exeter Township is a beautiful and
peaceful community and we promise to do every-
thing we can to keep it that way. Thank you for your
support.
Donald J. Hoffman
Jack Ruane
Hoffman, Ruane seek Exeter Township seats
The cliché ‘ignorance is bliss’ would make a
good motto for the Wyoming Area School Board
majority whose ignorance has led to the financial
crisis facing the school district today.
Over the past few years, too little has been done
by the Wyoming Area board majority to manage
expenditures despite concerns voiced by myself
and the business manager of a looming financial
crisis in the near future. Expenditures represent the
cost of running a school district, which includes
salaries, benefits, utilities, debt, etc. Revenue rep-
resents the various ways in which money is gener-
ated to pay for these costs.
Here is where the problemlies: We have all heard
about the $20 million loan that was taken out in
2005 for high school construction and howthe new
school board majority saved the day by scaling
back the construction to save money. Well, since
that time, about $1.5 million dollars of that money
has been used each year to help balance the budget
by paying the interest on loans. I predicted in a let-
ter to the Dispatch in 2009, that this money would
be depleted by the end of 2011. Well guess what?
Yep, it’s 2011.
Budgets include fund balances which are basi-
cally savings accounts. Generally, about $1million
of the endingfundbalance (e.g. 2011-2012) is spent
to balance the budget of the following year (e.g.,
2012-2013). That means the district takes from
their savings account to pay their bills. Because of
this practice, over the past few years, the fund bal-
ance has dropped from about $4 million in 2003-
2004 to less than $1 million in 2011-2012. It is im-
portant to note that the initial projection of the
2011-2012fundbalance was as lowas $75,000. The
increase to under $1 million was possible due to
(one-time only) federal stimulus money that was
not spent in the 2010-2011 school year and trans-
ferred to the fund balance. And what if that balance
were used up to pay for the flood damage repairs to
Montgomery Avenue if insurance and/or FEMA
don’t pay? Then the district would be left without a
balance.
Adding insult to injury, Governor Corbett has
begun to lay out his fiscal plan for managing public
education. One thing that seems likely is that the
10% yearly increase in state contribution to public
school districts that was received in the past few
years will be eliminated.
And to make matters worse, the recent flooding
Says WA board majority ignores fiscal situation
See FISCAL, Page 38
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Night vision camera
unveiled at Duryea
Party in the Park
PHOTOS BY TONY CALLAIO
While celebrating the Party in the Park, the Borough of Duryea
officials showcased a new tool in stopping crime. Through a grant
fromLuzerne County District Attorney Jackie Musto-Carroll's
forfeiture fund, the police department was able to purchase an
infared/night vision camera capable of detecting body heat.
Shown in the photo at right is Trina Moss, Chair of the Duryea
Neighborhood Crimewatch program, presenting a contributing
check to the Borough Police Chief, Nick Lohman towards the
purchase of the camera. Left to right, Musto-Carroll, Police Chief
Nick Lohman, Officer Michael Rosemellia, Trina Moss, PA State
Senator John Blake, PA State Rep. Michael Carroll, and Mary Kay
Brady fromthe Neighborhood Crime Watch.
Sarah Slusark, 12, and Ana Kuzemka, 11, pose for a picture during
Duryea's Party in the Park.
Allie Borgia, 14, paints a design on the hand of Sadie Gutierrez, 8, during the Party in the Park.
Lindsay Rachko, 13, focuses while painting 8-year old Hailey War-
ners face
Members of the Duryea Neighborhood Crimewatch programjoin borough, county and state officials
during the check presentation and night vision camera demonstration during the Party in the Park
event at Healey Memorial Park in Duryea. District Attorney Jackie Musto-Carroll presents the check
with, to her right, Duryea Mayor Keith Moss and District Justice Fred Pierantoni, III.
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Question #1
What happened in
1947 that bound the
families of two local
soldiers John Doyle
and William Bolin,
even though both cir-
cumstances concerning the men oc-
curred many years apart?
1947 – 64 Years Ago
Area veteran organizations formed a
joint unit to honor the war dead. Frank
Houser was elected temporary secretary
and Arthur Werts temporary chairman.
The joint unit combined John D. Stark
Post, American Legion; Fort Pittston
Post, VFW; Finnen-McHugh Post CWV;
Cannon Company 109th Infantry Re-
giment, Exeter and Pittston American
Legions, and United Spanish War Vets
forming a joint burial detail with firing
squad, pallbearers and eighteen uni-
formed members.
Three new homes built by Frank
Yuscavage were slated to have the first
commercial Anthratube heating systems
installed. Known as Pleasant View Ma-
nor along the Sullivan Trail, the homes
would utilize the new fully automatic
coal fired heating units designed to use
pea-sized anthracite coal reducing heat-
ing costs. The unit was said to be ultra-
clean, ejected its own ash and was 3 ½’
high by 4’ wide.
In 1947,Thomas Stine, Sebastopol;
Charles Stocker, Stanley Yunkunis,
Marilyn Yuscavage and Robert Ro-
dine of West Pittston; John Snopkow-
ski, Duryea; William Siglin, Hugh-
estown; Donald Stalbird and Clinton
Newman, Avoca and Ronald Savage,
Exeter were members of the Wilkes
College freshman class designated the
largest in the history of the college.
In 1947, the College was instituted as
an independent, nondenominational
four-year college, with programs in the
arts, sciences, and a number of profes-
sional fields as well as a full program of
extra-curricular activities.
The Rosedell Dress Shop in Pittston
sold women’s dresses sizes 16 to 52 for
$7.98. The Boston Shoe Store on North
Main sold women’s Sundial Shoes for
$5.50 and fans of the Dispatch comics
section were following Brick Bradford,
Henry, The Little King and Snuffy
Smith every Sunday.
1957 – 54 Years Ago
The general election scheduled for
November 5, 1957 would go down in
Dupont history. For the first time a
woman, Helen Barnakof
Penn Avenue, hoped to be elected to a
council seat along with running mate
Frank Tetlak of Quality Row. In years
prior, a council appointment was offered
to a woman of the third ward but she
refused.
Pittston High School seniors, Marilyn
Wierbowski and Sara Martinelli col-
laborated on a Halloween scene they
painted on the windows of the J.C. Pen-
ney Department Store on North Main
Street
. According to Pittston Kiwanis judg-
es Maryann Gaydos, Irene Mitchell
and Harold Jones, the two girls por-
trayed the scariest theme and took first
place in a contest sponsored by the orga-
nization. However, there was a fly, or
should I say bat, in the proverbial oint-
ment. There was only one first place
prize and that was a four-year scholar-
ship to a state college. Unsure of how to
solve the conundrum, sponsors consid-
ered trying to obtain another scholar-
ship. If that failed, the girls would have
to draw straws. If anyone knows if one
or both girls received the scholarship,
please call me at 602-0168. Over 144
students participated in the competition.
According to halloween-website.com,
the holiday can be traced back to the
Ireland, Britain and Northern Europe. Its
early beginnings started with the feast of
Samhain, which was held annually on
October 31 to honor the dead.
PFC Charles J. Lepore of Pittston
graduated from the surface-to-air missile
course at Anti-aircraft Artillery and
Guided Missile Center at Fort Bliss
Texas. The U.S. Army started Project
Nike, in 1944. Seeing that their anti-
aircraft artillery would be useless
against high-flying jet aircraft, the army
produced the Nike Ajax missile in 1952
and the Nike Hercules in 1958.
Question #2
What is said to be the most popular
candy among givers and receivers at
Halloween?
1967 – 44 Years Ago
Edward Winn Sr. of Duryea had in
his possession many valuable pieces of
war memorabilia representing the Civil
War to the Vietnam conflict. After col-
lecting the items over several years, Mr.
Winn decided to offer his extensive
collection for public viewing. With the
help of Bill Graham, of Duryea and
John Ruby of Yatesville, Winn opened
a museum in a den located in the base-
ment of his home on Kramer Street
Estimated at over $20,000 Winn’s
collection included uniforms, medals,
currency, helmets, some of Adolph
Hitler’s monogrammed silverware and
Civil War headgear and ammunition
pouches.
Wherever members of the Duryea
Germania Hose Company Novelty Band
performed, they were a big hit. Members
dressed in various costumes and enter-
tained at local events and parades attain-
ing several awards. Members included
Paul Komensky, John Bauman, Henry
Lewandowski, Donald MacRae, Paul
Zongila, John Pliska, Donald Pernot,
Bob Herron, Harold Kenia, Joseph
Kreseski, Adam Lewandowski, Char-
les Bartlow, George Orenich, Joseph
Hobbs, Andrew Wasta Sr., Joseph
Mondlak, Walter Maros, Al Thorne
and Joseph Swenton.
Karen Hatter Lacomis, Lorraine
Kazmierczyk Emma and Joanne
MacDonald Martinez wanted to do
something special for the soldiers serv-
ing in Vietnam. They along with WBAX
radio spearheaded Operation Vietnam.
The campaign brought about the collec-
tion of items for personal hygiene,
snacking, and entertainment to be sent
to the soldiers. The Duryea women were
the wives of Pfc. John Lacomis with
the 198th Infantry Brigade; Sp4 Joseph
Emma with the 581st Supply Company
and Staff Sgt.Richard Martinez with
Headquarters, 1st Infantry Division
Artillery.
1977 – 34 Years Ago
The Wyoming Valley Model Airplane
Club hosted by the West Pittston Library
presented local children with a slide
show and lecture on the art of building
model airplanes and the technique of
control line flight. Club president Chris
Peterson and Carl Luschel Jr dis-
cussed the different types of models and
answered many questions posed by the
curious youngsters. They learned the
club originated in 1948 in Franklin
Township.
The Falls Hose Company was pleased
that it had so many local heroes volun-
teering to become EMTs. In just two
years of its existence, the Ambulance
Association went from a handful of
personnel to thirteen trained members.
Captain Louis Bartoli Sr., Co-captain
Rex Williams, John Bartoli, Sue Web-
er, David Orlando, Ethel Bartoli,
Marianne Brunges, Nancy Darby,
Gerrie Franko, Louis Bartoli Jr., Del
Durland, Wayne Guss and Ginger
Stover were registered EMTs.
1987 – 24 Years Ago
The Incarnate Word College in San
Antonio, Texas contacted Avoca Post
office officials Leo Murphy and Ed
Massakowski seeking information on
the history of Avoca as the institution
was reviving an old Texas “ghost town”
formerly named Avoca, by expanding
their campus facilities on the site. As
Avoca was one of 13 Avocas in the Unit-
ed States, St. Mary’s School teacher
Margie Norwood enlisted her eighth
grade students, Joseph Chrobak, Kerri
Durkin, Kate Jackson, Michael Had-
dock, Chris Bungardy, Debbie Galo-
nis, Andrea Munski, Steven Horoszko,
Scott Oppel, Eileen O’Brien, and Amy
Patterson to compile information about
their hometown in Pennsylvania using
documents from the centennial. Estab-
lished in 1836, the Texas ghost town did
not survive. On October 5, 2000, Avoca,
Texas at the UIW campus was blessed
and the building named for the Sisters of
Charity of the Incarnate Word. Four of
the sisters present for the occasion came
to the United States from Ireland.
Fifth graders Jennifer Battista, Au-
tumn Oliver and Matthew Munski
gathered around the new Apple Plati-
num IIe computer at St. Mary’s School
in Avoca. The students were working
with the first “e” series that included
built-in features.
Answer #1
The bodies of William Bolin and
John Doyle, soldiers killed in action in
World War I and II respectively, were the
first local soldiers to be returned after
each conflict; both men were from “Up-
per Pittston.” Sergeant Doyle lost his
life in the China/Burma Theatre of oper-
ations. Members of the Fort Pittston
Post VFW took charge of the military
rites at the funeral at the family’s re-
quest.
Answer #2
Chocolate candy bars top the list as
the most popular candy for trick-or-
treaters with Snickers #1.
“My father, his father, and his father
before him all resided in Avoca. I think
Avoca is a great town and I would never
want to move.”
Kate Jackson, History assignment,
eighth grade student, St. Mary’s
School in Avoca, 1987.
New homes got state-of-the-art coal furnaces in ‘47
Peeking
into the past
With Judy Minsavage
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$
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call 654-9923. Distribution of
food is by appointment only.
The Free Health Clinic is open
every Wednesday from 5:30 in
the former Seton Catholic High
School, and on first come first
serve basis.
Pediatric Health Clinic is open
on the first and third Thursday of
the month. Registrationis heldin
the Seton building from 4:30 to
5:30 p.m. Bring your child’s im-
munizations records.
Greater Pittston Kids Closet is
open Wednesday from9 to11:30
a.m. and 5 to 7 p.m. and on
Thursdays from11 a.m. to 1 p.m.
The Closet accepts donations
new and gently used. For infor-
mation call the parish office.
The Altar and Rosary Society
will meet on Wednesday, Nov. 2
in the Seton Hall auditorium.
The rosary will be recited at 1:30
p.m. followed by the business
meeting at 2. Lunch will be
served. New members are al-
ways welcome.
ST JOHN’S LUTHERAN
9 Wood St., Pittston
Pastor – John Castellani
Organist - Marcia Colleran
Lay Reader - Nancy Castellani
Aycolyte - Marissa Faccipointi
Service begins at 9:30 am
Reformation Sunday Break-
fast is right after service. Tickets
are $6 for adults and $3 for chil-
dren under 10.
Pork and sauerkraut dinner
Nov. 5 from5 to 7 p.m. Take outs
are at 4 p.m. Tickets are $9 for
adults and $5 for children under
12.
November Altar Guild is Tra-
cy Drummond, Doris Mersin-
cavage; alternate is Sharleen Pal-
imia
Acolyte Schedule: Nov. 6 Jus-
tin Peterson, Nov. 13 Shelby Ri-
naldi, Nov. 20 Katie Colleran,
Nov. 30 Marissa Faccipointi
November 14, 6:30 - Church
Council Meeting
If you would like to join have
any questions or comments, call
655-2505.
ST. JOHN’S P.M. CHURCH
316 Main St., Avoca
Sunday Service 10:00 a.m.
Tuesday Bible Study 6:00-
7:30 p.m.
ST. MICHAEL THE
ARCHANGEL BYZANTINE
CATHOLIC CHURCH
Pittston
St. Michael the Archangel
Byzantine Catholic Church, Pitt-
ston, will celebrate the church
feast day on Nov. 8 with a Divine
Liturgy. The 15th annual feast
day dinner will be held on Sun-
day, Nov. 13, with servings from
1to 3 p.m. in the church hall, 205
North Main Street. This year’s
dinner will be a stuffed boneless
chicken breast with real mashed
potatoes, gravy, green beans,
coffee, tea or soft drinks. The
dessert table will consist of a va-
rietyof cakes of your own choos-
ing. Cost will be $9 for adults
and $6 for children. Take-out is
available anytime during dinner
hours. The public is invited. A
raffle with a variety of prizes will
be held. Rev. Joseph Bertha,
Ph.D. is pastor.
SAINT MONICA’S CHURCH
363 West 8th Street, West
Wyoming, PA 18644
Office Hours - 9:00 a.m. to
4:30 p.m., Mon. – Fri.
Phone: 570-693-1991
Email: olos363@verizon.net
website: www.stmonicanepa-
.com.
Father Leo J. McKernan, Pas-
tor.
CCDclasses: Pre-Kthrough 8
are back in session.
H.S. Theology Group meets in
the rectory with Father McKer-
nan at 9:45 a.m. every Sunday.
Toregister call Father McKernan
at 693-1991.
Adult bible study after 7 p.m.
Mass on each Thursday of the
month.
SAINT PETER’S
EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN
CHURCH
100 Rock Street, Hughestown
Stpeters_elc@yahoo.com
8:45 a.m. Confirmation Class
9:00 a.m. Sunday School
10:00 a.m. Worship Service
First Communion Class will
receive their First Communion
on Oct. 30 at the 10:00 a.m. Ser-
vice
A wimpie sale will be offered
on Nov. 8 at $1.50 each. Take-
outs only. Orders by Nov. 1, pick-
up Nov. 8 at 11:00 a.m. to 1:00
p.m. For those who cannot pick-
up orders during those times,
someone will be at the church
from 5:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m.
Call 654-1849 or 654-1594.
Bring your own containers
SAINT MARIA GORETTI
Laflin
Have you ever thought of be-
coming Catholic? The R.C.I.A.
(Rite of Christian Initiation of
Adults) provides an opportunity
without any commitment, to ask
questions and to learn about Ca-
tholic beliefs and practices.
If you are interested, please
call 655-8956 and ask for Mon-
signor Van Loon.
CCD classes are being held in
the Learning Center (lower level
of the church) from 9:30 a.m. to
10:45 a.m.
ST. MARY’S POLISH
NATIONAL CATHOLIC
CHURCH
200 Stephenson Street, Du-
ryea
Fr. Carmen Bolock
Phone: (570)-457-2291
The annual cemetery visita-
tion will be held today, at St. Ma-
ry’s Cemetery on Pettibone
Street, Duryea at 3 p.m. Blessing
of the graves and prayers for the
faithfully departed will take
place.
Holy Mass for All Saints Day
will be held Tuesday, Nov. 1 at 8
1.m. and 6:30 p.m. at St. Mary’s
Church, Stephenson Street.
Holy Mass for All Souls Day
will be on Wednesday, Nov. 2, 8
a.m., 8:30 a.m. and 7 p.m. Fol-
lowing the 7 p.m. Mass, prayers
for the souls of the departed and
reading of the names of the de-
ceased will be held.
Faith
Continued from Page 13
See FAITH, Page 23
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Tis Week’s Dining Guide Feature:
SEPTEMBER
DINING GUIDE
WINNER
STEVE ROPIESKI
of Duryea
To Advertise In Te Dining Guide Call:
Karen Fiscus • 829-7291 Steve Morris • 829-7290
ENTER TOWIN
THIS MONTH’S
GIFT CERTIFICATE:
Fill out and deliver
or mail entry to:
Te Sunday Dispatch
Dining Guide
109 New Street
Pittston, PA 18640
Name:____________________
Address:___________________
__________________________
City:______________________
State:______________________
Zip:_______________________
Phone:____________________
• CASTLE INN
• COOPER’S WATERFRONT
• DENTE’S CATERING
• ERNIE G’S
• FIRE & ICE
• IPANEMA GRILLE
• LIZZA’S MEZZO MEZZO
• MARVELOUS MUGGS
• NARDONE’S RESTAURANT
• SAVO’S PIZZA & RESTAURANT
• TIPSY TURTLE
Look On Te Following Pages For
Tese Advertiser’s Weekly Ads
Rt. 11 Pittston By-Pass, Pittston Commons
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK
Mon-Thurs 11-9
Fri & Sat 11-10 • Sun 12-9 655-0001
GIFT CERTIFICATES AVAILABLE
Price does not include sales tax, cannot be combined with
other specials. Good for our red pizza only.
Expires 12/31/11
Tray of Regular Pizza
Only
$
9.99
Price does not include sales tax, cannot be combined
with other specials. Expires 12/31/11
Get 12 Cuts of Pizza For
30 Piece Order
Of Wings
Only
Only
$
4.99
$
13.55
When You Buy 12 Cuts at
the Regular Price
Includes 1 Side Of Bleu
Cheese & Celery
Price does not include sales tax, cannot be combined with
other specials. Good for our red pizza only.
Expires 12/31/11
NOW THRU SUPER SUNDAY FEB. 5TH
WHILE WATCHING THE GAME ON OUR
GIANT TV SCREENS
12 CUTS OF PIZZA ONLY $9.99
CHICKEN WINGS ONLY 40¢ Each
Sold in 6 or 12 pieces only
• Miller Lite & Coors Light Buckets
(5 Bottles only $6.00)
• 16 oz. Miller Lite Pounder - only $2.00
• Frosted Mugs - only $1.00
• 16 oz. Drafts - only $1.75
DELIVERY, PICK-UP OR EAT IN COUPONS
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SUNDAY
DISPATCH
www.omarscastleinn.com • 675-0804
in the Pittston Commons, Pittston By-Pass, Pittston
& Family Restaurant
Since
1964
655-0001
OPEN WEEKDAYS 11 TO 9;
FRI. & SAT. 11 TO 10;
SUN. 12-9
MONEY SAVING SPECIALS
7 DAYS A WEEK!
www.savospizza.com
COUPON SPECIAL When you buy 12 cuts at the regular
price. Price does not include sales tax.
Cannot be used with other specials.
Good for our Red Pizza only.
EXPIRES 12/31/11
12 CUTS OF PIZZA
ONLY
$
4.99 DELIVERY, PICK-UP OR EAT-IN COUPON
NOW THRU SUPER SUNDAY FEB. 5TH
WHILE WATCHING THE GAME ON OUR
GIANT TV SCREENS
12 CUTS OF PIZZA ONLY $9.99
CHICKEN WINGS ONLY 40¢ Each
Sold in 6 or 12 pieces only
• Miller Lite & Coors Light Buckets
(5 Bottles only $6.00)
• 16 oz. Miller Lite Pounder - only $2.00
• Frosted Mugs - only $1.00
• 16 oz. Drafts - only $1.75
GIFT CERTIFICATES AVAILABLE
883-1991 or 602-9506
711 Main St., Pittston
www.lizzasmezzomezzo.com
Tues. - Thurs. 11-9, Fri. 11-10
Sat. 3-9, Sun. 3-8
OPENat 11amfor Lunch Tues. to Fri.
FREE Lunch-time Delivery
• Nightly Dinner Specials plus Draft &Bottle Beer Specials
EVERY FRIDAY
Buy 12 Cuts Unbaked
Pizza - Get 12 Cuts Unbaked Pizza
for only $3.99
EVERY SATURDAY
Buy 12 Cuts Bake or Unbaked
Pizza - Get 12 Cuts Unbaked Pizza
for only $3.99
Murder Mystery
November 13th
Audience
Participation
VOTED #1
SHOW IN
LUZERNE COUNTY
Check Out
Our Website For
Weekly Specials
SUNDAY
BRUNCH
$10.95
over 24
Homemade Items
Stop By To
Watch Your
Favorite NFL Games
On One Of Our
3 Flat Screen TVs
Complimentary Pizza
Now Booking
Christmas Parties
NEW EXPANDED MENU
AT BOTH LOCATIONS
with exciting
Nightly Features
BBQ - Seafood - Entrees
and More!
ED MENU E
TI
es
ED MENNU
IONS
s
Catering Packages
Available
Stop by our other location:
245 Owen Street
Swoyersville
287-6074
29 Market Street
Jenkins Twp.
655-8091
2 Large Family Dining Rooms
WATERFRONT
PITTSTON
304 KENNEDY BLVD.
654-6883 www.coopers-seafood.com
NEW MARTINI LIST
THIS WEEK
ALL MARTINIS $3.99
All September & October Birthdays
Will Be Honored Throughout October!
SUNDAY & MONDAY
3/4 POUND PLUS LOBSTER TAIL DINNER
$
24.99
Served with
French Fries & Cole Slaw
OR FISHERMAN’S DINNER
$
12.99
Shrimp in Garlic Butter,
Shrimp & Crab stuffed Flounder
and Fried Ocean Clam Strips.
Served with French Fries & Cole Slaw.
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SUN., MON., TUES.
7 A.M.-3 P.M.
WED., THUR., FRI., SAT.
7 A.M.-8 P.M.
509 Exeter Ave., West Pittston
“The Best Breakfast Around”
• Overstuffed Omelets • Huge Frittatas
• Fluffy Buttermilk Pancakes • Hand Dipped FrenchToast
Available All Day
Sundays
Voted “Best Value”...”Most Affordable”... and Favorite Restaurant” by our loyal customers
Serving Affordable Home-Cooked Meals • Eat-In or Take-Out
Call For Our Daily Specials, 654-2536
YES...WE ARE OPEN
Daily at 7 a.m.
SUNDAY
DISPATCH
Steve Morris 970-7290
Karen Fiscus 970-7291
To Advertise In The
Please Contact
1022 Main St. • Avoca, PA 18641 • 570-457-1600
ENTERTAINMENT SCHEDULE
Fri. Nov. 4th - Two of a Kind - 6PM
Fri. Nov. 11th - Millenium - 8PM
Monday & Wednesday
Eat in only 40¢ Wings
(Sold in Quantities of 10)
Tuesday - Clams
40¢ Rhode Island Clams
Eat in only
(Sold in Quantities of 10)
ASK ABOUT OUR MONDAY-FRIDAY
LUNCH SPECIALS
WE HAVE THE NFL AND
BIG TEN PACKAGES
655-0801
www.dentescatering.com
TABLE TALK
Biagio A. Dente, CEC,AAC, HOF
Blaise Alan Dente, CCC, HAAC
DENTE’S
Catering & Tent Rental
Help Wanted
Please Call:
Be cautious before giving children treats that could be
potential choking hazards, such as chewy candies, gum,
hard candies, lollipops, mini-cup jelly products and
peanuts. Depending on the size, shape, consistency, and
composition, these items may become lodged in the throat
and may be difficult to remove.
HAVE A SAFE AND HAPPY HALLOWEEN
Halloween Tip
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WE ARE NOWTAKINGORDERS FOR OURTHANKSGIVINGDINNERS
ENJOYTHE HOLIDAYANDLET US DOYOUR COOKING!
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OCTOBER 30
TH
THRUNOVEMBER 5
TH
USEYOUR GOLDCARD&SAVE
SENIOR CITIZENS DAYEVERYTUESDAY- RECEIVE 5%OFF
Y
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ROSSI’S
HOMEMADE
ITALIANSAUAGE
$
2
19
LB.
BONE-IN
NEWYORK
STRIP STEAKS
$
5
99
LB.
FRESH
GROUND
CHUCK
$
2
59
LB.
BONELESS/SKINLESS
CHICKENTENDERS
OR CHICKENBREAST
$
1
79
LB.
SHURFINE DELI GOURMET
IMPORTED
COOKEDHAM
$
3
99
LB.
$
5
99
150 OZ.
AJAXLAUNDRY
DETERGENT
431 LAWRENCE ST., OLD FORGE • 457-8323
Like Us on
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445 MAIN STREET
LUZERNE, PA 18709
570-287-1177
www.LuzerneLumber.com or order online
www.AceHardware.com & have it shipped to our store
...more than just great lumber!
Generators
EdenPURE Heaters
Wood Pellets
Bagged Coal
Insulation
Moulding
Paint
Sheetrock
7
1
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2
9
8
ELECT
Deanna
Farrell
Paid for by the Committee to Elect Deanna Farrell
Wyoming Area School Director
Your Singular
Independent Candidate
7
2
0
2
0
7
HAPPY 60TH
This little
cowboy
turned into a
“Big Indian”
Love, Rose Ann,
Connie
and Ann Marie
SAINT MARY’S/SS PETER
AND PAUL’S CHURCHES
715 Hawthorne St./1000 Main
St., Avoca
stmarysavoca@verizon.net
www.stmaryavoca.4lpi.com
457-3412 / 457-2483
St. Mary’s/SS. Peter and Paul’s
Parish will have a special Mass
Sunday, Nov. 6 at 2 p.m. at St.
Mary’s Church, 715 Hawthorne
St. The parish will open under its
future name, Queen of the Apos-
tles Parish, at this time.
Per the request of the parish-
ioners, any person who would
like to make a donation for the
opening Mass may place it in the
collection basket at any weekend
Mass or mail themto the rectory.
Please mark “QAP Memorial
Donation” on the envelope.
Also, any person who would
like to donate a baked for the re-
ception following the Mass, may
bring it to St. Mary’s School Au-
ditorium Saturday, Nov. 5 from
2-4 p.m. For more information,
please call Marilyn Redington at
457-4316.
The parishioners of St. Ma-
ry’s/SS. Peter and Paul’s Parish
extend a special thank you to Co-
larusso’s Cafe for supporting
their parish discretionary fun-
draiser. Any business that is in-
terested in supporting the par-
ish’s 2011-2012 campaign should
call the parish office at 457-
3412.
St. Mary’s/SS. Peter and Paul’s
Parish is accepting orders for
DVDs from the closing Mass of
SS. Peter and Paul Church.
DVDs are $16 each and $19 to
have it mailed directly to your
home. Please call the rectory at
457-3412 to place your order.
Congratulations to this week’s
winners of St. Mary’s/SS. Peter
and Paul’s Parish’s Pot of Gold
raffle:Mary Ann Sochin, Erin
Schmidt, Joe and Betty Shimko,
and Kay Shamnoski.
All Saints’/All Souls’ Re-
membrance Mass today at 11
a.m. at St. Mary’s Church. All of
the deceasedparishioners will be
remembered at this time. Those
who have died this past year will
be honored by having a family
member or friend carry a candle
in their memory to the altar at the
beginning of the Liturgy.
Boy Scout Troop 316 will have
an open fire barbeque chicken
dinner today from 11 a.m. to 4
p.m. at the corner of Main and
Hawthorne streets. The menu
consists of a half of a barbeque
chicken, a baked potato, coles-
law, a dessert, and a roll. Tickets
are $10 each and can be pur-
chased at the event.
Safe trick-or-treating and Hal-
loween party today from 3-7
p.m. at St. Mary’s School, 742
Spring St. Children up to 14 are
invited to trick-or-treat through-
out the school and enjoy games,
prizes, face painting, food,
drinks, music, and entertainment
by Johnny Superstar. Please be
sure to bring an adult and a trick-
or-treat bag to the party.
This project is beingorganized
by Samantha Iovacchini in ful-
fillment of the service require-
ments for the Girl Scout Silver
Award. This project is also sup-
ported by Cub Scout Pack 316,
Boy Scout Troop 316, Venture
Crews 3701 and 2025, and Girl
Scout Troop 3701.
All Souls’ Day cemetery ser-
vices today. The service in SS.
Peter and Paul’s Cemetery will
take place at 2 p.m. followed by
the service in St. Mary’s Ceme-
tery at 4 p.m.
Masses for All Saints’ Day
Tuesday, Nov. 1 at 9 a.m., noon,
and 7 p.m. at St. Mary’s Church.
The vigil Mass will take place
Monday, Oct. 31 at 5 p.m. There
will not be Eucharistic adoration
on November 1 due to the Holy
Day Masses.
The women’s guild will meet
Sunday, Nov. 13 at 2 p.m. at St.
Mary’s School auditorium.
Pastoral council meeting
Monday, Nov. 14 at 7 p.m. at St.
Mary’s Rectory.
Social concerns committee
meeting Tuesday, Nov. 15 at 7
p.m. at St. Mary’s Rectory.
St. Mary’s/SS. Peter and Paul’s
Parish will have an autumn din-
ner dance Saturday, Nov. 19 from
6-11 p.m. in St. Mary’s School
hall, 742 Spring St. The event
will include a full dinner buffet
catered by Colarusso’s La Palaz-
zo followed by entertainment
with DJ Johnny Superstar play-
ing the greatest hits of the 50s,
60s, and 70s. There will also be a
grand raffle where patrons will
have an opportunity to win one
of two overnight getaway pack-
ages at the Courtyard Marriot,
Moosic, which also include a set
of lift tickets for Sno Mountain.
Dinner dance tickets are $17.50
per person and are available by
callingthe rectoryat 457-3412or
Jenny Long at 654-6239. Please
note soda and water will be pro-
vided, but patrons may bring
their own alcoholic beverages.
Dress is casual. Raffle tickets
will be on sale after the weekend
Masses on November 12 and 13
and at the dance.
St. Mary’s/SS. Peter and Paul’s
Parish has gone green! Any per-
son who would like to drop off
aluminum cans may place them
in a container in the empty bayof
St. Mary’s Rectory Garage
which will be open on the week-
end during Mass times: Saturday
at 4 p.m. and Sunday at 8, 10, and
11a.m. To have your cans picked
up, please call Jason at 351-
5062.
Anyone who is interested in
renting St. Mary’s School for
child care, parties, or other use-
ful activities is invited to call the
rectory at 457-3412 to learn
more about this opportunity.
TRINITY EPISCOPAL
CHURCH
Spring Street and Montgom-
ery Avenue, West Pittston
Parish Mission: “To live and
build holy community.”
All welcome: Worldwide An-
glican Communion: ‘We believe
in one holy, Catholic apostolic
church."
Information and links at
www.trinityepiscopalchurch-
westpittston.org and www.dio-
beth.org.
Sunday Holy Eucharist: 11
a.m. every Sunday. Holy Days as
announced.
Food Pantry: October items
needed are peanut butter, jelly,
crackers, granola bars and nutri-
tion bars.
Prayernetwork. Open To Pub-
lic. Daily prayer for those with
needs requesting prayerful sup-
port. Start Prayernetwork at par-
ish office 654-3261.
Youth Program: 10:45 a.m. ev-
ery Sunday. Weekday special
events andservice projects as an-
nounced.
Faith Forum for Adults: En-
richment for adults seeking spir-
itual renewal and opportunities
for ministry and volunteerism.
Parish Life Events Team: Bi-
monthly first Sundays.
Parish Council: Every second
Sunday.
Women of Trinity: Every third
Sunday. WOT Ministry Invita-
tion.
The Women of Trinity have
undertaken a ministry to help
support Good Shepherd Episco-
pal Church of Scranton in their
outreach to the homeless of the
region.
Each month after enjoying a
home cooked meal at Good
Shepherd all who have needs
may “shop” for necessities like
clothing, shoes, toiletries in a
store-like setting in the church’s
refurbished basement of donated
items.
The Woman of Trinity has
supported this ministry by deliv-
ering donations of clothing, new
undergarments and socks and
toiletries to the Scranton church.
WOT will continue to collect
trial size and hotel toiletries and
invites the parish community to
join with themin helping the less
fortunate. Donations of trial size
and sample size toiletries are
welcome.
Party and Banquet Space.
Newly renovated banquet room
and kitchen.
All Day Rental $100. Reserva-
tions at 654-3261.
Music Together Classes: Fun
and music for infants and chil-
dren through age five accompa-
nied by a parent or caregiver.
Visit www.musictogether.com
for details or call 654-3261.
UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH
Corner of Broad & Church
Sts.
Sunday Worship Service 9:30
a.m.
Children’s Sunday School:
9:30 a.m.
Holy Communion: 1st Sunday
each month
Choir Rehearsal: Thursday’s
at 7 p.m. unless told otherwise
United Methodist Women:
Second Monday unless told oth-
erwise
Website www.umcpittston.org
Phone 655-4340 leave mess-
age
Hoagie Sale - Tuesday, Nov. 1-
Choices are ham, salami and
cheese or turkey and cheese with
or without onion. Price of hoagie
is $4.00. To place an order call
654-3936 or 693-1572 by Sun-
day, October 30.
Faith
Continued fromPage 18
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t Search the MLS on www.NasserRealEstate.com
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Swetland St then right onto N Sumner
OPEN HOUSE TODAY! • 12-2PM OPEN HOUSE TODAY! • 12:30-2PM
MOLD MASTERS DISTRIBUTION INC.
MOLD MASTERS DISTRIBUTION INC.
A Gateway To Better Living
Mold Problems?
Free Mold Seminar • November 5, 2011 at 9:00am
Wyoming Hose Company #2 • 70 E. Third Street, Wyoming, PA
Specialists will be available
for questions and concerns
• Why bleach doesn’t work
• Why demolition is not necessary
• If demolition done, importance of air duct cleaning and mold removal
• Free estimates
Limited Seating - Please Call
MOLD MASTERS, INC.
1-877-663-3511 for reservations
Refreshments will be served
Price for youths is $25 for Mem-
bers and $35 for Non-Members.
“It is a great workout for
adults,” she said. “It defines and
tones the arms and builds stami-
na.”
The YMCA Men’s Basketball
League will also be back this
winter and McCabe is expecting
the competition to be fierce.
Registration for the 2011 Winter
Men’s Basketball League is now
underway. The cost of the league
is $225 per team plus ref fees.
Registration forms must be sub-
mitted by Nov. 27 to reserve a
spot in the league. Teams are
generally composed of high
school and college students as
well as employees from area
businesses.
The first game for the Winter
League will be held on Dec. 4.
An adult Self Defense class
and a youth Martial Arts pro-
gramwill begin in January at the
YMCA. The classes will run on
Tuesday and Thursday and are
taught by Dennis Fritinger of the
Wilkes-Barre YMCA. A free
Self Defense Clinic set for Nov.
22 at 6 p.m. will kick-off the new
programs.
Winter is around the corner,
but it is not too cold to take the
plunge and join a group aquatics
class at the YMCA. The Fall II
Aquatics Session runs Oct. 31 to
Dec. 17 and registration is now
underway. A Parent Child Swim
Class, Preschool Class and
Youth Beginner and Intermedi-
ate SwimClasses are held Satur-
day morning at the YMCA. Pre-
school and beginner classes are
also held Tuesday evening at the
Y.
To register for Fall classes call
the YMCA Front Desk at 570-
655-2255 ext. 107.
Y sports
Continued fromPage 7
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Don’t just watch a movie, experience it!
All Stadium Seating and Dolby Surround Sound
825.4444 • rctheatres.com
• 3 Hrs. Free Parking At Participating Park & Locks with Theatre Validation
•Free Parking at Midtown Lot Leaving After 8pm and All Day Saturday & Sunday.
***$2.50 Additional Charge for 3D Attractions.***
No passes, rain checks, discount tickets accepted to these features
D-Box Motion Seats are the admission price plus an $8.00 surcharge
(Parenthesis Denotes Bargain Matinees)
All Showtimes Include Pre-Feature Content
Avoid the lines: Advance tickets available from Fandango.com
ALL FEATURES NOW PRESENTED IN DIGITAL FORMAT
• FIRST MATINEE SHOW ALL SEATS $5.25
EXPERIENCE D/BOX MOTION ENHANCED
SEATING ON SELECT FEATURES
SPECIAL EVENTS
The Metropolitan Opera: Don Giovanni LIVE
Saturday, October 29
th
at 12:55pm only
The Original Twilight Movie - PG13 - 140 min.
Tuesday, November 1
st
at 7:30pm only
London’s National Theatre Live: The Kitchen LIVE
Thursday, November 3
rd
at 7:00pm only
The Original Ghostbusters movie - PG13 - 115 min.
Thursday, November 3
rd
at 7:00pm only
*In Time - PG13 - 120 min.
(12:50), (3:20), 7:20, 9:50
***Puss in Boots in 3D - PG - 100 min.
(1:15), (3:30), 7:15, 9:25
*Puss in Boots - PG - 100 min.
(1:45), (4:00), 7:30, 9:40
*The RumDiary - R - 135 min.
(12:30), (3:15), 7:00, 9:45
Johnny English Reborn - PG - 115 min.
(1:10), (3:45), 7:15, 9:50 (No 7:15 or 9:50
shows onThurs. Nov. 3)
Paranormal Activity 3 - R - 95 min.
(12:50), (1:25), (3:00), (3:30), 7:00, 7:25,
9:10, 9:30
***The Three Musketeers in 3D -
PG13 - 125 min
(1:20), (4:15), 7:20, 10:15
The Three Musketeers in 3D D-Box -
PG13 - 125 min
(1:20), (4:15), 7:20, 10:15
Footloose - PG13 - 125 min.
(1:20), (4:00), 7:20, 10:00
The Thing - R - 115 min.
(3:40), 9:55 (No 3:40 show on Sat. Oct. 29;
No 9:55 show onTues. Nov. 1)
The Ides of March - R - 115 min.
(1:30), (4:15), 7:30, 10:15
Real Steel - PG13 - 140 min.
(1:00), (4:00), 7:10, 10:00 (No 7:10 or 10:00
shows onThurs. Nov. 3)
DreamHouse - PG13 - 120 min.
(12:40), (3:10), 7:40, 10:10 (No 7:40 show on
Thurs. Nov. 3)
Dolphin Tale - PG - 125 min.
(12:30), (3:10), 7:10, 9:45
Moneyball - PG13 - 145 min.
(12:45), 7:00 (No 12:45 show on Sat. Oct. 29;
No 7:00 show onTues. Nov. 1)
7
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Call 570-654-9120 For Orders and Reservations
Wednesday, November 9, 2011
Our Lady of Mount Carmel, Pittston
Pick Up After 4:00pm
Dinner 5:00 - 8:00pm
Available for Delivery All Day
Continuing Tradition
GRICO’S ANNUAL $9.95
TURKEY DAY DINNER
Abingo at Clarks Summit Fire
Company #1, 321 Bedford
Street, on Saturday, Nov. 5 will
benefit the Zerblas family from
Ransom Township who has had
a veryroughyear. Vince, a police
officer in Laflin, suffered a heart
condition which led to triple by-
pass surgery. Doreen has been
dealing with fibromyalgia, spi-
nal problems and digestive prob-
lems. She has not been able to
work due to numerous surgeries.
The couple has two boys ages 7
and 10.
For a free admission, attendees
will receive one bingo card and
one door prize ticket. Bingo
prizes will be Pampered Chef,
Lia Sophia and Tastefully Sim-
ple products. There will be prod-
uct demonstrations presented
and light refreshments available.
Additional bingo cards can be
earned and purchased. In addi-
tion, there will be a 50/50 draw-
ing and numerous baskets. Bring
friends to get hostess benefits.
Online orders will be accept-
ed. Contact 878-0170 for more
information.
Oblates Seminary
Monthly meeting for the Jose-
phite-Marellian Laity Associ-
ation will be held this Wednes-
day, Nov. 2, following the 7:00
p.m. Mass & Novena to St. Jo-
seph. The Mass will be offered
for All Souls of our families,
benefactors and friends.
Vocation Holy Hour will be
held this Thursday evening, Nov.
3, at 7:00 p.m. in the chapel. Ho-
ly Hour includes exposition of
Blessed Sacrament, rosary,
Scriptural readings, sermon,
general intercessions and bene-
diction.
Blue Army First Friday Vigil
on Nov. 4, beginning at 8:00 p.m.
with confessions, followed by
Mass in honor of the Sacred
Heart of Jesus and then devo-
tions to the Blessed Mother.
Note: The above notes from
the Oblates arrived at the Dis-
patch too late to be included in
the Matters of Faith section.
Pierantoni Committee
The Committee to Elect Fred
Pierantoni for Luzerne County
Judge will meet on Saturday,
Nov. 5, at the Polish-American
Citizens Club, 111 Elm Street,
Dupont, from 2:00 p.m. to 5:00
p.m.
Election Day materials will be
distributed to all poll workers.
New volunteers and anyone in-
terested in helping are welcome
to attend. Food and refreshments
will be served. For more infor-
mation please call 654-8455.
Hughestown Sports Club
The Hughestown Sports Club
will hold its last fall meeting on
Sunday, Nov.r 13, at Granteed’s
Tavern, 295 Parsonage Street at
2:30. All members are reminded
that reservations and payment
for the 2012 season tickets are
now due. All season ticket hold-
ers must have all accounts cur-
rent to qualify for next year’s
tickets. Winter meetings will re-
sume in January.
WA Yearbook Photos
WASenior portraits are due by
Nov. 1. Students must have their
photographer forward them to-
clynch@wyomingarea.org.
Hard copies must be handed in
directly to Mrs. Lynch in room
132.
The 2011 Warrior yearbook
has a correction sticker available
at the front desk in the lobby. It is
to be placed on page 130.
Pittston Library
Story Time
Toddler story time will be held
on Wednesdays at 1:30 p.m. It
will begin on Nov. 9 and run until
Dec. 14. It is open to children age
18 months to 3 years.
Preschool story time will be
held on Tuesdays at 1:30 p.m. It
will begin on Nov. 8 and run until
Dec. 13. It is open to children age
3 to Pre -Kindergarten
Registration is required by
calling the library.
Operation Christmas Cards
The library is participating in
Operation Christmas Cards by
collecting hand made or store
bought Christmas greeting cards
that will be sent to troops. Do-
nors should write an encourag-
ing and supportive note and do
not seal the envelope. The dead-
line to bring the cards in is Mon-
day, Nov. 14. Community organi-
zations are invited to participate.
A Family Card Making Night
will be heldonMonday, Nov. 7at
6:00 p.m. All in the community
are invited to make cards. Regis-
tration is not required.
Furry Tails
Read to the dogs on Saturday,
Nov. 12 at 10 a.m. Registration is
required.
Books and Bagels
The Adult Book club will be
on Saturday, Nov. 19, at 10 a.m.
with bagels, coffee and a lively
discussion about the book “Sav-
ing Fish From Drowning” by
Amy Tan. Pick up your copy of
the book as well as a readers
guide
The December selection is
“Skipping Christmas” by John
Grisham and is available at the
front desk
Crochet Club
The crochet club will meet on
Tuesday 10:00 a.m. to noon and
Thursday from 6 to 7:45 p.m.
Participants bring their own sup-
plies (crochet hook and yarn)
and learn to make simple pro-
jects. Open to ages 12 and up.
Call or stop by the library to reg-
ister.
Pittston Area Memorial Li-
brary is located at 47 Broad St.,
Pittston. Hours are Mondays and
Thursdays, 12 Noon to 8 p.m.;
Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Fri-
days, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Saturdays,
9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Phone number is
654-9565, or visit us on the Web
atwww.pittstonlibrary.com
Election night
The Committee to Elect Fred
Pierantoni for Luzerne County
Judge will gather at VFW Post
4909, 401 Main Street, Dupont
on election night, Tuesday, Nov.
8, from 8:00 p.m. to 11:00 p.m.
The public is invited to attend.
Food and refreshments will be
served. For more information,
please call 654-8455.
Rovinski Rally
The South Pittston Social
Club will sponsor a meet and
greet party for candidate Stanley
E. Rovinski today, Sunday, Oct.
30, from 3 to 7 p.m. Everyone is
welcome.
Wyoming Area Cabaret
Members of the Wyoming Ar-
ea Drama Club will perform a
variety of acts at a Cabaret style
event held on Saturday, Nov.r 5.
The event will take place at the
Wyoming Area Secondary Cen-
ter Cafeteria, Memorial Street,
Exeter, and will begin at 7:00
p.m. Admission is $5 which in-
cludes a free dessert and bever-
age. The public is invited.
WA Drama Parents
The Wyoming Area Drama
Club Parents Association will
meet on Wednesday, Nov. 2, at
the Wyoming Area Secondary
Center library beginning at 7:00
p.m. Everyone is welcome.
Spaghetti Dinner
The Germania Hose Compa-
ny, 430 Foote Avenue, will host a
E V E N T S , M E E T I N G S , B R I E F S
Bingo Saturday to benefit Zerblas family of Ransom
Three events listed this week at Oblates Seminary
See EVENTS, Page 28
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T
he 1971 Wyoming Area
football teamwill be hon-
ored on the 40th anniver-
sary of its Wyoming Valley Con-
ference championship at half-
time of the Wyoming Area-Pitt-
ston Area football game Friday
night. Returning players from
that team will be introduced at
halftime and there’s a cocktail
partyafter the game at St. Antho-
ny’s Center.
Those ’71 Wyoming Area
Warriors were 11-1 overall and
won a second consecutive
Wyoming Valley Conference
championship.
But unlike 1970 when they
were upset by Pittston Area on
Thanksgiving and backed into
the title when Valley West beat
Coughlin, in 1971 they had to
beat Pittston Area and then beat
Coughlin in a playoff game to
clinch the WVC title.
With three quality running
backs in Mickey Calabrese and
Dave Amico, who were in the
160-lb. range, and Paul Tamale-
nus, a 6-1 and 190 wing or slot
back, and a quarterback, Don
McDermott, who ran like a
fourth tailback, the Warriors
pounded the ball on the ground
behind fullback Andy Supey, a
big athletic offensive line with
the likes of GinoChiavacci, a 6-3
230-pound all-scholastic; Lou
Lucarella, 6-0, 220; Bob Black,
6-4, 230; Vince Randazzo, Phil
Falvo, John Chiampi and tight
end John Fumanti.
The defense gave up more
than one touchdown in only five
of the12games andpitchedthree
shutouts.
TomVaxmonsky was the head
coach in his second season.
WA 34 GAR14
Friday, Sept. 10 at Wilkes-
Barre
The season didn’t start like a
winner. GAR’s Dave Carter ran
the opening kickoff back for a
6-0 lead.
But Calabrese ran for 217
yards and scored four touch-
downs after that, one on a 36-
yard run after an interception by
linebacker Fumanti.
WA 34 Central Catholic 7
Saturday, September 18 at Val-
ley West
It was close, 13-7, after three,
but the Warriors scored 21 in the
fourth. McDermott returned an
interception 40 yards to set up
his Td pass to Russ Ramage. He
also tossed short Td passes to
Fumanti and Staley. Calabrese
went for 85 on 16 carries.
Three Td passes was an aber-
ration for an offense that would
throw double figure passes in
only two games.
WA13 Coughlin 0
Friday, September 24, home
An estimated 9,000 fans saw
the Warriors win on 1-yard Td
runs by Calabrese and fullback
Andy Supey in the first half.
McDermott caught as many
passes as he threw. He was 1-
for-2 passing and had two inter-
ceptions.
WA 21 Plains 0
Saturday, October 2, home
Plains High School was in its
last season. It merged with
Coughlin the next year. It was
6-0 late in the third quarter when
McDermott tossed a screen pass
to Amico and Chiavacci made a
block to convert a 3rd-and-20 to
the Plains 4. Amico took it in
from there with :02 left in the
third. Tamalenus scored the first
Td on a 10-yard run in the first
quarter.
WA 31 Scranton Prep 6
Friday, October 8, home
With Calabrese out with an in-
jury Tamalenus rushed for 92
yards on just seven carries and
scored 22 points on three Tds
and two 2-point runs.
Stan Waleski, yes that Stan
Waleski, scored the Prep Td.
WA 27 Valley West 12
Friday, October 15, home
More Tamalenus as he went
for over 100 yards including
three runs of 20 plus. Amico
scored on a 70-yard punt return
and McDermott scored three
Tds, one on a 25-yard pick-six.
The crowd was estimated at
8,000.
WA 23 Lake Lehman 8
Saturday, October 23, at Lake
Lehman
Calabrese got back on the
field and breezed to 125 yards
and a Td on 19 carries.
McDermott ran for two Tds.
WA12 Nanticoke 10
Friday, October 29, home
Calabrese came all the way
back getting 37 carries and 197
yards.
He scored the first Td to cap a
97-yard drive that included a 35-
yard pick up on a McDermott
pass to Fumanti.
Trailing10-6 with 3:18 left the
Warriors drove 57 yards for the
winning Td, most of it on two
runs, 24 by Calabrese and 22 by
McDermott for the Td.
WA 39 Old Forge 21
Friday November 5, at Old
Forge
Up 26-0 at the half, Vaxmon-
sky gave Calabrese the second
half off after he went for 96 on13
carries in the first half.
Amico scored three Tds and
McDermott was 6-for-12 pass-
ing for 129 and two Tds, the most
he’d thrown all season.
WA 8 Meyers 27
Friday, November 12, home
Coulda clinched the WVC.
What happened? The biggest up-
set of the season according to the
Wilkes-Barre papers. Eight turn-
overs will do that.
Forced to throw after falling
behind McDermott was 10-19
for 167 yards, but Meyers picked
off five.
The Warriors also lost three
fumbles and had a punt blocked.
Meyers played with a short
field all night, starting posses-
sions at the WA10 and 22 for two
of their scores.
WA 32 PA 23
Saturday, November 27, home
Having lost to Meyers the
Warriors couldn’t afford to lose
to PA again and they didn’t, but
they had to wait.
A Thanksgiving eve snow-
storm postponed the game until
Saturday, Nov. 27.
Chiavacci and company paved
way for 195 yards rushing and
three TDs for Calabrese on a
WA-PA series record 40 carries.
Some kid named Jimmy Cefa-
lo, a sophomore, had 84 yards
and a TD for PA.
Having done their part, the
Warriors had to wait, and wait, to
see what Coughlin, who also had
one loss, would do in their
Thanksgiving Day rivalry game
with Valley West.
That game was put of until
Tuesday.
Coughlin won 34-20 setting
up a playoff game.
With Coughlin facing a short
week it was agreed to play on
Saturday afternoon December 4
at Valley West.
Warriors went to the wire for title 40 years ago
Vaxmonsky’s Wyoming Area squad copped WVC championship in ‘71
By Jack Smiles
Associate Editor
The 1971 Wyoming Area football teamthat won the WVC championship for the second straight year.
See WARRIORS, Page 29
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The A+ Team for Wyoming
Area – Mary Louise Degnan, Dr.
Estelle Campenni, Beth Gober-
Mangan, and Carl Yorina – are
seeking election to 4 year terms
as directors on the Wyoming Ar-
ea School Board. Join The A+
Teamon November 6 from7 to 9
p.m. at Gober’s Deco Lounge in
Exeter for a “Get Out The Vote”
rally.
Dr. Estelle Campenni is
seeking re-election to the
Wyoming Area School Board.
Dr. Campenni is an Associate
Professor and Psychology De-
partment Assistant Chair at Ma-
rywood University. She received
her Ph.D. in Experimental Psy-
chology from Adelphi Universi-
ty and her B.A. in Psychology
from Penn State. Prior to her po-
sition at Marywood, Dr. Cam-
penni served as an adjunct facul-
ty member at Lafayette College,
Villanova University.and Gwy-
nedd Mercy College.
In her 16 years at Marywood,
Dr. Campenni’s academic focus
has been development of critical
thinking skills, research profi-
ciency and statistical abilities in
graduate students seeking mas-
ter’s and doctoral degrees. She
was intimately involved in the
development of both doctoral
programs at Marywood and
serves on numerous administra-
tive committees at the Universi-
ty.
Estelle resides in West Pittston
with her two sons, Trevor and
Evan.
Beth Gober-Mangan is
pleased to announce her candi-
dacy for the position of school
director in the Wyoming Area
School District.
Bethis a resident of Exeter and
a1977 graduate of Wyoming Ar-
ea. Due to the excellent educa-
tionandguidance she receivedin
high school, Beth was awarded a
full four year academic scholar-
ship to Goucher College in Tow-
son, Md where she majored in
Chemistry. Since high school,
she has assisted her parents, Joe
and Leona, in the operation of
their family business, currently
known as Gober’s Deco Lounge.
After several years as a stay at
home mom, Beth began her ca-
reer as an analytical chemist in
the Research and Technology
Development group of Schott
North America in Duryea. Beth
has played a key role in the an-
nual “Take Your Child to Work”
activities which provide employ-
ees’ children the opportunity to
experience various job possibil-
ities in both a production and re-
search environment. She also
served as a leader for both the
Girl Scouts and Boy Scouts of
Exeter for fifteen years.
Children have always been her
focus which Beth attributes to
the strong influence of her heri-
tage.
Beth and her husband Jim are
the proud parents of Kate
(WA’99), Sarah (WA’03) and
Conner (WA’12). They are also
the grandparents of Gabriel and
Gwendolyn, future students of
Wyoming Area
Carl Yorina Jr. would like to
announce his candidacy for the
Wyoming Area Board of Educa-
tion. Carl was born and raised in
the Wyoming Area School Dis-
trict and is the son of Carl and
Theresa Yorina of West Wyom-
ing. He is a 1983 graduate of
Wyoming Area. After gradua-
tion, Carl attended Johnson
Technical Institute, where he re-
ceived a degree in Biomedical
Equipment Technology. After
completing his degree at John-
son Tech., Carl went on to attend
the State University of NewYork
at Binghamton where he com-
pleted his engineering studies
and received a Bachelor’s degree
in Electro-Mechanical Engi-
neering. Carl is alsoa Pennsylva-
nia State licensed sewage treat-
ment operator and owns his own
company that oversees the waste
water treatment for various com-
panies.
While attending college, Carl
worked at the Celotex Corpora-
tion in Harding in production,
quality, and engineering. After
completinghis engineeringstud-
ies, Carl accepted a position with
the Quaker Oats Corporation at
their Gatorade manufacturing
facility in Mountaintop, Pa.
While with Quaker Oats, Carl
served as a Project Engineer
with design and maintenance re-
sponsibilities for a multi-million
dollar production facility.
In 1999, Carl left Quaker Oats
to accept a position with the
Wyoming Area School District
as the District’s Facilities Man-
ager. While at Wyoming Area,
Carl was responsible for all as-
pects of buildings and grounds.
Carl also operated the district’s
sewage treatment plant at the Sa-
ra J. Dymond School in Harding
during his employment. In 2007,
Carl left Wyoming Area to ac-
cept a position with Procter and
Gamble at their plant in Mehoo-
pany as a Process\Project Engi-
neer.
In 2009, Carl returned to what
he loved best when he accepted a
position with the Hazleton Area
School District as Director of
Operations. At Hazleton Area,
Carl is responsible for oversee-
ing buildings and grounds,
maintenance, capital projects,
transportation, and food service.
Presently, Carl’s companyis con-
tracted to operate the sewage
treatment plant at Wyoming Ar-
ea’s Harding school. “Obviously,
I cannot be a sitting board mem-
ber and receive any payment for
services. The District will retain
the services of in house person-
nel to operate the plant and I will
serve as a non-paid backup oper-
ator. I will also continue to mon-
itor and test the drinking water at
the Harding building at no
charge to the District.”
Carl resides in Wyoming with
his wife Angie and their two
daughters Kaylee and Cara, both
students at Wyoming Area.
Mrs. Mary Louise Degnan,
R.N., B.S.N., would like to an-
nounce her candidacy for the
Wyoming Area Board of Educa-
tion. Mary Louise is joining the
“A+ Team” ticket as an Inde-
pendent Party candidate.
Mary Louise is a life long resi-
dent of the Wyoming Area
School District. She is the
daughter of the late Stanley and
Louise Korzeniewski of Luzerne
Avenue in West Pittston. ASum-
ma Cum Laude graduate of
Wyoming Area in 1978, and she
continued her education at
Bloomsburg State College and
received her Bachelor of Science
Degree in Nursing with the dis-
tinction of Summa Cum Laude
in 1982. Mary Louise began
practicing nursing at Wilkes-
Barre General Hospital in 1982.
During her 29 years of em-
ployment, Mary Louise held
both staff and managerial posi-
tions. Mary Louise served on the
Policy and Procedure Commit-
tee.
Mary Louise also is a past
member of PASNAP, the regis-
tered nurses bargaining union.
She is currently employed at
Kindred Hospital Wyoming Val-
ley as an Infusion Therapist and
is also employed by Heartland
Home Care Hospice Services
and Compassionate Home Care
as a Case Manager.
Mary Louise resides in
Wyoming with her husband,
Louis Peter Sr. and two children,
son Louis Peter Jr., a freshman at
East StroudsburgUniversity, and
daughter Serra Louise, a junior
at Wyoming Area.
E L E C T I O N 2 01 1
A+ Team running for Wyoming Area School Board
Running for the Wyoming Area School District Board of Educa-
tion as the A+ teamare, fromleft, Dr. Estelle Campenni, Carl Yori-
na Jr., Mary Louise Degnan and Beth Gober-Mangan.
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VOTE
EILEEN M. SOROKAS
for
LUZERNE COUNTY MUNICIPAL COUNCIL
November 8 General Election
“Please Make Your Vote Count”
Paid for by the candidate.
“Good Government
Happens When Good
People Participate”
• Transparency in government
• Hold the line on taxes
• Eliminate county debt, waste
and redundacy
• Be an independent voice
• Hire county manager with the best interest
of all residents of Luzerne County.
I will strive for an honest, responsive and dependable government.
One that will understand and serve the needs of the people.
Thank you,
Eileen M. Sorokas
Easy to Shop
Modern Well Organized Store
Large Craft/ Micro and Import Selection
Located on Rt. 315
in Laflin Next to
Passeri Tile
Just minutes
from Wal-Mart
on Rt. 315
in Pittston
Open
Mon-Sat 9-9
Sun 12-5
Gift
Certificates
Available
Quality Beverage
OF N. E. P. A.
Providing quality products since 1934
1600 Highway 315 • Laflin • 299-7446
Also PA Lottery,
ATM, Cigarettes,
Cigars, Snacks,
Soda, Water,
5 Gallon Water Jugs
spaghetti dinner to benefit flood
victims of Lighthouse Fellow-
ship Church on Nov. 10 from4 to
8 p.m. Tickets are $8 for adults,
$4 for children under 12 and are
available at the door or call 655-
0283. Take-outs available.
WA Class of 1986
The Wyoming Area Class of
1986 will hold its 25th anniver-
sary class reunion on Saturday,
Nov. 26, at 6:00 p.m. at Bar
Louie, Mohegan Sun Casino.
Reservations required.
Please contact one of the fol-
lowing classmates for ticket in-
formation: Leslie (Olerta) Leib-
man (e-mail) lolerta@com-
cast.net; Trisha (Kamor) Seidel
at 570-885-4121 or trisha.sei-
del@sbcglobal.net; Lee (Stela-
cone) Seaman (e-mail)
las0311@gmail.com.
Financial Workshop
State Rep. Phyllis Mundy and
State Fire Commissioner Ed
Mann will co-host an education-
al workshop 6:30 p.m. Thursday,
Nov. 10, at Luzerne County
Community College’s Educa-
tional Conference Center, 1333
S. Prospect St., Nanticoke, to
help local volunteer and ambu-
lance companies make smart fi-
nancial decisions and outline
state loan and grant programs.
Mundy said additional infor-
mation about the workshop is
available by calling her Kingston
office at 570-283-9622 or 570-
655-3375.
12/24 at Tunkhannock
Twelve Twenty Four will be
bringing their high energy, full-
scale holiday rock orchestra con-
cert to the Tunkhannock Area
High School Auditorium on Fri-
day, December 9th at 7:00 p.m.
Their performance features the
music of the Trans Siberian Or-
chestra, as well as their own re-
corded holiday creations!
Twelve Twenty-four was es-
tablished in 2002, starting out as
a recreation of the resounding
Trans Siberian Orchestra. This
year coming off their momen-
tumof last year’s acclaimed holi-
day release “Miracle on Rock
Street”; they are currently being
reviewed for a Grammy nomina-
tion. Nominations will be made
public in November.
Twelve Twenty-Four’s Christ-
mas tunes, with the rock edge is
for all ages and sure to be an
event you will look forward to
every year.
Every performance12/24 ben-
efits a specific charity they play
for. The Tunkhannock High
School performance proceeds
will benefit the Tunkhannock
Area Music Program.
This year the Twelve Twenty
Four Tour will be dedicated to
band member Andrew Collins-
worth, Cellist, who passed away
at the age of 33 from pancreatic
cancer.
Please visit Twelve Twenty-
Four on their site for updates and
late breaking news at www.twel-
vetwentyfour.net , join their ex-
tended family and make it a fam-
ily holiday tradition as many
have.
Events: WA Class of 1986 to reunite on November 26
Continued from Page 25
See EVENTS, Page 34
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Forty-six years after discharge
from four years of active duty
with the US Coast Guard, Wil
Toole, of Pittston, has finally re-
ceived the medals he earned
while on active duty.
The US Coast Guard office of
Military Personnel, Medals and
Awards has issued a corrected
form DD 215 which corrects the
normal discharge form DD 214
to include authorization of the
following medals and ribbons:
the Navy Expeditionary Medal,
the Coast Guard "E" Medal, the
Good Conduct Medal, the Coast
Guard Sea Service Medal and
the National Defense Medal.
US Senator Robert Casey has
written Toole and advised him
that there is action pending in
Congress to authorize the Cold
War Victory Medal and it is ex-
pected that the authorization of
that medal is not too far into the
future.
Toole is a member of the NE
PA Coast Guard Veteran’s Asso-
ciation, Duryea VFW Post 1227,
Pittston American Legion Post
477 and is a life member of the
Coast Guard Sea Veteran’s Asso-
ciation of America.
Toole enlisted in the Coast
Guard on August 2, 1961 and re-
cently celebrated his 50 year an-
niversary of military service.
Any Coast Guard veteran in-
terested in joining the Associ-
ation can contact Neil Morrison
at 288 6817 or Bob Youngblood
at 824 4588.
Military medals arrive 46 years after discharge
Presenting Wil Toole with long overdue medals is his actual Coast Guard Recruiter fromAugust
1961, retired Coast Guard Lt. Bill Shaffer, current Vice President of the NE PA Coast Guard Veteran's
Association and Neil Morrison Coast Guard veteran and Association president.
Pittston’s Wil Toole served four
year with the US coast Guard
WA 8 Coughlin 7
Saturday, December 4 at Val-
ley West
Infront of a reported“paid” at-
tendance of over 5,200, McDer-
mott found another way to win –
punting.
He punted seven times for a 43
yard average. The last of his
punts, in the fourth quarter,
pinned Coughlin back at their
own 1 with two minutes remain-
ing.
The score was 8-7, with all the
points having been scored in the
first half.
Coughlin scored first on a 66-
yard catch-and-run pass play
from Jeff Zych to Pesotski.
The Warriors scored on a 5-
yard run by Calabrese with 1:07
left in the half. Tamalenus
caught a 29-yard pass from
McDermott in the drive and
caught the 2-point conversion
pass which wound up as the win-
ning points.
McDermott said they prac-
ticed that play for the 2-points
during the week and it was the
only time all season, as he recalls
it now, that they practiced a spe-
cific play for a specific purpose.
“Vax said if the situation
comes up where it’s a close game
we were going to go for two. He
must have thought there wasn’t
going to be a lot of scoring. It
was a roll out on my part and
Paul did a little curl. It worked as
it was drawn up.”
Back to that final Coughlin
possession.
Throwing from his own end
zone after the McDermott punt
was downed at the 1, Coughlin
quarterback Zych connected
with Howe all the way out to the
Wyoming Area 37.
Three plays, later facing a 4th-
and-7 from the WA 33 with 1:39
left, Zych threw a screen pass to
Laniel Crawford.
Gary Wendorf smelled it and
dropped Crawford for a five-
yardloss toclinchthe champion-
ship.
McDermott said as the quar-
terback he got a lot of props for
the team success as did Cala-
brese and Amico, deservedly so.
But McDermott said Tamale-
nus was something of an unsung
hero as was Supey, the 180-
pound fullback.
“Andy just punished people.
He was a crushing blocker. Vax
usedtoline himuppointingright
where we were going to go and
they still couldn’t stop him.”
Warriors
Continued fromPage 26
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Ed. Note: The photos of
the Pittston Area marching
band arrived past the dead-
line for the annual Goalpost
supplement.
The Pittston Area march-
ing band is pictured above.
First row, left to right, Re-
becca White, Mia Nardone,
Albert Zuba, Samantha
Schneider, Ashley Muchler,
Sarah Gromala, Kiera
Wells, Alan Thomas, Bran-
don Houghtlin; second row,
Matt Bukevicz, Ginny
Kriete, Sarah Velehoski,
Lauren Robbins, Miranda
Romanofski, Kala Berlin-
ski, Ashley Bidwell, Kristen
Santey; third row, Steven
Moldanaro, Gary Thomas,
Kansas White, Douglas
Jumper, Josh Coe, Chelsea
Smith, Katlyn Jumper, Mat-
thew Blom.
Bottom photo is of the se-
nior members of the band,
left to right, Katlyn Jumper,
Ginny Kriete, Samantha
Schneider, Matthew Blom.
Marching Patriots will perform at PA-WA game
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The Flood Knocked
MANY of us
“out of place”,
including me.
If you need to be
straightened out,
come visit at my
NEW LOCATION:
135 S. Main St.
Pittston
(across from Sabatelle’s Mkt)
Thank you to all who have
helped us during this setback!
ELECT
Deanna
Farrell
Paid for by the Committee to Elect Deanna Farrell
Wyoming Area School Director
Your Singular
Independent Candidate
Hughestown Borough Park
and Recreation Committee will
meet on Thursday, Nov. 3, at 7
p.m. in the borough building.
Mary Ann Quick (654-5763)
and Mary Golya (655-4552) are
chairpersons of the Holiday
Craft and Gift Sale scheduled for
Nov. 6 from 12 to 5 p.m. at the
Hughestown Hose Company, 30
Center Street. Over 30 vendors
will be on hand to display their
items for gift giving.
A donation of one offering of
canned goods which will be do-
nated to the Pittston Food Pantry
would be appreciated as free will
offering at the door.
Food and beverages will be
available.
HSC to meet
The Hughestown Sports Club
will hold its last fall meeting on
Sunday, Nov. 13, at Granteed’s
Tavern, 295 Parsonage Street at
2:30. All members are reminded
that reservations and payment
for the 2012 season tickets are
now due. All season ticket hold-
ers must have all accounts cur-
rent to qualify for next year’s
tickets.
Winter meetings will resume
in January.
Poppy Seed Sale
A poppy seed and nut roll sale
will be held Nov. 21. Deadline is
Nov 13 with pick- up scheduled
for Nov. 21 from 12 to 4 p.m. in
the church hall, 100 Rock Street,
Hughestown.
Call Carolyn 654-1849 or
Ruth 654-1594.
Council Meeting
Hughestown Borough council
work session will be held Nov. 10
with Wayne Quick presiding.
New Councilman Dave Stefa-
noski will proceed with super-
vising the road fund as did the
late CouncilmanPaul Murphy. A
special thank you goes to Coun-
cilmen Wayne Quick and Dave
Stefanoski for their help in the
park area. Treasurer Angelia
Acierno is welcomed back after
her visit with her son Vincent
and family.
Parade Today
The Hughestown Lions Club
will hold their annual Halloween
parade and party today at 1:00
p.m. The parade will begin in the
parking lot of St. Peters Lutheran
Church at the corner of Rock and
Center Streets at 1:00 p.m. and
proceed to the Lions Club pavil-
ion. Prizes will be awarded for
best costume and there will be
candy for all children. Two bicy-
cles will also be chanced off.
Holiday craft and gift sale next Sunday in Hughestown
HUGHESTOWN
The Jenkins Twp. tax collector
reminds residents the face period
for payment of the 2011 school
taxes will expire on Monday,
Nov. 21. Office hours will only
be on Tuesdays from 4:30 to 6
p.m. at Laflin Road, Inkerman,
as stated in the tax bill or by spe-
cial arrangements.
Payments can be sent in the
mail and post mark date will be
accepted. After Nov. 21 all pay-
ments are to be made at the pen-
alty amount.
For property owners who se-
lected the three payment option,
payments #3 is due by October
28. Any payments after this date
must be paid at the penalty
amount. Special dates for pay-
ment can be made by contacting
the tax collector.
All property owners who have
lost their mobile homes or have
major damage to their homes
due to the recent flood must file
an appeal with the Luzerne
County Assessor in order to re-
ceive an elimination or reduction
on their property taxes. This
must be done as soon as possible
as evaluations will be done in
early 2012.
The necessary forms can be
obtained at the Jenkins Town-
ship Municipal Building, 46 1/2
Main Street, Inkerman or by
calling 654-9710.
If you are a new homeowner
you should complete the Home-
stead Exemption Formto receive
the reduction for 2012. Any
questions, please call 654-9710
Jenkins tax reminder
JENKINS TWP.
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yoming Area Key Club sponsored the 2011 Floodfest fundraiser last Sunday at the Anthony “Jake”
ravaged West Pittston Library.
The event, titled “Warriors Helping Warriors,” lived up to the name as hundreds of students ca
attended the festival where the audience was entertained by 13 area bands. Many band members had Wyomi
Along with music, there were raffle baskets, games for the children, face panting, mini golf, sack races, twi
T-shirts were sold along with plenty of food and beverages. Organizers called the event a complete success an
be announced at a future date.
The Wyoming Area Drama Club performs a Mob Dance between band sets at the FloodFest to support the W
A very confident Roger Pollard, 4-months old, takes a little nap
prior to the Halloween parade and contest.
Allison Golden, Sara Radzwilka, and Kimberly Golden look over
the dozens of raffle baskets at the FloodFest.
Flaxy Morgan, an area favorite, performing their 30-minute set
during FloodFest at Wyoming Area Stadium.
‘FloodFest’ does its b
The 'best of' winners of the Halloween parade pose for a photo.
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” Sobeski Stadium to benefit the flood-
ame out to support the cause. All ages
ing Area ties.
ister and a huge dodgeball tournament.
nd the total amount of money raised will
West Pittston Library.
Wyoming Area grad Sara Hando belts out a few tunes with her
band, 12 Letters.
Wyoming Area student, Stormy Ruiz sings the National Anthemto
open the FloodFest last Sunday in West Pittston.
best for WP Library
Jeanne Zano, left, along with her band, brought up Wyoming Area
talent, Danielle Dolhon, to help out with a song.
Wyoming Area cheerleader advisor Krista Baines does a little
face-painting on 8-year old Jake Walton.
Photos and text by Tony Callaio
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W Y OM ING A R EA R ES ID ENTS
ON NOVEM B ER 8 EL EC T
Estelle
CAMPENNI
Mary Louise
DEGNAN
Beth-Gober
MANGAN
Carl
YORINA
THE C HA N GE Y OU N E E D,
THE VOIC E Y OU DE S E RVE
Paid for by the A+ Committee
Tickets can be purchased from
Tunkhannock Marching Band
students, Gay’s True Value,
Bridge Street, Tunkhannock, PA,
Rock Street Music, Pittston, PA,
or youmayorder tickets online at
www.twelvetwentyfour.net. $15
per person presale or $20 at the
door. For further information
you may call (570) 836-6979.
Roast Pork Dinner
St. John’s Lutheran Church,
located at 9 Wood Street, Pitt-
ston, will offer its annual Roast
Pork Dinner on Saturday, Nov. 5.
Take-outs begin at 4 p.m. and
dinner seating is from 5-7 p.m.
Tickets are $9.00 for adults and
$5.00 for children under the age
of 12.
To place your ticket order, or
for more information, please call
655-2505.
IAA Dinner Meeting
The November Dinner/Meet-
ing of the Italian American As-
sociationof Luzerne Countywill
be held on Thursday, Nov. 10, at
Genetti Hotel and Convention
Center, Wilkes-Barre. Arrival
time is 6:00 p.m. with dinner
served at 6:30 p.m. The cost is
$26.00 per person. Music for
dancing by Gary Dee to 10:15
p.m. Reservation deadline is Fri-
day, Nov. 4.
For reservations and member-
ship information, please call Ju-
dy Deice at 654-7600 or Louise
Castellani 654-6454.
Herman Castellani will pre-
side
PA Craft Fair
The Pittston Area Boys Base-
ball Booster Clubis sponsoringa
Holiday Craft/Vendor Fair on
Dec. 3, fromnoon to 4:00 p.m. at
the Pittston Area Senior High
School. Interested vendors can
contact Lisa Bolka at 570-905-
2920 for more information.
Animals in Winter
Animals in Winter will take
place Nov. 5 from 10:00 am -
11:00 am at Frances Slocum
State Park. Young people ages 6-
12 are invited to learn about ani-
mal strategies for winter surviv-
al. Meet at the EE building.
Nuts about Squirrels will take
place Nov. 5 from1:00 pm– 2:00
pm at Frances Slocum State
Park. Little ones ages 3-5 can
learn about squirrels through
story, craft and song. Meet at the
EE building.
Holiday Craft Fair
The Hughestown Park & Rec-
reation Committee is holding its
annual Holiday Gift &Craft Fair
on Nov. 6, from noon to 5:00
p.m. at the Hughestown Fire
Hall,30 Center Street, Hughes-
town. Over30 vendors will be on
hand with homemade crafts and
goodies for holiday shopping.
There is plenty of free parking.
The admission is free but a dona-
tion of a canned good for the lo-
cal food pantry would be appre-
ciated. There will bea huge Chi-
nese auction along with food and
refreshments.
IAA Membership Drive
The Italian American Associ-
ation of Luzerne County is con-
ducting its 2012 Membership
Drive. If you are of Italian de-
scent or married to someone of
Italian descent, come and cele-
brate your heritage by participa-
ting in cultural events, commu-
nity service, scholarship pro-
grams and social events.
This membership is open to
Luzerne and surrounding county
residents. For informationplease
call Judy Deice at 654-7600 or
Louise Castellani at 654-6454.
Music Box
Irving Berlin’s ‘White Christ-
mas’ will be presented Nov. 26,
27, Dec. 1 to 4, 8 to 11, 15 to 18;
Thursdays thru Saturdays: cur-
tain: 8 p.m., Sundays: curtain: 3
p.m. Dinner and showand show-
only tickets now on sale.
The Music Box Dinner Play-
house is located at 196 Hughes
St, Swoyersville. Call 283-2195
or 800-698-PLAY.
Dining with Diabetes
Penn State Extension is con-
ducting a Dining with Diabetes
class on Tuesday mornings from
10 a.m. to noon beginning No-
vember 1 through November 29.
The cost of the program is
$35.00 per individual which cov-
ers a A1C test, program give-
aways like pedometers and tapes
and food samples. Family price
is $50.00 which includes one ad-
ditional family member.
The program will be held at
the Luzerne County West Side
Annex, 2009 Wyoming Ave,
Forty Fort, PA18704
Night at the Races
On Saturday, Nov. 5, the Pitt-
ston Knights of Columbus
Home Association will host a
Night at the Races. Food and re-
freshments provided. $5:00 en-
trance fee at the door or free ad-
mission with the purchase of a
$10:00 horse. Purchase your
horse from any member or stop
in our club at 55 S Main St. Pitt-
ston.
Vendor Show
The Wyoming Free Library
will present a Vendor Show on
Saturday, Nov. 5, from 9 to 3 at
the WyomingHose Company#1,
33 E. 8th Street, Wyoming.
Win prizes from the vendor
basket raffle. Shop with top
notch vendors and crafters: Thir-
ty-One, Mary Kay, Mia Bella,
Avon, Creative Memories, NE-
PAGold, Celebrating Home, Eu-
ropean Treasures, Dennison
Wood Turning, Discovery Toys,
Scentsy, Dove Chocolate Dis-
coveries, Perpetually Yours Jew-
elry Designs, Lia Sophia, Miss
Stephanie’s Potions (fairy and
monster potions), Children’s
Scarves and Purses, Kitchen
Items, Christmas Ornaments,
Crocheted Baby Blankets.
Shop at the Friends of the Li-
brary book sale and hand crafted
American Girl Doll Clothes sale.
Doll clothes prices starting at $5.
All proceeds go to the library.
Enjoy great food while you shop
for holiday gifts. Event parking
on 8th Street and behind library.
The lot is connected to the Hose
Company side entrance.
Skate for Causes
Skate for the Causes will be
held at the Skateaway, 610
Blackman Street, Wilkes-Barre
to benefit Fallen Officers Re-
membered, Making A Differ-
ence Ministries and a local food
pantry on Thursday, Nov. 10,
Events: Craft, gift fair next Saturday in Hughestown
Continued from Page 28
See EVENTS, Page 35
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Find us on
Facebook
Get your virtual smile makeover at
www.BackMountainDental.com
210 Carverton Road
Trucksville
For more information or to schedule a
complimentary consultation call us at
570.763.4364
You’re ready to retire,
but is your smile?
Call us before you do.
We can help you keep your smile for a lifetime.
from6to9p.m. Admissionis $5,
skate rental $2. For each non-
perishable food itemyou donate,
you will receive a raffle ticket to
enter to win our grand prize: 2
hockey tickets and a $25 Visa
Card. There will be fingerprint-
ing, 50/50 tickets, basket raffles
and Penguins mascot Tux.
Donations for the raffles glad-
ly accepted. For more informa-
tion call Jaclyn at 760-9034 or
email faloffrem@aol.com
Round Table
The Wyoming Valley Civil
War Round Table meeting will
be held on Nov. 10 at 7 p.m. in the
lower level of the Daddow-
Isaacs American Legion, 730
Memorial Highway Dallas. The
speaker will be John D. Hoptak
of Benderstown, a lifelong stu-
dent of the Civil War who cur-
rently serves as a park ranger at
Antietam National Battlefield.
Any questions, call Pete 639-
1283. Everyone is welcome.
There is a fee of $3 for guests.
Vera Bradley Bingo
The JFK Elementary School
PTO is holding Vera Bradley
Bingo Fundraiser on Sunday,
Nov. 13, at 2p.m. (doors openat 1
p.m). It will be held in the
Wyoming Area Secondary Cen-
ter cafeteria, 20 Memorial
Street, Exeter. Tickets are $20.
Tickets will be available at the
door but seating is limited. To
purchase tickets in advance,
make check payable to JFKPTO
and send to 50 Penn Avenue,
Exeter PA18643, attn: bingo. In-
clude name, address, phone and
e-mail address. For more infor-
mation, please call 570-655-
6130.
Wyoming Library
The Wyoming Free Library
presents an evening with Cecilia
Galante, author of The Patron
Saint of Butterflies, Monday,
Nov. 14, from6 to 8 p.m. Galante
teaches creative writing at
Wilkes University and is cur-
rentlyworkingona children’s se-
ries to be published in 2012.
Space is limited, so please call
Wyoming Free Library at 693-
1364 to reserve a spot.
Bus Trip
The Salvation Army Women’s
Auxiliary is planning a trip to
Dutch Apple on Wednesday,
Nov. 23, the day before Thanks-
giving.
The trip is $80.00 including
transportation, show, and lunch.
The show is Miracle on 34th
Street.
Those attendingshouldplanto
leave The Salvation Army, 17 S.
Pennsylvania Avenue at 8:45
a.m. and return at 7 p.m.
For more information, contact
Anne Gerrity, Auxiliary Presi-
dent at 825-5747.
Italian Documentary
WVIA presents the world
broadcast premiere of the WVIA
Original Documentary Film,
“Paesani: The Story of Italian
Culture in Northeastern Penn-
sylvania,” on Tuesday, Nov. 22 at
8 p.m. on WVIA-TV with en-
cores airing Thursday, Nov. 22 at
8 p.m., Saturday, Nov. 26 at 9
p.m. and Sunday, Nov. 27 at 1
p.m. on WVIA-TV.
JTHS Class of ’62
The Jenkins Township High
School class of 1962 is planning
their 50th anniversary reunion
for June 9, 2012.
Classmates interested in at-
tending or planning this event
please call Stan Gelaszus at 609-
306-6939 or Paul Donahue at
570-510-1399.
Events: Vera Bradley Bingo planned at JFK elementary
Continued fromPage 34
The Upper Valley Eye Bank October meeting was held at the Dupont VFWand hosted by the Dupont
Lions Club. Members brought in used eyeglasses to be processed and distributed to the needy.
There was also a discussion on the Cornea transplant programand grant program. The next meeting
will be Thursday, Nov. 3 at the Avoca VFW, 915 Main Street and hosted by the Avoca Lions Club. First
row fromleft, Bart Bryk, president of Dupont Lions Club; Nancy Baiera, vice president; Marina Mar-
tin, president; Betty Dantone, acting secretary all of the Upper Valley Eye Bank. Second row, Stan
Golembiewski, Chris Kalmanowicz, Jean Chacko, Stanley Knick, Susan Gregory, Tina McDonald,
Janet Rooney, Rose Linko, all of the Dupont Lions Club.
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C A L L 714-6460 T O D AY!
w w w .pin n aclerehabilitation .n et
M ostIn su ran cesA ccepted .
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520 Third A venu e • K ings to n
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Church of St. Maria Goretti
Laflin Road, Laflin
Monsignor Neil J. Van Loon
and the Parish Community
Cordially Invite All
SUNDAY, NOVEMER 6, 2011
Noon to 5:00 P.M.
Dinner includes: Salad, Bread/Butter,
Beverage, Dessert
Take Outs: Noon to 4 P.M.
(containers will be provided)
Tickets At the door $9:00
Children 5 years old and under are FREE for “Eat-in only”
Church of St Ma
Homemade
Pasta &
Sausage
Dinner
Facilities are Handicapped Accessible
Ample and Free Parking
C
oming from a nearly five
decade career as being a
touring warhorse, Grate-
ful Dead co-founder Bob Weir
deservingly sounds refreshed
when talking about his latest
venture, Furthur, a band he
formed two years ago with his
longtime Dead cohort, bassist
Phil Lesh.
“You know, it’s nice to catch
your breath between tours,”
Weir, 64, said from his home in
Marin County California during
a break before the bands Fall
East Coast run. “You don’t want
to take too much time though.
Then you get rusty.”
True to form, the road came
calling, and now Weir, Lesh and
the rest of Furthur are gearing up
for a 15-show tour, which in-
cludes a stopat the MoheganSun
Arena at Casey Plaza this Satur-
day.
Since forming in fall of 2009,
Furthur has gone through vari-
ous lineup changes including the
departures of co-drummer Jay
Lane and vocalist Zoe Ellis.
Now, after the addition of vocal-
ists Sunshine Garcia Becker and
Jeff Pehrson, the band is enjoy-
ing the ride of constantly playing
for fans that are ecstatic over the
top-notch ensemble.
“It took a little shopping, and
then a little shuffling to get it
right,” Weir explained. “I guess
Phil had had some interaction
with Joe Russo (drums) and he
liked what he found there. It’s
important for the bass player and
the drummer to be tight. Then I
had Jeff Chimenti (keyboards),
who I’ve been working with for a
while, and also Jay. They were
part of my band (Rat Dog), so I
figured let’s bring them in. Jay
was pretty much a set of training
wheels for Joe, because there’s
an immense amount of material
there. Jay was able to impart that.
Jay was headed back towards
Les Claypool (Primus) anyway.”
And what about lead guitarist
John Kadlecik, formerly Jerry
Garcia in respected tribute act
DarkStar Orchestra, whohas be-
come something of a savior for
Deadheads?
“As for John, he was almost an
after-thought when Phil and I
were talking about guitarists,”
Weir said. “We found out he did
things other than Dark Star Or-
chestra, and we looked into that
and found out he had this other
voice. It made good sense be-
cause he knewall the material, so
we figured we’d try him out to
see if it was creepy or if it was ok.
It turnedout it was better thanok.
The guy’s really good.”
Knowing the Dead’s music
and improvisational tendencies
are almost a necessity, as Furthur
set lists have seen the band do ev-
erything from playing “China
Cat Sunflower” as an opening
songtowithholdingthe undenia-
ble “I KnowYou Rider” until lat-
er in the second set, or some-
times not even playing it until a
showor two later. Weir and Lesh
have the final vote on set lists,
but surprisingly, the blueprint for
the show comes from two un-
likely sources – Furthur assistant
tour manager Matt Busch and
Lesh’s wife, Jill.
“Basically, they consult Phil
and I, but they do the ground-
work,’ Weir said. “It takes a
whole lotta loadoff Phil’s andmy
back.”
An overwhelming highlight to
Furthur shows is the inclusion of
brand new material which Weir
and Lesh have been cranking out
rather frequently since 2009.
Cuts like the Weir-penned “Big
Bad Blues,” and Lesh’s “High on
a Mountain,” have been received
with such praise it wouldn’t be
surprising to see a larger amount
of originals coming out in the fu-
ture.
“Any band I’m working with
better have an outlet for newma-
terial,” Weir said. “I’m always
working on more.”
The amount of new material
doesn’t overcrowd a set list, but
knowing how many originals
have seen the light of day, it’s al-
most inevitable to think about
the possibility of a studio album.
With Weir recently opening a
state-of-the-art high definition
broadcasting studio called Ta-
malpais Research Institute (TRI)
in the Marin County, everything
seems to slowly be taking place
for the hopes of a new album.
“I think we’re pretty much
ready at anytime to go in and do
that, and we have a facility to do
that in,” he said. “I guess we
should start talking about that
(laugh).”
Since its inception, TRI has
housed everyone from Furthur,
Jackie Greene, Slightly Stoopid
and even Journey, all of whom
either streamed a live in-studio
performance or simply re-
hearsed for a tour. For Weir, who
says the hardest part has been
awakening the public to what’s
going on thanks to the Internet,
the feedback he’s received from
the musicians who’ve played
there has been nothing but posi-
tive.
“It’s taken off slowly. It’s a
matter of educating the public to
the quality of music that can be
available on the Internet,” he
said. “It’s expensive to do it, so
we have to figure out how to get
it funded. But the facility works
splendidly. People that come in
and play are amazed at how it
sounds and how wonderful it is
to play in there. We have the
Meyers sound constellation sys-
tem in our studio room. It can
make the room sound like any-
thing from a living room to a ca-
thedral…When we use the sys-
tem, everyone can hear them-
selves so well, and the instru-
ments sound so good that it’s
pretty freaky (laugh).”
Although Furthur and TRI are
his primary musical focus right
now, Weir is optimistic about the
possibility of getting back to-
gether, in some capacity, with his
last two projects, Rat Dog and
The Dead.
“For what it’s worth, I at least
have the plan of putting on a Rat
Dog Retrospective and broad-
casting it from TRI,” he said.
“And The Dead, I wouldn’t be
surprised if we reassembled that
at some point, polish it up and
take it out for a spin. It’s always a
hoot.”
As for Futhur, the band is
keeping Weir and Lesh on the go
due to its relentless touring
schedule and the energy of the
music reciprocating between the
band and its fans. Like every
show they’ve played, the music
will be the guiding force in
Wilkes-Barre, something Weir
feels is the way it should be.
“We’re gonna play. We don’t
know where we’re going with it;
we have no idea,” he said. “But
we’ll get there. We’ll get there
when we do.”
And the beat goes on…
Ryan O’Malley is the music
journalist for The Sunday Dis-
patch and a correspondent for
The Weekender. He may be reac-
hed at musicjournalman@hot-
mail.com
And the Beat Goes On
Ryan O'Malley
Bob Weir on Further:
‘we’ll get there when we do’
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M ORREALE’S M ID CITY SERVICE
40 Years E xperien ce
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Hardware
Petro Hardware
& Supply Co.
On October 9 Germania Hose
Company, Duryea, held a coun-
try style breakfast with the pro-
ceeds going to its members af-
fectedbythe Floodof 2011. Pres-
ident Jerry Korea is pictured pre-
senting checks to the members
affected by the flood and the
members present at the check
presentation.
The members effected are:
Bernadine Hoover, Bob Reed
and Chris Williams, Lou and
Wendy Radle, and Eric and Alli-
son Wruble.
Germania breakfast raises funds for flood victims
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ELECT
Deanna
Farrell
Paid for by the Committee to Elect Deanna Farrell
Wyoming Area School Director
Your Singular
Independent Candidate
of towns in the WA district will
result inless local revenue gener-
atedfrompropertytaxes because
some businesses will not be re-
turning and some homes have
been condemned and will be de-
molished.
Seems bad doesn’t it? Well it
gets worse. Not only is revenue
going down but expenditures are
going up. Health care costs are
projected to increase by15%, the
state has indicated that retire-
ment contributions provided by
the district will increase, the cur-
rent budget includes an unsettled
teacher contract which includes
no room for financial solutions,
and then there is inflation which
increases the costs of running a
district from year to year.
Please be aware that the finan-
cial crisis facing Wyoming Area
didnot happenwithout the warn-
ings and forecasting of the dis-
trict’s business manager. Much
more could have been done over
the past few years to soften the
blow. But the board majority re-
fused to be proactive.
Yes, they will say that retire-
ment positions were not replaced
this year. But ask themwhat else
was done to really save money
without compromising the edu-
cation of our children over the
past four years? Proactive deci-
sions are needed to manage fi-
nances without sacrificing the
integrity of education and these
decisions require much more
than expecting teacher contract
negotiations to be the solution.
Proactive decisions require an
atmosphere of transparency, ac-
countability, honesty, intelli-
gence and a commitment to keep
one’s personal interests and ego
out of the picture at all cost.
Because very few people at-
tend the WA board meetings,
what you may not know is that
while Mr. DeAngelo and Ms.
Valenti will proudly boast that
they did not vote to increase tax-
es, be aware that, year after year,
they have offered no productive
solutions or support for produc-
tive solutions which could have
addressedthis financial situation
before it became a financial per-
fect storm.
Wyoming Area taxpayers, ig-
norance Is not bliss.
The fiscal crisis at Wyoming
Area is a reality and while it is
due in part to the nature of our
nation’s economy, it is due in
large part to a school board ma-
jority that put their own interests
ahead of yours and then hid their
heads in the sand. Nowit is up to
you to do your part and vote for
candidates who value transpar-
ency, accountability, honesty,
and intelligence -- not the poli-
tics as usual that Valenti and
DeAngelo stand for.
Estelle Campenni
Fiscal
Continued fromPage 15
YO U R O P I N I O N
What would our mundane, or-
dinary lives be without high-
school sports?Asparents, welive
vicariously as we watch our sons
and daughters play football,
wrestle, run, and swim; shoot
baskets, swing a bat, jump, play
in the band, do a Flying Dutch-
man while cheering, and twirl a
flag or baton.
Those who have sons and
daughters; and those who wish
they had, all get their blood pres-
sure and heart rates racing. They
provide us with the adrenaline
rush we love to experience as we
witness what weas parents flatter
ourselves intobelievingthat their
talent is more a genetic predispo-
sition rather than a product of
good coaching.
Even in these trying times,
with flooding and destruction,
nothing prevents our Wyoming
Are families from displaying
their team colors, their player’s
numbers and the pride of their
families, their sons and daugh-
ters.
As a mother of five, whose
childrenplayedsummer andwin-
ter sports, marchedintheband, or
cheered at Wyoming Area, I
share with you a passion for the
excitement of highschool sports.
Yes, though none of my chil-
drenplayedfootball, I must admit
football is King. It’s the welcome
cold of an autumn night. The
boomandstrut of aproudmarch-
ing band, a clash of cymbals on a
first down and a drum beat and
bugle call on a touchdown. Its
confetti and athletic young girls
who are breathlessly lifted to the
top of a human pyramid, while
trustingtofall intheother’s arms.
It’s the French fries that taste so
much better than the fast food
restaurants and even the potato
soup with tiny flecks of carrot.
WrestlingwasKinginmyfam-
ilyandseldomdidwe ever miss a
meet. The misery of watching
your son starve to make weight,
the excitement and agony of
watching his neck twisted in a
head-lock; helped to put all of
your other troubles in another
compartment. What is it about
sports that bringout thetestoster-
one in all of us? Is it the same in-
stinct that drove the Romans to
honor the gladiators?
To all those parents, who man
the stands, begfor donations, ini-
tiate dinners, bake sales, whether
you are football, wrestling, track
and field, field hockey, swim-
ming, basketball, baseball, soft-
ball, volley ball or band -- con-
gratulations. You are continuing
onwithone of the proudest tradi-
tions in this state. Pennsylvania
always was and always will be a
sportslovingstate. Frommoreaf-
fluent school districts, such as
Crestwood and the Abington; to
little teams intinycoal towns like
Mount Carmel and Shamokin,
the pride is the same.
Will these sports oriented chil-
dren go on? Certainly not all, but
there’s a good chance that more
than a few will favor a college
scholarship, enablingthemtoget
an education that a college that
they otherwise could never have
afforded. And then there are so
many more that have brought
great pride to the District and a
whole lot of seasonal, inexpen-
sive entertainment.
Today’s world is a much more
difficult environment, thanit was
back when my last of five gradu-
ated in 1987. Wyoming Area’s
sports programs played no small
part inkeepingall fiveonthepath
to success.
Anystudent whoremains loyal
tohisvalues, loyal tohisfamily, is
productive throughout his life
andgrateful tothose whohelped;
is bydefinition, asuccess. Anex-
cellent sports program contrib-
utes greatly. A responsible stu-
dent reduces the need for police
protection, enhances confidence
to do better in academics, makes
wayfor cohesiverelationships by
teachingteamworkandis abene-
fit to the community in so many
unexpressed ways. These activ-
itieswill outliveall of us, beingso
much a part of the human spirit.
Deanna Innamorati Farrell
Writer believes high school sports have great value
The West Pittston Library,
along with hundreds of its West
Pittston neighbors, all lost a lot
in the flood, but it is what we’ve
gained that I would like to ad-
dress. It’s true, tragedybrings out
the best and worst in everyone,
but we at the library have only
beenprivytothe verybest. There
is no question that our communi-
ty loves its library. And the li-
brary loves you all right back.
There is just no way to thank
everyone who did their part to
get our library back on its feet. I
hope you all know who you are
and how much our heart extends
to convey the boundless grati-
tude we feel toward each and ev-
ery one of you.
Last Sunday, the Wyoming
Area Key Club, under the direc-
tion of Mr. Chris Hizynski,
“banded” together to put togeth-
er a phenomenon called Flood-
Fest. This was an event on a gor-
geous Fall day filled with band
playing, a dodge ball tourna-
ment, Halloween parade, face
painting, bake sale, basket raffle,
food and drinks and general fun
and fanfare. The proceeds gath-
eredwill benefit the Library. The
generosity of spirit and enthusi-
asmthat was put forthonthis day
was unparalleled.
I thank, fromthe bottomof my
heart, Mr. Hizynsky, the Wyom-
ing Area Key Club, the WA
Cheerleaders and their parents,
the WAMarchingBandandtheir
parents, the Friends of the Li-
brary, members of S.A.D.D.,
FBLA, WA Builders Club, Exe-
ter Lions, Exeter Little League,
Rock Street Music, Joyce insur-
ance, Rainstopperz, WA Drama
Clubandthe amazingbands who
entertained the massive crowd
from 11:15 am until 6:00 p.m. I
thank every person who passed
through those stadiumdoors and
purchased a ticket and a T-shirt
for the privilege of helpingour li-
brary. I thank you all.
It truly does take a village.
Anne Bramblett Barr
Director, WP Library
WP Library Staff
Board of Trustees
WP librarian sends thanks for FloodFest
I am writing today to respond
to a letter in the Dispatch last
Sunday from Toni Valenti and
Nick DeAngelo, candidates and
current school directors for
Wyoming Area. While these two
long serving board members
seem comfortable in misleading
the taxpayers into believing that
they care about their current fi-
nancial situation, I would like to
take a moment and remind vot-
ers that Mrs. Valenti and Mr.
DeAngelo seem to have forgot-
ten a fewthings. While these two
directors take aim at health care
costs as the reason for the dis-
trict’s budget problems, let me
remind them that included in the
health care costs is the taxpayer
funded health care for a number
of family members of current
board members Mrs. Valenti and
Mr. DeAngelo supported the hir-
ing of over the past five years.
These connected employees
can each receive the $21,000 in
family health care as Mrs. Valen-
ti andMr. DeAngelopointedout.
That means that $189,000 of our
tax dollars goes to fund the bene-
fits of board relatives.
Perhaps Mrs. Valenti and Mr.
DeAngelo would also like to
share with the taxpayers that
these same family members are
paid approximately $330,000
per year in taxpayer paid salaries
and that they gave the superin-
tendent a new contract with a
value of a half million dollars
and that they attempted to si-
lence taxpayer questioning at
board meetings. Lastly, perhaps
Mrs. Valenti and Mr. DeAngelo
would like to remind the tax-
payers that the wives of two
board members, members of
their majority, are nowthe recip-
ients of same health benefits that
they now claim as the problem
for the taxpayers. Health care
costs are a problem but so is the
rampant nepotism, outrageous
contract giveaways and the lack
of respect for public input.
Sorry Mrs. Valenti and Mr.
DeAngelo, I am not voting for
youbecause youandyour major-
ity have proven your main con-
cern is hiring family members
and taking care of friends, not
the taxpayers of WA.
Tom Cason
Writer responds to Valenti/DeAngelo
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In the towns
There is new life coming into
the Catholic community in Avo-
ca, andall are invitedtocelebrate
it.
St. Mary’s/SS. Peter and Paul’s
Parish will have a special Mass
Sunday, Nov. 6, at 2 p.m. at St.
Mary’s Church, 715 Hawthorne
St. The parish will open under its
future name, Queen of the Apos-
tles Parish, at this time.
Per the request of the parish-
ioners, any person who would
like to make a donation for the
opening Mass may place it in the
collection basket at any weekend
Mass or mail themto the rectory.
Please mark “QAP Memorial
Donation” on the envelope.
Also, any person who would
like to donate a baked for the re-
ception following the Mass, may
bring it to St. Mary’s School Au-
ditorium Saturday, Nov. 5 from
2-4 p.m.
For more information, please
call Marilyn Redington at 457-
4316.
Thank You Note
The parishioners of St. Ma-
ry’s/SS. Peter and Paul’s Parish
extend a special thank you to Co-
larusso’s Cafe for supporting
their parish discretionary fun-
draiser. Any business that is in-
terested in supporting the par-
ish’s 2011-2012 campaign should
call the parish office at 457-
3412.
Closing Mass DVDs
St. Mary’s/SS. Peter and Paul’s
Parish is accepting orders for
DVDs from the closing Mass of
SS. Peter and Paul Church.
DVDs are $16 each and $19 to
have it mailed directly to your
home. Please call the rectory at
457-3412 to place your order.
Raffle Winners
This week’s winners of St. Ma-
ry’s/SS. Peter and Paul’s Parish’s
Pot of Gold raffle: Mary Ann So-
chin, Erin Schmidt, Joe and Be-
tty Shimko, and Kay Shamnoski.
***
The Lower Lackawanna Val-
ley Sanitary Authority (LLVSA)
business office has moved to the
Avoca Borough Building, 752
Main St., due to the flood in Sep-
tember. Individuals can pay their
bills by mailing themto P.O. Box
2067Duryea,PA18642, or they
can pay them at any of the fol-
lowing locations: Avoca Munici-
pal Building (Monday through
Friday 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.); The
Medicine Shoppe, Old Forge;
Llewellyn’s Pharmacy, Avoca;
and The Hub, Dupont.
The business office is closed
on Saturdays and Sundays. It
will also be closed Election Day,
Veterans Day, and Thanksgiving
Day.
For more information, please
contact the LLVSA at 655-1665.
The cleanup at the plant is pro-
gressing. The business office
hopes to reopen there in mid-De-
cember.
VFWDonations
In order to keep the U.S. Post
Office operating in Duryea, the
members of the Duryea V.F.W.
Post 1227, which own the build-
ing, need to do major repairs at
the facility. The roof will be re-
placed soon, the ceiling tiles in-
side will be replaced, and a fresh
coat of paint will be applied to
the ceiling.
To help offset the cost of these
repairs, the community can send
donations to Building Fund #2
c/o of Penn Security Bank, Main
Street,Duryea,PA18642.
Langcliffe Exercise
The Langcliffe Ladies Exer-
cise program meets Monday
through Friday from 7-8 a.m.
The suggested donation is $20
monthly.
The group is considering add-
ing an hour-long class on Satur-
day at 10 a.m. The suggested do-
nationfor the class is $5for those
who do not attend the weekly
class. For more information,
please call 881-3379.
Remembrance Mass
St. Mary’s/SS. Peter and Paul’s
Parish will have their annual All
Saints’/All Souls’ Remem-
brance Mass today at 11 a.m. at
St. Mary’s Church, 715 Haw-
thorne St. All of the deceased
parishioners will be remembered
at this time. Those whohave died
this past year will be honored by
having a family member or
friend carry a candle in their
memory to the altar at the begin-
ning of the Liturgy.
BBQ Chicken Today
Boy Scout Troop 316 will have
an open fire barbeque chicken
dinner today from 11 a.m. to 4
p.m. at the corner of Main and
Hawthorne streets. The menu
consists of a half of a barbeque
chicken, a baked potato, coles-
law, a dessert, and a roll. Tickets
are $10 each and can be pur-
chased at the event.
Halloween Party
St. Mary’s/SS. Peter and Paul’s
Parish will have its inaugural
safe trick-or-treating and Hallo-
ween party today from 3-7 p.m.
at St. Mary’s School, 742 Spring
St. Children up to 14 are invited
to trick-or-treat throughout the
school and enjoy games, prizes,
face painting, food, drinks, mu-
sic, and entertainment by Johnny
Superstar. Please be sure to bring
an adult and a trick-or-treat bag
to the party.
This project is beingorganized
by Samantha Iovacchini in ful-
fillment of the service require-
ments for the Girl Scout Silver
Award. This project is also sup-
ported by Cub Scout Pack 316,
Boy Scout Troop 316, Venture
Crews 3701 and 2025, and Girl
Scout Troop 3701.
Cemetery Service
St. Mary’s/SS. Peter and Paul’s
Parish will have All Souls’ Day
cemetery services today. The
service in SS. Peter and Paul’s
Cemetery will take place at 2
p.m. followed by the service in
St. Mary’s Cemetery at 4 p.m.
All Saints Day
St. Mary’s/SS. Peter and Paul’s
Parish will have Masses for All
Saints’ Day Tuesday, Nov. 1 at 9
a.m., noon, and 7 p.m. at St. Ma-
ry’s Church, 715 Hawthorne St.
The vigil Mass will take place
Monday, Oct. 31 at 5 p.m.
There will not be Eucharistic
adoration on November 1 due to
the Holy Day Masses.
Yard Waste
Avoca Borough will have yard
waste collections Tuesday, Nov. 1
and15 weather permitting. In ad-
dition to collecting grass clip-
pings and leaves, the borough
workers will also collect other
yard waste including shrubs,
hedge clippings, and tree limbs.
Please note that grass clippings,
leaves, and brush must be placed
in separate containers.
Collection items should be
placed curbside by 8 a.m. on the
collection date.
Recycling Reminder
Avoca residents are invited to
recycle newspaper and commin-
gledglass, plastic, andmetal bot-
tles, cans, and jars every
Wednesday from8 a.m. to 8 p.m.
in the Moosic Recycling Truck
at the Avoca Municipal Garage,
1106 Plane St. All lids should be
removed and disposed in your
home trash. Avoca residents can
also recycle corrugated card-
board on the first Thursday of
each month from8 a.m. to 8 p.m.
in the Moosic Recycling Truck
at the Avoca Municipal Garage.
Avoca has recently been ad-
vised by Moosic Borough that
some Avoca Borough residents
are not abiding by the rules. Avo-
ca will be billed for dumping
fees for all non recyclable mate-
rials. Recycling calendars are
available in the lobby of the Avo-
ca Municipal Building and in a
box on the recycling truck.
Food Giveaway
The Avoca Lions Club will
have their monthly food give-
away Thursday, Nov. 3 from 4-
6:30 p.m. at the Bethel United
Methodist Church, 532 Main St.
Volunteers are needed to unload
the truck at 1:30 p.m. Individuals
who use this service are encour-
aged to bring boxes and bags
with them for their goods.
For more information, please
call Mary Ann at 457-7619.
VFWAuxiliary
The Ladies AuxiliarytoV.F.W.
Post 8335 will meet Monday,
Nov. 7 at 7 p.m. in the post home,
915 Main St. President June Fitz-
gerald will preside over the
meeting.
The auxiliary will sponsor a
bingo party Wednesday, Nov. 9
for the patients at the VA Med-
ical Center inWilkes-Barre. Un-
wrapped donations for the party
can be dropped off at the post
home until 5:30 p.m. on the day
of the event. The ladies will meet
and leave at that time for the par-
ty.
In other auxiliary news, the la-
dies will have their annual
Christmas party Saturday, Dec. 3
at 6 p.m. at the post home. The
chairperson is Betty Lewis, and
the co-chair is Sandy Rosser.
Guests of members are welcome
to attend. Gifts will be ex-
changed and reservations can be
made until December 1 by call-
ing Mary Orluk at 457-5999 or
June Fitzgeraldat 457-9604. The
hostesses for the evening will be
Patricia Rinkus, Marilyn
O’Boyle, and Mickey Vermac.
Chicken Dinner
The Rev. Joseph Bertha, Ph.D.
and the parishioners of St. Mi-
chael the Archangel Byzantine
Catholic Church invite the com-
munity to their 15th annual feast
day dinner Sunday, Nov. 13 from
1-3 p.m. in the church hall, 205
North Main St., Pittston. The
menu includes stuffed boneless
chickenbreast, mashedpotatoes,
gravy, green beans, cake, and
Queen of the Apostles opening Mass next Sunday
AVOCA
JACKIE BORTHWICK-GALVIN
457-3351
avocahappenings@verizon.net
See AVOCA, Page 44
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ELECT
Deanna
Farrell
Paid for by the Committee to Elect Deanna Farrell
Wyoming Area School Director
Your Singular
Independent Candidate
Sacred Heart of Jesus Church
and Holy Mother of Sorrows
PNCC will observe Cemetery
Sunday today.
Sacred Heart will have with a
prayer service in church begin-
ning at 1:00 p.m. and blessing at
the cemetery at 1:45 p.m.
Holy Mother of Sorrows Cem-
etery Service will be held at 2:00
p.m. at their Parish Cemetery. If
ir rains, prayer service will be in
the cemetery chapel.
Pumpkin Patch Party
Dupont Borough will sponsor
a Smurf Halloween Pumpkin
Patch Party at the Park Pavilion
on Monday evening, Oct. 31,
from4:30-6:30 p.m. Children up
to 12 are welcome to pick a
pumpkin from the Smurf Pump-
kin Patch, enjoy hot dogs, drinks
and treat bags under the pavilion.
The Pittston Area Leos Club will
be on hand to help Papa Smurf.
Halloween Lottery
Last chance to buy tickets for
the Halloween $100 Lottery Bas-
ket displayedat the municipal of-
fice. Chances are $1.00 each and
all processes are used for the an-
nual Party in the Park and the
Children’s’ Halloween and
Christmas party. Tickets can be
purchased at the municipal of-
fice during business hours. Win-
ner will be picked at Smurf
Pumpkin Patch Party on Hallo-
ween.
Safety Stations
The Dupont Lions will have
Halloween safety stations for the
ghosts and globins at the home
of Lion Stan Golembiewski, 320
Center St., Cake Studio, 288
Main St. and Paddock, 115 Hold-
en St. They will be serving hot
chocolate and goblin goodies for
all to enjoy.
Crime Watch
The Crime Watch Committee
held their October meeting Tues-
day with guest speaker Assistant
District Attorney Molly Hanlon
Mirabito. Ten Neighborhood
Crime Watch signs have been
placed in Quail Hill, Lidy’s Rd.,
Lackawanna Ave., Chestnut St.,
Walnut St and on Elmby the Lit-
tle League Park.
The Crime Watch Committee
will help the Dupont Hose Com-
pany Police Benefit selling 50/
50 chances. Any member that
wishes to help at this event is
asked to contact any Crime
Watch officer. The next meeting
is scheduled for Nov. 29 at 6:30
at the municipal buildingcouncil
chambers.
Scholarship Winner
William Borysewicz, son of
Rose Borysewicz, Dupont who
was awarded a $2,000 scholar-
ship recently from the Pulaski
Scholarship Committee of
Northeastern Pa. at the Second
Annual Pulaski Scholarship Ball
held at Gus Genetti Hotel and
Conference Center.
Purse Auction
The West Pittston Council of
Salvation Army is holding their
Fourth Annual Purse Auction on
Nov. 2. The sale/auction is at 214
Luzerne Avenue in West Pittston
at the Salvation Army Church.
Everyone is welcome. Start time
is 6:00 p.m. All proceeds will
benefit the Women’s programs at
the Salvation Army, West Pitt-
ston. Contact Major Sheryl Her-
shey 655-5947 or Sheryl.her-
shey@use.Salvationarmy.org
Lions Raffle
The Lions annual fundraiser is
underway. Tickets are $10 and
are available from any Lion
member. Match the Lottery tick-
ets will begin on Nov. 28 and run
through Dec. 24. All proceeds
benefit the Halloween Safety
Stations, Children’s Christmas
Party and annual Easter Egg
Hunt.
Eco-Tip
Here is Joey’s Eco-Tip of the
week: When you turn your fur-
nace on, make sure that there is
nothing near it. This will de-
crease the chance of fire and will
increase airflow!
WAC Cash Bingo
Wyoming Area Catholic PTG
Cash Bingo will be held today,
Sunday, October 30, in the
School Auditorium. Doors open
at 12:30; games start at 1 p.m.
Tickets are $20 and include 20
regular games and door prize
drawings. There will also be spe-
cial games, a bake sale and 50/50
drawing. Tickets will be availa-
ble at the door.
Sacred Heart Meetings
Sacred Heart of Jesus Church
meeting dates: Women’s Society
on Tuesday, Nov. 1, at 6:30 p.m.
in the church hall; Holy Name
Society on Wednesday, Nov. 2 at
7 p.m. in the church hall; Choir
on Thursday, Nov. 3, at 6:30 p.m.
in the church loft.
Food Collection
Sacred Heart of Jesus and Ho-
ly Mother of Sorrows Church
will take part intheir annual food
collection for the Greater Pitt-
ston Food Bank. Food Items
needed: any canned foods that
would make a holiday dinner,
such as, dry stuffing mix, gravy,
cranberry sauce, vegetables,
soups and sweet potatoes. All
donations can be dropped off at
the weekend Masses at both
Churches on Nov. 5-6 and Nov
12-13.Outside of Mass times you
can leave your offerings on the
back porch at Sacred Heart
Church.
VFW Auxiliary
The Ladies Auxiliary of the
Przybytek-Kundlas VFW Post
4909 will hold their monthly
business meeting on Tuesday,
Nov. 1, beginning at 7:00 p.m. at
the Post Home. Hostesses for
this meeting are Ruth Hieme and
Mary Janoski.
Service Schedule
Dupont services schedule:
Monday, Oct. 31 - Purple re-
fuses bags
Tuesday, Nov.1 - Yard waste -
30 lb. limit
Wednesday, Nov. 2 – Recy-
cling cans and bottles
Raffle Winners
Weekly Winners of Elko’s Jr.
Bowlers annual fundraiser: 1st
Prize - #144 - Deb Scaramastro;
2nd Prize - #211 - Rose Dough-
erty; 3rd Prize - #58 - Tamara
Dudek; 4th Prize - #95 - Katelyn
Kimsel.
Bowling Results
Dupont Lanes Bowling
Leagues scores:
Junior/Senior
High Scratch Series Scores:
Men’s Division: Billy Jr. Elko,
600; Peter Kulick, 594; Michael
Lenchak, 583; Sam Carlen, 561;
Stephen Yuhas, 559.
Women’s Division: Katie
Wynn, 453; Courtney Osiecki,
444; Michelle Grossbauer, 419.
Pittston Twp. VFW
High Scratch Series Scores:
Joe Jr. Walsh, 636; Jack Casper,
602; Jody Marranca, 586; Gene
Wasko, 579; Jim Stefanowicz,
572; Joe Argenio, 569; Joe JR.
Walsh, 536; John Blattner, 531;
Joe Dalessandro, 525; Tom
Judge, 517.
Warehouse Mixed
High Scratch Series Scores:
Men’s Division: Matt Char-
ney, 744; JohnBorgis, 646; Chris
DeHass, 643; Steve Seeley, 617;
Ed Markovich, 571.
Women’s Division: Michelle
Moscatelli, 413; Melony Yurek,
381; Nicole August, 341..
Magic Circle
High Scratch Series Scores:
Men’s Division: Paul Chmiel,
676; Don Whiting, 629; Matt
Charney, 597; Bill Pupa, 594; Ed
Wasko, 574; Francis Pupa, 559;
Joe Sr. Wruble, 553; Rick Sr. As-
ton, 552; Kyle Wagner, 551; Jo-
seph Chmiel, 548.
Women’s Division: Marythe-
resa Pupa, 474; Lis Heck, 435;
Ashley Fuller, 272.
Universal
High Scratch Series Scores:
Dale Reese, 645; Dan Polerecki,
631; William Elko, 630; Jim La-
velle III, 624; Edward Collins,
609; Jerry Coggins, 600; David
Titton, 597; Francis Pupa, 587;
Ryan O’Malley, 576; Lowell
Stoss, 571.
National
High Scratch Series Scores:
Matt Felter, 683; Mark Kulick,
668; John Pisano, 641; Allyn Sr.
Ferretti, 640; Jerry Coggins,
628; Dale Reese, 626; Keith
Weinschnek, 623; Edward Col-
lins, 608; Michael Kivak, 606;
Steve Seeley, 604.
Dupont Bowlerettes
High Scratch Series Scores:
MaryTheresa Pupa, 565; Donna
Kasa, 525; Trisha Chmeil, 470;
Ann Alfano, 457; Kim Kishel,
441; Rose McDade, 434; Ma-
ryAnn Shugdinis, 431; Debbie
Stevens, 426; Gracelynn Wil-
liamson, 415.
Dupont churches to observe Cemetery Sunday today
DUPONT
ANN MARIE PADDOCK
654-0897
dupont.news@comcast.net
The Dupont Volunteer Hose Comapny will present a "Benefit for
Our Brothers" a night of entertainment to support the Dupont
Police Department on Saturday, Nov. 5, at 7:00 p.m. at the Fire
Light Lounge, Dupont Hose Company, 308 Main St. Dupont. There
will be live entertainment by The Dawgs and Fork-N-Nuts and light
refreshments will be served. Admission is $10.00 and will be avail-
able at the door. For more information contact Don Hudzinski, Jr.,
benefit chairman, at 654-4222. First row, Janet Rooney, treasurer
Crime Watch, Officer Charles Yarick and Hudzinski, Jr. Second
row, Susan Gregory, secretary Crime Watch and Pina Hansen,
vice-president Crime Watch. Back row, Joseph Nolan, president
Crime Watch.
See DUPONT, Page 44
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201 Foote Avenue, Duryea
FREE DELIVERY! CALL 457-8881
OPEN DAILY: 6 a.m.-7 p.m. • Saturday & Sunday ‘til 5 p.m.
REHOSKI’S MARKET
Center Cut Pork Chops or Roast ........$2.59 lb
Country Style Ribs............................. $2.59 lb.
Quick Fry Pork Chops........................ $2.59 lb.
Stuffing Pork Chops .......................... $2.59 lb.
Whole Chicken Breast ......................... $.99 lb.
Smoked Bacon.................................. $4.99 lb.
Bologna............................................$3.99 lb.
Polish Imported Ham........................$6.99 lb.
Cooper Cheese .................................$4.99 lb.
FRESH & SMOKED KIELBASI
Although the devastating
flooding that heavily impacted
Duryea occurred nearly two
months ago, many people in
town are just beginning to reas-
semble their homes and lives,
and they still need our help.
The “Help for Duryea Flood
Victims” relief program is still
accepting donations for flood
victims.
The volunteers organizing this
effort encourage not only Du-
ryea residents but also any per-
son who has been impacted by
the flood to come to the newcol-
lection site at the former Zam-
ber’s building, 177 Foote Ave., to
gather items to assist them as
they rebuild their lives.
Currently, the volunteers have
numerous pieces of bedroom
and living room furniture avail-
able, and they are seeking small
kitchen appliances.
If you would like to help or to
schedule a pick-up time, please
call Rose at 259-8629.
Tax Relief
Speaking of the flood, the
Pennsylvania Institute of Certi-
fied Public Accountants (PIC-
PA), RSVP Volunteer Program,
and the Area Agency on Aging
for Luzerne and Wyoming
Counties will host eight pro-
grams to help local flood victims
amend their 2010 federal income
tax returns.
Some taxpayers may be able to
receive a refund that can help
them rebuild following the da-
maging floods from Hurricane
Irene and Tropical Storm Lee.
Two programs will detail
which tax forms need to be filed
and what taxpayers need to have
in order to support their return,
including proof of loss, value,
and damage sustained.
The information-only pro-
gram which will take place in
Duryea is Tuesday, Nov. 1 from
6-7 p.m. at the Duryea Munici-
pal Building, 315 Main St.
Sanitary Authority
The Lower Lackawanna Val-
ley Sanitary Authority (LLVSA)
business office has moved to the
Avoca Borough Building, 752
Main St., due to the flood. Indi-
viduals can pay their bills by
mailing them to P.O. Box 2067
Duryea, PA 18642, or they can
pay them at any of the following
locations: Avoca Municipal
Building (Monday through Fri-
day 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.); The Med-
icine Shoppe, Old Forge; Lle-
wellyn’s Pharmacy, Avoca; and
The Hub, Dupont.
The business office is closed
on Saturdays and Sundays. It
will also be closed Election Day,
Veterans Day, and Thanksgiving
Day.
For more information, please
contact the LLVSA at 655-1665.
The cleanup at the plant is pro-
gressing. The business office
hopes to reopen there in mid-De-
cember.
Germania Bingo
The Germania Hose Company
bingo is back and under new
management. Weekly bingo will
take place every Tuesday at the
hose company, 430 Foote Ave.
The doors open at 5 p.m. There
will be 20 regular games, $100
prizes, and a guaranteed $1,000
jackpot.
There will also be an early bird
jackpot at 6:30 p.m. Rides are
available by calling 451-3750 or
407-4236.
Wiffle Ball Tourney
The members of the Germania
Hose Company thank all of the
teams that participated in their
inaugural wiffle ball tournament
and for helping to make it such a
success.
The Town Tavern team won
the tournament, and runners-up
were the Iron Pigs. Ron Ralston
from the Duryea Little League
and Bob Letteri fromthe Duryea
Wildcats provided the field to
host the tournament. The mem-
bers of the Germania Hose Com-
pany plan to have another tour-
nament in May.
VFWDonations
In order to keep the U.S. Post
Office operating in Duryea, the
members of the Duryea V.F.W.
Post 1227, which own the build-
ing, need to do major repairs at
the facility.
The roof will be replaced
soon, the ceiling tiles inside will
be replaced, and a fresh coat of
paint will be applied to the ceil-
ing.
To help offset the cost of these
repairs, the community can send
donations to Building Fund #2
c/o of Penn Security Bank, Main
Street, Duryea, PA18642.
Wildcats Playoffs
The Duryea Wildcats playoff
games are today. The B Team
will play at the Wildcats’ field,
andthe CTeamwill travel toFor-
ty Fort.
The Super Bowl is set for Sun-
day, Nov. 6. Visit the Duryea
Wildcats Football page on Face-
book for location information.
Participants on teams which
are not eligible to play in either
game are encouraged to return
their uniforms to the equipment
stand Tuesday from 5:30-6:30
p.m.
Also, any child moving to the
next teamlevel is eligible to play
in the Charity Bowl. These par-
ticipants should see his or her
head coach for details.
The election of the board
members will take place Tues-
day, Nov. 15 at 7 p.m. at the con-
cession stand.
The Wildcats’ banquet is De-
cember 4 from 1-5 p.m. at the
Best Western Genetti Hotel &
Conference Center,Wilkes-
Barre. Tickets are on sale at the
concession stand during all prac-
tices, home games, and away B
games.
The members of the Duryea
Wildcats program thank the
Avoca Little League for allowing
themto practice at their field un-
der the lights.
Excelsior Meeting
The Excelsior Hose Co. No. 2
will have its regular monthly
meeting Wednesday, Nov. 2 at 7
p.m. at the hose company, 798
Foote Ave.
Purse Auction
The West Pittston Council of
the Salvation Army is having its
annual purse auction sale
Wednesday, Nov. 2 at 6 p.m. at
the Salvation Army Church, 214
Luzerne Ave., West Pittston. All
proceeds will benefit the Salva-
tion Army’s women’s programs
at the church in West Pittston.
For more information, please
contact Major Sheryl Hershey at
655-5947 or Sheryl.her-
shey@use.Salvationarmy.org.
Council Meeting
The Duryea Borough Council
meeting and work session has
been changed from Tuesday,
Nov. 8toTuesday, Nov. 15at 6:30
p.m. due to Election Day. The
public is invited to attend.
Roast Beef Dinner
The members of the Duryea
V.F.W. Post 1227 will have their
55th annual roast beef dinner
Friday, Nov. 11 and Saturday,
Nov. 12 from4-8 p.m. at the post
home, 492 Stephenson St. Tick-
ets are $9. Takeouts will be avail-
able too. All proceeds will bene-
fit the VFW’s programs which
benefit veterans, their families,
currentlydeployedservice mem-
bers, and the youth of the com-
munity.
Chicken Dinner
The Rev. Joseph Bertha, Ph.D.
and the parishioners of St. Mi-
chael the Archangel Byzantine
Catholic Church invite the com-
munity to their 15th annual feast
day dinner Sunday, Nov. 13 from
1-3 p.m. in the church hall, 205
North Main St., Pittston. The
menu includes stuffed boneless
chickenbreast, mashedpotatoes,
gravy, green beans, cake, and
your choice of coffee, tea, or a
soft drink. Dinners are $9 for
adults and $6 for children. Take-
outs will be available too. There
will also be a piggy sale during
the dinner hours. In addition to
the great food, there will also be
a raffle with various prizes.
Legion Auxiliary
The American Legion Ladies
Auxiliary Post 585 will meet
Tuesday, Nov. 15 at 6:30 p.m. at
the post home, 329 Main St. All
upcoming events will be dis-
cussed at this time.
Auxiliary dues are now being
accepted for 2012. Anyone who
has not paid their dues or updat-
ed their information is asked to
do so as soon as possible. Also
any female, adult or child, who is
interested in becoming a mem-
ber of the auxiliary, is welcome
to inquire about the application
process.
To be eligible, the applicant
must be a relative of a veteran,
living or deceased. For more in-
formation, call the post at 457-
4242 or stop by the post home.
Until Next Time
That’s about it for this week! If
you would like something to ap-
pear in next Sunday’s edition of
the Duryea News, please e-mail
or call me with your information
by Thursday at noon. You can e-
mail me at duryeahappen-
ings@verizon.net or call me at
457-3351. Please be sure to in-
clude your name and phone
number with any correspond-
ence in case I need to reach you.
Have a great week!
Flood relief program continues for Duryea residents
DURYEA
JACKIE BORTHWICK-GALVIN
457-3351
duryeahappenings@verizon.net
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Members of the Wyoming Ar-
ea Drama Club will perform a
variety of acts at a Cabaret style
event held on Saturday, Nov. 5, in
the Wyoming Area Secondary
Center Cafeteria, Memorial
Street, Exeter at 7 p.m. Admis-
sion is $5 which includes a free
dessert and beverage. The public
is invited.
Friendly Circle
The Friendly Circle Seniors
will meet on Thursday, Nov. 3, at
1 p.m. in the Community Room
on Schooley Ave, Exeter. Eva
Naples is the host. Bingo will be
played and refreshments served.
New members are always wel-
come.
Vera Bradley Bingo
The JFK Elementary School
in the Wyoming Area School
District is holding a Vera Bra-
dley Bingo Fundraiser on Sun-
day, Nov. 13, at 2 p.m. in the
Wyoming Area Secondary Cen-
ter cafeteria, 20 Memorial
Street, Exeter. Tickets are $20.
Tickets will be available at the
door but seating is limited.
To purchase tickets in ad-
vance, make check payable to
JFK PTO and send to 50 Penn
Avenue, Exeter PA 18643, Attn:
Bingo. Include name, address,
phone and e-mail address. For
more information, please call
570-655-6130. Doors open at 1
p.m.
Purse Auction
The West Pittston Council of
Salvation Army purse auction
will take place on Nov. 2 at 214
Luzerne Avenue in West Pittston
at the Salvation Army Church.
Everyone is welcome. Start time
is 6 p.m. All proceeds to benefit
the Women’s Programs at the
Salvation Army West Pittston.
Contact Major Sheryl Hershey
655-5947 at Sheryl.her-
shey@use.Salvationarmy.org
Cosmopolitan Seniors
The Cosmopolitan Seniors, a
Project HEAD club, will meet
onTuesday, Nov. 1, at 1p.m. at St.
Anthony Center, in Exeter. Vic
Malinowski will preside. Host/
hostesses are Theresa Blasavage,
Toni Hall, Marcella Fountain,
Johanna and Vic Malinowski.
The previous meeting was at-
tended by 52 members and two
guests. After the call to order by
President Malinowski, Vice
President Joe Kleback led the
group in prayer, pledge of alle-
giance and a patriotic song. Sec-
retary Terri Mislan read the min-
utes, and a report was rendered
by Treasurer Amy Alpaugh.
President Vic introduced Ro-
semary Golinski as a prospective
member and welcomed back
several members who missed
meetings.
After the meeting the group
enjoyed refreshments and bingo
was played. 50/50 winners were:
Aggie Abromavage, Amy Al-
paugh, Florence Aquilina, Share
Dailey, and Ann Mattei. Marion
Kratzer won the special game
and the Bingo jackpot was won
by Mary Coleman.
Cosmopolitan Seniors travel
coordinator Johanna is accepting
reservations for a Mount Airy
Casino trip on Wednesday, Nov.
9. Pickups in Exeter and Pittston.
You do not have to be a member
to come on these trips. Details
can be obtained from Johanna at
655-2720.
St. Barbara Parish
St. Barbara’s Parish will not
have Religious Education class-
es on Monday, Oct. 31. Classes
will resume on Monday, Nov. 7.
The American Red Cross will
conduct a Blood Drive at St. Bar-
bara’s Parish on Wednesday,
Nov. 9, from1 p.m. to 6 p.m.
Reminder
That is all for this week; re-
member if you have any events
or news you would like listed in
the Exeter Town column, you
can reach me at 287-3349 oreci-
priani@comcast.net.
Wyoming Area Drama Club Cabaret Saturday
EXETER
EILEEN CIPRIANI
287-3349
ecipriani@comcast.net
West Pittston Parks, Recre-
ation, and Beautification Board
will hold their annual Halloween
party and parade today at 2:00
p.m. at the Moose Lodge in West
Pittston.
Children of all ages are wel-
come.
Prizes will be awarded.
Rams in Playoffs
The Rams A-team football
players, accompanied by the
award-winning A-team cheer-
leaders, will take on the Dallas
Jr. Mounts at the Dana Street
School Field today at 3:00 p.m.
The winner of this game will ad-
vance to the Wyoming Valley
West Youth Football and Cheer-
leading Conference Super Bowl
on Nov. 6.
Those players not involved in
playoffs or the Charity Bowl is
reminded to visitwww.westpitt-
stonrams.com for uniform re-
turn dates the first week of No-
vember.
Parents are reminded to assist
the board by laundering the prac-
tice and game pants and to wipe
down the shoulder pads and hel-
met with either a cleansing tow-
elette or mild bleach solution.
The West Pittston Rams an-
nounced that letters of interest
for 2012 board positions are be-
ing accepted until Nov. 30.
Elections will be held in De-
cember. Interested parties may
submit their letter to presi-
dent@westpittstonrams.com or
mail to PO Box 3127, West Pitt-
ston, PA18643.
Purse Auction
The West Pittston Council of
Salvation Army will conduct
their 4th Annual Purse Sale/
Auction on Nov. 2.
The sale/auction is at 214 Lu-
zerne Avenue in West Pittston at
the Salvation Army Church. Ev-
eryone is welcome. Start time is
6:00 p.m.
All proceeds to benefit the
Women’s Programs here at the
Salvation Army West Pittston.
Contact Major Sheryl Hersheyat
655-5947 or email her at:She-
ryl.hershey@use.Salvationar-
my.org.
Drama Parents
The Wyoming Area Drama
Club Parents Association will
hold their monthly meeting on
Wednesday, Nov. 2, at the
Wyoming Area Secondary Cen-
ter library beginning at 7:00 p.m.
All are welcome.
Cabaret Saturday
Members of the Wyoming Ar-
ea Drama Club will perform a
variety of acts at a Cabaret style
event held on Saturday, Nov. 5.
The event will take place at the
Wyoming Area Secondary Cen-
ter Cafeteria, Memorial Street,
Exeter, and will begin at 7:00
p.m.
Admission is $5.00, which in-
cludes a free dessert and bever-
age.
The public is invited.
Breakfast Buffet
Breakfast is continuing to be
served at the Moose Lodge to the
community from 7:00 a.m. to
12:30 p.m.
The Moose Lodge is located at
425Exeter Avenue. Cost is $6.95
for adults and $4 for children.
Chef Pat Greenfield from Gri-
co’s Restaurant will be preparing
the meals.
Street Department
Leaf pick up has begun. Resi-
dents are requested to place leav-
es in open containers on tree
lawns.
No leaves are to be placed on
the road.
Library is Open
The Library is nowtemporari-
ly open at the site of the former
Blockbuster store at the Insala-
co’s Shopping Center, Wyoming
Avenue, located next to Rite Aid.
Youcanvisit the libraryduring
their regular hours.
Taxes Due
West Pittston Tax Collector
George L. Miller announces tax-
es are now in the Face Value
phase until Dec. 1.
Office hours are: Tuesday eve-
nings from 6:00 p.m. to 8:00
p.m., Saturdays 9:00 a.m. until
11:00 a.m. and by appointment.
If a receipt is requested, please
enclose a self-addressed,
stamped envelope along with the
entire bill.
For an appointment, call 570-
655-3801. Any property owners
not receiving a tax bill are re-
quested to contact the tax office
at 655-7782 ext. 232.
Birthday Notes
Celebrating this week are: Jo-
lene Carey, 10/31; Amanda Fas-
ciana, 11/1; Joey Sherinski, 11/1;
Eric Speece, 11/1; Mark Wanko,
11/3; and Bob Lauck, 11/5.
Thought for the Week
Give light, and the darkness
will disappear of itself.
Quote of the Week
“The only man who makes no
mistakes is the man who never
does anything.” – Theodore
Roosevelt
Bumper Sticker
One should count each day as
a separate life.
Halloween party and parade today at the Moose Club
WESTPITTSTON
Tony Callaio
654-5358
tonyc150@verizon.net
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Due to poor weather, the
Wyoming Recreation Board
Halloween parade originally
scheduled for yesterday has been
rescheduled to today, Sunday,
October 30, at 3 p.m. There will
be a prize for scariest, prettiest,
funniest and most original cos-
tumes and treats for the children
who come dressed in costume up
to age 12.
Cabaret Saturday
Members of the Wyoming Ar-
ea Drama Club will perform a
variety of acts at a Cabaret style
event held on Saturday, Nov. 5, at
the Secondary Center Cafeteria,
Memorial Street, Exeter at 7
p.m. Admission is $5 which in-
cludes a free dessert and bever-
age. The public is invited.
Friendly Circle
The Friendly Circle Seniors
will meet on Thursday, Novem-
ber 3 at 1p.m. in the Community
Room on Schooley Ave, Exeter.
Eva Naples is the host. Bingo
will be played and refreshments
served. New members are al-
ways welcome.
Chicken and Biscuits
Wyoming Masonic Lodge
#468, 821Wyoming Ave Wyom-
ing will hold a chicken and bis-
cuit dinner on Saturday, Nov. 5
serving from 4 to 7 p.m. for
$8.50 per person. Take outs
available.
Rotary Happy
The Wyoming Rotary will
hold a Happy Hour fund raiser
on Nov. 4 from5:30-9:30 p.m. at
Rooney’s Irish Pub, Main St Pitt-
ston. The event benefits Wyom-
ing Rotary charities primarily
within the Wyoming Area
School District. Complimentary
pizza will be served by Roo-
ney’s. The event includes a 50/50
Raffle, Great Restaurants of
Wyoming Valley raffle. Dona-
tions of any amount are always
appreciated. Bar food and din-
ners are available all night.
Senior citizens
The Wyoming/ West Wyom-
ing Seniors will meet on Tues-
day, Nov. 1, at 1:30 p.m. in St
Monica meeting rooms with
President Frank Perfinski pre-
siding. Servers are Eleanor Se-
neski, Maryann Paluck and Eli-
nor Yurek.
Fifty-Fifty winners were Elea-
nor Seneski, Ann Kosloski, Joe
Kosloski, Nancy Marcy, Ma-
ryann Paluck and Eva Caseri.
Special prize winnerswere Irene
Zelinski, Joe Shemanski, There-
sa Alexander, Olga Mizin, Joan
Kwasny and Helen Ostroski.
Plans were discussed for the
Christmas dinner party to be
held on December 6.
Bingo jackpot winners were
Joe Kosloski, Eva Caseri and
Angie Mastruzso. There will be
refreshments and bingo will be
played.
Newmembers are always wel-
come. Call Angie Mastruzzo,
membership chairperson, at
693-1104 if interested.
Pork and Sauerkraut
Wyoming United Methodist
Church, 376 Wyoming Ave,
Wyoming, will offer a pork and
sauerkraut dinner on Nov. 5 from
4 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Dine in or use
the drive thru for takeout. The
cost is adults $9/children $5. For
more information or tickets call
693-2821 or 693-1303.
Wyoming Library
For valuable information, ac-
cess the Library on the web
at:www.wyomingfreelibrary.org
or call 570-693-1364.
The Library is nowopen Mon-
daynights from6:00p.m. to8:00
p.m. The Scrabble Club for
adults is heldat this time. Several
groups have joined.
Now thru Dec. 16 the library
will have story time for pre-
school children ages 3 to 5 from
11 a.m. to noon. There will be
stories, snacks and crafts. Space
is limited so please call the Li-
braryat 693-1364toreserve your
child’s spot.
The library’s inaugural vendor
fund raising event is Nov. 5 from
9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Wyoming
Hose Company at 33 East 8th
Street. Vendors include: Ameri-
can Girl Clothes, Avon, Books &
Raffle, Joanne’s videos, Mary
Kay, Thirty one, Celebrating
Home, Pampered Chef, Lia
Sophia, Mia Bella, Scentsy, De-
signer Jewelry, Avon, Creative
Memories, NEPA Gold, Cele-
brating Home, European Trea-
sures, Dennison Wood Turning,
Discovery Toys, Chocolate Dis-
coveries, Perpetually Yours Jew-
elry Designs, Lia Sophia, Miss
Stephanie’s Potions (fairy and
monster potions), children’s
scarves and purses, kitchen
items, Christmas ornaments and
crocheted baby blankets.
The Friends will have a book
sale and a hand-crafted Ameri-
can Girl Doll clothes sale with
prices starting at $5. All pro-
ceeds go to the library. Parking is
on 8th St. and behind the library.
The lot is connected to the Hose
Co. side entrance.
St. Monica’s Parish
St. Monica’s Men’s group will
sponsor pasta dinner at the
church hall on 363 W. 8th Street,
from12 to 5 p.m. on Sunday Nov.
13. The pasta dinner includes sal-
ad, bread and butter, desert, cof-
fee and beverage. Take-outs are
available. Bring your own con-
tainer. It’s $8 for adults and $6
for children under 12. Tickets
may be purchased after Mass or
by calling Tom Tomsak at 237-
2188.
Tickets are available for St.
Monica Parish Fall Raffle featur-
ing a handmade Queen Size
Quilt as first prize, $250 second
prize and a basket of cheer third
prize. The drawing will be held
on Nov. 13. Tickets may be pur-
chased after all Masses at St. Jo-
seph’s Church and at Our Lady
of Sorrows Church. You may al-
so call the creator of the quilt,
Joann Kwasny at 283-3388 or
the Chairman of the Fundraising
Committee, TomTomsakat 237-
2188.
You can see a picture of the
quilt on the Parish website
atwww.stmonicanepa.com.
Once again St. Monica Parish
is doing the Baby Bottle project
for the Pro-Life Center in
Wilkes-Barre. Take a baby bottle
home and throw in your spare
change to support the cause. Re-
turn by October 31.
Reminder
That’s all for this week; if any-
one has any Wyoming news or
special events, such as birthdays
or anniversaries, I would like to
hear from you. You can contact
me at 287-3349, Fax 287-3349
orecipriani@comcast.net.
Recreation board Halloween parade set for today
THEWYOMINGS
EILEEN CIPRIANI
287-3349
ecipriani@comcast.net
West Wyoming Boy Scout Troop 366 held a Court of Honor on October 4 at the West Wyoming Hose Co #1. Hose #1 is the troop spon-
sor. The boys received merit badges fromsummer camp and Rank Advancements. Those who advanced in rank were: first row, M
Minnelli, D Corby, MCarlson, G Massa, D Thomas, B Berti, M. Sanflippo. Second row, C. Jackson, D. Kaminski, J. Berti, A. Shission, M.
Dovidas, N. Kaminski, P. Minnelli, N. Granteed, J. Bencho Missing fromphoto was D. Stahley
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West Wyoming resident She-
ryl Ann Klus recently attended
the 2011 International Confer-
ence on Children and Youth with
Behavioral Disorders in New
Orleans. As a sophomore at Le-
banon Valley College, Sheryl
Ann along with Cady Harman
and Chloe Shyakon completed a
research study with autistic chil-
dren, “Integrating Aerobic Exer-
cise in Early Intervention Autis-
tic Support Classrooms.”
Klus is a graduate of Wyom-
ing Area. She is currently major-
ing in Early Childhood Educa-
tion at Lebanon Valley College.
Sheryl Ann is the daughter of
David and Patricia Klus of West
Wyoming. Her brother Matthew
is a senior at Wyoming Area.
Sanitation Stickers
Sanitation stickers will be on
sale starting Nov. 1 at the Town
Hall, weekdays between the
hours of 8 a.m. and 4 p.m. All
residences in West Wyoming
must purchase a sticker. The cost
remains the same as last year,
$200.
If purchased before January
31, 2012, senior citizens (65 and
older) will receive a $25 rebate
($175), all others receive a $15
rebate ($185). If purchased from
February 1-28, 2012, the full
price will be charged, $200.
After February 28, 2012, the
cost will be $300 for the year and
citations will be filed with the
District Magistrate for noncom-
pliance with the Ordinance.
Stickers are also available
through the mail: West Wyom-
ing Borough Building, 464 West
8thStreet, P.O. Box 4035, 464
West 8thStreet, West Wyoming
PA18644.
For the added convenience of
residents, Visa, MasterCard and
Mac are accepted
Compost Yard
The West Wyoming Borough
compost yard will be closing for
the season on Nov. 12.
Leaf Collection
Residents are advised that
leaves need to be placed in open
containers in order to be collect-
ed.
Yard Waste
West Wyoming Borough yard
waste pick-ups will end at the
end on Nov. 10.
The schedule will be as fol-
lows, Nov. 10, 8th Street to the
Exeter Line. Nov. 3, Atherton
Section up to 8th Street but not
including 8th Street Residents
can call the Borough building to
arrange to drop off waste or re-
quest the truck be left at their res-
idence for large volume. Resi-
dents are advised if their yard
waste container weighs more
than 40 lbs the haulers will not
collect it. Residents are advised
that leaves need to be placed in
open containers in order to be
collected. Last yard waste col-
lection is Nov. 10.
Website
Visit the West Wyoming Web-
site atwww.westwyoming.org.
West Wyoming resident presents study on autistic children
WESTWYOMING
Sheryl Ann Klus, of West Wyoming, Dr. Cheryl George, Head of
Special Education Dept LVC, Cady Harman and Chloe Skylakon at
the international Conference on Children and Youth Behavioral
Disorders.
American
High Scratch Series Scores:
Edward Collins, 746; Dave
Kern, 731; Neal Elko, 684; Mark
Kulick, 680; Scott Kowalczyk,
641; John Grohowski, 634; Tom
Spurlin, 621; Gerry Reilly, 588;
Chris Kasa, 575; Al Jr. Cannarel-
la, 573.
Sunday Night Mixed
High Scratch Series Scores:
Men’s Division: Russ Stevens,
587; Joe Sr. Wruble, 577; Jim
Rowlands, 573; Vito Buzzetta,
489; Gene Wasko, 484.
Women’s Division: Karen
Umbra, 439; Mary Theresa Pu-
pa, 409; Courtney McKitish,
400; Paul Williamson, 399;
Gracelynn Williamson, 388.
Prep Boys
High Scratch Series Scores:
Evan Elko, 391; Joey Jones, 337;
Zachary Garbarino, 307; Jimmy
Dillon, 294; Dylan Kelly, 290;
Joey Wruble, 250; Tyler Grana-
han, 245; JohnBlackiewicz, 221;
CalvinSutcliffe, 214; CadenSut-
cliffe, 207.
Bantam/Prep Mixed
High Scratch Series Scores:
Men’s Division: Jeremy La-
velle, 191; Nicholas Aschen-
back, 169; Marc Piechota, 156;
Martin Kuna, 147; Jacob Dobro-
walski, 147;John Colarusso, 133;
Tyler Cegelka, 132; Zachary El-
ko, 127; Chaz Sciandra, 126; Ja-
cob Kenzakoski, 122.
Women’s Division: Isabella
Halapin, 187; Janelle Dudek,
154; Kacie Fisk, 117; Ashlyn
O’Donovan, 102; Makenzie Ka-
minski, 91; Madison Mesaris,
91; Emily Dessoye, 59.
Mixed Girls
High Scratch Series Scores:E-
rin Donnelly, 470; Rachael Sola-
no, 390; Katrina Dillon, 349;
Jordan Cegelka, 341; Hannah
Maruhnich, 319; Gina Kirkpa-
trick, 297; Samantha Piechota,
295; Alex McKitish, 291; Da-
nielle Zydko, 280; Kayla Hind-
marsh, 278.
Mixed Boys
High Scratch Series Scores:
Peter Kulick, 546; Spencer Sax-
on, 521; David Zydko, 507; Ste-
phen Yuhas, 501; Michael Elko,
458; Justin Coyne, 450; Anthony
Zimmerman, 444; Evan Espos-
tio, 438; Alex Ferretti, 405; Paul
Greco, 399.
Got News?
If you have an article which
you would like to submit you can
send the information todu-
pont.news@comcast.netor by
calling 407-0231.Send your
news items by Wednesday eve-
ning. Please include a contact
phone number.
Dupont
Continued from Page 40
your choice of coffee, tea, or a
soft drink. Dinners are $9 for
adults and $6 for children. Take-
outs will be available too. There
will also be a piggy sale during
the dinner hours. In addition to
the great food, there will also be
a raffle with various prizes.
Women’s Guild
St. Mary’s/SS. Peter and Paul’s
Parish’s women’s guild will meet
Sunday, Nov. 13 at 2 p.m. at St.
Mary’s School auditorium, 742
Spring St.
Pastoral Council
St. Mary’s/SS. Peter and Paul’s
Parish will have a pastoral coun-
cil meeting Monday, Nov. 14 at 7
p.m. at St. Mary’s Rectory, 715
Hawthorne St.
Social Concerns
St. Mary’s/SS. Peter and Paul’s
Parish will have a social con-
cerns committee meeting Tues-
day, Nov. 15 at 7 p.m. at St. Ma-
ry’s Rectory, 715 Hawthorne St.
Autumn Dinner-Dance
St. Mary’s/SS. Peter and Paul’s
Parish will have an autumn din-
ner dance Saturday, Nov. 19 from
6-11 p.m. in St. Mary’s School
hall, 742 Spring St. The event
will include a full dinner buffet
catered by Colarusso’s La Palaz-
zo followed by entertainment
with DJ Johnny Superstar play-
ing the greatest hits of the 50s,
60s, and 70s. There will also be a
grand raffle where patrons will
have an opportunity to win one
of two overnight getaway pack-
ages at the Courtyard Marriot,
Moosic, which also include a set
of lift tickets for Sno Mountain.
Dinner dance tickets are $17.50
per person and are available by
callingthe rectoryat 457-3412or
Jenny Long at 654-6239. Please
note soda and water will be pro-
vided, but patrons may bring
their own alcoholic beverages.
Dress is casual. Raffle tickets
will be on sale after the weekend
Masses on November 12 and 13
and at the dance.
Fire Dept. Raffle
The Avoca Fire Department is
currently sponsoring a prize raf-
fle. The drawing is November
20. The prizes include gift certif-
icates fromWal-Mart, Domino’s
Pizza, Cooper’s Seafood, Cine-
mark, Subway, Perkins, the
Moosic Diner, the Tipsy Turtle,
and a $50 gift card sponsored by
Piccini Surveying. There are al-
so free passes for snowtubing at-
SnoMountain. The grandprize is
a $500 Visa gift card. Tickets,
whichare $2eachor three for $5,
can be purchased by calling the
fire department at 457-2894.
They will also be available at St.
Mary’s/SS. Peter and Paul’s Par-
ish after the weekend Masses on
November 12 and 13. For more
information visit the station on
the web atwww.avocafire.net.
Worship Committee
St. Mary’s/SS. Peter and Paul’s
Parish’s worship committee will
meet Monday, Nov. 21 at 7 p.m.
at St. Mary’s Rectory, 715 Haw-
thorne St.
Basketball Camp
There will be a Stan Waleski
Black Friday Basketball Camp
Friday, Nov. 25 from 8 a.m. to 2
p.m. at the St. Joseph’s Oblates
Seminary gymnasium, 1880
Highway 315, Pittston. The
camp is open to boys and girls in
grades 2-8.
The camp features fundamen-
tals, skills, team play, competi-
tions, and fun. All attendees will
receive a camp T-shirt and certif-
icate. For registration informa-
tion, please contact Coach Wa-
leski at 457-1206 or stanwales-
ki@yahoo.com or Coach Lo-
Brutto at 654-8030.
Avoca
Continued from Page 39
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Sports
It was only fitting that three
days before Halloween, the
Wyoming Area football team got
a bit of a scare.
Northwest played the Warriors
tough in the first half as the West
Siders held just a slimeight-point
lead at halftime. But it was the
Wyoming Area offensive jugger-
naut that was downright scary in
the second half, racking up 337
yards onthegroundonits waytoa
dominating50-17victoryover the
Rangers on Friday night at Lewis
and Miller Memorial Stadium in
Shickshinny.
Nick O’Brien led the way with
another monster game for the
Warriors, checking in with 216
yards rushing and four scores on
22 carries. His Friday night total
pushed him over the 1,000-yard
mark for the season. O’Brien has
1,053yards on103carries. Theju-
nior has also scored 23 touch-
downs in Wyoming Area’s eight
games. O’Brien has now rushed
for over 2,000yards and40touch-
downs the past two seasons.
“Nick is a very dynamic ath-
lete,” said Head Coach Randy
Spencer. “All thoseskills, all those
tools but at the same time one of
his most valuable commodities is
his leadership. He’s tough, he’s
gritty, and he was the guy leading
the charge in the second half,
coming out setting the tempo
you’ve got to give himcredit.”
O’Brien kicked off the scoring
when took the snap and moved to
his left before bursting into the
secondaryandzigzagginghisway
through the defense en route to a
59 yard touchdown run giving the
Warriors a quick 7-0 lead three
minutes into the game.
The Ranger offense tested the
Warrior run-D but Wyoming Ar-
eabent but didn’t breakandforced
a Northwest punt.
On the third play of the ensuing
drive, Skursky bounced the inside
carryout tohis left andthe power-
ful backshowedsome speedas he
went 46 yards before being tack-
led frombehind. He took the next
two handoffs for six and four be-
fore getting the ball on first-and-
goal fromthe two and walking in-
to the endzone untouched as the
WAline pushedthe Northwest D-
line three yards off the ball.
Theensuingkickoff wasreturn-
ed up the middle for a 98 yard
touchdown by Northwest and the
two-point conversion was good
cutting the lead to 14-8 WA with
1:10 left in the first.
Wyoming Area punted on their
next possession but the defense
held Northwest to a three-and-out
and got the ball right back.
After being stopped on their
first three plays, WA was forced
into a punting situation. O’Brien
took the snap and punted the ball
deep. Jake Smith hustled down
the field and laid a huge hit on the
Ranger returner, who immediate-
ly coughed up the ball, leaving
Cody Schmitz to pick it up and
run 27 yards for the special teams
score. Skursky added the two-
point conversion to push the lead
to 22-8.
On their next possession,
Northwest cut the leadto22-14on
a 16 yard post pattern at the 2:20
mark and that was the score that
would be taken into the half.
“We called their attention to the
urgency,” Spencer said. “When
youneedthat, you’vegot toturnto
your leaders, you’ve got to turn to
your seniors and upfront I think
the offensive line came out and
did what we needed to do and
O’Brien took charge and when
your leader steps up everybody
else follows suit.”
The Warriors followed their
leader, Nick O’Brien, in the sec-
ond half - right into the endzone.
O’Brien opened the third quar-
ter with a 53 yard scamper to the
Ranger six yard line. After a five
yard run by O’Brien, he took the
ball out of the I-formation and
No tricks, all treats: Warriors win big
WA dominates second half of 50-17 victory over Northwest
By Matt Page
Dispatch Correspondent
PHOTOS BY FRED A. ADAMS
Above, Wyoming Area's Joe Adonizio gets tackled by a Northwest defender after grabing a pass
during the first quarter of the Warriors 50-17 victory. Below, WA freshman running back Jeff Skursky
rumbles for yardage against Northwest.
See TREAT, Page 54
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He smoked a 360-foot drive,
dropped a beautiful approach
shot out of the skyandpositioned
himself within three feet of a
birdie.
Then Brandon Matthews
rolled his putt just outside the
hole.
It was that kind of day for the
Pittston Area senior in the PIAA
boys’ golf championship final.
Looking green on the greens
Tuesday at the same Heritage
Hills Golf Course he owned dur-
ing the state final a year ago,
Matthews finishedinanseventh-
place tie in the final state stand-
ings with a two-day total of 152.
"If I had the putter working to-
day, I think I could have won this
thing," Matthews said.
Instead, he had to settle for
winning a second straight state
medal.
Matthews accomplished that
with a fabulous finish - and by
getting a little of the fortune that
had deserted him all day.
His drive off the 17th hole
landed in the No. 6 tee box, giv-
ing him a clear shot overlooking
the green.
Matthews didn’t miss, chip-
ping his approach shot within a
couple feet of the hole.
Then he sank the birdie for a
three-stroke hole that ultimately
earned him a medal.
"I felt like I knew I had to do
something," Matthews said.
"That was a very big opportuni-
ty."
Finally, a bit of fate played his
way.
For too long Tuesday, it went
the other way for Matthews, who
wound up 10 strokes over par for
the two days and six strokes in
back of the 146 that crowned this
year’s state champion Garrett
Browning of West Allegheny,
whoalsowona state title in2009.
A string of near-misses smack
in the middle of play cost Mat-
thews any hope of repeating his
PIAA title.
His near-miss of a three-foot
putt following his sky-shot ap-
proachonNo. 9forcedMatthews
to settle for par on the hole. The
same fate awaited Matthews on
VA R S I T Y G O L F
Defending state champ falls short of repeat
Pittston Area star finishes tied for 7th with a 10-over 152
By Paul Sokoloski
Times Leader Reporter
PA's Brandon Matthews watches one of his drives fromearlier
this season. The defending PIAA champ finished 7th this year. See MATTHEWS, Page 47
Holy Redeemer’s Marissa
Durako turned in the best time
of the afternoon by any girl in
either class on her way to the
District 2 Class 2ACross Coun-
try title on Wednesday at Elk
Lake High School in Dimmock.
The victory gave Durako her
second straight title, and helped
lead the Lady Royals to the
Class 2A team title.
The Laflin resident posted a
winning time of 19:06 – 37 sec-
onds faster than the second-
place finisher, Durako’s team-
mate Rachel Sowinski. The time
also bested that of D2 Class 3A
champ Regan Rome from Dal-
las who turned in a 19:18 in a
separate race earlier in the day.
Rome beat Durako at the
Wyoming Valley Conference
Coaches Meet last week.
“It feels really awesome. I’m
enjoying this a lot,” Durako told
the Times Leader. “Last year,
we were the first race, so we
were right out there. We get here
and we’re the fourth race and
you just have to tune it all out
and stay focused.”
Durako now competes for a
state title on Saturday at 9:30
a.m. at the Parkview Cross
Country Course in Hershey.
Lombardo places eighth,
Pittston Area seventh
Pittston Area’s Catherine
Lombardo ran to an eighth-
place finish at the District 2
Class 3A Girls’ Cross Country
Championships on Wednesday
afternoon at Elk Lake High
School in Dimmock.
Lombardo turned in a time of
20:18 to finish one full minute
behind champion Regan Rome
of Dallas. The Lady Patriots top
runner finished third among
WVC runners, behind Rome
and Nicole Buehrle of Hazleton.
Five Lackawanna Conference
runners also finished ahead of
Lombardo.
Pittston Area had a strong
showing, finishing seventh over
all in the team standings and
third among WVC teams.
Bianca Bolton ran a 20:45 to
place 12th and give the Lady Pa-
triots two runners in the Top 15.
Kaitlynn Kutcha finished
35th overall with a time of
22:03, and Emily Seaman ran a
22:52 to place 54th. Olivia Lan-
za contributed with a 23:16, and
Kristen Lombardo turned in a
time of 24:33 to held PA in the
standings.
Radzwilka earns
Top 20 finish
Sara Radzwilka finished with
the lead runners at the District 2
Class 3A Girls’ Cross Country
Championships on Wednesday
afternoon at Elk Lake High
School in Dimmock.
The Wyoming Area runner
turned in her fourth-best time of
the season with a time of 21:00
to place 18th overall at the 3.1
mile course. She was the only
WA runner to finish in the Top
VA R S I T Y C R O S S C O U N T R Y
Durako repeats as D2 Class 2A champion
Laflin resident wins second straight Class 2A XC title
By Rick Notari
Dispatch Staff
PHOTO BY JOE BUTKIEWICZ
Pittston Area's Catherine Lombardo finishes in eighth place at the
District 2 Class 3A Cross Country Championships on Wednesday.
See CONNORS, Page 47
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Pittston Area’s post-season
was short-lived as the Patriots
dropped its first-round match in
the District 2-4 Class 3A play-
offs to Williamsport, 4-0, on the
road on Wednesday in the Mil-
lionaire City.
The Patriots played even for
the first 17 minutes with the lone
District 4 entry into the tourna-
ment before Williamsport’s Ja-
kin Rintelman scored to give the
hosts a 1-0 lead.
The score remained the same
for the next 14 minutes before
Bernard Avoulou scored the first
of his two goals with less than10
minutes left in the match to send
Pittston Area to halftime, trail-
ing 2-0.
The Millionaires added two
more goals in the second half to
keep the Patriots outside striking
distance.
The high-scoring Patriots
managed just 12 shots on goal,
compared to 18 for Billport.
Taylor Roberts and Zack Mik-
itish combined to stop five shots
ingoal for PittstonArea (10-6-1).
Williamsport advances to the
tournament semis to take on
Wallenpaupack on Monday at
Wilkes at 6:30 p.m. The other
semi features Abington Heights
and Delaware Valley. All four
WVCteams have been eliminat-
ed from the tournament.
WVC All-Star selections
Pittston Area had seven play-
ers selected to the Wyoming Val-
ley Conference Division II
Coaches All-Star team which
was announced earlier this week.
The high-scoring forward duo
of Jordan Consagra and Pietro
Colella, along with defender
Quinn Tracy and midfielder Eric
Fino were awarded with berths
on the First-Team squad, while
midfielders Ian Tracy and Matt
Tavaglione, and defender Tom
Allardyce were named to the
Second-Team.
Consagra scored 30 goals on
the season and added nine as-
sists. Colella tallied 26 goals and
10 assists for the second-place
Patriots. Fino had one goal and
three assists, and Quinn Tracy
scored two goals.
Ian Tracy scored 11 goals and
added nine assists for PA. Matt
Tavaglione scoredfour goals and
added four assists, and Tom Al-
lardyce had four goals.
Wyoming Area had two play-
ers selected to the WVC Divi-
sion III Coaches All-Star team.
Forwards Nate Brague and
Chris Bone garnered berths on
the team.
Brague scored 16 goals and
added four assists while Bone
notched seven goals and three
assists for the Warriors.
LSL All-Star selections
Old Forge’s J Argonish earned
First-Team honors for the third
consecutive season on the Lack-
awanna Soccer League Division
3 Coaches All-Star Teamwhen it
was announced earlier this week.
Argonish, a midfielder, is the
program’s all-time leading
points and goal scorer after net-
ting 15 goals this season as a se-
nior. He also added six assists
this year, and saved 13 shots
while spending some time in
goal during one game. Argonish
was also selected to participate
in the annual UNICO All-Star
Cup which will be played later
this year.
Senior Ian Nemetz joined Ar-
gonish on the LSL squad, earn-
ing second-team honors as a de-
fender. Nemetz scored two goals
and added an assist, but injuries
to the Blue Devils this year re-
quired the former forward to
move to defender early this sea-
son. Nemetz was namedanalter-
nate to the squad.
Defender Adam Barsigian
earned a bid to participate in the
UNICO All-Star Cup with Ar-
gonish after a solid senior season
on defense for Old Forge.
Final Standings
WVC Division 2
Lake-Lehman ..................13-3
Pittston Area.................10-5-1
Holy Redeemer ..............8-7-1
Tunkhannock.....................9-7
Wyoming Sem...............8-6-2
Meyers.............................4-12
WVC Division 3
Berwick ........................10-5-1
Hanover Area................11-4-1
Wyoming Area ................6-10
MMI Prep........................3-13
GAR ................................3-13
Nanticoke ........................0-16
LSL Division 3
Forest City .......................13-1
Lakeland .......................11-2-1
Carbondale.......................11-3
Mid Valley......................7-6-1
Dunmore ...........................5-9
Blue Ridge....................3-10-1
Old Forge .........................3-11
Riverside .......................1-12-1
VA R S I T Y S O C C E R
Patriots make early exit from D2 playoffs
WVC and LSL Coaches All-Stars announced
By Rick Notari
Dispatch Staff
Pietro Colella Jordan Consagra Chris Bone J Argonish
No. 10, where
he rolled a po-
tential birdie
put just over the
outside lip of
thehole- which
left himpound-
ing his club in-
to the ground.
Then everything went haywire
on him on No. 11.
He badly sliced his second
shot behind a row of trees on the
par-5 hole, then chipped out
straight intothe rough. Matthews
took two drops to get to the
green, then missed a gimme putt
for him and finished the hole
with a double-bogey.
He flipped out a bit over it,
flipping his putter in disgust.
"It’s more frustrating than you
know when I walked off the 11th
green," Matthews said. "I’d just
missed three putts in a row, that
(if I made) I couldhave beenone-
under (for the day). And I could
win this tournament."
Instead, he was forced to win a
spot in the top 10.
Matthews did that with solid
driving and a few nifty approach
shots that salvaged a score of 77
for the day - six-over for the final
round.
"It’s difficult to win anything,"
said Matthews, who’s won most
of the major tournaments he’s
played during his high school ca-
reer. "If I had the putter for two
days, I would have been right
there in contention. (Finishing)
top-10 in the state (while) not
playing well, that’s pretty good.
I’mout there having fun, no mat-
ter what happens. Doesn’t matter
whether I’mplaying bad or play-
ing great.
"Hopefully, I’ve got a great ca-
reer ahead of me."
Matthews finishes in Top 10
Continued fromPage 46
Matthews
20.
Angela Coco
also ran for the
Lady Warriors,
posting a time
of 25:40 to fin-
ish in the Top
100.
Connors runs
to Top 50 finish
Pittston Area’s Jamie Con-
nors concluded his scholastic
career with a Top 50 finish at the
District 2 Class 3A Boys’ Cross
Country Championship on
Wednesday at Elk Lake High
School in Dimmock.
The Patriots top runner posted
a time of 19:02 to finish 42nd at
the event. Sean Burke of Abing-
ton Heights won the individual
title with a time of 16:35. Do-
minic Deluca of Dallas was the
top WVC finisher, placing third
with a time of 16:53 to lead the
Mountaineers to the team title.
Connors was joined in the Top
100 by teammates Tyler Cum-
mings and Dimitri Shea.
Cummings posted a time of
20:04 to finish 72nd and Shea
ran a 22:42 to place 88th.
Connors in Top 50
Continued fromPage 46
Connors
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Wyoming Valley West head
football coach Pat Keating
knew Pittston Area’s record
was 2-6 on the season. He also
knew they were competitive in
nearly every game they played
thus far.
Despite trailing 14-13 in the
first half, the Spartans roared
back to a 37-14 victory on Fri-
day night at Charley Trippi Sta-
dium in Yatesville.
“I’m telling you right now,
and we told our kids all week
these kids at Pittston play ex-
tremely competitive and ex-
tremely tough,” WVW Head
Coach Pat Keating said. “They
may only have two wins, but if
you look at their games from
the season, they are in every
single game. They play tough,
they play physical and don’t shy
away from anyone.”
The Patriots received the ball
to start the game and made the
most of it.
An 11-yard return from Jor-
dan Houseman set the Patriots
at the 35. Senior quarterback
Anthony Schwab made his
presence felt by connecting
with receiver Evan Hahn for 32
yards on the opening play, and
Schwab didn’t stop there on the
very next play, finding a wide-
open Houseman for the 31-yard
touchdown. Chris Musto nailed
the PAT and the Patriots lead
was 7-0 less than two minutes
into the games.
“I would have liked to have
gone to Jordan (Houseman) a
lot more,” Pittston Area Head
Coach Mike Barrett said.
“They were doing a nice job
getting to the quarterback’s
face so we couldn’t get to him.”
Tashawn Bunch then intro-
duced himself to the Patriots
defense on the very next drive
as he broke for a 19-yard rush
on the first play of the drive. He
later capped the drive with a 35-
yard jaunt into the end zone.
Nick Singer drilled the PAT and
the game was knotted at 7-7.
Later in the first. the Patriots
were forced to punt from their
VA R S I T Y F O O T B A L L
Patriots give up early lead in loss to WVW
PA led before WVW scored 24 unanswered points in 37-14 defeat
By Josh Horton
Dispatch Correspondent
PHOTOS BY CHARLOTTE BARTIZEK
Above, Pittston Area's Jordan Houseman (center) is congratulated by his teamates after his touchdown catch against Wyoming Valley
West on Friday night. Below left, PA quarterback Anthony Schwab escapes the grasp of a WVWdefender. Below right, Patriots wide
receiver Evan Hahn is tackled after making one of his four catches against the Spartans.
See LEAD, Page 54
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Back in the 1980’s arm wres-
tling contender Al Price grew up
with arm wrestling legend Val
Myrkalo of Scranton. Over the
years Price watched Myrkalo
shape good arm wrestling pro-
spects into well-known conten-
ders, including local arm wres-
tling guru Tom “Nitro” Simko of
Suscon.
“Val wasknownastheguytogo
to. Nobody knew more about the
sport than him,” said Price.
Once Myrkalo retired, he sawa
natural talent in Price and con-
vincedhimtogive the sport a shot
andthrowhisarmonthetable. Ev-
er since then, Price has trained
non-stop, becoming the best arm
wrestler he canbe. Twoyears ago,
Price joined the arm wrestling
family at Diane’s Deli located on
S. Main Street Pittston.
It was here where Price started
training every Saturday with pro
armwrestlers Tom“Nitro”Simko
andLeiraun“BlackIce”Baldwin.
“Nitro and Ice helped me mas-
ter techniques such as the hook
and the top roll,” said Price.
Once Price learned some tech-
niques he took his first third place
trophy in the “Arms of Steel” 0-
165-pound Open Right Division.
Afewmonths later, Pricetooka
first placeinAtlanticCityinthe0-
154-pound Novice Right Divi-
sion.
“Al’s a tank. He’s the jokester of
the group along with being a true
sportsman who cheers for every-
one,” said Baldwin.
After takinga first place trophy,
Price decided to buy his own arm
wrestling table and train with
Baldwin for the International
Arm Wrestling Federation’s
(IAF) 2011 PA State Arm Wres-
tlingTournament, whichwas held
on September 24 at Diane’s Deli.
“We would train twice a week
on the table and then hit the gym
on the days we weren’t on the ta-
ble,” said Price.
Like his mentor Myrkalo, Price
alsodecidedtotrainhis wife Deb-
bie Price for the Women’s Open.
The IAF State Tournament had
63 entries, including competitors
fromthestateof NewJersey. Price
battledit out, winningfive match-
es in a row. He was undefeated in
the0-154-poundNoviceRight Di-
vision and beat up-and-coming
armwrestler “Big”BobMac, who
was ranked number three in the
nation, novice.
“He’s the most improved arm
wrestler I’ve ever come across in
thesport andkeepsgettingbetter,”
said Simko.
Al’s wife Debbie took first
place in the women’s open right
becoming the first family of state
champions at Diane’s.
Price is now currently training
for the American Arm wrestling
Association’s (AAA) Pa State
Arm Wrestling Tournament. The
tournament, which will be held in
November, is being run by PA
State Director Chris Ratchford
whosays “Al is lookingtobe a top
contender at the tournament.”
If Price takes first he will be the
right hand novice state champion
in both the IAF and AAA arm
wrestling divisions.
When asked how it feels to be
the IAF state champion Price
smileda little andsaid, “Inthe end
it’s all about healthy competition
and having fun.
IAFState Results
Novice Right
0-154–1. Al Price, 2. “Big”Bob
Mac, 3. AdamBlannard
155-176 – 1. Fred Delucca, 2.
TimSeamens, 3. TomDeacon
177 and up – 1. Brandon Rei-
chart, 2. JimFussner, 3. Paul Mar-
tinelli
Novice Left
0-165 1. Matt Powell, 2. Jesse
Simko, 3. Paul Martinelli
166-198 1. Fred Delucca, 2.
Brian Malek, 3. JimFussner
Women’s Open
1. Debbie Price, 2. Amanda
Runkle, 3. Lisa Carroll
Men’s Open Right
0-143 - 1. “Nitro,” 2. Zack Lee,
3. Matt Degilio
144-165 - 1. Mike “Flash Sur-
plus, 2. SamHarris, 3. Paul Marti-
nelli
166-187 - 1. Steve Shoemaker,
2. TimLewis, 3. TomMorgan
221 and up – 1. Storm Chelino,
2. DustinMorgan, 3. MikeRunkle
Men’s open Left
0-165 1. Mike “Flash” Surplus,
2. JimAiello, 3. SamHarris
166-198 1. Storm Chelino, 2.
Justin “Superman” Kopa, 3. Jim
Aiello
199andup:1. DustinMorgan, 2.
ChrisRatchford, 3. StormChelino
A R M W R E S T L I N G
‘Natural talent’ grows into state champion
Above, Al Price, left, armwrestles, Paul Martinelli at the recent IAF State Championships which were
held in Pittston at Diane's Deli. Below, Price's wife Debbie, left, is set to armwrestle Amanda Runkle.
Both Al and Debbie Price went on to win state titles in their respective divisions.
By Matt Powell
Special to the Dispatch
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The Wyoming Area-Pittston Area foot-
ball game will be broadcast live over the In-
ternet through the web site www.wyomin-
gareafootball.org. Both audio and video
will be broadcast.
This will be the fourth Warrior game of
the season that will be broadcast live over
the Internet. This year’s broadcast experi-
ment has been well-received by fans, rela-
tives, and former players who are unable to
attend games in person. In particular, view-
ers from out of town have taken advantage
of the service. For example, one player’s
relatives in Tennessee have been able to
watch the games. Many former Warrior
football players, who are currently attend-
ing college out of town, also have tuned in.
Although there have been a fewglitches,
theaudioandvideoqualityof thebroadcast
has been surprisingly good. There is a
“chat” mechanism built in the system that
allows viewers to interact with the announ-
cers and with each other. Individuals may
also view the broadcast from an archive
file. NickPerugini, SeanCarroll, RonMus-
to, and Temple student Anthony Bellino,
have shared in the announcing duties. Stu-
dents from the Wyoming Area Audio-Vi-
sual Club serve as cameramen.
Although the game will be broadcast by
WNEP, a large out-of-town audience is ex-
pected to tune into the Internet broadcast.
Typically, 200-300 people click in to view
some portion of the game .A steady audi-
ence of about 80people has beenobserved.
The pre-game showwill start at 6:30 pm
on Friday night. Go towww.wyomingarea-
football.org. to viewthe broadcast.
Contact Nick Perugini at nperugi-
ni@aol.comfor further information.
Duryea Wildcats news
Playoff games for BTeamis at the Wild-
cat field and the CTeamis at the Forty Fort
field this Sunday, Oct. 30 and super bowl is
Nov. 6. Location and teams TBA. Any
cheerleader and or football player not eligi-
ble to play in either games are encouraged
to return uniforms to the equipment stand
this Tuesday 5:30-6:30pm. Any child mov-
ing to the next level teamis eligible to play
in the charity bowl.
Election of DWC board members will
takeplaceonNov.15at 7p.m. at theconces-
sion stand. See your head coach for details
of the charity game. WC banquet is set for
Dec. 4 at WBGenetti’s from1-5 p.m. Ban-
quet tickets are also on sale during all prac-
tices at concession stand, home games and
any away Bgames.
For moredetails, pleasevisit Facebookat
Duryea Wildcats Football page.
JTLL meeting Tuesday
Jenkins Twp Little League will hold a
monthlymeetingonTuesdayat 6p.m. at the
fieldhouse.
Items to be discussed are field closing
and new officer elections. All interested
members and parents are urged to attend.
PAboys’ cage boosters to meet
The PA Boys Basketball Booster Club
will holdameetingonWednesdayat 6p.m.
at Lizza’s Mezzo/Mezzo, Pittston. Items to
be discussed are fund raisers for upcoming
season. All parents of boys interested in
playing basketball for Pittston Area are
asked to attend.
Any questions, call Carl or Maria Stra-
vinski at 570-883-7220.
WAboys’ hoop parents to meet
WA Boys Basketball Parents will meet
on Wednesday at 7 p.m. at the Secondary
Center Gym. All parents of players in 7th
through 12th grade are encouraged to at-
tend. Plans for the upcomingseasonwill be
discussed. If youhaveanyquestions, please
call Tracy Carey at 313-0837.
PABaseball Booster Craft Fair
The PittstonArea Boys Baseball Booster
Club is sponsoring a Holiday Craft/Vendor
Fair on December 3 from12 to 4 p.m. at the
Pittston Area Senior High School. Interest-
ed vendors can contact Lisa Bolka at 570-
905-2920 for more information.
Red Devils meeting Tuesday
The PittstonRedDevils SportsmenClub
is meeting Tuesday, November 1 at 7:30
p.m. at Dr. Nick Ruggiero’s house in West
Pittston.
The Christmas party and other fall and
winter events will be discussed.
Black Friday Hoops Camp
Registrations are being accepted for the
Stan Waleski Black Friday Basketball
Camp to be held at the St. Joseph’s Oblates
gymin Laflin for boys and girls in grades 2
through 8 from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Friday,
November 25.
The camp features fundamentals, skills,
team play, competitions and fun with all
players receiving a camp t-shirt and certif-
icate.
For Black Friday Camp information in-
terestedplayers cancall CoachStanWales-
ki at 457-1206 or Coach Charles LoBrutto
at 654-8030. Interested players can also e-
mail stanwaleski@yahoo.comfor campin-
formation.
PASoccer Boosters
to meet Nov. 2
The Pittston Area Soccer Booster Club
will beholdingameetingonNovember 2at
7 p.m. All parents of players on the boys or
girls soccer teams are encouraged to attend
this meetingwhichwill beheldinthelobby
of Pittston Area High School.
Pace Setter MS
boys’ tournament
The Pace Setter Athletic Club of North-
eastern Pa. will sponsor a 5th & 6th grade
boys’ basketball tournament on Saturday,
Nov. 5 at the Greater Scranton YMCA in
Dunmore. Each teamwill play a minimum
of two games with the possibility of a third
in the championship round. For further in-
formationcontact 347-7018or 575-0941or
e-mail pacesetterbasketball@verizon.net.
Ring of Pride
Wyoming Area’s annual Ring of Pride
ceremony and festivities have been resche-
duled for November 4 with the Warriors
host arch-rival Pittston Area at Jake Sobes-
ki Stadium.
The event was to take place earlier but
duetotherecent flooding, WyomingArea’s
game withLake-Lehmanwas movedtothe
Black Knights’ home field in the Back
Mountain.
There will be a ceremony at the 50-yard
linebeforethePittstonAreagamehonoring
Dante Bovani, Mike Liberski and Tommy
Evans whowill beinductedintotheRingof
Pride. The 1971 Championship team will
alsobe honored. It is their 40thanniversary.
Therewill beacocktail partyimmediate-
lyfollowingthegameat St. Anthony’s Ban-
quet Hall in Exeter. Tickets are $25 each
and includes hors d’oeuvres and beverages
(beer, wine and soft drinks). All fans of
Warrior Football are invited to attend and
questions shouldbedirectedtoLouCiampi
Jr. at 654-4040.
All members (players, coaches, manag-
ers etc) of the 1971championship teamare
encouraged to attend the football game for
the pregame ceremony plus the cocktail
party. Any 1971 team member with ques-
tions should contact Dave Amico at dam-
ico@wyomingarea.org. If any family
members have contact with former players
out of town, please relay this message to
them.
Warrior Legacy project
The Wyoming Area Football Alumni
Association is working on a project to cap-
ture old Warrior football programs, Goal
Posts, and other printed memorabilia for
posting on the Internet. The Warrior Lega-
cy Project can be viewed atwww.wyomin-
gareafootball.org
For each year, the following sections of
the football program can be viewed from
the web site: program cover, senior pic-
tures, team picture, scores of games. Thus
far, with the exception of 1981and1985, all
programssince1980havebeenposted. Pro-
grams and printed materials from 1966 to
1979 are needed. Pictures of cheerleaders
and coaches are also being captured and
will be posted at a later date.
Anyone who has a 1981 or 1985 Warrior
football program, or programs printedfrom
1966to1979, is askedtocontact NickPeru-
gini at nperugini@aol.com. Materials will
be scanned and returned promptly to the
owner.
S P O R T S B R I E F S
Warriors-Patriots game to be broadcast over internet
The Panthers D-Team beat
Kingston Twp. 24-20 in their
last home game of the season.
The game was dedicated to
all the 7 yr. olds from both
towns, moving up to the C-
team. Leo Haros scored twice
while Rocco Pizano scored
once. Hunter Lawall pitched in
for a two-point conversion.
Great bocks were delivered by
Liam and Logan Nace, Matt
Ragantesi, Zachary Pitcavage,
Joshua Stone and Zachary
Sheridan.
Defense was stout with tack-
les by Drew Mruk, Russell Va-
nAuken, Keegan Rusyn.
The Panthers ended their
year 4-4.
The WWE Panthers C-Team
defeated the Kingston Town-
ship Raiders 14-6.
Charlie Banashefski scored
both touchdowns for the Pan-
thers and Dillon Williams had
the successful two-point con-
version.
The Panthers dominating de-
fense led by Corey Mruk, Riley
Rusyn, Nick Elko, Nathaniel
May, Walter "Bear" Smith and
Garrett Larson did a great job.
Banashefski, Dillon Wil-
liams, and Jacob Williams did
a great job running the ball and
gaining yards. The Offensive
line led by Jayden Rusyn,
Bryce Hinkle, Caleb Graham,
and Adam Wisnewski did a
great job blocking.
The Panthers C-Team made
it to the playoffs. They will
play Duryea today at the Dana
Street Field in Forty Fort.
J U N I O R F O O T B A L L
Wyoming/West Wyoming/Exeter teams win final games
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Wyoming Area completed
its Wyoming Valley Confer-
ence Division 3 season with a
3-0 win over GAR on Tuesday
during Senior Parents Day fes-
tivities in the Wyoming Area
gym in Exeter.
Audrey Hiedacavage led the
way for the Lady Warriors
with 17 assists and 16 service
points. Wyoming Area’s top
setter also added a kill in the
25-14, 25-8, 25-17 victory.
Kate Kross added 12 points
and seven kills for WA while
Gabby Bohan chipped in with
nine kills.
The Lady Warriors finished
the season 4-8.
PA 1, Dallas 3
Pittston Area saw its 2011
WVC Division 2 campaign
come to an end in a 3-1 loss to
Dallas on Wednesday after-
noon in the Back Mountain.
The Lady Patriots won the
first game, 25-22, to take a 1-0
lead, but dropped a heart-
breaking 25-23 set in the sec-
ond game as the Lady Moun-
taineers evened the score.
Dallas then cruised in the fi-
nal two games, winning 25-15,
and 25-18, to earn just its third
win on the season.
Alexandra Kochis led Pitt-
ston Area with 16 digs. Nicol-
lette Branshaw added 25 as-
sists for the Lady Patriots.
PA finished 0-15 this season
and has lost 31 straight match-
es dating back to the 2009 sea-
son. Pittston Area’s last victo-
ry game in late October of
2009 against Nanticoke.
PA 0, Crestwood 3
Pittston Area finished its
WVC home schedule with a
3-0 loss to Crestwood on
Monday afternoon during Se-
nior Parents Day at the Tho-
mas R. Kelly Gymnasium in
Yatesville.
The Lady Patriots lost two
tough games, 25-20, and 25-
19, to open the match before
struggling in the finale, 25-10.
Ali Slomba led PA with nine
digs and four kills. Alexandra
Kochis added seven digs.
Final WVC Standings
Division-1
Delaware Valley ...........13-1
North Pocono...............10-4
Valley West ...................8-6
Hazleton........................5-9
Coughlin ......................1-13
Division-2
Redeemer.....................15-0
Crestwood....................12-3
Tunkhannock .................8-7
Berwick .......................5-10
Dallas ..........................3-12
Pittston Area................0-15
Division-3
Nanticoke .....................11-1
Lake-Lehman................11-1
MMI Prep......................6-6
Meyers...........................6-6
Hanover .........................4-8
Wyoming Area ..............4-8
GAR ............................0-12
Leaders
Points
1. Kate Kross, WA..........67
2. Audrey Hiedacavage, WA
..........................................65
3. Leslie Shumlas, WA 18
4t. Mallory Bohan, WA 14
4t. Ali Slomba, PA 14
6. Kaitlynn Simyan, PA...13
Aces
1. Kate Kross, WA..........29
2. Ali Slomba, PA ............8
3t. Audrey Hiedacavage,
WA ......................................7
3t. Leslie Shumlus, WA....7
5. Kaitlyn Simyan, PA......6
Assists
1. Audrey Hiedacavage, WA
.........................................183
2. Nicolette Bradshaw, PA59
Kills
1. Sam Acacio, WA ........45
2. Gabby Bohan, WA......36
3. Kate Kross, WA..........35
4. Jackie Rabender, PA ...18
5. Melissa Kazmenck, WA11
6t. Kaitlynn Simyan, PA...9
6t. Ali Slomba, PA ...........9
Digs
1. Alexandra Kochis, PA.63
2. Ali Slomba, PA...........20
VA R S I T Y V O L L E Y B A L L
Lady Warriors end season with victory
Pittston Area finishes winless, losing streak at 31
PHOTOS BY TONY CALLAIO
Above, Wyoming Area's Kate Kross digs deep to return the ball. Below left, Lady Warriors outside
hitter Gabby Bohan gets a point in third set.
PHOTOS BY BILL TARUTIS
Above, PA's Nicolette Bradshaw makes a
last-second save against Crestwood. Below,
Jackie Rabender gets the ball over the net.
By Rick Notari
Dispatch Staff
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Almost one year ago,
Wyoming Valley Conference
Division III No. 3 seed Pitt-
ston Area was handed a 4-1
loss by WVC Division II
number-two seed Wyoming
Area in the first-round of the
District 2 Class 2A playoffs.
This season seemed eerily
similar as the Cross River Ri-
vals earned the same exact
seeds and produced almost
the same exact result.
The Lady Warriors played
stellar defense and displayed
a relentless offensive attack
as Serra Degnan recorded a
hat trick, and WA out shot
Pittston Area, 20-0, on its way
to a 4-0 victory over the Lady
Patriots in the First-Round of
the District 2 Class 2A play-
offs on Tuesday afternoon at
the Atlas Sports Complex in
West Pittston.
“(Serra) always performs
well. She had a hat trick in
three games this year, and had
four goals in one game this
year. She’s our go-to girl for
sure,” said first-year Lady
Warriors Head Coach Megan
Krebs. “She’s very aggres-
sive, she gets the call, if she
doesn’t have a scoring oppor-
tunity she does whatever she
can to get a call for herself
and the team.”
The Lady Warriors wasted
no time kicking off the scor-
ing when Brionna Murray
played a nice through ball to a
running Degnan who cut back
with the ball, dribbled at the
goal and fired one into the
right of the cage for a 1-0 lead
at the 25:28 mark of the first
half.
WA nearly pushed the lead
to two goals just six minutes
later when Jenna Skrinak
ripped a shot into the top of
the net, but it was waved off
because it was too high with
too many people in front of it.
It then took more than 14
minutes for the Lady Warriors
to push the score to 2-0, doing
VA R S I T Y F I E L D H O C K E Y
WA ousted by Dallas in D2 tournament
Lady Warriors advanced to quarters with win over PA
By Matt Page
Dispatch Correspondent
PHOTOS BY BILL TARUTIS
Above, Pittston Area's Rebecca Weinstock, right, and Wyoming Area's Morgan Kane battle for the ball in the District 2 Class 2A play-
offs in West Pittston on Tuesday afternoon. Below left WA's Serra Degnan, left, attacks the cage as PA's Rachel Simansky defends.
Below right, WA's Abby Thornton, left, and PA's Liz Mikitish chase down the ball.
See FIELD HOCKEY, Page 53
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so off of a corner when the
ball was played out to Skrinak
who passed it to Liv Adoni-
zio. Adonizio fired the ball in
front of the net where it was
deflected in by Degnan for
her second goal of the game
with five minutes left in the
half.
The first 17 minutes of the
second half were played back-
and-forth between the two at-
tacking thirds of the field,
however neither team was
able to turn their scoring op-
portunities into anything sub-
stantial. That is until Degnan
registered her fourth hat trick
of the year.
The junior took a long pass
on the sideline and attacked
the defender making a cut and
hitting a hard low shot which
took a deflection off a stick
before rolling into the goal
for a 3-0 Wyoming Area lead
with less than 13 minutes left
in the game.
The final tally of the game
came when Murray hit a hard
shot at PA keeper Ariel Ardo,
who made a great kick save.
But the ball landed right on
the stick of Lexi Coolbaugh,
who easily put the ball into
the cage for a 4-0 lead and
victory.
“We always say to the girls,
make purposeful passes and I
think it’s finally clicking with
them,” Krebs said. “Every
pass they made was to their
own player or up the field, and
we always tell them every
game, up the field and up the
sides. The sides are the best
way to get it up the field.”
Lea Garibaldi recorded four
saves for the Lady Patriots
and Ardo added nine more.
Wyoming Area (8-8) held a
10-2 advantage in corners.
Pittston Area finishes its
season at 10-5.
WA 1, Dallas 4
Wyoming Area saw its sea-
son come to an end in a 4-1
loss to Dallas on Friday after-
noon in the District 2 Class
2A quarterfinals at Wyoming
Seminary’s Klassner Field in
Kingston.
The teams played scoreless
for much of the first half be-
fore the second-seeded Lady
Mounts got on the board with
a goal from Vanessa Parsons
at the 3:44 mark.
The Lady Warriors answer-
ed with a Serra Degnan goal
just 1:39 before intermission
to even the score at 1-1. Liv
Adonizio assisted on Deg-
nan’s 15th goal of the season.
But the WVC Division I
fifth-place team turned it on
in the second half, as Ashley
Dunbar scored three goals for
Dallas to get the win.
Nicole Cumbo stopped six
shots in goal for WA.
The Lady Warriors finish
its season at 8-9.
Final Standings
WVC Division 2
Holy Redeemer ...........12-3
Wyoming Area .............7-8
Hazleton.......................7-8
Honesdale...................3-12
Nanticoke ...................3-12
Wallenpaupack............4-11
Meyers........................2-13
Abington Heights........0-15
WVC Division 3
Northwest ...................12-2
Elk Lake .....................11-3
Pittston Area...............10-4
GAR.............................8-6
Hanover........................6-6
Tunkhannock................5-9
Berwick ......................1-12
Montrose.....................0-11
Points
1. Serra Degnan, WA .....34
2. Gabby Vaxmonsky, PA30
3t. Rebecca Weinstock, PA
.........................................17
3t. Jenna Skrinak, WA ...17
5t. Liz Mikitish, PA .......12
5t. Sam Shiner, WA........12
Goals
1. Serra Degnan, WA......15
2. Gabby Vaxmonsky, PA12
3. Jenna Skrinak, WA......8
4t. Rebecca Weinstock, PA5
4t. Liz Mikitish, PA.........5
6. Sam Shiner, WA..........4
Assists
1. Rebecca Weinstock, PA7
2. Gabby Vaxmonsky, PA.6
3t. Ally Adonizio, WA.....4
3t. Serra Degnan, WA......4
3t. Sam Shiner, WA.........4
6t. Madeline Dworak, PA.3
6t. Brionna Murray, WA ..3
Saves
1. Ariel Ardo, PA...........63
2t. Nicole Cumbo, WA ..30
2t. Emily Wolfgang, WA30
4. Lea Garibaldi, PA ......17
PHOTOS BY BILL TARUTIS
Above, Pittston Area's Gabby Vaxmonsky makes a pass ahead of Wyoming Area's Liv Adonizio.
Below, Wyoming Area's Liv Adonizio, left, challenges Pittston Area's Brielle Warren for possession.
FIELD HOCKEY
Continued fromPage 52
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dove over the line for the score to
cap the three-play 1:06 drive and
push the lead to 29-14.
The first play for the Rangers
resulted in a fumble which Corey
Popovich dove on to give the ball
back to the Warriors at the North-
west15with10:32left inthethird.
The senior had a huge night de-
fensively, recording a team-high
eight tackles, includingtwosacks.
After the first three plays failed
to pick up a first down, the War-
riors faceda fourth-and-five from
the10 yard line. O’Brien took the
handoff and cut outside. He
leaped over a defender and was
blastedout of mid-air bya Ranger
defensive lineman. However,
Coach Spencer decided to give
theball right backtoO’Brienwho
ran off tackle and found a hole to
cross the goal line for a three-yard
touchdown pushing the Warriors
lead to 36-14 just 3:41 into the
half.
“It was a pretty big hit,” said
O’Brienwitha smile. “It’s socold
out here I didn’t really feel it.
Coachcalledthe play, I just hit the
hole and the line did a good job
guiding me to the endzone.”
After the defense forceda punt,
Skursky took the first play and
rumbledfor10.Twoplays later, he
cut outside and went for 19 down
totheNorthwest 22.Theverynext
play sawO’Brien cut the ball out-
side to his left where he was in a
footrace and used his speed to get
the ball to the pylon with 2:59 left
inthe third, stretchingthe Warrior
lead to 43-14.
After abigreturnintoWAterri-
tory, the Warrior defense was able
to stop the Ranger offense and
hold them to a 27 yard field goal
just 10 seconds into the fourth.
After the Northwest score, the
attempted onside kick was reco-
veredbytheWarriors givingthem
a short field, starting at their own
49.Wyoming Area only needed
seven plays to score when
O’Brien hit Zach LaNunziata in
the flat and he took it seven yards
for the score expanding the WA
lead to 50-17 which is how the
game would end.
The Warriors (6-2) will face
their rivals, Pittston Area, next
weekinthefinal gameof theyear.
“Obviouslywearelookingfor a
bigwinthere,”saidO’Brienabout
the WA-PA game. “The rivalry,
it’s beengoingonfor years soit’s a
tradition so we will see if we can
get a win in there, we’re pretty ex-
cited.”
TREATS
Continued fromPage 45
PHOTO BY FRED A. ADAMS
Wyoming Area quarterback Nick O'Brien runs away froma Northwest defender during the Warriors
50-17 victory over the Rangers on Friday night. The victory solidified a playoff berth for WA.
own three-yard line allowing
the Spartans to take over from
the Patriot 25. On second-and 3
from the 17, WVW superstar
Eugene Lewis flew by Patriot
defenders and went into the end
zone for a touchdown. The
score remained 13-7 with 4:34
remaining, because Jake Za-
lewski busted through the
Spartan offensive line and
blocked the PAT.
The Patriots then gave the
Spartans a scare when Schwab
pushed his way into the end
zone for a one-yard touchdown
with 7:05 remaining in the first
half. Musto split the uprights
with the PAT and the Patriots
lead was 14-13.
The Patriots score was made
possible when Houseman
picked off Lewis and returned
the interception 41 yards to the
Spartans 34-yard line.
The Patriots threat didn’t last
long as the Spartan offense
heated up late in the second
half. Bunch found the end zone
yet again with 6:11 in second
half, this time for 20 yards. Le-
wis then completed the two-
point conversion and the Spar-
tans lead was 21-14.
Lewis then found the end
zone for the first time with 37.6
remaining in the half. He bull-
dozed his way into the end zone
for the one-yard rushing touch-
down. Singer nailed the PAT
and the Spartans held a 28-14
advantage as they headed to the
locker room for half.
Bunch made it 35-14 with a
one yard rushing touchdown of
his own. Singer again was suc-
cessful on the PAT with 8:48 re-
maining in the third quarter.
The Spartan defense provid-
ed the final two points for the
Spartans when they sacked
Schwab in his own end zone.
The Wyoming Valley West lead
was 37-14 with 3:56 remaining
in the third quarter.
The safety proved to be more
than enough for the WVW vic-
tory as the teams played score-
less the rest of the way.
“We just couldn’t tackle and
that has been our Achilles heel
all year,” Barrett said. “Offen-
sively they did a nice job
against us in the second half.”
Schwab was 11-22 for 137
yards with one touchdown and
two interceptions. The senior
signal caller needs just 65 yards
passing to reach the 1,000-yard
mark on the season
Hahn was the leading receiv-
er for the Patriots with four re-
ceptions for 68 yards. House-
man added three receptions for
44 yards. .
Stankoski recovered a fum-
ble for the Patriots. Sammy Fal-
cone and Kyle Gattuso led the
Patriots on defense. Romanc-
zuk led the Patriot ground game
with 11 carries for 43 yards.
PA travels to West Pittston on
Friday night to take on Wyom-
ing Area (6-2). The Warriors
clinched a place in the District
2 Class 2A playoffs with their
win against Northwest.
LEAD
Continued fromPage 48
PHOTO BY CHARLOTTE BARTIZEK
Pittston Area's Marc Romanczuk is taken down by the WVWdefense during the Patriots loss on
Friday night.
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Entering Week 10 of the high
school football season both
Wyoming Area and Old Forge
know one thing – there will be a
Week 11 for both the Warriors
and Blue Devils.
What the two schools do not
knowis whotheir opponents will
be when the District 2 playoffs
open up on November 11.
In Class 2A, the Warriors have
solidified themselves with a spot
in the four-team tournament.
Wyoming Valley Conference ri-
val GAR has already locked up
the No. 1 seed in the tourney.
Wyoming Area could clinch a
home game and the No. 2 seed
with a victory over Cross River
Rival Pittston Area on Friday
night. Aloss to the Patriots could
put the Warriors on the road in
Week 11 depending on what else
occurs in the final week of play.
The wildcard in determining
the rest of the field as of this
morning is that Week 9 is yet to
be complete, including a Lacka-
wanna Football Conference
game between Mid Valley and
Susquehanna that will go a long
way in determining who plays
who to open the playoffs. The
Spartans and Sabers play Mon-
day in Susquehanna.
Susquehanna is currently the
third team but could move into
the No. 2 spot with wins over
Mid Valley and Friday night at
Old Forge. If the Sabers win out,
the Warriors would travel to Sus-
quehanna on Sat., Nov. 12 should
they lose to PA. The same Sus-
quehanna scenario with WA
beating the Patriots would have
the Sabers traveling to West Pitt-
ston to take on the Warriors on
Fri., Nov. 11.
Now, should current No. 4
seed Lake-Lehman upset Old
Shoe Rival Dallas this week, the
Black Knights could move to
No. 2 if WA were to lose and
Susquehanna loses one of its two
games at the least. Aloss to Dal-
las would have Lehman fighting
for the final spot and a chance to
play GAR.
MidValleyandLakeland–yes
Lakeland – also figure into the
mix. The Chiefs are reeling late-
ly, but they did beat the Darrell
Crawford-less Grenadiers in
Week 3. Should Lakeland beat
Western Wayne on Friday night,
the Chiefs would need Lehman
to lose, and Susquehanna to lose
to Old Forge on Friday night to
get in. If Lakeland loses they
look to be out.
Should Mid Valley beat Sus-
quehanna, they are in position to
finish with the No. 3 seed if both
Lakeland and Lehman lose. That
would mean the Spartans travel
to Wyoming Area in Week 11.
But the Spartans finish No. 4 if
they fall to Susquehanna, and
Lakeland loses.
Whew, that was a mouthful.
All that said here are my pro-
jections for the Class 2Atourna-
ment:
3-Lakeland (6-4) at
2-Wyoming Area (7-2)
4-Susquehanna (6-4) at
1-GAR (9-1)
Class 1A
In Class 1A, things are a little
clearer. The field is set with only
seedings to be determined.
Dunmore is the clear cut No. 1
team, and projects to finish un-
beaten heading into the district
playoffs. The Bucks do play Riv-
erside on Friday night in what
could be the first of back-to-
back games between the teams.
The Vikings are currently No.
4 and should remain there. Even
if Riverside were to upset Dun-
more, they could do no better
than the fourth-seed unless
Lackawanna Trail was upset by
Holy Cross in Week 10. Should
that happen, Riverside moves in-
to the third slot ahead of the Li-
ons, and face a return trip to Old
Forge.
Now, if the Blue Devils - who
were set toplayHolyCross today
at 2 p.m. weather permitting -
win out, they are set to earn the
No. 2 spot and host Trail or Riv-
erside. A loss to either Holy
Cross today or Susquehanna on
Friday could push Old Forge to
the No. 3 spot, and a trip to Tun-
nel Hill if Trail beats Holy Cross
as expected on Friday.
If Old Forge were to lose both
its remaining games they would
remain No. 3 unless Riverside
beats Dunmore. That wouldsend
the Blue Devils to Bucktown in
Week 11.
Northwest and Holy Cross
have been mathematically elim-
inated from the district playoffs.
Here are my projections for
the Class 1A tournament:
3-Trail (7-3) at
2-Old Forge (8-2)
4-Riverside (6-4) at
1-Dunmore (10-0)
VA R S I T Y F O O T B A L L
Warriors, Blue Devils set for post-season
Final week will determine opponents
By Rick Notari
Dispatch Staff
PHOTO BY BILL TARUTIS
WA quarterback Nick O'Brien throws a touchdown pass under
heavy pressure against GAR last Saturday.
Rushing Yards (att-yds-td)
1. Nick O’Brien, WA....................103-1053 (23)
2. Lou Febbo, OF.............................145-723 (9)
3. Colin Carey, OF...........................88-596 (10)
4. Marc Romanczuk, PA ...................93-565 (3)
5. Justin Wilk, PA.............................110-407 (8)
6. Jeff Skursky, WA...........................64-429 (7)
7. Kyle Gattuso, PA............................42-219 (1)
8. Brian Tomasetti, OF.......................49-216 (3)
9. Ahmad Bouie, WA........................23-208 (3)
Passing Yards (comp-att-int-td)
1. Michael Schwab, PA.........86-166-12, 935 (8)
2. Colin Carey, OF..................52-106-7, 721 (4)
3. Nick O’Brien, WA...............36-63-4, 669 (9)
Receptions (rec-yds-td)
1. Jordan Houseman, PA....................32-426 (6)
2. Dave Argust, OF............................25-355 (2)
3. Joe Starinsky, PA............................22-209 (1)
4t. Cody Schmitz, WA .......................10-221 (3)
4t. Evan Hahn, PA....................................10-132
6. Mike Vieira, OF ...............................9-132 (1)
Scoring (points)
1. Nick O’Brien, WA.....................................142
2. Lou Febbo, OF............................................62
3. Colin Carey, OF..........................................60
4. Jordan Houseman, PA.................................54
5. Jeff Skursky, WA ........................................50
6. Justin Wilk, PA ...........................................48
7. Matt Mancsuo, OF......................................30
8t. AJ Lenkaitis, WA ......................................29
8t. Chris Musto, PA ........................................29
Tackles for Loss
1. Joey Ciuccio, OF.........................................15
2. Jorden Sekol, OF.........................................13
3t. Tony DeSando, OF ....................................10
3t. Anthony Trotta, OF....................................10
Tackles
1. John Ameen, PA..........................................68
2. Anthony Trotta, OF.....................................71
3. Jorden Sekol, OF ........................................52
4. Jake Zalewski, PA.......................................49
5. Dave Dragon, PA........................................43
6. Nick O’Brien, WA......................................42
7. Joe Giambra, PA.........................................38
8. Matt Kintz, WA ..........................................35
9. Corey Popovich, WA..................................34
Sacks
1. Joey Ciuccio, OF...........................................9
2. Corey Popovich, WA ....................................7
3. Tony DeSando, OF .......................................4
4. Joe Taylor, WA..............................................3
5. John Ameen, PA........................................2.5
Interceptions
1t. Dave Argust, OF ..........................................3
1t. Jordan Houseman, PA..................................3
1t. Justin Langdon, WA.....................................3
4t. Ryan Cadwalder, OF ...................................2
4t. Nick O’Brien, WA.......................................2
4t. Jordan Zezza, WA........................................2
Fumble Recoveries
1. Joey Ciuccio, OF...........................................4
1. Jorden Sekol, OF...........................................3
2. Jake Manetti, OF...........................................2
2. 11 tied with ....................................................1
Kicking
1. AJ Lenkaitis, WA...........26-for-29, 1 FG (32)
2. Matt Mancuso, OF ........21-for-25, 3 FG (28)
3. Chris Musto, PA ............20-for-21, 2 FG (24)
Punting
1. Chris Musto, PA..................................39-38.2
2. Dave Argust, OF.................................19-30.5
3. Nick O’Brien, WA..............................10-29.2
D I S PAT C H F O O T B A L L S TAT S
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Ina game that couldbe consid-
ered as the game of the year in
the Wyoming Valley Confer-
ence, WyomingArea hadtrouble
stopping the best player in Divi-
sion AA/A, GAR’s Darrell
Crawford.
But the Warriors had bigger
problems not stopping them-
selves as two second-half fum-
bles allowed Crawford to out
duel WA quarterback Nick
O’Brien last Saturday night in a
37-30 win over Wyoming Area
at Wilkes-Barre Memorial Sta-
dium in South Wilkes-Barre.
The loss by Wyoming Area all
but assured the Grenadiers will
be the top seed in when the Dis-
trict 2 Class 2Aplayoffs open up
in three weeks.
“That’s the waythe ball bounc-
es and those are the things you
have to manage especially in big
games,” said WA Head Coach
Randy Spencer about the two
costly turnovers. “Games that
are going to come down to this
small of a margin for victory,
those are the things you definite-
ly have to take care of to be suc-
cessful.”
The Grenadiers got on the
board first, scoring on a 17-yard
post pattern as Crawford hit Sha-
liek Power less than three min-
utes into the game. Crawford
would throwfor two touchdowns
and run for three more on the
night.
However, the Warriors would
answer right back.
Taking advantage of GAR’s
spotty run defense, Wyoming
Area ran the ball eight times, in-
cluding a bruising 20-yard run
by Jeff Skursky and a 21-yard
scamper by Corey Popovich. Fi-
nally, Nick O’Brien faked the
handoff at the 17-yard line,
sprinted up the middle, cut to his
right and bounced off of a de-
fender and into the endzone.
Skursky went over the top of the
line for the two-point conversion
and an 8-7 lead at the 5:15 mark
of the first quarter.
The Warriors recovered the
ensuing kickoff, when the ball
was chipped over the first line of
Grenadiers and Cody Schmitz
hustled down the line to dive on
it before it rolled out of bounds.
However, the drive stalled at the
10 yard line and a missed field
goal kept the Warriors lead at
one with 1:53 left in the quarter.
GAR used the rest of the first
quarter and three and a half min-
utes of the second quarter before
Crawford found the endzone
again and converted for two to
take a 15-8 lead with 8:29 left in
the half.
After a 26-yard kick return by
Ahmad Bouie, Kintz ran for five
on the first play of the drive then
Skursky for 12 and six to get to
the GAR 36. O’Brien then took
the snap and rolled right. He
stumbled and it looked as if he
was going to get caught frombe-
hind but the speedy junior reco-
vered and got himself to the edge
where he turned on the burners
and split the defenders going 36
yards untouched to paydirt. The
four-play, 59 yard drive took1:17
and knotted the game at 15 with
6:52 left in the half.
GAR answered back to re-
claimthe lead on their next drive
when they connected on a 35-
yard fly pattern from Crawford
to tailback Lucas Benton.
Down 22-15, Bouie made the
Grenadiers pay for kicking the
ball away fromO’Brien. He took
the kickoff and found himself
sprinting down the sideline for
63 yards before being horse-col-
lared by the last defender at the
GAR20. The half the distance to
the goal penalty gave the War-
riors the ball on the10 and it only
took two Skursky carries to re-
ach the endzone. Skursky added
a two-point run to take back the
lead 23-22 with 2:48 left in the
half.
GAR moved the ball to the
Warrior 26 before lining up for a
field goal with only a few sec-
onds left in the half. The Grena-
diers attempted the fake but WA
read it perfectly and Justin Lang-
don came up with the intercep-
tion and had a lot of running
room in front of him. Langdon
sprinted down the sideline be-
fore being cut off by the last de-
fender, who made a touchdown
saving tackle, and the Warriors
went into the half with a 23-22
lead.
Wyoming Area got the ball af-
ter the half andwent right backto
their game plan of pounding the
rock right at the GAR defense.
Popovich went for four and
then O’Brien for two and Skur-
sky for one bringing up fourth-
and-two from the GAR 49. The
Warriors – who didn’t have a sin-
gle negative yardage play until
the fourth quarter – were confi-
dent in their ability to pick up
one yard and decided to go for it.
The handoff went to Popovich
whopickedupthe first downand
more as he ran over defenders,
picking up14 yards before being
stripped by GAR. The Grenadier
defender jumped on the ball and
took over possession at the War-
rior 36-yard line.
The turnover proved costly as
GARconvertedthe fumble intoa
Crawford touchdown and two-
point conversion to take a 30-23
lead with 7:36 left in the third
quarter.
The Warriors ensuing posses-
sion was once again run-laden as
they moved the ball fromtheir 37
to the GAR nine before the usu-
ally reliable Skursky coughed up
the ball and gave it back to the
Grenadiers at the 1:33 mark of
the third.
GAR took advantage of the
Wyoming Area misfortune as
they drove 93 yards for their fifth
score of the game as Crawford
cashed in from25 yards out. The
back-to-back scores gave the
VA R S I T Y F O O T B A L L
Turnovers costly in Warriors loss to GAR
Two second-half fumbles too much to overcome in 37-30 defeat
By Matt Page
Dispatch Correspondent
PHOTOS BY BILL TARUTIS
Above, Wyoming Area freshman running back Jeff Skursky stretches for extra yardage as GAR's
Lucas Benton closes in. Below left, Warriors wideout Cody Schmitz runs for yardage on a sweep.
Below right, Ahmad Bouie turns the corner on a kick return against GAR.
See TURNOVERS, Page 57
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Mentor Doe Hunt is not quite
the name of the season. It’s a col-
lective name of all of the deer
hunting seasons where a young
prospective hunter can harvest a
doe. A recent change in the law
nowallows for a mentored young
hunter to harvest an antlerless
deer by using the license of the
adult they are hunting with. The
idea behindit is toallowa mentor
(adult, licensedhunter) togive up
one of their antlerless deer licens-
es to a youngster (under 12 years
of age) involved in the mentored
hunting program.
I wasn’t quite sure just how
many people would take advan-
tage of the new law but now I’m
convincedit’s a success. We start-
ed receiving photos of young
hunters with their antlerless deer
shortly after the archery season
began. Fathers and other mentors
were happily giving up one of
their licenses in order for a
youngster to tag their first deer.
The number of photos sent to
Pennsylvania Outdoor Life qua-
drupled after the three day youth
antlerless hunt held two weeks
ago. Once again we received
photos of nine, ten and eleven
year olds proudly sitting by their
harvest.
The decision as to what age is
old enough or too young is up to
the parent or legal guardian. I
have hunted turkeys with a more
than qualified nine year old and I
have seen some very immature
eleven year olds who I wouldn’t
hunt with. The choice has been
left up to the parent at hand. I just
hope they consider the individu-
al’s maturity level at the time.
Non-the-less the new law is a
winner in my books. If you don’t
believe me, watch Pennsylvania
Outdoor Life tonight at 6:30 and
see the smiles on the kid’s faces
as they show off their antlerless
trophies. It is important to re-
member that a mentored youth
may only receive one antlerless
deer license each license year.
The antlerless deer license trans-
ferred to the mentored youth
must be for the Wildlife Manage-
ment Unit in which the adult
mentor and youth are hunting.
The antlerless change is in ad-
dition to the buck season for
youngsters already in place. For
antlereddeer, thementoredyouth
must use legal sporting arms for
that season. For example, a bow
or crossbowmust be used during
archery antlered deer season. Al-
so, those youths participating in
the Mentored Youth Hunting
Program(MYHP) are requiredto
follow the same antler restric-
tions as a junior license holder,
which is one antler of three or
more inches in length or one an-
tler with at least two points.
The other regulations require
that the youth to adult ratio be
one-to-one, and that the pair pos-
sesses only one sporting arm
whenhunting. Whilemoving, the
sporting arm must be carried by
the mentor. When the pair reac-
hes a stationary hunting location,
the mentor may turn over posses-
sion of the sporting arm to the
youth and must keep the youth
within arm’s length at all times.
The programalso requires that
both the mentor and the youth
must abide by any fluorescent or-
ange regulations, and that the
mentored youth must tag and re-
port any deer or spring gobbler
taken. As part of the MYHP per-
mit (which you can get online)
every hunter will be provided the
necessary harvest tags for an-
tlered deer and spring gobbler,
but must use the adult mentors
antlerless deer harvest tag.
I do believe that the push to get
youngsters involved in the hunt-
ing and fishing sports is not only
a healthy idea for the formation
of family values and sportsman-
ship, it is necessary to keep our
outdoor heritage alive in Penn-
sylvania. Get involved if you can
andinvest inthefutureof outdoor
sports. I think it’s worth the time.
White Nose
Syndrome update
I promised to keep you up to
date on the loss of bats in Penn-
sylvania due to white nose syn-
drome. While the cure is still far
away, a team of scientists includ-
ing Bucknell biology professor
Dee Ann Reeder has identified
the deadly fungus that causes
white-nose syndrome in bats.
This discovery is very important
in the effort to prevent extinction
of the nocturnal creatures in east-
ern North America.
Researchers have proven that
Geomyces destructans, the tell-
tale white fungus found on sick
bats, led to white-nose syndrome
in otherwise healthy hibernating
bats. This was proven on both
those bats artificially infected
with the fungus and those that
shared a hibernation space with
bats that contracted the condition
naturally. The big question now
is, what can be done to prevent
the spread and possible extinc-
tionof certaincave dwellingbats.
InPennsylvania, bats spendsix
months out of theyear inhiberna-
tion, living off their stored food
supply. Most of this supply is
fromconsuming massive quanti-
ties of flying insects. White nose
syndrome, now called Gd (Geo-
myces destructans) irritates the
deep-sleeping bats, forcing them
out of their hibernation stupor,
which requires increased energy
consumption from a reserve that
barely sustains them through
winter. Most of them often die,
regardless of whether the bat
stays put or flies out into the
harsh winter weather looking for
food that isn’t there. Although
some hibernacula have been
scorched by Gd and remain ab-
sent of all bat life, there have been
some bats that have survived at
some contaminated caves and
mines in Pennsylvania and New
York for several years. This fact
gives researchers hope for a po-
tential sign of resistance.
It is still too early to tell what
can be done to save the bats, but
now that they know the cause,
they can look for a cure. I have
faith in the brilliant minds be-
hinds this research. I will keep
you posted.
Be sure to watch Pennsylvania
Outdoor Life tonight at 6:30 on
WNEP-TV. We’ll take you to
Schuylkill Countyonrabbit hunt.
Join us as we tag along with
Northern Tier Outfitters and
their four beagles. We will also
have an edition of Pennsylvania
People and Places with success-
ful mentored doe hunters. Have a
great day!
Mentor Doe Hunt is a success
OUTDOORS WITH JAKE
by Don Jacobs
Email your hunting or fishing photos to
rnotari@psdispatch.com
or drop them off at
The Sunday Dispatch office,
109 New Street, Pittston.
Grenadiers a twopossessionlead
with 9:43 left in the game.
However, the Warriors did not
quit after the two costly turn-
overs.
With the ball at their own 41,
O’Brien scrambled for five be-
fore hitting Grove for 30 yards to
the GAR 34. After two O’Brien
carries and an incomplete pass,
WA found themselves facing a
fourth-and-six. O’Brien took the
snap and hung in the pocket but
no one came open, he rolled to
his left and lofted a pass just be-
fore taking a big hit from the de-
fensive lineman. The pass land-
ed in the hands of a wide-open
Grove for 13 yards to the 17. On
the very next play, O’Brien ran
up the middle and collided with
the umpire at the10 yard line. He
bounced off him and took the
play outside and into the end-
zone to cut the lead to 37-30 with
6:45 left in the game.
The Grenadiers took the ball
back at the 6:36 mark and looked
to try to run the clock out. How-
ever, Wyoming Area was able to
force a fumble that was jumped
on by Zack LaNunziata, giving
the Warriors a shot at eveningthe
score.
With 1:34 and no timeouts,
O’Brien hit LaNunziata on a
swing pass for minus-two yards
and then was sacked for mi-
nus-12 yards. With 30 seconds
left and facing a third-and-24,
O’Brien fired a pass deep but it
was intercepted to end the game.
“We have to refocus,” said
Spencer about what lies ahead
for the Warriors. “You have two
games left in your regular sea-
son, you have a district playoff
birth in the balance, so you have
to refocus. Our kids will be back.
We will work hard.”
TURNOVERS
Continued from Page 56
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OBITUARIES
Alice T. "Gi-
gi" Brown Da-
niels, of Wyom-
ing, formerly of
Lehman Town-
ship, died Octo-
ber 27, 2011
surrounded by loved ones at the
Geisinger Wyoming Valley Med-
ical Center, Plains Township.
She was the daughter of the late
Henry and Lillian Nagle and was
a graduate from Ashley High
School, class of1944, andworked
at various employments: riveter,
waitress, seamstress, housekeep-
er, and finally retiring from Gen-
eral Hospital. She was a member
of the Lehman-Idetown United
Methodist Church and attended,
regularly, the Wyoming United
Methodist Church, where she
was active in the Women’s Socie-
ty. She did volunteer work at Mis-
sion Central Shoemaker Hub and
was involved with the Wyoming/
West Wyoming Senior Citizens.
She was also a long distance sup-
porter of the Amazing Grace
Baptist Church, Georgia.
She was also preceded in death
by her first husband, Glenn
Brown, and her second husband,
Donald Daniels; brothers, Tho-
mas, Joseph and Paul Nagle, and
sisters, Mary Howatt, Elizabeth
LaPoint, Anna Crawford and
stepson Donald Daniels.
Surviving are her children and
their spouses, Fred and Linda
Brown, Alexandria VA; Faye and
Phillip Hobbs, Lawrenceville,
GA; Glenna and Michael Pocces-
chi, Exeter; Susie and Jack Snyd-
er, Lehman Township; her step-
sons, Samand Mary Ann Daniel,
Wapwallopen, and Wayne and
Georgia Daniels, Warrior Run;
her sister and friend, Henrietta
Marconi, Mountain Top; 10
grandchildren; and 13 great-
grandchildren.
Funeral will be held Monday at
10 a.m. from the Curtis L. Swan-
son Funeral Home Inc., corner of
routes 29 & 118, Pikes Creek,
with Pastor Bob Ryder of the
Lehman-Idetown United Metho-
dist Church officiating. Inter-
ment Chestnut Grove Cemetery,
Loyalville. Friends may call to-
day from 4 to 7 p.m.
In lieu of flowers, memorial
donations may be sent to the Leh-
man-Idetown United Methodist
Church, PO Box 12, Lehman,
18627 or the Wyoming Valley
United Methodist Church, PO
Box 4004, Wyoming, 18644.
Alice T. Brown Daniels
October 27, 2011
Thomas M.
Kaminski, 86, of
the Lincoln
Heights section
of Hanover
Township died
October 27, 2011
at home.
He was born in Hanover Town-
ship, on August 15, 1925, the son of
the late Alex and Mary Nypower
Kaminski. He was a graduate of Ha-
nover Township High School in
1944 and the University of Georgia,
where he excelled in football, hav-
ingplayedinthe Sugar Bowl in1946
and in the Orange Bowl in1947. He
was drafted by the San Francisco
49ers when knee injuries suddenly
ended his career. In the 1960s, he
was a PIAA football official in the
Wyoming Valley Conference. He
was a U.S. Army veteran of World
War II, having entered the service in
January of 1944, returning to the
valley for high school graduation in
June of 1944 after completing basic
training. He then left for duty in
Germany, England, France and Bel-
gium with the 1123 Headquarters
Combat Engineers until the war in
Europe ended. He worked for Glen
Alden Coal Company Electricians
and from1958 until 1979, and own-
ed and operated KK’S cafe in As-
kam, Hanover Township. His last
employments were at the Acme
warehouse, Forty Fort and Churnet-
ski Transportation in Sugar Notch.
He was a member of the Exaltation
of the Holy Cross Church, Button-
wood, a Fourth Degree Member of
the Knights of Columbus Council
302, Wilkes-Barre; VFW Post
5267, Amvets Post 59, and Team-
sters Local 401.
He was preceded in death by his
sister Mary Uczen.
Surviving are his wife of 54
years, the former Anna Mae Grys-
kiewicz; sons, Thomas Jr., Exeter,
and John, Mount Pocono; daugh-
ters, Gail Potter, Havertown, and
Gwen, at home; grandson Timothy
Uffer; granddaughters Noelle and
Brittany Potter; and sister Martha
Harris, Bridgewater, NJ.
Funeral will be held Monday at
10:30 a.m. fromthe Charles V. Sher-
bin Funeral Home, 630 Main Road,
Hanover Green, Hanover Township.
A Mass of Christian Burial will be
in the Exaltation of the Holy Cross
Church, Buttonwood at 11a.m. fol-
lowed by Military Services before
interment in St. Mary’s Cemetery,
Hanover Township. Friends may
call Monday from 9 a.m. until 10
a.m. at the funeral home.
Thomas M. Kaminski
October 27, 2011
Madeline
Lamberti, 94,
Old Forge, died
October 28, 2011
at Hospice Com-
munity Care in
Dunmore.
She was born in Pittston and was
the daughter of the late Domonic
and Jennie Longo Tamburro. Her
husband, Nunzi Lamberti, died on
March 23, 1990. Before retirement,
she worked at Brooks Manufactur-
ing in Old Forge and had worked at
Revello’s Pizza in Old Forge. She
was a member of Prince of Peace
Parish.
She was preceded in death by
three sisters, Concetta Karsko,
Grace Catania, Josephine Cotton
and three brothers, John, Arthur and
Albert.
Surviving are two sons, Nicholas
and his wife, Mary Ann, of Old
Forge, Nunzi and his wife, Mary
Ann, of Roaring Brook Township;
three grandchildren, Nick, Mark and
Michelle, and five great grandchil-
dren, Nick, Melanie, James, Alexa
and Chloe, nieces and nephews.
The funeral will be Monday at
9:15 a.m. from the Jacob Davis Fu-
neral Home, 422 S. Main St., Taylor,
with a Mass of Christian Burial at 10
a.m. at Prince of Peace Parish, West
Grace Street, Old Forge. Interment
Memorial Shrine Cemetery, Carver-
ton. Visitationwill be Sundayfrom2
to 4 and 6 to 8 p.m.
Madeline Lamberti
October 28, 2011
WVC 4A
Valley West ................8-1 (67)
Hazleton ....................4-5 (33)
Williamsport..............3-6 (25)
WVC 3A
Dallas .........................8-1 (67)
Crestwood..................7-2 (59)
Berwick .....................6-3 (49)
Coughlin....................5-4 (43)
Pittston Area ..............2-7 (17)
Tunkhannock...............0-9 (0)
WVC 2A/1A
GAR...........................8-1 (54)
Wyoming Area ..........6-2 (41)
Northwest ..................5-4 (35)
Lake-Lehman ............5-4 (34)
Hanover......................3-6 (21)
Nanticoke...................2-6 (14)
Meyers .......................2-6 (14)
Holy Redeemer ...........0-8 (0)
LFC Division 1
Valley View................5-1, 8-1
Scranton .....................5-1, 6-3
Wallenpaupack ..........4-2, 7-2
Delaware Valley.........3-2, 6-2
Scranton Prep ............3-2, 5-3
West Scranton............2-4, 3-5
Abington Heights.......1-5, 3-6
North Pocono.............0-5, 0-9
LFC Division 2
Dunmore....................4-0, 9-0
Riverside ....................3-1, 6-3
Honesdale ..................2-2, 3-6
Lakeland.....................1-3, 4-5
Western Wayne ..........1-3, 3-6
Carbondale.................1-3, 2-7
LFC Division 3
Old Forge...................3-0, 6-2
Susquehanna ..............2-1, 5-3
Mid Valley..................2-1, 5-3
Trail............................2-2, 7-2
Holy Cross .................1-2, 4-4
Montrose....................0-4, 0-9
D2 Class 4A
Valley West ............1080 (8-1)
Wallenpaupack ........810 (7-2)
Scranton...................780 (6-3)
Delaware Valley ......730 (6-2)
Hazleton ..................440 (4-5)
Williamsport............300 (3-6)
D2 Class 3A
Valley View .1210, 134.4 (8-1)
Dallas ...........1190, 132.2 (8-1)
Crestwood....1010, 112.3 (7-2)
Berwick...........730, 81.1 (6-3)
Coughlin.........720, 80.0 (5-4)
Scranton Prep.630, 78.8 (5-3)
West Scranton 350, 43.8 (3-5)
Abington Hts..360, 40.0 (3-6)
Honesdale.......310, 34.4 (3-6)
Pittston Area ...280, 31.1 (2-7)
Tunkhannock...............0 (0-9)
North Pocono ..............0 (0-9)
D2 Class 2A
GAR.............1070, 118.9 (8-1)
Wyo. Area ......750, 93.8 (6-2)
Susquehanna ..560, 70.0 (5-3)
Lake-Lehman.600, 66.7 (5-4)
Mid Valley......530, 66.3 (4-4)
Lakeland.........590, 65.6 (4-5)
W. Wayne .......400, 44.4 (3-6)
Hanover ..........380, 42.2 (3-6)
Meyers ............250, 31.3 (2-6)
Carbondale.....250, 27.8 (2-8)
Nanticoke .......200, 25.0 (2-6)
Holy Redeemer ...........0 (0-8)
Montrose .....................0 (0-9)
D2 Class 1A
Dunmore................1350 (9-0)
Lackawanna Trail ..1060 (7-2)
Old Forge.................940 (6-2)
Riverside..................910 (6-3)
Northwest ................670 (5-4)
Holy Cross...............530 (4-4)
Class 2A and 3A playoff spots
determined by per game average
D I S PAT C H F O O T B A L L S TA N D I N G S
1. Valley West.......(8-1) 1
2. Valley View.....(8-1) 2
3. Crestwood .......(7-2) 3
4. Dallas...............(8-1) 4
5. Dunmore .........(9-0) 5
6. Scranton ..........(6-3) 7
7. Wallenpaupack(7-2) 6
8. Del. Valley.......(6-2) 8
9. GAR.................(8-1) 9
10. Wyo. Area....(6-2) 10
11. Scranton Prep(5-3) 11
12. Old Forge .....(6-2) 12
T H E R I C K ’ S D 2 D I S PAT C H D O Z E N
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OBITUARIES
John "J.R."
Cebula Jr., 84,
of Dupont, died
surrounded by
his family on
Saturday, Octo-
ber 22, 2011, at
Geisinger South Wilkes-Barre.
Born June 24, 1927, he was a
sonof thelateJohnandViolaGe-
drich Cebula of Dupont. He was
a graduate of the Dupont High
School and served in the armed
services during World War II. He
was a master electrician and the
owner of Cebula’s Bar and Pizza
in Dupont. His hobbies included
hunting, fishing, raising fantail
pigeons and spending time at his
lake house at Mountain Lake,
Bear Creek. He loved to travel
and frequently visited Canada
and the western United States.
John was a devout Catholic and a
member of Sacred Heart of Jesus
Church, Dupont. He was a mem-
ber of the Elm Street Sports-
man’s Club, the Dupont VFW
Post 4909, and a life member of
the Dupont Hose Co. John was a
devoted husband, father, grand-
father, brother and friend.
He is survivedbyhis wife of 63
years, the former Theresa Hala-
garda; four daughters, Christine
Wardrop and her husband, Ge-
orge, West Chester; Diane Dev-
lin and her husband, Robert, Pitt-
stonTownship; Elaine Boothand
her husband, Edmund, Dupont,
and Maureen McLaughlin and
her husband, Michael, Pittston
Township; six grandchildren,
Robert Devlin Jr., Kristen War-
drop, Jade Devlin, Lauren War-
drop, Michael McLaughlin Jr.,
and Allison Booth; and his sister,
Marion Babiarz, Avoca.
Funeral services were held
Oct. 25 from the Lokuta-Za-
wacki Funeral Home, Dupont,
with a Mass of Christian Burial
in Sacred Heart of Jesus Church,
Dupont, to be celebrated by the
Rev. Joseph D. Verespy, Pastor.
Interment Ss. Peter &Paul Cem-
etery, Avoca.
John Cebula, Jr.
October 22, 2011
Mary Lou Polit Dudzinski, 70,
passed away peacefully Monday,
September 26, 2011, in Chesa-
peake, VA, following a lengthy
illness.
She was born and raised in
Pittston. She will be dearly mis-
sed by her husband, Paul; and
daughter Lesley; brother and sis-
ter in-law, Sam and MaryAnne
Polit of West Pittston; sister and
brother in-law, Patricia and Wal-
ter Kelley of Hammonton, NJ;
aunt Esther Rooney of West
Wyoming; and many nieces, ne-
phews, and cousins.
A memorial service will be
held at a later date.
Friends are invited to sign the
online guestbook atwww.sim-
plycremationonline.com. Sim-
ply Cremation of Virginia
Beach, VA, handled the arrange-
ments.
Mary Lou Dudzinski
September 26, 2011
Doris Dale
Klush, 89, of
Pittston passed
into eternal life
on Wednesday,
October 26,
2011at Hospice
Community Care.
She was born and raised in
Pittston, daughter of the late
Clifton and Jeanette Buren Dale.
Mrs. Klush was a graduate of
Pittston High School and St.
John’s Business School. Prior to
retirement, she was employed by
Pittston Hospital and Geisinger
Wyoming Valley Medical Cen-
ter. She was a member of St.
John the Evangelist Church and
a member of the Ladies Auxilia-
ry of the United Transportation
Union Lodge 259.
She was preceded in death by
her husband Constant in 1959.
Surviving are her sons, Con-
stant and wife Margaret, Robert,
with whom she resided and
Dale; grandchildren, Kimberly
(Alan) Kosick, Amy, Jason and
Dale (Stephanie); great-grand-
children, Alison, Dylan and Av-
rie.
A private funeral and inter-
ment will be held at the conve-
nience of the family. Memorial
contributions can be made to the
charity of the donor’s choice. Fu-
neral arrangements are by Gra-
ziano Funeral Home.
Doris D. Klush
October 26, 2011
Guy Joseph
“Doc” Fascia-
na, of West
Pittston, died
Monday, Octo-
ber 24, 2011.
Born on De-
cember 5, 1950 in Pittston, he
was a son of the late Catherine R.
(DelPriore) Fasciana and Dr. Jo-
seph A. Fasciana. Guy was a
graduate of St. John’s High
School. He was the owner and
operator of Doc’s Sports Bar for
over 20 years where he spon-
sored many softball teams.
He was a former member of
Fox Hill Country Club.
He is survived by brother, Jo-
seph Francis, and his wife, Char-
leen Fasciana; sister, Marie
Catherine Fasciana; and nephew,
Nicholas Fasciana.
Funeral services were held
Oct. 27 in the Graziano Funeral
Home, Pittston Township.
A Mass of Christian Burial
was held in St. Anthony of Padua
R.C. Church Exeter, with the
Rev. Joseph Sibilano officiating.
Interment services followed at
Mt. Olivet Cemetery, Carverton.
Guy Fasciana
October 24, 2011
Margaret Gatto, 96, of Old
Forge, died Friday, October 21,
2011.
Born in Moscow, a daughter of
the late Thomas and Carmella
Cianataia Gatto, she was preced-
ed in death by nine siblings. She
is survived by her sister, Carmel-
la Gatto; five generations of
nieces and nephews; and close
friends.
Funeral services were held
Oct. 24 fromthe Kearney Funer-
al Home, Old Forge, with a Mass
of Christian Burial in St. Mary of
the Assumption Church, Prince
of Peace Parish, Old Forge, to be
celebrated by the Rev. Ronald
Hughes, Associate Pastor.
Interment Old Forge Cemete-
ry.
Margaret Gatto
October 21, 2011
Josephine R.
Tedesco, 88, of
Pittston, passed
away Wednes-
day, October
26, 2011 in
Hospice Com-
munity Care at Geisinger South
Wilkes-Barre.
Born in Pittston Township, she
was the daughter of the late
Alexander and Catherine De-
Graba Tedesco. She was a gradu-
ate of Pittston Township High
School, Class of 1941. She was
employed by Pagnotti Enterpris-
es for the past 70 years in many
capacities until the time of her
death. She was a member of Our
Lady of Mt. Carmel Church,
Pittston where she taught CCD
Classes for many years; she was
also a member of its Altar and
Rosary Society.
She was preceded it death by
her sister, Rose Tedesco in 1997.
Surviving are her brother,
Alexander and his wife, Rosem-
ary, of Exeter; nephew, Joseph
Tedesco, Ambler, PA; niece,
Carolyn Tedesco, Catonsville,
Maryland; great-niece, Nicole
Martin, Exeter; great-nephews,
Eric and Justin Martin, West
Pittston and great-great nephew,
Julius Quevas, Exeter.
Funeral services will be Mon-
day at 9 a.m. from the Adonizio
Funeral Home, 251 William
Street, Pittston with a Mass of
Christian Burial at 9:30 a.m. in
Our Ladyof Mt. Carmel Church,
William Street, Pittston. Inter-
ment, Mt. Olivet Cemetery,
Carverton. Friends may call to-
day from 5-8 p.m. at the funeral
home.
In lieu of flowers, memorial
donations may be made to Our
Lady of Mt. Carmel Church.
Funeral arrangements are en-
trusted to the Peter J. Adonizio
Funeral Home.
On-line condolences may be
made at www.peterjadonizio-
funeralhome.com.
Josephine R. Tedesco
October 26, 2011
The Sunday Dispatch publishes obituaries of local individuals who
reside, formerly resided or have family living in the Greater Pittston area.
Obituaries should be submitted by 12 p.m. Saturday to ensure publi-
cation in the same week’s edition.
Email is preferred for submission, but fax or handwritten entries will
be acceptable with a contact name and phone number. Entries not in-
cluding a contact name and telephone number will not be published.
Email obituaries to sd@psdispatch.com; Fax obituaries to
570.602.0184; or mail themto109 NewSt., Pittston, PA18640. For more
information call the obituary desk at 570.602.0170, or to place a memo-
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Obituary Policy
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OBITUARIES
Clem Lello,
83, of Dupont
passed away,
Tuesday, Octo-
ber 25, 2011, in
the Geisinger
Wyoming Val-
leyMedical Center, Plains Town-
ship.
Born in Dupont, on April 4,
1928, he was a son of the late Ni-
cholas and Elizabeth Pannunzio
Lello. He was a member of Our
Lady of Mount Carmel Church,
Pittston; theVFWPost 4909, Du-
pont, and AMVETSPost 189. He
was a combat veteran of the Ko-
reanWar. Clemwas a graduate of
Dupont High School and was an
active member of its alumni asso-
ciation. He attended the Univer-
sity of Scranton. He was a retired
sales agent of the Prudential In-
surance Company. Clem was a
past member of the Pittston Area
School Board and volunteered
his time withMeals onWheels of
Greater Pittston. He also served
as Cubmaster of Pack 361, and
Dupont Borough secretary.
Inadditiontohis parents, Clem
was preceded in death by his lov-
ing wife, Regina, who passed
away May 30, 2011; and his
brother, Paul.
Surviving are his sons, Nick
andhis wife Diane, Carlisle; Jim-
my, Philadelphia; Joe and his
wife Alona, Wyoming; Patrick
and his wife, Karen, Dupont;
grandchildren, Megan, Nicholas,
Christopher, Julia, Eugene and
his wifeAbby, Brian, Patrick, and
Timothy; brother, Nick and his
wife Betty, Dupont; nieces and
nephew, Becki Johnson, Marian
McNevin, Paul Johnson, Lisa
Morreale, and Lenora Lello. The
familywouldlike toextenda spe-
cial thank you to Dr. Gerald Gib-
bons for his many years of devot-
ed and compassionate care, and
to his cousin, the Rev. Joseph
Adonizio, for his spiritual com-
fort that he gave to Clem and his
family.
Funeral services were held
Oct. 29 from the Peter J. Adoni-
zio Funeral Home, Pittston, with
a Mass of Christian Burial in Our
Lady of Mount Carmel Church,
Pittston. Interment St. John the
Evangelist Cemetery. Online
condolences may be made at
www.peterjadoniziofuneral-
home.com.
Clem Lello
October 25, 2011
Margaret T.
Petrillo, 78,
passed away
Tuesday, Octo-
ber 25, 2011, in
the home of her
son in Harding.
Born in Pittston, on May 2,
1933, she was a daughter of the
late Carmen and Philomena Se-
rino Oliveri. She was one of 11
siblings. She attended Pittston
schools and worked in the local
garment industry.
Margaret was preceded in
death by her husband, Joseph Pe-
trillo.
Survivingher are sons, Ronald
Mitchell and wife Elizabeth, Ya-
tesville, and Richard Petrillo and
wife Lori, Harding; grandchil-
dren, Jennifer Opal, Fla.; Ronald
and Michael Mitchell, Yates-
ville; Jessica, Jenna and Joseph
Petrillo, Harding; great-grand-
children, Savanna, Caden and
Lucia Opal; sister, Nancy Doblo-
vasky, Pittston; and numerous
nieces and nephews.
Funeral services were held
Oct. 28 in Peter J. Adonizio Fu-
neral Home, Pittston, with a
Mass of Christian Burial in Our
Lady of Mount Carmel Church,
Pittston. Interment will be at the
convenience of the family in
Good Shepherd Cemetery.
Memorial donations may be
made to Erwine Hospice, 270
Pierce St., Suite 101, Kingston,
18704.
Online condolences may be
made to www.peterjadonizio-
funeralhome.com.
Margaret T. Petrillo
October 25, 2011
Michael Ste-
phen Mick-
nick, 47, Pitt-
ston, died Sat-
urday evening,
October 22,
2011, at home
after a courageous battle with
cancer.
Born in Taylor, on March 9,
1964, he was a son of Michael
Micknick, Avoca, and the late
Dorothy Yager Micknick, who
died September 8, 2011. Mike
was a 1982 graduate of Pittston
Area High School, and attended
Lackawanna College. For many
years, he worked for Techneglas,
Pittston Township, and was em-
ployed by Floserve, Clarks Sum-
mit. During the summer, he
lovedtospendtime withhis fam-
ily at the beach and ride his mo-
torcycle. He was a parishioner of
St. Nicholas of Myra Byzantine
Catholic Church, Old Forge.
In addition to his father, he is
survived by a sister, Beverly Kir-
by, and her husband, Doug, Li-
titz; three nieces, Kaitlin, Kara
and Kyla; and several aunts, un-
cles and cousins.
A Parastas service was held
Oct. 26 in the Semian Funeral
Home, Taylor, by the Rev. Jo-
seph Bertha. Interment St. Ma-
ry’s Byzantine Catholic Cemete-
ry, Taylor.
Memorial donations to the
Abramson Cancer Center, 3451
Walnut St., Philadelphia 19104.
Please visit www.semiancares-
.comto share memories or ex-
tend condolences.
Michael S. Micknick
October 22, 2011
Mr. Herman J. Kovalan, 90,
of Duryea passed away Tues-
day, October 25, 2011, in the
Riverside Rehabilitation and
Nursing Center, Taylor.
Born in Duryea, he was a son
of the late Martin and Lena Or-
loski Kovalan. He was a gradu-
ate of Duryea High School. He
served in the U.S. Marines dur-
ing World War II serving at
Guadalcanal. Prior to his re-
tirement, he was employed by
Tobyhanna Army Depot, To-
byhanna. He was a member of
the Nativity of Our Lord Par-
ish, Duryea, formerly Sacred
Heart of Jesus Church. He was
a member of the VFW Post
1227, Duryea, and the Amer-
ican Legion Post 585, Duryea.
He was preceded in death by
his wife, the former Regina T.
Yonuska Kovalan, who passed
away on November 14, 2008;
brothers, Arthur, August and
Joseph; sisters Gertrude Nar-
done, Della McCormick,
Catherine Matt, Josephine Sa-
polis, Lena Davis and Martha
Hazenski; and son-in-law, Ed-
ward J. Brady. Surviving him
are, daughter, Pat Brady, Pitt-
ston; granddaughter, Maureen
Lussi and her husband, Louis,
Duryea; grandson, Edward
Brady, Suscon; great-grand-
son, Louis Lussi, Duryea;
great-great-granddaughter,
Brea Lussi, Duryea; sister
Esther Daileda, Old Forge; and
several nieces and nephews.
A Mass of Christian Burial
was held Oct. 29 in Sacred
Heart of Jesus Church, Du-
ryea. Interment St. John’s
Cemetery, Duryea. The Amer-
ican Legion Post 585, Duryea,
conducted Military Services.
Arrangements are by the Pion-
tek Funeral Home, Duryea.
Herman J. Kovalan
October 25, 2011
Doris S.
Firestine, of
West Pittston,
passed away
Sunday, Octo-
ber 23, 2011,
in United
Methodist Homes, Wesley Vil-
lage Campus, Jenkins Town-
ship.
She was born in West Pitt-
ston, April 6, 1916, daughter of
the late Allen and Alice Fergu-
son Smiles. She graduated
from West Pittston High
School and Wyoming Semina-
ry School of Business. Doris
was a member of the First
United Methodist Church,
West Pittston, the Methodist
Women, and Class 18, of the
church. She was also a mem-
ber of The West Pittston Wom-
en’s Club. Doris loved to cro-
chet and made beautiful hand-
made afghans for her family.
She is preceded in death by
her husband, Russell "Butch"
Firestine; and sister, Helen
Wicks.
Doris is survived by her
daughters, Jane Firestine,
West Pittston; Ellen R. Rebert
and her husband, Lynn, Get-
tysburg; sister, Marian Wilson,
West Pittston; grandchildren,
Kelsey and Gregg Rebert; and
several nieces and nephews.
Private funeral services will
be held at the convenience of
the family. The Rev. Janet
Tiebert, her pastor, will offici-
ate. Interment West Pittston
Cemetery.
Memorial donations may be
sent to West Pittston Library
Memorial Fund, Warren St.,
West Pittston, 18643. Arrange-
ments are through the Howell-
Lussi Funeral Home, West
Pittston.
Doris S. Firestine
October 23, 2011
Vincent P. Chesslock, 83,
Duryea, died Tuesday, Octo-
ber 25, 2011, in the home of
his daughter Theresa.
Surviving him are daugh-
ter Shirley Heppding and
husband Joseph, Theresa
Ameika and husband Leo-
nard, Gerri Opiela; eight
grandchildren; six great-
grandchildren; sister, Victo-
ria Zielinski; several nieces
and nephews.
A Mass of Christian Burial
was held Oct. 28 in Sacred
Heart of Jesus Church, Du-
ryea. Interment Holy Rosary
Cemetery, Duryea. The VFW
Post 1227, Duryea conducted
Military Services.
Memorial contributions
may be made to the Holy
Rosary School, Duryea.
Vincent P. Chesslock
October 25, 2011
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F U N E R A L S E R V I C E S I N C .
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OBITUARIES
Adeline
(Della) Bara-
nowski, 85, of
Nanticoke,
passed away
Saturday, Octo-
ber 22, 2011, in
the Wilkes-Barre General Hos-
pital.
She was born in Nanticoke, on
August 8, 1926, to the late Stan-
ley and Anna Frankowski
Stooks. Adeline attended Nanti-
coke schools. She was a lifetime
member of the parish Communi-
ty of Holy Name of Jesus Polish
National Catholic Church, Pros-
pect Street, Nanticoke, and a de-
voted caregiver to her family.
She also enjoyed family get-to-
gethers and loved travel. Togeth-
er withher late husband, Edward,
of 64 years, she operated and
owned Barans Fabric Store,
Nanticoke, for 40 years.
Adeline was preceded in death
by a brother, Bernard Frankow-
ski.
Presently surviving her are
sons, Edward and his wife, Bar-
bara, Hunlock Creek; Richard
and his wife, Elaine, Nanticoke;
Anthony and his wife, Michelle,
Nanticoke; daughter, Debra
Keener and her husband, Byron,
Pittston; brother Stanley Fran-
kowski, Texas; sisters, Irene
Hvozda, Nanticoke, and Hen-
rietta Golaszewski, Michigan;
grandchildren, Cheryl Brud-
nicki; Ricky, Kevin, Heather
Dinstel; Sarah, Tony, Joshua,
Neil and Kelly Keener; great-
grandchild, Kaitlyn Brudnicki;
and several nieces and nephews.
Funeral services were held
Oct. 27 n the Grontkowski Fu-
neral Home, Nanticoke, with
Mass in Holy Name of Jesus Pol-
ish National Church, Nanticoke,
withBishopRysz officiating. In-
terment will be in Holy Name of
Jesus Polish National Catholic
Cemetery, Lake Silkworth.
Adeline Baranowski
October 22, 2011
Edward C. Baranowski, 90, of
Nanticoke, passed away on Sun-
day, October 23, 2011, in the Vet-
erans Administration Medical
Center, Plains Township.
Born in Plymouth, on July 17,
1921, he was a son of the late An-
thony and Rose Baranowski. Ed-
ward attended the Lehman
School District and was a devot-
ed member of Holy Name of Je-
sus Polish National Catholic
Church, Nanticoke.
He was president of his
church’s committees, and a
sponsor of bowling and softball
teams. Edward was an U.S. Ar-
my veteran of World War II serv-
ing in the European Theater, and
a recipient of a Purple Heart for
his valiant efforts during his time
of service.
Upon his return home, he
joined the American Legion Post
350, Nanticoke. He and his late
wife, the former Adeline Fran-
kowski who recently passed
away on Saturday, October 22,
2011, were owners and operators
of Barans Fabric Store in Nanti-
coke for 40 years.
Most of all, Edward enjoyed
family gatherings and traveling
with his late wife, Adeline (Del-
la).
He was preceded in death by
brothers Tony and Leo; sisters
Marian, Joan, Valerie and Alex-
andra.
Surviving him are sons, Ed-
ward Baranowski Jr. and his
wife, Barbara, Hunlock Creek;
Richard Baranowski and his
wife, Elaine, Nanticoke; Antho-
ny Baranowski and his wife, Mi-
chelle, Nanticoke; daughter, De-
bra Keener and her husband, By-
ron, Pittston; brothers Stanley
and Alfred Baranowski; sisters
Rosalyn Driscoll and Ruth Bell,
both of New Jersey; grandchil-
dren, Cheryl Brudnicki, Rickey,
Kevin and Heather Dinstel, Sa-
rah, Tony, Joshua, Ned and Kelly
Keener; great-grandchild, Kait-
lyn Brudnicki; and several niec-
es and nephews.
Funeral services were held
Oct. 27 in the Grontkowski Fu-
neral Home, Nanticoke, with
Mass in Holy Name of Jesus Pol-
ish National Catholic Church,
Nanticoke, at 9:30 a.m. with
Bishop Rysz officiating. Inter-
ment parishcemetery, Lake Silk-
worth.
Edward C. Baranowski
October 23, 2011
Catherine
Bryk
Rheinschmidt,
78, of Dupont,
passed away on
Saturday, Octo-
ber 22, 2011, in
her home.
Born in Dupont, on April 8,
1933, she was a daughter of the
late George and Antonia Pacz-
kowski Niemiec Bryk. She was a
1950 graduate of Dupont High
School. Catherine was a member
of the Sacred Heart Church, Du-
pont, and its Altar and Rosary
Society and choir. She served as
a CCD teacher for many years
and was also director of religious
education at St. Mary’s, Avoca.
Prior to retirement, she was em-
ployed in the local garment in-
dustry. Catherine’s passions were
her faith, grandchildren and Du-
pont High School Alumni Asso-
ciation, of which she was one of
the founding members.
Besides her parents, she was
preceded in death by her hus-
band, Carl A. Rheinschmidt, in
2001; brothers Frank, Joseph and
Vincent Niemiec, and Alfred
Bryk; sisters Dorothy Niemiec
Wrazien and Lucille Niemiec
Pavco.
Surviving her are daughter,
Georgann Wywoda, and hus-
band Peter, Dupont; brother Ge-
orge Bryk Jr. and wife Lynn,
Palm Coast, Fla.; sisters Marie
Niemiec Grzybowski, St. Louis,
Mo.; Delores BrykKaveliski and
husband Dominic, Chardon
Ohio; sister-in-law, Judy Klenz
Bryk; grandchildren, Carlie Ann
and Katie Elizabeth Wywoda;
numerous nieces and nephews,
great nieces and nephews, and
great-great nieces and nephews.
The funeral was heldOct. 28in
the Kizis-Lukuta Funeral Home,
Pittston. A Mass of Christian
Burial was be celebrated in Sa-
cred Heart of Jesus Church, Du-
pont. Interment will be in the
parish cemetery, Dupont.
Memorial donations can be
made to Erwin’s Home Health
and Hospice, 270 Pierce St.,
Kingston, 18704.
Catherine Rheinschmidt
October 22, 2011
Dolores (Wnenta) Polak,
81, of Duryea, passed away
Tuesday, October 25, 2011 at
Hospice Community Care,
Dunmore.
Born in Duryea, February
28, 1930, she was the daugh-
ter of the late Stanislaw
(Stanley) and Helena (Smi-
gel) Wnenta. Dolores was a
life-long member of Holy
Rosary Church (Nativity Of
Our Lord) Duryea, She at-
tended Holy Rosary School
and Duryea High School.
In addition to her parents,
her husband Stanley T. Polak,
who passed away May 25,
2002 preceded her in death;
along with her son David and
daughter Christina; brothers
Stanley (Sty), Walter (Hast-
ie), Joseph (Popeye), Theo-
dore (TT) and Valenty (Lin-
dy); and sisters Stephanie
(Stephie), and Anna (Annie).
She is survived by her sons,
Stanley (Stosh) and his wife
Carol, of Houston, TX; Mi-
chael and his wife Margaret,
of Manasquan, NJ; Mark and
his wife Adele of Manassas,
VA; daughter-in-law, Cathe-
rine (Kate) Polak; grandchil-
dren Christopher, Samantha,
Amy, Ashley, David Jr., Jes-
sica and Virginia, and several
nieces and nephews.
Funeral services will be
held Monday at 9 a.m. from
Kiesinger Funeral Services,
255 McAlpine St., Duryea,
with a Mass of Christian
Burial at 9:30 a.m. at Sacred
Heart of Jesus Church, Du-
ryea, with Fr. Andrew Sinnot
officiating. Friends may call
today from 5-8 p.m. Inter-
ment will be held at Holy
Rosary Cemetery.
Memorial contributions
may be made to Holy Rosary
School, 125 Stephenson St.,
Duryea 18642 or to Hospice
Community Care, 100 Wil-
liam St., Pittston 18512.
Online condolences may be
made towww.kiesingerfuner-
alservices.com
Dolores Polak
October 25, 2011
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Funeral Home, Inc.
211 LUZERNE AVENUE
WEST PITTSTON, PA
Helena A. Morris, Supervisor
(570) 654-3471
451 N. MAIN STREET
WILKES-BARRE, PA
H. Merritt Hughes, Supervisor
(570) 823-6511
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atpeacenow,and web elieve
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m oth erand averyloving,
devoted grandm oth erto ou r
ch ildren. W ewereall so b lessed
to h aveh ad you in ou rlives.
You weresu ch an inspiration
to u sall. Restin peacedear
m oth er,weloveyou !!!!
Grea tly m issed by y ou r
children ,gra n dchildren ,
da u ghtera n d son s-in -la w a n d
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wh o h elped in anywayand wasth ereforou r
fam ilyatth isdifficu lttim e.
OBITUARIES
Mary S.
Bellas, for-
merly of West
Pittston,
passed away
Saturday, Oc-
tober 22, 2011,
in Highland Manor Nursing
Center/Community Hospice
Care, Exeter.
Mary was a member of St
Anthony’s Parish, (St. Barba-
ra’s), Exeter.
Displayed in her room at
Highland Manor, where she
was a resident for over two
years, was the following: The
woman who lives in this room
is Mary Bellas, born March 2,
1924, to Pietro and Angeline
Candelora Rosetti, who emi-
grated from Campobasso, in
the Molise region of Italy. Ma-
ry was the sixth child to Ange-
line, who gave birth to eight
children. Mary’s older brother,
Victor, died in infancy in the
Great Flu Epidemic of 1918.
When Mary was 9 years old,
her father was crushed in a
mining accident that left him
paralyzed. He died not long af-
ter, leaving Mary’s mother, An-
geline, a widow at the age of
45, with seven children to
raise. Mary left school in the
seventh grade to help support
her family. She went to work in
a dress factory where she
stayed for 35 years. She
worked as a "waistmaker," a
job that required great skill. On
July 4, 1944, Mary married a
boy from Duryea, James Bel-
las, whom she had met on a
blind date. After James return-
ed fromOkinawa, Japan, where
he had been stationed during
the war, they bought a home in
West Pittston which became
the family homestead. Mary
gave birth to their son, James,
on January 19, 1946; four years
later, their daughter, Charlene,
was born. Mary continued to
work in the dress factory until
the 1960’s when she left to be-
come a full-time homemaker.
Her sewing skills, however,
went with her. She made cur-
tains, pillows, doll-clothes,
shirts and dresses -- whenever
anyone had an event for which
they needed something special
to wear, Mary fashioned some-
thing beautiful. In 1967, Ma-
ry’s first grandchild, Cheri Lin,
was born. Mary and James rev-
eled in the job of grand parent-
ing. Cassandra, Kimberly,
Christine, Luisa and finally,
her only grandson, Luke, fol-
lowed. Sadly, however, in 1981,
James died suddenly of a mas-
sive heart attack, leaving Mary
a widow at 57 and her life dras-
tically changed. She mourned,
but managed to continue her
day-to-day existence.
She was eventually blessed
with nine great-grandchildren,
Kendra, David and Benjamin,
Sebastian and Sara, Honor, An-
thony and Brianna, and Sama-
ra. Just a few months ago, Ma-
ry was even blessed with a
great-great-granddaughter,
Lillianna. Throughout the
years, Mary struggled to main-
tain her home, refusing to leave
the place she and her husband
had shared for so many years.
After a series of falls, Mary
eventually ended up at High-
land Manor. Although Mary’s
hearing and vision failed over
the last few years of her life,
she remained who she had al-
ways been, a feisty, talented,
devoted wife and mother. She
is a person who traveled quite a
journey through this life.
She was also preceded in
death by brothers, Samuel, Ni-
cholas, Louis; and her sister,
Genevieve Bolock.
Surviving besides her chil-
dren, James Bellas; daughter-
in-law; Connie Bellas and
Charlene Berti; son-in law,
Louis Berti; grandchildren,
great-grandchildren, great-
great grandchild; sisters, An-
geline Bonito and Josephine
Marriott, and several nieces
and nephews.
A Mass of Christian Burial
was held Oct. 25 in St. Barba-
ra’s Parish at St. Anthony’s
Church, Exeter. Interment will
be held in Mount Olivet Ceme-
tery.
Memorial contributions
should be made to the charity
of the donor’s choice. On-line
condolences may be made
atwww.peterjadoniziofuneral-
home.com.
Mary S. Bellas
October 22, 2011
Peter Joseph Sarago, age 82,
passed away Wednesday, Octo-
ber 26, 2011 surrounded by his
loving family at his home.
Born May 27, 1929 in Pitt-
ston, he was the son of the late
Dominic and Agnes (Christia-
no) Sarago. Peter was a retired
manager with Drug Fair in Eno-
la. He was a US Army veteran
of the Korean War and was a
member of St. Joseph Catholic
Church, Mechanicsburg where
he also served as an usher. Peter
enjoyed fishing, gardening,
wood working and crafts yet his
favorite hobby was bowling
where he participated in many
leagues at Trindle Bowl.
Peter is survived by his loving
wife of 63 years Ida Louise
(Sciabacucchi) Sarago, his four
children P. Kenneth Sarago and
wife Patricia, Dominic J. Sara-
go and wife Tina all of Mechan-
icsburg, Ann Marie Termini
and husband Lee of Clarks
Summit, Anthony J. Sarago and
wife Beth of Wellsville, two sis-
ters Mary Francis and Rose
DeAlba, a brother Anthony Sa-
rago and wife Helen all of Pitt-
ston as well as 16 grandchil-
dren, 10 great grandchildren
and several nieces and neph-
ews.
Peter was preceded in death
by two sisters Theresa Forlenza
and Florence Bone.
Memorial services will be
held today at 2 p.m. at Malpezzi
Funeral Home, Mechanicsburg.
Visitation will be held today
from 12-2 p.m. at the funeral
home. Interment will be held at
the convenience of the family.
In lieu of flowers, contribu-
tions may be made to Celtic
Hospice of Carlisle, 220 Wilson
Street, Carlisle, 17013. To sign
the online guest book, please
visit malpezzifuneralhome.com
Peter J. Sarago
October 26, 2011
Angelo W. Bartorillo, 93, of
Wyoming, died Tuesday, Oc-
tober 25, 2011, in the Mead-
ows Nursing Center, Dallas.
He was born in Luzerne, son
of the late Cornelius "Con"
and Mary Papa Bartorillo. An-
gelo was a decorated U.S. Ar-
my veteran of World War II,
having fought in the battles of
Anzio, Salerno and Norman-
dy. For 43 years, he owned and
operated Rutter Auto Service,
on Rutter Avenue, Forty Fort.
He was a member of the Keys-
tone Garage Association. The
family would like to thank his
many loyal customers of the
past, who remained his friends
after the closing of his garage.
He was also a member of the
former St. Mary’s Annuncia-
tion Church, and currently of
St. Ignatius Church, Kingston.
Angelo is survived by his
daughter, Lisa, at home; sister,
Eleanor Piazza, Dallas; niec-
es, nephews, great-nieces and
great-nephews.
Funeral was held Oct. 29 in
the Kopicki Funeral Home,
Kingston, with Mass of Chris-
tian Burial in St. Ignatius
Church. Interment will be in
the St. Mary’s Annunciation
Cemetery, Pringle.
Memorial contributions be
made to the Wounded Warrior
Project, PO Box 758517, To-
peka, KS 66675-8517.
Angelo W. Bartorillo
October 25, 2011
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In Loving M em ory
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Ga m bino
W h o passed away
10 yearsago
10/28/66 -10/31/01
Ju stath ou gh tof sweet
rem em b rance
m em orysad and tru e
Ju stth eloveand sweet
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W ou ld lik eto extend ou rth ank sto all of ou rfam ily,friends
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Octob er30,1982
S a dly m issed by
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OBITUARIES
Thomas C. Roberts, 89, a resi-
dent of Ashley, passed away
early Sunday morning, October
23, 2011, in the Highland Manor
Nursing and Rehabilitation Cen-
ter, Exeter. His beloved wife was
the late Marion (Davis) Roberts,
who passed away on January 6,
2008. Together, Thomas and
Marion shared 61beautiful years
of marriage.
Born on April 15, 1922, in
Ashley, Thomas was a son of the
late Charles and Claire (Liggett)
Roberts. Tomwas raised in Ash-
ley and had resided there his en-
tire life. He was a graduate of the
former Ashley High School,
class of 1940. A U.S. Army Air
Force veteran, Tom honorably
served his country during World
War II. During his time of ser-
vice, he was decorated with the
GoodConduct Medal, the Amer-
ican Campaign Medal, and the
World War II Victory Medal.
Upon his honorable discharge on
February 8, 1946, Tom had at-
tained the rank of Staff Sergeant.
Prior to his retirement in the
early 1980s, Tom was employed
for over 25 years as an assembler
for Foster Wheeler Corporation,
Mountain Top. Tomwas a devot-
ed member of Ashley Centenary
United Methodist Church, Ash-
ley. Active within his church,
Thomas served as a communion
steward for many years. Addi-
tionally, Tom was a longtime
member of the Coalville Mason-
ic Lodge No. 474, Sugar Notch,
F & AM District 12 of Pennsyl-
vania.
In addition to his parents,
Charles and Claire Roberts, he
was preceded in death by his
wife, Marion Roberts; brother,
George Roberts; sisters, Eliza-
beth Payne and Olive Swank.
Thomas is survivedbyhis only
daughter, Melinda Howe, and
her husband, Francis, Wyoming;
grandson, Michael Howe,
Wyoming; brothers-in-law, Bill
Davis and his wife Ellen, New-
town, and William J. Foley,
Lyndwood; and several nieces,
nephews and friends.
The funeral was heldOct. 27in
the Wroblewski Funeral Home,
Forty Fort, with the Rev. Carol
Coleman officiating. Interment
Albert Cemetery, Dorrance. To
send an online message of con-
dolence visit www.wroblewski-
funeralhome.com.
Memorial Contributions may
be made in to Ashley Centenary
United Methodist Church, 26
North Main Street, Ashley,
18706.
Thomas C. Roberts
October 23, 2011
Mary Siva-
hop, 98, of
Port Griffith,
passed away
Sunday, Octo-
ber 23, 2011,
in her home.
She was the widow of John Si-
vahop, who died in 1986.
Born in Luzerne, she was a
daughter of the late Michael
and Helen Gobbler Marko. She
was educated in the Luzerne
public schools. Prior to retire-
ment, she was employed by
Consolidated Cigar Company,
West Pittston, and General Ci-
gar, Kingston. She was a mem-
ber of St. Michael’s Byzantine
Catholic Church, Pittston. She
was a beloved wife, mother,
grandmother, great grand-
mother, sister and aunt who
was dearly loved and will be
greatly missed.
She was preceded in death
by brothers, Leo Marko, Wil-
liamMarko, Joseph Marko and
Edward Marko; sisters Emma
Sabol, Sophie Kunec, Josie
Yastremski and Helen Marko.
Surviving her are two sons,
Thomas Sivahop, Pittston, and
Albert Sivahop, Trumbull,
Conn.; two daughters, Lor-
raine Rosencrans and Marga-
ret Ann Solt, both of Pittston;
two sisters, Catherine Kasaba,
Plains, and Anne Westawski,
Pittston; six grandchildren;
two great-grandchildren; and
several nieces and nephews.
The funeral was held Oct. 27
in the Baloga Funeral Home,
Port Griffith section of Pitt-
ston, with the Office of Chris-
tian Burial with Divine Liturgy
in St. Michael’s Byzantine Ca-
tholic Church, Pittston. The
Rev. Joseph Bertha, Ph D., of-
ficiated. Interment parish
cemetery. To send an online
condolence visit www.baloga-
funeralhome.com.
Mary Sivahop
October 23, 2011
Harry Redmond, 59, Pittston,
died Sunday, October 23, 2011,
in the Inpatient Unit of Hospice
Community Care, Dunmore, af-
ter a courageous battle with a
long-term illness.
Born June 26, 1952, in Pitt-
ston, he was a son of Phyllis Do-
vin Redmond and the late Do-
nald Redmond. He loved music
and entertaining friends and
family as a DJ.
Preceding him in death were
sister, Phyllis Simko; and broth-
er, Lawrence Redmond.
In addition to his mother,
Phyllis, he is survived by broth-
er-in-law, Ronald Simko, Tunk-
hannock; sister-in-law, Anna
Marie Redmond, Wilkes-Barre;
several nieces and nephews.
A private funeral will be held
at the convenience of the family
from the Bednarski Funeral
Home, 168 Wyoming Ave.,
Wyoming.
Memorial contributions may
be made to the American Cancer
Society, 712 S. Keyser Ave., Tay-
lor, 18517.
Harry Redmond
October 23, 2011
Vida D. Peck,
81, of Trucks-
ville, passed
away Saturday,
October 22,
2011 in the
Geisinger
Wyoming Valley Medical Cen-
ter, Plains Township.
Born in Philadelphia on De-
cember 19, 1929, she was a
daughter of the late Vincent Jo-
seph and Vida Rydzewski Peck.
She was raised in Forty Fort,
graduated from Forty Fort High
School in 1949 and Easton Hos-
pital School of Nursing in 1954.
Vida had worked as head nurse at
the Medical Center in Jersey
City, NJ, and at Boston Veterans
Administration Hospital. She
had resided in Cambridge, MA,
for 30 years, returning to the
Wyoming Valley in the 1990s.
She was preceded in death by a
brother, Vincent John Peck.
Surviving are her nephew,
Vincent J. Peck, andhis wife, An-
nette, West Pittston; great-neph-
ews, Vincent, Nicholas and Do-
minick Peck; great-niece, Alex-
andra Peck; and several cousins.
A Mass of Christian Burial
was held Oct. 26 in Our Lady of
Mount Carmel Church, Pittston.
Interment Mount Olivet Cemete-
ry, Carverton. Online condolenc-
es may be made atwww.peterja-
doniziofuneralhome.com.
Vida D. Peck
October 22, 2011
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W arriorsAnd Patriots
121 Sou th M a in St.,Pitts ton • 654-0067
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C M Y K
SUNDAY DISPATCH SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 PAGE 1B
➛ S O C I A L
Social Section
Inside
Anniversaries .....................1
Birthdays............................3
Schools ..............................4
Classified...........................8
S E C T I O N B
Ronald and Brenda D’Eliseo, Duryea, celebrated their 25th
wedding anniversary on October 25.They were married in St.
Mary’s Assumption Church, Pittston by Rev. WilliamCampbell.
Mrs. D’Eliseo is the former Brenda Bernoskie, daughter of
Robert Bernoskie, Pittston, and the late Elizabeth Bernoskie. Mr.
D’Eliseo is the son of Virginia and Tony Ellis, Laflin, and the late
Ronald D’Eliseo, Sr.
The couple has been blessed with three children, Christen, a
senior at Penn State University, Ronnie, a junior at Pittston Area
and Robert, an eighth grade student at Pittston Area.
The couple celebrated their anniversary with a trip to Cape
May, New Jersey
Mr. and Mrs. Ronald D'Eliseo
25th Anniversary
Jerry and Jackie Uhrin, Old Forge, recently celebrated their
50th wedding anniversary. They were married Oct. 28, 1961, in
St. Nicholas Greek Catholic Church by the late Rev. Steven Za-
jac.
They were attended by Marlene Uhrin Disimoni, Helen Herron
Werner, Janet Leterri, Bonnie Aulisio Mochan, George Aulisio,
WilliamStefanko, the late JosephAulisioandthe late Daniel Dis-
imoni.
Mrs. Uhrin is the former Jackie Aulisio, daughter of the late
Dominick and Shirley Aulisio. Mr. Uhrin is the son of the late
John and Margaret Uhrin. Prior to retirement, he worked for
Pennsylvania Gas and Water Company.
The couple has six children, Shirley Vender, Jackie Evans and
Jerry, Dominick, MarkandMichael Uhrin, all of OldForge. They
also have 11 grandchildren. They marked the occasion with a
family dinner.
Mr. and Mrs. Jerry Uhrin
50th Anniversary
Tony and Deborah Williams of West Pittston are celebrating
their 40th wedding anniversary today, October 30. They were
married at St. Johns U.C.C. in Schuylkill Haven by the late Rev.
James R. Williams.
Deborah is the daughter of the late John and Mary Ann Yorio.
Tonyis the sonof JeanWilliams andthe late JohnWilliams. Their
marriage has been blessed with three sons, Brian, Jarrod and Ja-
son. They also have four grandchildren, Brianna, Brian, Jacob
and Ava.
They will celebrate the occasion with a cruise in the spring.
Mr. and Mrs. Tony Williams
40th Anniversary
Dean Samuel Moorman, son of Chad and Maria Pie-
montese Moorman, was baptized by Father Joseph Elston
on August 28 in Sacred Heart Church, Duryea.
Dean is pictured on his Christening day with his god-
parents, Cousin Jennifer Battista and Uncle Daniel Pie-
montese.
A luncheon was held after the Christening in Dean’s
honor hosted by his grandparents, Sam and Geri Piemon-
tese.
Dean Samuel Moorman
Baptism celebrated
The 74th Taylor High School commencement was celebrated with a class reunion on September 1 at Labella Restaurant. Class
committee members pictured are, left to right, Mary Rowlands, Andrew Kulich and Lillian Goldstein.
Presentations from county, state and federal representatives included plaques, certificates of "special honor" awards for the "most
years served," citations of excellence and citizen’s diplomas of remarkable honors and distinction. Classmates shared a meal, followed
by singing, poems,words of wisdom, and a "this is your life" presentation.
The guests of honor have been reuniting every year since their 55th anniversary and prior to this every five years.
Taylor High School Class of 1937
Celebrates 74th anniversary reunion
Pittston Senior Center
Weight Wise
Aten-week Weight Wise class
with Denise will be offered at
the Pittston Senior Center
through Friday, Dec. 6. Each
session will be on-hour long and
begin a1p.m. There is no charge
for this class but registration is
necessary by calling the center
at 655-5561.
American Music Theatre
Reservations are open for a
daytriptoAmericanMusic The-
atre on Thursday Dec. 3. Cost is
$90 which includes round trip
motor coach transportation din-
ner at Miller’s Smorgasbord and
the Christmas Show only a few
seats remain. Payment will con-
firmreservations. For further in-
formation call Hazel 655-5561.
Zumba
Zumba Gold classes are being
held on Tuesdays and Thursdays
from 2:30 to 3:30. Cost is $2 for
center members and 33 for non-
members.
Hiking Group
A hiking group with Nikki is
forming. The group will meet on
Thursdays at 10 a.m. at Frances
Slocum State Park. For more in-
formation call the center.
Cosmopolitan Seniors
The Cosmopolitan Seniors, a
Project HEAD club, will meet
again on Tuesday, Nov. 1, at 1
p.m. at St. Anthony Center, in
Exeter. Vic Malinowski will pre-
side. Host/hostesses are Theresa
Blasavage, Toni Hall, Marcella
Fountain, Johanna and Vic Ma-
linowski.
The previous meeting was at-
tended by 52 members and two
guests. After the call to order by
President Malinowski, Vice
President Joe Kleback led the
group in prayer, pledge of alle-
giance and a patriotic song. Sec-
retary Terri Mislan read the min-
utes, and a report was rendered
by Treasurer Amy Alpaugh.
President Vic introduced Ro-
semary Golinski as a prospec-
tive member and welcomed
back several members who mis-
sed meetings. After the meeting
the group enjoyed refreshments
and bingo was played. 50/50
winners were: Aggie Abromav-
age, Amy Alpaugh, Florence
Aquilina, Share Dailey, and Ann
Mattei. Marion Kratzer won the
special game and the bingo jack-
pot was won by Mary Coleman..
Cosmopolitan Seniors travel
coordinator Johanna is accept-
ing reservations for a Mount Ai-
ry Casino trip on Wednesday,
Nov. 9. Pickups in Exeter and
Pittston. You do not have to be a
member to come on these trips.
Details can be obtained fromJo-
hanna at 655-2720.
Highland Manor
Highland Manor Nursing and
Rehabilitation Center will dis-
tribute bags for their annual ho-
liday food drive to support the
Greater Pittston Food Pantry,
Nov. 1-3.
In an effort to promote invol-
vement within the community
and support the Greater Pittston
Food Pantry with their ongoing
need to collect food donations
team members from Highland
Manor will step forward and re-
ach out to the community to col-
lect donations.
Donations will be collected
Nov. 1throughthe10. For further
information contact Pam Shed-
der, Admissions Director, 655-
3791 ext. 24 or email adm-high-
land@seniorsnorth.com.
S E N I O R B R I E F S
C M Y K
PAGE 2B SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 SUNDAY DISPATCH
➛ P E O P L E
Pittston High School class of 1961celebrated the 50th anniversary
of its commencement with a three-day reunion event in September.
Class members in attendance: first row, left to right, Joseph Dan-
ko, Frank Brogna, Joseph Pavlico, JoAnn Tompkins Thomas, Mi-
chael Curatilo, Irene Bonchonsky Lanza, Catherine Burkel Brown;
second row, Michael Breza, Anna Marie Detitto, Camille Cremard
DeAngelo, Carol Ann Vensky Reedy, Theresa Dalessandro Ripa,
Nina Argo Perrins, Rosemary LaFratte, Carol Vitale Fong, Patricia
Butera Nocerini, Mary Ann Verbitsky Cybulski, Margaret DeAnge-
lo Keating; third row, John Martinelli, George Engleman, Phyllis
Lumia Mantione, Sam Sanguedolce, Frances DeLuca Podsodlik,
Robert Reedy, Florence DeMarco, Judith Wierbowski, Antoinette
Falzone Fath, Christina Arrange, Camille Marranca Tomasetti, Ma-
rie Capwell Ventre, Mary Cupano Kelly, Martina Hopkins Wilson,
Jeanne Whyte Gubbiotti; fourth row, Michael Cummings, John
Smalanskas, Joseph Russick, John Lynott, Robert Keating, Paul Ya-
rolin, Patrick Walker, Philip Pisano, Peter Judge, James Best.
Pittston High School Class of ’61 reunites on 50th anniversary
Mary Cupano Kelly, Nina Argo Perrins, Irene Bonchonsky Lanza, Judy Weirbowski at the PHS
Class of '61 gathering.
Jeanne Whyte Gubiotti, Marge DeAngelo Keating, Nina Argo Perrins, and Florence DeMarco pose
for a photo at the PHS Class of '61 reunion.
Robert and Carol Ann Vensky Reedy at the PHS Class of '61 re-
union.
Theresa Dalessandro Ripa, Michael Breza, and Nina Argo Perrins
at the PHA Class of '61 reunion.
Marie Capwell Ventre and Theresa Dalessandro Ripa reminisce at
the PHS Class of '61 reunion.
Holy Redeemer High School will
present the musical “Guys and Dolls”
Friday and Saturday, Nov. 11 and 12 at 7
p.m. in the school’s McCarthy Auditori-
um.
This musical comedy originally
played on Broadway in 1950 and is set
primarily in New York City, where
Nathan Detroit runs the oldest perma-
nent floating crap game. He bets gam-
bler Sky Masterson that Sky can’t make
the next girl he sees fall in love with
him, and that girl turns out to be Sarah
Brown of the Save-a-Soul Mission,
whose goal is to reformthe evildoers of
Times Square.
The musical features such songs by
FrankLoesser as “LuckBe a Lady,” “Sit
Down, You’re Rocking the Boat,”
“Guys and Dolls,” “A Bushel and a
Peck,” and “Follow the Fold.”
Tickets for the performance are $7 for
adults, $6 for senior citizens, and $5 for
students. They may be purchased at the
door the night of the performance or in
advance in person at Holy Redeemer
Monday-Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30
p.m.
Thomas Hanlon is directing “Guys
and Dolls” assisted by Michael Stofko
and student director Angela Costigan.
Vocal music director is Ann Manganiel-
lo, Steven Wise is stage manager, and
Keith Zielen is assistant stage manager.
Choreographer is Lauren Gonzalez.
Linda Johnson created stage scenery,
and Linda Rakausakas is costumer. A
number of Holy Redeemer students are
working on the musical behind the
scenes as well as on stage.
Holy Redeemer High School is locat-
edinWilkes-Barre onSouthPennsylva-
nia Blvd. and is the largest Catholic
high school sponsored by the Diocese
of Scranton. Anita Sirak is principal.
Holy Redeemer High School to present ‘Guys and Dolls’
Cast members for the production of Guys and Dolls at Holy Redeemer High School: seated, fromleft, Ben Nause, Swoyersville; Anthony Gialanella, Dallas;
standing, Tyler Floryan, Forty Fort; Ron May, Hanover Twp.; Thomas Caffrey, Hanover Twp.; Angela Costigan, Mountaintop; Beth DeMichele, Wilkes-Barre;
Louis Jablowski, Wilkes-Barre Twp.; Mary Katherine Evans, Mountaintop; Eva Smith, Wilkes-Barre; Patrick Loftus (kneeling), Mountaintop; Nicholas McCarroll,
Dallas.
C M Y K
SUNDAY DISPATCH SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 PAGE 3B
➛ B I R T H D A Y S
Elaina Grace (Laney) and Nina Catherine Agolino, daughters
of Michael and Jill Agolino, Broomall, will celebrate their birth-
days inthe near future. Laneywill turn7onNovember 4andNina
will turn 4 on October 31. Grandparents are Joseph and Mary
Agolino, West Pittston, and Joseph and Linda Carpenter of Phila-
delphia. A family party will be held to celebrate the occasion.
Elaina Grace and Nina Catherine Agolino
Jenelle Balchune will
celebrate her 7thbirthday,
November 2.
She is the daughter of
Joseph and Jennifer Bal-
chune, Eldersburg, MD.
Jenelle has a sister, Jil-
lian, 4 1/2 years old.
Grandparents are Do-
minic andMaryJane Car-
sia, and Harve and Eileen
Balchune.
Jenelle Balchune
D.J. Branhamwill cele-
brate his 11th birthday,
November 1. He is the son
of Kim Branham, Pitt-
ston.
D.J. is the grandson of
Tom and Becky Rosiak,
Pittston, and the great-
grandson of Rose Rosiak,
Port Griffith.
D.J. is a fifth grade stu-
dent at the Pittston Area
Intermediate Center. D.J.
has two sisters, Amanda,
21 and Kiersten, 8.
DJ Branham
Dino Domiano Jr and his sister, Leah Domiano recently cele-
bratedbirthdays. Dinoturned8onSeptember 30andLeahturned
6 on October 29. They are the children of Dino and Donna Dom-
iano, Old Forge. Their maternal grandmother is the late Dianne
Herbert. Their paternal grandparents are Josephine and Angelo
Soprano and Joseph and Diane Domiano, all from Old Forge.
Leah and Dino Domiano
Michael Cumbo, son of
Mike and Debbie Cumbo
of Dallas, is celebrated
his sixth birthday on Oc-
tober 18. Michael is a
grandson of Leonard and
Linda Kozick, Dallas;
Florence Cumbo, West
Pittston, and the late Leo-
nard Cumbo.
Michael Cumbo
Olivia Rose DeSarro,
daughter of Molly and
Frank DeSarro, Duryea,
celebrated her first birth-
day on Friday, October
28. Olivia is the grand-
daughter of Rosalie and
Richard Kerpovich, Ed-
wardsville, and Jessica
and Frank DeSarro,
Moosic. Olivia has an ol-
der brother, Benjamin,
age 3. Olivia celebrated
her special day with her
family and friends and a
party is being held in her
honor.
Olivia Rose
DeSarro
Joshua John and Jacob Joseph Lampman celebrated
their first birthdays on October 29.
Joshua and Jacob are the sons of Susan and Michael
Lampman of Avoca.
Grandparents are Christine and Joseph Rutkowski of
Shickshinny and Dolores and John Lampman of Avoca.
They have a sister, Elisabeth, 8 years old.
Joshua John and Jacob Joseph Lampman
Daniel John Grabo III, son of Dan and Janet Ramos Grabo,
Blackwood, NJ celebrated his 5th birthday on September 20. Da-
niel attends kindergarten at Our Lady of Hope School in Black-
wood. He is the grandson of Dan and Theresa (Stuccio) Grabo,
Pittston and Pedro and Gladys Ramos Vineland, NJ. A family
party marked the occasion followed by a special vacation to the
Great Wolf Lodge in Williamsburg, Virginia. Daniel enjoys play-
ing t-ball and soccer. Daniel’s dad, a Pittston native, is serving in
the US Navy and completing a fellowship in critical care and
trauma surgery at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia.
Daniel’s mom is a native of Vineland, NJ and is employed as a
physical therapist at Nova Care.
Daniel John Grabo III
Wyoming Area
Secondary School
Monday –A. Turkey & cheese on
a bagel. B. Mozzarella breadsticks
w/marinara sauce, C. Chicken fajita
w/lettuce, tomato, salsa, sour
cream. D. Rib-a-que, cheeseburger
or chicken patty on bun. Sides: Cel-
ery & carrots,/ranch dip, baked po-
tato wedges, mixed fruit.
Tuesday - A. Hot dog w/chili
sauce and/or cheese sauce B. Maca-
roni ’n cheese. C. Philly double
cheese steak hoagie. D. Rib-a-que,
cheeseburger or chicken patty on
bun. Sides: Brown sugared carrots,
seasoned spiral potatoes, apple-
sauce
Wednesday- A. Popcornchicken,
bread. B. Hot turkey sandwich. C.
Taco hard or soft shell w/ meat,
cheese, lettuce, tomato, rice. D. Rib-
a-que, cheeseburger or chicken pat-
ty on bun. Sides: Mashed potatoes/
gravy, green beans, jiggling Jell-O
Thursday - A. Chipotle burger w/
cheddar cheese, B. Southwest
chicken wrap w/ lettuce. C. Meat-
ball hoagie w/ mozzarella cheese.
D. Rib-a-que, cheeseburger or
chicken patty on bun. Sides: Baked
colossal fries, pickle slices, diced
pears.
Friday - A. Cheese or sausage
pizza. B. Buffalo chicken sub. C.
Grilled cheese sandwich, taco soup.
D. Rib-a-que, cheeseburger or
chicken patty on bun. Sides: Tossed
salad/dressing, tortilla chips/salsa,
peaches
Wyoming Area
Elementary Schools
Monday -Turkey and cheese on
bun or grilled cheese sandwich car-
rots, celery, broccoli/dip tomato
soup, saltine crackers, Minute Maid
Frozen Juice Bar. Alternate: Cheese
sandwich or PBJ or 4 oz yogurt and
animal crackers, all w/choice of
string cheese or sunflower seeds.
Breakfast: Warm Danish, fruit
juice, cereal, milk.
Tuesday -Hot dog on bun, macar-
oni ’n cheese, brown sugar carrots,
applesauce. Alternate: Cheese
sandwich or PBJ or 4 oz yogurt and
animal crackers, all w/choice of
string cheese or sunflower seeds.
Breakfast: Whole wheat English
muffin w/jelly, juice, milk
Wednesday -Baked popcorn
chicken, bread, mashed potatoes/
gravy, green beans, jigglin’ Jell-O.
Alternate: Cheese sandwich or PBJ
or 4 oz yogurt and animal crackers,
all w/choice of string cheese or sun-
flower seeds. Breakfast: Super forti-
fied donut, cereal, fruit, juice, milk
Thursday -Cheeseburger on bun
or chickenpattyonbun, bakedFree-
dom Fries, pickle slices, diced
pears. Alternate: Cheese sandwich
or PBJ or 4 oz yogurt and animal
crackers, all w/choice of string
cheese or sunflower seeds. Break-
fast: Scrambled eggs w/sausage,
toast, juice milk
Friday -Fresh cheese pizza or
pepperoni pizza topped salad/dress-
ing, peaches. Alternate: Cheese
sandwich or PBJ or 4 oz yogurt and
animal crackers, all w/choice of
string cheese or sunflower seeds.
Breakfast: Pancakes w/syrup, juice,
cereal, milk.
Pittston Area
Elementary Schools
Monday - Cheese steak hoagie or
grilled ham and cheese sandwich,
peas, apple slices, milk. Breakfast:
French toast sticks, 100%fruit juice
Tuesday - Macaroni & cheese or
bacon cheeseburger, carrots, peach-
es, milk, Breakfast: Ham, egg, &
cheese on bagel 100% juice
Wednesday - Chicken fajita,
meatball hoagie, green beans, Man-
darin oranges, milk. Breakfast: Pan-
cakes with syrup, fruit juice, milk
Thursday - Ham slice with pota-
toes au gratin BBQrib a que on bun,
corn, pineapple tidbits, milk.
Breakfast: Scrambled eggs with
toast, fruit juice, milk
Friday - Beef taco or plain pizza,
mixed vegetables, pears milk.
Breakfast: Waffles with syrup,
juice, milk
Available Daily:
Weekly - Ham & Cheese Wrap
Assorted Whole Grain Cereals w/
toast Breakfast Pizza ButteredToast
CHOICES Chef Salad, Turkey
Hoagie, Chicken Tenders with
bread
Pittston Area
Middle and High Schools
Monday - Italian dunkers with
marinara sauce, mixed vegetables,
fruit, milk
Tuesday - Spaghetti with meat
sauce, garlic bread slice, corn, fruit,
milk
Wednesday - Cheese steak Pani-
ni, green beans, fruit, milk
Thursday- Sweet &sour chicken,
stir fry vegetables, bread slice, fruit,
milk
Friday - BBQ Rib a Que Hoagie,
carrots, fruit, milk
Daily - Plain Pizza
Daily at High School Grill:
Whole Grain Chicken Patty; Deli
Specials; Salads, assorted “Made to
Order” Hoagies and Wraps.
Daily at Middle School Plain Piz-
za, Grill Specials, Whole Grain
Chicken Patty and Chicken Fajitas;
Deli Salads; Salads, Assorted Hoa-
gies and Wraps.
Weekly Specials
High School
PIZZA M W F: Buffalo chicken;
Cafeteria Store; T: Pepperoni; TH:
Sausage
Smart Start – Grab and Go
Breakfast
Middle School Breakfast
Monday - Egg & cheese on bagel
OR French toast sticks with syrup
Tuesday - Sausage & cheese on
English muffin OR scrambled eggs
with toast
Wednesday - Pancakes with syr-
up OR Egg, bacon & cheese on ba-
gel
Thursday - Breakfast pizza OR
Egg & cheese on bagel
Friday - Waffles with syrup OR
Ham & cheese on bagel
S C H O O L M E N U S
Stop by or mail your birthday photo to:
The Sunday Dispatch
109 New Street
Pittston, PA18640
Pictures can run in back and white for $2 or color for $10.
Deadline is Wednesday at 5 p.m., but space is limited, so pictures
will be published on a first-come, first-served basis. Any ques-
tions, please call 602-0168.
Happy Birthday!
Checks can be made
payable to The Sunday Dispatch.
Falls Senior Center
The Falls Senior Center
sponsored by the Area Agen-
cy on Aging for Luzerne/
Wyoming counties invites
anyone 60+ to the following
activities:
Mon. Oct.31 Masquerade
Party including games follow-
ing the noon meal.
Thurs. Nov. 3 at 12:15 p.m.
Laura Sickler, graduate die-
tary intern from Marywood
University, will do a presenta-
tion on "Organics".
Fri. Nov. 4 at11:30 a.m.
Phyllis Rennie, Volunteer
Services Coordinator from
SouthernCare, will give a pre-
sentation on Hospice Success
stories.
Wed. Nov. 9 at 1 p.m. Repre-
sentative Karen Boback will
visit the center.
Thur. Nov. 10 at 1 p.m. "The
Jolly Seniors" will give a mu-
sical presentation in honor of
Veterans.
The center offers daily ac-
tivities including Wii, Scrab-
ble, Yatzee and Shuffle Board.
Anyone wishing to come for a
hot noon meal for a suggested
donation of $2 can RSVP to
Twila at 388-2623 by noon the
day before. The Center is open
M-F 9 a.m.-2 p.m. It is located
on SR 92. All are welcome.
S E N I O R C I T I Z E N N E WS
Senior menus
Senior Citizens Centers sponsoredbytheAreaAgencyonAgingfor
LuzerneandWyomingCountiesofferhot noonmealsMondaythrough
Friday to people 60 years of age or older. Donations fromparticipants
are gratefully accepted and needed in order to expand this program.
The following is the menu for the week of October 31, 2011:
Monday Masquerade Party: Stuffed peppers, whipped potatoes,
Brussel sprouts, dinner roll, ice creamcups, margarine, milk&coffee.
Tuesday: Bag lunch
Wednesday: Grilled chicken sandwich, Craisin spinach salad, lite
Italian salad dressing, lentil soup, whole grain sandwich roll, lettuce,
tomato, mayo, brownie/vanilla pudding parfait, margarine, milk and
coffee.
Thursday: Lemon pepper fish (whitefish), broccoli/cauliflower
gratin, wildricepilaf, wholewheat dinner roll, orange, margarine, milk
and coffee.
Friday: Beef brisket, lima beans, roasted red potatoes, whole wheat
bread, crackers, tapioca pudding, margarine, milk and coffee.
For further information, contact the Area Agency on Aging for Lu-
zerne/Wyoming Counties Nutrition Program.
S E N I O R C I T I Z E N M E N U
C M Y K

PAGE 4B SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 SUNDAY DISPATCH
➛ S C H O O L S
Spirit Week 2011 will start on
Monday, Oct. 31, and conclude,
as is tradition, on Friday, Nov. 4,
with the pep rally before the
football against rivals Wyoming
Area.
The Student Council selected
the themes for spirit week: Mon-
day, Oct. 31, is crazy sock day;
Tuesday, Nov. 1, is twin day;
Wednesday, Nov. 2, is tacky
sweater day; Thursday, Nov. 3, is
class shirt day; and Friday, Nov.
4, is the red, white, andblue dress
down day.
Over the years, the themes for
spirit week have changed due to
dress code changes. Student
Council President Shelby Smith
said, “Over the last couple of
years we’ve had different themes
that are dress code approved, the
ones people liked we keep, ones
people do not like get changed
the next year.”
In addition to themed days,
many other events occur over the
course of spirit week. On Tues-
day, Nov. 1, the Goodwill Lun-
cheon will be held at Fox Hill
Country Club. The luncheon, for
representatives and officers of
the football and cheerleading
teams, band, senior class offi-
cers, and Student Council and
Key Clubs from both Pittston
and Wyoming Areas, is an op-
portunity to show that it is a
friendly rivalry, and in the end,
Pittston Area and Wyoming Ar-
ea students are all one communi-
ty.
In addition, the bon fire and
public pep rally will take place
on Thursday, Nov. 3, during the
evening at the high school.
P I T T S T O N A R E A H I G H S C H O O L
Spirit Week starts Monday
By James LaMarca
Spelling bee practice will be
held after school in the Middle
School Library until 4:00 p.m.
on Nov. 1, 8, 14, 22 and Dec. 6
and 13.
Each practice is mandatory,
and students are responsible for
their own rides home. Rides
must be in front of the Middle
School no later than 4:00 p.m. on
practice days. The tentative date
for the SpellingBee is December
20.
Act 80 Day
Monday, Oct. 31, is an Act 80
Day. Middle School students
will be dismissed at 1:00 p.m.
Parent/Teacher Conferences
The Martin L. Mattei Middle
School will conduct parent/
teacher conferences on Nov. 21,
22, and 23.
Talent Show Practice
There will be practice for the
Middle School Talent Showafter
school on Nov. 2, Nov. 7, and
Nov. 14 at the high school at 5
p.m. All participants are respon-
sible for their own transportation
home.
The Talent Showis Nov. 17at 6
p.m.
Reading and Math
The Pittston Area School Dis-
trict will present a Reading and
Math informational session to
the families of 6thgrade students
on Wednesday, Nov. 9, from 6
until 8 p.m. at the Pittston Area
Middle School. The program
will be presented by Mrs. Brady,
Miss Biscotti, Mr. Bartoli, and
Mr. Wrubel. Refreshments will
be served, and each family at-
tending will receive a free book
and a free calculator. Sign-up
forms must be completed and re-
turned no later than Nov. 4.
8th Grade Field Trip
The 8th grade class will go on
a field trip to the Scranton Cul-
tural Center on Wednesday, Nov.
30.On the trip, the students will
watch a performance of five
plays including: The Monkey’s
Paw, Icabod’s Last Ride, The
Necklace, The Tell Tale Heart,
and The Jumping Frog.
Both red and blue pod students
are invited to take part in the trip.
The cost of the trip is $20 and in-
cludes: transportation, a ticket to
the performance, and pizza, a
snack, and a drink when the stu-
dents return. Any child interest-
ed in attending must complete
and return a permission slip
along with $20.00 in cash to
Mrs. Rebovich in room249 or to
Mrs. Ferentino in room 227 by
Nov. 15.
Only students in good aca-
demic and behavioral standing
will be allowed to attend the trip,
and refunds will only be availa-
ble if the trip is cancelled. Con-
tact Mr. Bilbow or Mr. Booth at
655-2927 with any questions.
Book Club
It is not too late to join the
Middle School Book Club. The
first book to be discussed is The
Boy in Striped Pajamas by John
Boyne. If you are interested, see
Mrs. Jamieson in the upstairs of-
fice or e-mail her atjamie-
son@pittstonarea.com.
Candy Pick-Up
Gertrude Hawk candy orders
can be picked up on Monday,
Nov. 7, or Tuesday, Nov. 8, be-
tween the hours of 4 p.m. and 6
p.m. in the Middle School Cafe-
teria.
Sports Physicals
Seventh and eighth grade win-
ter sports physicals will be ad-
ministered during the first week
of November. Any student who
needs a physical should visit
www.pittstonarea.comto print
out a copy of the physical form.
Students will be required to re-
turn the completed form to Mr.
Lopresto, Assistant Athletic Di-
rector, prior to receiving a phys-
ical. Students without completed
forms will be unable to receive a
physical. If you already had a
physical for a fall sport, you will
not need another for winter
sports.
If you have any questions, call
Mr. Lopresto at 883-0070.
P I T T S T O N A R E A M I D D L E S C H O O L
Spelling bee practices scheduled; early dismissal on Monday
Monday, October 31, is an Act
80 Day. Dismissal will be at 1:30.
The Halloween parade will be
held on this day.
School security will direct
parkingat the PrimaryCenter for
the parade. The parade will be at
9:30 a.m. in the rear of the Pri-
mary Center. Students will pa-
rade around the bus circle. Par-
ents shouldline the outside of the
bus circle for the parade. The
high school band will play.
Parents are reminded that cos-
tume weapons are not allowed.
Costumes that represent vio-
lence of any form are not al-
lowed.
November Assembly
The Primary Center “What’s
Special About November” As-
sembly will be held on Thursday,
Nov. 10. Mrs. Zambetti’s first
grade class and Mrs. Cosimo’s
second grade class will perform.
Performances are at 10:00 a.m.
and 2:00 p.m.
Target Rewards
Parents are reminded to send
in Box Tops for Education logos.
Register your Target Red card at
Target.com/tcoe or call 1-800-
316-6142 to register the Primary
Center for credit.
PA P R I M A R Y C E N T E R
Halloween parade Monday
The Halloween party and pa-
rade will be held Monday, Octo-
ber 31. The party will be in the
morning and parade will begin at
11 a.m. Students will have early
dismissal due to a scheduled Act
80 Day as follows: walkers/car
students - 1:20; van/pin - 1:25; all
other buses - 1:30.
School Pictures
School pictures will be taken
Tuesday, Nov. 8. Parents are re-
minded to fill out the Picture
Payment Envelope, selecting
background color and enclosing
exact payment amount. All mon-
eyandorders must be returnedto
your child’s teacher by Monday,
Nov. 7.
Parent/Teacher Conferences
Because of the missed school
days due to the recent flooding,
the first marking period will end
on Wednesday, Nov. 9. Parent/
teacher conferences will be held
on Friday, Nov. 18; Monday, Nov.
21; Tuesday, Nov. 22 and
Wednesday, Nov. 23.
Student Pick-up
Parents are advised that when
picking up your child as a car
student, you must come to the
double glass doors by the flag-
pole with number in hand. This
is for the safety of your child and
will ensure that the students are
only released to the authorized
persons.
Treats
Birthday and holiday treats
should be healthy and nutritious.
A list of alternatives will be sent
home. The school’s food service
can also provide safe and portion
controlled food items for a rea-
sonable cost. Contact Sue Ruda-
lavage, Food Service Director, at
654-7770.
Fall Fundraiser
The PTO Fall fundraiser is
complete. The PTO thanks ev-
eryone who participated. Order
pick up date will be the last week
of November.
Box Tops
The Kindergarten Center is
collecting General Mills box
tops for education logos for the
2011-2012 school year. Parents
are asked to cut the box tops and
put in bundles of 50 before send-
ing them to your child’s teacher.
PA K I N D E R G A R T E N C E N T E R
Early dismissal,
Halloween parade
scheduled Monday
C M Y K
SUNDAY DISPATCH SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 PAGE 5B
➛ S C H O O L S
As part of National Teen Driv-
er Safety Week, Wyoming Area
High School students and offi-
cials joined PennDOT to remind
teen drivers and their parents/
guardians to be aware of the be-
haviors that cause most teen
driver crashes. Teen driver safety
information was distributed dur-
ing lunch last week at the event,
which was spearheaded by WA’s
student council.
Joining PennDOT was the
Northeast Highway Safety Pro-
gram.
According to the National In-
stitute of Child Health and Hu-
man Development, the highest
risk of a crash occurring is in the
first six months and 1,000 miles
of driving. Some key contrib-
utors to crashes involving teen
drivers in Pennsylvania include
driver inexperience and driver
distractions.
Congress established National
Teen Driver Safety Week last
year in response to the more than
5,000 teens who died in teen
driver-related crashes on U.S.
roads in 2006. National Teen
Driver Safety Week is held the
third week of October to raise
awareness about teens’ elevated
crash risks and to highlight the
issue of teen driver safety.
For more tips for teens and
parents, and to download the
Pennsylvania Driver’s and the
Howto Steer Themto Safe Driv-
ing manuals, visit http://
www.dmv.state.pa.us/ and click
on the Teen Driver Information
Center.
More safety information may
be obtained by checking out
www.neparoads.com Penn-
DOT’s Northeastern Pennsylva-
nia transportation website. For
safety tips, click on “Safety.”
Program at Wyoming Area aimed at safe teenage driving
Participating in National Teen Driver Safety Week at Wyoming Area are: seated, left to right, Nick Heck, Kendra Radle, Joseph Adoni-
zio, Dorianna Williams, Hannah Shelley; standing, Chris Alberigi, WAPD; Janet Serino, district principal of curriculum; Raymond J.
Bernardi, superintendent; Rebecca Rybak, Northeast Highway Safety Programcoordinator.
The Halloween parade and parties at Wyoming
Area’s MontgomeryAvenue school will be heldon
Monday, Oct. 31. This is also an early dismissal
day. All students K-5 will be dismissed at noon.
The parade will begin approximately 9:00 a.m.
for grades K-5. The parade route will be around
the school block (this is a newchange in the route)
Warren Street, Montgomery Avenue, Wyoming
Avenue, Berry Street and back on Warren Street,
weather permitting. (The parade will begin at the
Warren Street exit.)
Children are allowed to wear their costumes to
school or they can dress themselves for the parade
in their classroom. Students are not to wear their
masks to school because of safety concerns; they
should carry their mask and then put the mask on
at school for the parade. Also, should the costume
present a safety issue, it should be carried and put
on at school.
No plastic weapons or anything that resembles a
weapon are allowed in the school.
Food Drive
Parents are reminded to continue to send in food
for the on-going food drive. The school is collect-
ing food for the United Methodist Church in West
Pittston for their food pantry.
PTO Meeting
The Montgomery Avenue PTO will meet on
Monday, Nov. 7, at 6:30 p.m. All parents are wel-
come. (This is a newtime and day change fromlast
school year)
Bus Safety
On Wednesday, Oct. 26, a bus safety drill was
held for grades K, 1and 2 at the Montgomery Ave-
nue Elementary. JimSlocum, AAAEducation Di-
rector, came to speak to the children regarding bus
safety rules and procedures while riding a school
bus.
Safety Patrol
OnWednesday, Oct. 26, JimSlocum, AAAEdu-
cationDirector, alsocame tospeaktothe 5thgrade
students that signed up for School Safety Patrol.
The safety patrol is completely voluntary and open
to all interested 5th grade students. Duties will re-
quire a short amount of time each day. Members
are selected for their leadership, courtesy, depend-
ability, interest in their job, physical fitness, atti-
tude toward others and scholastic standing. The
primary aim of the Patrols is to foster qualities of
leadership and good citizenship in Patrol mem-
bers.
Donations
School districts and private organizations who
made donations to Montgomery and Sarah J. Dy-
mond: Walmart - $1,000 school supplies; Office
Max – Large carton of school supplies. Also, from
Fairview Elementary, Crestwood Area School
District, Mrs. CarolynBoone delivered12boxes of
supplies for students which had been collected by
staff and students at Fairview Elementary.
Rosemary Prebola, a former graduate of Wyom-
ing Area, who is currently residing in Philadel-
phia, delivered 50 back packs filled with school
supplies for Sarah J. Dymond.
Montgomery Avenue PTO purchased clear
backpacks and distributed them to students who
were affected by the flood.
Edinboro Elementary School, in the General
McLane School District, (Western, Penna.) has
donated $1,105 to Montgomery Avenue School.
Grandchildren of Mr. Michael Podwika, retired
Wyoming Area Librarian, who go to school at
Edinboro Elementary, brought attention to the de-
struction at Montgomery Avenue to their princi-
pal, Randy White. Mr. White spearheaded a fun-
draiser called “Bringing Change”. Students col-
lected loose change, their P.T.O. donated $100, and
a local TV station, Nextar Broadcasting, Inc. con-
tributed $167.00 for a total of $1,105.
M O N T G O M E R Y AV E N U E S C H O O L
Halloween parade and early dismissal Monday; donations continue
The first Wyoming Area Ca-
tholic Parent-Teacher guild cash
bingo is today, Sunday, Oct, 30,
in the School Auditorium from
1:00 to 5:00 p.m.
Participants must be over 18
years old.
The price of tickets is $20.00
and includes 20 regular games
and door prize drawings. There
will be special games, a bake
sale and a 50/50 drawing.
Early Dismissal
There will be an early dismiss-
al at 11:00 a.m. on Monday, Oct.
31.
Key Dates
November 2 - End of First
Quarter
November 8- Report Cards
November 10 - Parent-Teacher
Conferences
November 11 - No School –
Veteran’s Day
All Saints Day
Parents, relatives, friends and
community are invited to attend
the All Saints/All Souls Day lit-
urgy on Tuesday, Nov. 1at St. Ce-
cilia’s Church (St. Barbara’s Par-
ish). At this Mass the students,
faculty and the school communi-
ty will place the list of deceased
loved ones on the altar and dedi-
cate this Mass in their memory.
Fr. Paul McDonnell will be the
celebrant for this liturgy. The
students in grades 1 and 5 will
help.
Halloween Parade
The Halloween parade and
class parties will be from8:30 to
11:00 a.m. All grades will dress
up and 8th grade will lead the pa-
rade. Immediately, following the
parade, students will return to
their classrooms for a party.
Families are invited to watch the
parade. Only students will be al-
lowed in the building after the
parade.
Forensic Competition
The Diocesan Forensic
League Fall Competition will be
conducted on Tuesday, Nov. 2, at
6:30 p.m. at St. Nick’s St. Mary’s
School in Wilkes-Barre. The fol-
lowing students will represent
Wyoming Area Catholic in this
competition:
Junior Varsity - Charles Kul-
ick, John Morris, Bianca Mazza-
rella, Abigail Kolessar, Danielle
Morris
Varsity - Juliana Buonsante,
Alexia Mazzarella, Marissa Mo-
ran, Sarah Cragle, Isabella Ro-
mani
Chess Club
Chess club meetings are held
from 6:30 to 8:00 p.m. at SS Pe-
ter and Paul in Plains. The No-
vember dates are: 1, 8, 15, 29
Parent-Teacher Conferences
Conferences are scheduled for
Thursday, Nov. 10. Parents are
asked to return forms with pre-
ferred times by November 1.
Veterans Day
The students at Wyoming Ar-
ea Catholic are paying tribute to
veterans, both living and de-
ceased, by creating a “Wall of
Heroes” for a stage display. Stu-
dents will talk to their relatives
about family members who have
served or are serving and com-
plete a “Hero to All” tribute
sheet. Students are asked to
bring in a picture of their veteran
along with their tribute sheet.
Poinsettia Sale
The PTG will again sponsor a
poinsettia sale during the month
of November. Forms will be sent
home to order the flowers for the
holiday.
Intramurals
The schedule for intramural
sports is as follows:
Boys’ Flag Football - Tuesday
& Thursday, 3:00 to 4:00 p.m.
Girls’ Flag Football - Wednes-
day & Friday, 3:00 to 4:00 p.m.
Volley Ball – Monday, 3:00 to
4:00 p.m.
Soup Labels
Parents are asked to keep
sending in Campbell Soup La-
bels and Box Tops for Educa-
tion. The containers for the la-
bels are in the main hallway.
WYO M I N G A R E A C AT H O L I C
Cash bingo today at WAC
On Nov. 2, the Holy Redeemer Systemwill present the Fall Forensics Competition to be held at
St.Nick's/St. Mary's in Wilkes-Barre. The theme will be Interpretation of Poetry. Students repre-
senting Wyoming Area Catholic for this competition are:
Top, Varsity: Sarah Cragle, Isabella Romani, Alexia Mazzarella, Marissa Moran, Juliana Buonsante.
James Renfer is the Varsity Moderator and Coach.
Bottom, Junior Varsity: Charles Kulick, Bianca Mazzarella, Danielle Morris, Abigail Kolessar, John
Morris. Mrs. Josephine Toomey is the Junior Varsity moderator and coach.
The JFK Elementary School PTO Vera Bradley
Bingo will take place on Sunday, Nov. 13 at 2 p.m.
in the Wyoming Area Secondary Center Cafeteria,
20 Memorial Street, Exeter. Doors will open at 1
p.m. with the bingo starting promptly at 2 p.m.
Tickets are $20 each and include 15 plus rounds
of bingo. The prize for each round is a new Vera
Bradley item.
You can purchase tickets by sending payment
along with name, address, phone number, and
email to JFKElementary, 50 Penn Avenue, Exeter,
PA18643, attn. bingo. Checks can be made paya-
ble to JFK PTO.
PTO Meeting
The next PTO meeting will take place on
Wednesday, Nov. 2, at 6:30 p.m. in the school cafe-
teria. All are welcome and child care is provided.
Early Dismissal
The early dismissal and half-day in-service
scheduled for Friday, Oct. 28, has been switched
with Monday, Oct. 31. The costume parades and
celebrations will be on Monday as well.
J F K E L E M E N TA R Y S C H O O L
Early dismissal Monday; Vera Bradley Bingo November 13
C M Y K
PAGE 6B SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 SUNDAY DISPATCH
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On October 19, third and
fourth grade students at Holy
Rosary School. Duryea, wel-
comed Chef Ann Marie Piccini
and Sue Richter, CWPC, from
the American Culinary Federa-
tion. During the visit, the classes
learnedabout food, fun, andsafe-
ty. Students worked in small
groups and visited a veggie and
cupcake station, where they cre-
atedfunnyfaces froma varietyof
veggies, and used various deco-
rating tools to design their own
cupcakes. Students were given
their own chef hats, aprons, and
activity books.
Halloween Parade
Avoca Fire and Police and
Avoca Borough Council granted
Holy Rosary School permission
to have the annual Halloween Pa-
rade onthe streets aroundSt. Ma-
ry’s School on Monday, Oct. 31.
Gary Halagarda, one of the par-
ents, helped with arrangements.
At 8:45 a.m., Avoca Fire and Po-
lice will escort the children in a
parade around the school block.
Immediately following the pa-
rade, the children will return to
the school for Halloween parties.
All Saints’ Day
All Saints’ Day Liturgy will be
celebrated on Tuesday, Nov. 1, at
9:00 a.m. in St. Mary’s Church.
All family, friends, and parish-
ioners are invited.
All Souls’ Day
Departed souls will be remem-
bered on their feast day, Nov. 2.
First Friday Liturgy
First Friday Liturgy for the
month of November will be cele-
brated on Friday, Nov. 4, at 9:00
a.m. in St. Mary’s Church.
PTO Meeting
The PTO will meet on
Wednesday, Nov. 2, at 6:30 p.m.
in Sacred Heart Church Hall,
Stephenson St., Duryea. The
meeting is on Wednesday instead
of Tuesday due to the holy day
Mass schedule for All Saints’
Day.
Forensics Team
The Holy Rosary forensics
teams: Grace Berlew, Harleigh
Davis, Kalley Kovaleski, Peyton
McNulty, and Sarah Liskowicz,
will participate onthe Junior Var-
sity level, and Megan Conlon,
Tyler Mackell, Nina Mucciolo,
Denise Pinto, and Michael Pope,
will comprise the Varsity team.
They will participate in the Re-
gional Forensics Competition on
Nov. 2 at St. Nick/St. Mary
School, Wilkes-Barre. Registra-
tion begins at 6:00 p.m. Coaches
are Lauren Gedrich and Nancy
Musso.
Report Cards
Report Cards for grades 2-8
will be distributed on Wednes-
day, Nov. 9. First grade will re-
ceive their first report cards inJa-
nuary, and children in the kinder-
garten and preschool 4 year-old
programwill receive progress re-
ports in January as well. While
report cards and progress reports
will not be issued until January,
PK4, kindergarten and first
grade did receive conference ap-
pointments for Nov. 10.
Early Dismissal Thursday,
Nov. 10 for parent-teacher con-
ferences
Conferences for grades PK4
through 8 have been scheduled
for Wednesday, Nov. 10 in the af-
ternoon and evening. Anyone
who cannot make the assigned
appointment should call the
school office (457-2553). Stu-
dents will be dismissed at 11:00
a.m. on Thursday, Nov. 10, due to
the conference schedule, and
lunch will be served that day.
Veteran’s Day
Holy Rosary School will be
closed on Friday, Nov. 11, in ob-
servance of Veteran’s Day.
Gertrude Hawk Candy
Gertrude Hawk candy as well
as cookie dough orders are tenta-
tively scheduled for delivery on
Tuesday, Nov. 15. Profit from
these fundraisers can be used as
tuition reduction opportunities.
Virtus Training
The Diocese of Scranton man-
dates that all school and parish
employees and persons who vol-
unteer 20 hours or more per year
inHolyRosaryschool must com-
plete a mandatory three-hour
training program entitled Virtus
Program: Protecting God’s Chil-
dren.
This program for adults teach-
es staff, volunteers, and parents
to recognize the warning signs of
childsexual abuse andtorespond
appropriately. All coaches (in-
cluding intramurals) and moder-
ators as well as all board mem-
bers of the PTOand Athletic As-
sociation must have this training.
Atraining session will be offered
on Wednesday, Nov. 16, from
6:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. at Sacred
Heart Church Hall, Stephenson
St., Duryea. If you would like to
attend, call the school office
(457-2553) by Wednesday, Nov.
9.
Bowling Chairpersons
Holy rosary school thanks
bowling chairpersons Tammi
Galli and Erica Giordina for all
their work.
Mission Mass
Holy Rosary Student Council,
under the directionof Lisa Casey,
and the Mission Club, under the
direction of Nancy Rafferty and
Mrs. Margaret Kishbaugh, and
their families represented Holy
Rosary School at the Diocesan
Mission Mass, on Sunday Oct.
23 at St. Peter’s Cathedral in
Scranton.
PTO Lottery
PTO Lottery returns were due
Monday, Oct. 24. The lottery
tickets are for the month of No-
vember, and profit fromthis fun-
draiser canbe usedas a tuitionre-
duction opportunity.
Gift Certificates
Vouchers sales will continue to
be held in Sacred Heart Church
Hall in Duryea each Thursday
from 8:00 a.m. to 10:00 a.m.
School families may send in or-
ders onWednesdaytobefilledon
Thursday. Those with questions
may contact Teresa at 457-9001.
Recycling
In addition to cartridge recy-
cling, Holy Rosary also partici-
pates in cell phone recycling. Se-
lect cell phones can be dropped
off and recycled for credit. For
more information or for a list of
qualifying cartridges, visit
www.fundingfactory.com or
contact Mrs. Skutack at 457-
2553.
Labels & Box Tops
Campbell’s soup labels and
box tops are being collected at
Holy Rosary School. These pro-
grams enable Holy Rosary to
provide educational resources
that maybe unaffordable through
the regular budget. They offer
merchandise like computers,
software, sports equipment, ref-
erence materials, science and art
items, even musical instruments.
Those who wish to participate
may send in labels to the school
office or place theminthe church
vestibule.
Tab Collection
Holy Rosary Student Council
will be collectingringtabs for the
Ronald McDonald House
throughout the school year.
H O LY R O S A R Y S C H O O L N E W S
Chef visits Holy Rosary School for Childhood Nutrition Day
'Chefs-in-training' at Holy Rosary School, Duryea, above, and
with their instructor, chef Ann Marie Piccini, left.
SUNDAY DISPATCH SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 PAGE 7
100 Announcements
200 Auctions
300 Personal Services
400 Automotive
500 Employment
600 Financial
700 Merchandise
800 Pets & Animals
900 Real Estate
1000 Service Directory
MARKETPLACE
To place a Classified ad: Call 570-829-7130 or 1-800-273-7130 Email: classifieds@thepittstondispatch.com
thepittstondispatch.com
135 Legals/
Public Notices
135 Legals/
Public Notices
LEGAL NOTICE
FY 2011 CITY OF PITTSTON
COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT BLOCK
GRANT PROGRAM
NOTICE OF EARLY PUBLIC REVIEW
OF PROPOSED ACTIVITY IN THE 100-
YEAR FLOODPLAIN AND WETLAND
In accordance with Section 2 (a) (4) of
Executive Order 11988 and by Section 2
(b) of Executive Order 11990 for the Pro-
tection of Wetlands (HUD Regulations
found at 24 CFR 55.20(b)), the City of
Pittston is requesting public comment on
its proposal to spend funds provided
through the Pennsylvania Department of
Community and Economic Development
(DCED) under the Small Cities Community
Development Block Grant (CDBG) on the
activity designated below, which may be
located (or affect areas) within the 100-
year floodplain. The City is reviewing its
program for the effects on floodwater, for
alternatives to floodplain development and
for consistency with federal, state and
local policies and regulations on flood
management.
• Citywide Spot Demolition
Program (multi-year)
CDBG funds will be used to demolish
deteriorated residential structures locat-
ed throughout the city. This project will
improve living conditions in Pittston by
mitigating blight and increasing the safety
of residents through the removal of dan-
gerous, dilapidated homes. Specific sites
are yet to be identified.
Any questions about the project or
requests for additional information should
be directed as identified below. Issues
raised during the course of the review will
be integrated into the decision-making
process. The City anticipates completing
its review within 15 days of the date of the
publication of this notice. A second notice
describing the City’s findings and public
explanation of its decision will be pub-
lished in this paper on or after 15 days
from the date of the publication of this
notice. A subsequent seven-day period
will be permitted to the public for com-
ments on the decision. This notice with a
request for comment was mailed to the
regional office of the Federal Emergency
Management Agency, the state Depart-
ment of Environmental Protection and the
PA Department of Community and Eco-
nomic Development.
Comments should be submitted to Mr.
Gerald Mullarkey, Redevelopment Authori-
ty of the City of Pittston, 35 Broad St.,
Suite 202, Pittston, PA 18640.
Publication Date:
Sunday, October 30, 2011
100
ANNOUNCEMENTS
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135 Legals/
Public Notices
NOTICE:
Notice is hereby
given that pursuant
to the provisions of
the Fictitious Names
Act, 54 Pa. C.S.A.
Section 311, as
amended, an Appli-
cation was filed in
the Office of the
Secretary of the
Commonwealth of
Pennsylvania on
September 14, 2011
to conduct business
under the assumed
or fictitious name of:
Wyoming Valley
Enrichment Center.
Having its principal
place of business
at: 66 Broad Street,
Pittston, Luzerne
County, Pennsylva-
nia 18640. The
name and address
of the entity owning
or interested in the
business is: Provi-
dence Church
Alliance Inc., 66
Broad Street,
Pittston, PA 18640.
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HAPPY TRAILS
TRUCK SALES
570-760-2035
542-2277
6am to 8pm
310 Attorney
Services
ESTATE PLANNING
/ADMINISTRATION
Real Estate &
Civil Litigation
Attorney Ron Wilson
570-822-2345
Free Bankruptcy
Consultation
Payment plans.
Carol Baltimore
570-822-1959
310 Attorney
Services
SOCIAL SECURITY
DISABILITY
Free Consultation.
Contact Atty. Sherry
Dalessandro
570-823-9006
406 ATVs/Dune
Buggies
HAWK 2011 UTILITY ATV
NEW!! Full size
adult ATV. Strong 4
stroke motor. CVT
fully automatic
transmission with
reverse. Electric
start. Front & rear
luggage racks.
Long travel suspen-
sion. Disc brakes.
Dual stage head
lights. Perfect for
hunters & trail rid-
ers alike. BRAND NEW
& READY TO RIDE.
$1,695 takes it
away.
386-334-7448
Wilkes-Barre
409 Autos under
$5000
CADILLAC `94
DEVILLE SEDAN
94,000 miles,
automatic, front
wheel drive, 4
door, air condi-
tioning, air bags,
all power, cruise
control, leather
interior, $3,300.
570-394-9004
GET THE WORD OUT
with a Classified Ad.
570-829-7130
CADILLAC `94
DEVILLE SEDAN
94,000 miles,
automatic, front
wheel drive, 4
door, air condi-
tioning, air bags,
all power, cruise
control, leather
interior, $3,300.
570-394-9004
FORD ‘93 TAURUS
Newly inspected,
new brakes, new
tires, air condition-
ing. 102K.
$1850 FIRM.
Call Vince after 5
570-258-2450
412 Autos for Sale
ACURA `06 TL
White Diamond
80K original miles,1
owner, garage kept,
camel leather interi-
or, 3.2L / 6 cylinder,
5-speed automatic,
front/rear & side
airbags, ABS
Navigation System,
8-speaker surround
system DVD/CD/AM
/FM/cassette,XM
Satellite Radio,
power & heated
front seats,power-
door locks & win-
dows, power moon-
roof, 4 snow tires
included!....and
much, much
more! Car runs and
looks beautiful
$17,500 Firm
See it at
Orloski’s Car Wash
& Lube
295 Mundy Street
(behind Wyoming
Valley Mall)
or Call 239-8461
AUDI `05 A6
3.2 Quattro AT6.
Auto tiptronic 6
speed. Black with
black leather. Garage
kept. Fully loaded,
gps, cold weather
package. 78K miles.
Asking $17,400. Call
570-814-6714
BMW `01 X5
4.4i. Silver, fully
loaded, tan leather
interior. 1 owner.
103k miles. $8,999
or best offer. Call
570-814-3666
BMW `07 328xi
Black with black
interior. Heated
seats. Back up &
navigation sys-
tems. New tires &
brakes. Sunroof.
Garage kept. Many
extras! 46,000
Miles.
Asking $20,500.
570-825-8888 or
626-297-0155
Call Anytime!
412 Autos for Sale
BMW `99 M3
Convertible with
Hard Top. AM/FM. 6
disc CD. 117 K miles.
Stage 2 Dinan sus-
pension. Cross
drilled rotors. Cold
air intake. All main-
tenance records
available. $13,000
OBO. 570-466-2630
Rare, Exclusive
Opportunity To
Own...
2002 BMW 745i
The Flagship of
the Fleet
New - $87,000
Midnight Emerald
with beige leather
interior. 61K miles.
Mint condition.
Loaded. Garage
Kept. Navigation
Stunning,
Must Sell!
$20,000
$18,600
‘26 FORD
MODEL T
Panel Delivery
100 point
Concours quality
restoration. Red
with black fend-
ers. Never Driven.
0 miles on
restoration.
RARE!
$40,000
$38,000
$36,500
1954 MERCURY
MONTEREY
WOODY WAGON
100 point restora-
tion. $130,000
invested. 6.0
Vortec engine.
300 miles on
restoration. Cus-
tom paint by
Foose Automo-
tive. Power win-
dows, a/c, and
much more!
Gorgeous
Automobile!
$75,000
$71,000
$69,900
From an Exotic,
Private Collection
Call 570-650-0278
BUICK `05 LESABRE
Garage kept. 1
owner. Local driv-
ing, very good
condition.
53,500 miles.
Asking $9,700
(570) 457-6414
leave message
CADILLAC ‘06 STS
AWD, 6 cylinder, Sil-
ver, 55,000 miles,
sunroof, heated
seats, Bose sound
system, 6 CD
changer, satellite
radio, Onstar, park-
ing assist, remote
keyless entry, elec-
tronic keyless igni-
tion, & more!
$16,500
570-881-2775
CHEVROLET `03
IMPALA
97,000 miles,
$3,300.
570-592-4522
570-592-4994
CHEVROLET `04
CORVETTE COUPE
Torch red with
black and red
interior. 9,700
miles, auto, HUD,
removable glass
roof, polished
wheels, memory
package, Bose
stereo and twilight
lighting, factory
body moldings,
traction control,
ABS, Garage kept
- Like New.
$25,900
(570) 609-5282
CHEVROLET `88
MONTE CARLO SS
V8, automatic,
51,267 miles,
MUST SELL
$3,900
(570) 760-0511
CHRYSLER `04
SEBRING
LXI CONVERTIBLE
Low miles - 54,000.
V6. Leather interior.
Great shape. A/C.
Power door locks.
$7,500. Negotiable
(570) 760-1005
DODGE `97
CARAVAN
139,000 miles, new
brakes, runs well,
body is fair. $1,275.
570-603-0252
FORD `04 MUSTANG
Mach I, 40th
ANNIVERSARY EDITION
V8, Auto, 1,400
miles, all options,
show room condi-
tion. Call for info.
Asking $24,995
Serious inquiries
only. 570-636-3151
412 Autos for Sale
FORD `07 MUSTANG
63,000 highway
miles, silver, runs
great, $11,500.
negotiable.
570-479-2482
FORD ‘02 MUSTANG
GT CONVERTIBLE
Red with black
top. 6,500 miles.
One Owner.
Excellent Condi-
tion. $17,500
570-760-5833
HONDA `07 ACCORD
V6 EXL. 77K miles. 1
owner with mainte-
nance records.
Slate blue with
leather interior. Sun-
roof. Asking $12,500.
Call 570-239-2556
HYUNDAI `02
ELANTRA
129,995 miles,
manual, 4 door,
anti-lock brakes, air
conditioning, air
bags, power locks,
power windows,
power mirrors, CD
player, leather inte-
rior, sun roof, rear
windshield wiper,
tinted windows,
GREAT ON GAS.
REDUCED $3,000.
570-654-8469
JAGUAR `00 S TYPE
4 door sedan. Like
new condition. Bril-
liant blue exterior
with beige hides.
Car is fully equipped
with navigation sys-
tem, V-8, automatic,
climate control AC,
alarm system,
AM/FM 6 disc CD,
garage door open-
er. 42,000 original
miles. $9,750
Call (570) 288-6009
JAGUAR `98 XK8
Convertible. 40k
miles. Great condi-
tion. Silver with black
interior. Garage
kept. Recently
inspected. V8/auto/
AC. AM/FM / 6 disc.
$12,000 or best
offer. 570-310-1287
JAGUAR ‘94
XJS CONVERTIBLE
Mint Condition
Magnolia red,
with palomino
beige leather
interior. A
cream puff
inside & out.
4 new tires and
services. Florida
car. $14,900.
570-885-1512
JEEP `04
WRANGLER
4” lift, 33” BFG
base KM2, 5
speed, excellent
condition, 46,200
miles. $12,500.
OBO.
Call 570-592-1829
To place your
ad Call Toll Free
1-800-427-8649
LEXUS `98 LS 400
Excellent condition,
garage kept, 1
owner. Must see.
Low mileage, 90K.
Leather interior. All
power. GPS naviga-
tion, moon roof, cd
changer. Loaded.
$9,000 or best
offer. 570-706-6156
WANTED!
ALL
JUNK
CARS!
CA$H
PAID
570-301-3602
MAZDA `08 MIATA
MX-5 CONVERTIBLE
Red. Power steer-
ing, auto, AC, CD.
ONLY 5,500 MILES.
$18,000
(570) 883-0143
MERCEDES-BENZ `95
SL 500
Convertible, with
removable hard
top, dark Blue,
camel interior,
Summer Driving
Only, Garage Kept.
Very Good
Condition,
No Accidents.
Classy Car.
New Price!
$5,000
or trade for
SUV or other.
570-388-6669
NISSAN `08 SENTRA
58K miles. 4 cylin-
der, 6 speed manu-
al. Great condition.
All power. A/C.
Cruise. $10,500.
Call 570-333-4379
after 6:30 pm
412 Autos for Sale
PORSCHE `85 944
Low mileage,
110,000 miles, 5
speed, 2 door, anti-
lock brakes, air con-
ditioning, power
windows, power
mirrors, AM/FM
radio, CD changer,
leather interior, rear
defroster, tinted
windows, custom
wheels, $8,000.
(570) 817-1803
SAAB `06 93
A E R O s p o r t .
Leather interior.
Heated seats. Sun-
roof. Good condi-
tion. $8,000. Seri-
ous inquiries only.
Call 570-760-8264
SUBARU `98
IMPREZA
144,000 miles, auto-
matic, four wheel
drive, 4 door,
$2,1,95.
570-498-5127
SUBURU ‘06 LEGACY
GT LIMITED SEDAN
4 door, black,
approximately
76,000 miles. 2.5
liter engine, auto.
asking $12,000.
570-510-3077
TOYOTA `05
COROLLA-S
68,700 miles. Auto-
matic, power win-
dows, locks, mir-
rors, air, cruise, key-
less entry. Ground
effects.
$8,900 Negotiable
570-388-2829 or
570-905-4352
VOLKSWAGEN `04
Beetle - Convertible
GREAT ON GAS!
Blue. AM/FM cas-
sette. Air. Automat-
ic. Power roof, win-
dows, locks &
doors. Boot cover
for top. 22k. Excel-
lent condition.
Garage kept.
Newly Reduced
$14,000
570-479-7664
Leave Message
415 Autos-Antique
& Classic
CHEVY ‘30 HOTROD COUPE
$49,000
FORD ‘76 THUNDERBIRD
All original $12,000
MERCEDES ‘76 450 SL
$24,000
MERCEDES ‘29
Kit Car $9,000
(570) 655-4884
hell-of-adeal.com
DESOTO CUSTOM
‘49 4 DOOR SEDAN
3 on the tree with
fluid drive. This All
American Classic
Icon runs like a top
at 55MPH. Kin to
Chrysler, Dodge,
Plymouth, Imperial
Desoto, built in the
American Midwest,
after WWII, in a
plant that once
produced B29
Bombers. In it’s
original antiquity
condition, with
original shop &
parts manuals,
she’s beautifully
detailed and ready
for auction in Sin
City. Spent her
entire life in Ari-
zona and New
Mexico, never saw
a day of rain or
rust. Only $19,995.
To test drive, by
appointment only,
Contact Tony at
570-899-2121 or
penntech84th@
gmail.com
FORD `52
COUNTRY SEDAN
CUSTOM LINE
STATION WAGON
V8, automatic,
8 passenger,
3rd seat, good
condition, 2nd
owner. REDUCED TO
$6,500.
570-579-3517
570-455-6589
FORD SALEEN ‘04
281 SC Coupe
1,000 miles
documented #380
Highly collectable.
$28,500
570-472-1854
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
MAZDA `88 RX-7
CONVERTIBLE
1 owner, garage
kept, 65k original
miles, black with
grey leather interior,
all original & never
seen snow. $7,995.
Call 570-237-5119
415 Autos-Antique
& Classic
MERCEDES 1975
Good interior &
interior. Runs
great! New tires.
Many new parts.
Moving, Must Sell.
$2,300 or
best offer
570-693-3263
Ask for Paul
MERCEDES-BENZ `73
450SL
Convertible with
removable hard top,
power windows, AM
/FM radio with cas-
sette player, CD
player, automatic, 4
new tires. Cham-
pagne exterior; Ital-
ian red leather inte-
rior inside. Garage
kept, excellent con-
dition. $28,000. Call
825-6272
OLDSMOBILE
`68
DELMONT
Must Sell!
Appraised
for $9,200
• All original
45,000 miles
• 350 Rocket
engine
• Fender skirts
• Always
garaged
Will sell for
$6,000
Serious
inquires only
570-
690-0727
427 Commercial
Trucks &
Equipment
CHEVY ‘08 3500
HD DUMP TRUCK
2WD, automatic.
Only 12,000 miles.
Vehicle in like
new condition.
$19,000.
570-288-4322
Let the Community
Know!
Place your Classified
Ad TODAY!
570-829-7130
CHEVY ‘08 3500
HD DUMP TRUCK
2WD, automatic.
Only 12,000 miles.
Vehicle in like
new condition.
$19,000.
570-288-4322
GMC SIERRA ‘98 3500
4WD Stake Side,
350 V8, Auto.
75,000 miles on
current engine. 12'
wood bed, body,
tires, interior good.
Excellent running
condition. New
generator, starter,
battery. Just tuned
and inspected.
$6,900.
Call 570-656-1080
439 Motorcycles
BMW ‘07 K1200 GT
Low mileage. Many
extras. Clean.
$9,000
(570) 646-2645
HARLEY 2011
HERITAGE SOFTTAIL
Black. 1,800 miles.
ABS brakes. Securi-
ty System Package.
$16,000 firm.
SERIOUS INQUIRIES ONLY
570-704-6023
HARLEY DAVIDSON `03
100th Anniversary
Edition Deuce.
Garage kept. 1
owner. 1900 miles.
Tons of chrome.
$38,000 invested. A
must see. Asking
$18,000. OBO
570-706-6156
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘80
Soft riding FLH.
King of the High-
way! Mint origi-
nal antique show
winner. Factory
spot lights, wide
white tires,
biggest Harley
built. Only
28,000 original
miles! Never
needs inspec-
tion, permanent
registration.
$7,995
570-905-9348
HYOSUNG `04 COMET
250. 157 Miles.
Excellent Condition.
$1,200. Call
570-256-7760
439 Motorcycles
KAWASAKI ‘05
NINJA 500R. 3300
miles. Orange.
Garage kept. His &
hers helmets. Must
sell. $2400
570-760-3599
570-825-3711
Kawasaki` 93
ZX11D NINJA
LIKE NEW
8900 Original
miles. Original
owner. V@H
Exhaust and Com-
puter. New tires.
$3,800.
570-574-3584
YAMAHA ‘97
ROYALSTAR 1300
12,000 miles. With
windshield. Runs
excellent. Many
extras including
gunfighter seat,
leather bags, extra
pipes. New tires &
battery. Asking
$4,000 firm.
(570) 814-1548
YAMAHA ‘97
ROYALSTAR 1300
12,000 miles. With
windshield. Runs
excellent. Many
extras including
gunfighter seat,
leather bags, extra
pipes. New tires &
battery. Asking
$4,000 firm.
(570) 814-1548
442 RVs & Campers
CHEROKEE ‘10
Travel trailer. 39 ft.,
4 slide outs, 3 bed-
rooms, 2 bath
rooms, microwave,
awning, tinted win-
dows, Brand new.
Have no pets or
smokers. Much
more!!!!!
$33,000
(cell) 682-888-2880
EQUIPMENT/BOBCAT
TRAILER
Brand new 2010
tandem axle, 4
wheel electric
brakes, 20’ long
total, 7 x 16 wood
deck, fold up ramps
with knees, remov-
able fenders for
oversized loads,
powder coat paint
for rust protection,
2 5/16 hitch
coupler, tongue
jack, side pockets,
brake away switch,
battery, 7 pole
RV plugs, title &
more!! Priced for
quick sale. $2,595
386-334-7448
Wilkes-Barre
FLAGSTAFF `08
CLASSIC
NOW BACK IN PA.
Super Lite Fifth
Wheel. LCD/DVD
flat screen TV, fire-
place, heated mat-
tress, ceiling fan,
Hide-a-Bed sofa,
outside speakers &
grill, 2 sliders,
aluminum wheels, ,
awning, microwave
oven, tinted safety
glass windows,
fridge & many
accessories &
options. Excellent
condition, $22,500.
570-868-6986
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
PACE ‘99 ARROW VISION
Ford V10. Excellent
condition. 8,700
miles. 1 slide out. 2
awnings. 2 colored
TVs, generator,
back up camera, 2
air conditioners,
microwave/convec-
tion oven, side by
side refrigerator
with ice maker,
washer/dryer,
queen size bed.
$37,900 negotiable
(570) 288-4826
(570) 690-1464
SUNLINE SOLARIS `91
25’ travel trailer A/C.
Bunk beds. New
fridge & hot water
heater. Excellent
condition. $3,900.
570-466-4995
SUNLITE CAMPER
22 ft. 3 rear bunks,
center bathroom,
kitchen, sofa bed.
Air, Fully self con-
tained. Sleeps 6.
New tires, fridge
awning. $4500.
215-322-9845
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
BUICK `05
RENDEZVOUS
BARGAIN!!
AWD, Fully
loaded, 1 owner,
22,000 miles.
Small 6 cylinder.
New inspection.
Like new, inside
& out. $13,200.
(570) 540-0975
DODGE ‘07 RAM
4 W.D. HEMI
engine. Full bed.
1500. Extended
cab. Excellent con-
dition. 49,6128
miles. $19,000
570-954-3650
FORD `90 TRUCK
17’ box. Excellent
running condition.
Very Clean. $4,300.
Call 570-287-1246
HONDA `10
ODYSSEY
Special Edition.
Maroon, Fully
loaded. Leather
seats. TV/DVD,
navigation, sun roof
plus many other
extras. 3rd seat .
Only 1,900 Miles.
Brand New.
Asking $37,000
(570) 328-0850
JEEP `02 GRAND
CHEROKEE LAREDO
Triple black, eco-
nomical 6 cylinder.
4x4 select drive.
CD, remote door
opener, power win-
dows & locks,
cruise, tilt wheel.
108k highway miles.
Garage kept. Super
clean inside and out.
No rust. Sale price
$6,895. Scranton.
Trade in’s accepted.
570-466-2771
JEEP `04
CHEROKEE
135,000 miles, auto-
matic, four wheel
drive, $6,500.
(570) 237-6979
MERCURY `07
MARINER
One owner. Luxury
4x4. garage kept.
Showroom condi-
tion, fully loaded,
every option
34,000 miles.
GREAT DEAL
$14,500
(570)825-5847
MITSUBISHI `11
OUTLANDER SPORT SE
AWD, Black interi-
or/exterior, start/
stop engine with
keyless entry, heat-
ed seats, 18” alloy
wheels, many extra
features. Only
4,800 miles. 10
year, 100,000 mile
warranty. $23,500.
Willing to negotiate.
Serious inquires
only - must sell,
going to law school.
(570) 793-6844
NISSAN `10 ROGUE SL
AWD. Gray. Sun-
roof. Bose stereo
system. Black,
heated leather
seats. Sunroof
6,000 miles.
$24,000
(570) 696-2777
RANGE ROVER
‘07 SPORT
Supercharged
59,000 miles, fully
loaded. Impeccable
service record.
$36,000
570-283-1130
SUZUKI `07 XL-7
56,000 miles,
automatic,
all-wheel drive,
4 door, air condi-
tioning, all power,
CD player, leather
interior, tinted
windows, custom
wheels, $13,000
Call 570-829-8753
Before 5:00 p.m.
VOLVO `08 XC90
Fully loaded, moon
roof, leather, heat-
ed seats, electric
locks, excellent
condition. New
tires, new brakes
and rotors. 52,000
miles highway
$26,500/ best offer.
570-779-4325
570-417-2010 till 5
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
SUZUKI `07 XL-7
56,000 miles,
automatic,
all-wheel drive,
4 door, air condi-
tioning, all power,
CD player, leather
interior, tinted
windows, custom
wheels, $13,000
Call 570-829-8753
Before 5:00 p.m.
460
AUTOMOTIVE
SERVICE
DIRECTORY
468 Auto Parts
All Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Wanted
Highest
Prices
Paid In
CA$H
FREE
PICKUP
570-574-1275
BEST PRICES
IN THE AREA
CA$H ON THE $POT,
Free Anytime
Pickup
570-301-3602
570-301-3602
CALL US!
TO JUNK
YOUR CAR
506 Administrative/
Clerical
A Wilkes-Barre
based organiza-
tion is seeking a
Data Processing
Clerk. The ideal
candidate must
possess excep-
tional communica-
tion and reasoning
skills, efficient typ-
ing skills, and
attention to detail.
Strong organiza-
tional skills and the
ability to multi-task
are key require-
ments. The posi-
tion offers an
excellent opportu-
nity for advance-
ment within the
organization.
The Company has
a compensation
package that
includes a com-
petitive starting
salary, generous
benefits package,
paid holidays and
vacation. Send
resume to: c/o
The Times Leader
BOX 2805
15. N. Main St.
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18711-0250
DATA PROCESSING
CLERK
509 Building/
Construction/
Skilled Trades
OPERATORS AND
LABORERS
5 years minimum
experience and
valid drivers license.
Background check
and drug screen
required. Prevailing
wage. Please visit
ceankiewicz.com to
complete application
Fax 570-868-3654
or email ceatrucking
@frontier.com.
PROJECT MANAGERS &
CARPENTERS
General Contractor
seeking Project
Managers with esti-
mating experience
& Carpenters for
commercial con-
struction company.
Attention to detail,
desire to work as
part of a team, abili-
ty to keep projects
on schedule and
valid drivers license
are a must.
Please forward
resume to:
CHAMPION BUILDERS, INC.
239 Pringle St.
Kingston, PA 18704
PAGE 8 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 SUNDAY DISPATCH
CALL NOW 823-8888 CALL NOW 823-8888
1-800-817-FORD 1-800-817-FORD
Overlooking Mohegan Sun Overlooking Mohegan Sun
577 East Main St., Plains 577 East Main St., Plains
Just Minutes from Scranton or W-B Just Minutes from Scranton or W-B
*Tax and tags extra. Security Deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 27 month lease 23,625 allowable miles. First months
payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. See salesperson for details. All payments subject to credit approval by the primary lending source, Tier 0 rate.
Special APR financing cannot be combined with Ford cash rebate. “BUY FOR” prices are based on 72 month at $18.30 per month per $1000 financed with $2,500 down (cash or trade). Photos of
vehicles are for illustration purposes only. Coccia Ford is not responsible for any typographical errors. No Security Deposit Necessary. See dealer for details. Sale ends OCTOBER 31, 2011.
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 27 month lease
23,625 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 11/31/10.
27
Mos.
NEW2012 FORDEXPLORER 4X4
3.5L Engine, PL, MyFord
Display. Rearview Camera, PW, Dual Auto.
Climate Control, Pwr. Mirrors, 17” Steel
Wheels, CD, Keyless Entry,
MyKey, Cruise Control
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 27 month lease
23,625 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 11/31/11.
Auto., 16” Steel Wheels,
Air, Keyless Entry with
Remote, PL, PW, Safety
Canopy, Side Air Bags
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied
**Lease payments based on 27 month lease 23,625 allowable miles. First months payment,
$595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 11/31/11.
NEW2012 FORDFOCUS
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 27 month lease
23,625 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 11/31/11.
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 27 month lease
23,625 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 11/31/11.
Remote Keyless Entry, AM/FM/CD,
Power Door Locks, Air Conditioning,
Anti-Theft System, Side Curtain Air
Bags, Side Impact Air Bags,
Message Center, MyKey
NEW2012
FORDFUSION
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied
**Lease payments based on 27 month lease 23,625 allowable miles. First months payment,
$595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 11/31/11.
27
Mos.
NEW2012 FORDFIESTA
Automatic, Air Conditioning, Pwr., Mirrors,
Advance Trac with Electronic Stability Control,
Side Curtain Air Bags, AM/FM/CD,
Pwr. Door Locks, Remote
Keyless Entry, Tilt Wheel
NEW2012 FORD
FUSION SE
Auto., AM/FM/CD, Alum. Wheels, Tilt, PW, PDL, Pwr.
Seat, Safety Pkg., Side Impact Air Bags, 1st & 2nd Air
Curtains, Anti-Theft Sys., Sirius Satellite Radio, Keyless
Entry, Message Center,
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 27 month lease
23,625 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 11/31/10.
27
Mos.
NEW2012 FORDTAURUS SEL
Auto., 3.5L V6, SYNC, Reverse Sensing
Sys., AM/FM/CD, Keyless Entry with
Keypad, PDL, PW, 18” Alum
Wheels, Anti-Theft Perimeter
Alarm, Sirius Satellite Radio
27
Mos.
27
Mos.
M
O
S.
A
P
R
PLUS
Auto., AM/FM/CD, 16” Alum. Wheels, Tilt Wheel,
PW, PDL, Safety Pkg., Anti-Theft Sys., 1st & 2nd
Row Air Curtains, Side Impact Air Bags, Keyless
Entry, Message Center, Cruise Control
M
O
S.
A
P
R
PLUS
M
O
S.
APR
PLUS
All Wheel Drive, XLT, Safety Canopy, Side Impact Safety
Pkg., Pwr. Seat, Auto., PDL, PW, CD, Air, Fog Lamps, Privacy
Glass, Roof Rack, 16” Alum. Wheels, Sirius Satellite Radio,
Keyless Entry, Rear Cargo Convenience
Pkg.,
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 27 month lease
23,625 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 11/31/10.
27
Mos.
NEW2012 FORDESCAPE XLT 4X4 NEW2012 ESCAPE XLS
M
O
S.
APR
PLUS
SUNDAY DISPATCH SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 PAGE 9
The Kia 10-year/100,000-mile warranty program includes various warranties and roadside assistance. Warranties include power train and basic. All warranties and roadside assistance are limited.
See retailer for details or go to kia.com. *24-hour Roadside Assistance is a service plan provided by Kia Motors America, Inc. **All rebates applied, plus tax and tag. Picture may not
represent exact trim level. Plus tax & tag, 12k miles per year with 1,500 down & fees due at signing. Payments based on a 36 month lease with approved credit.
WyomingValley Motors
560 Pierce Street
Kingston, PA 18704
570-714-9924
www.wyomingvalleykia.com
Our shelves are restocked! We have the cars and we have the deals! COME IN TODAY!
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1
PAGE 10 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 SUNDAY DISPATCH
726 Clothing 726 Clothing
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
EVERYTHING MUST GO
Women’s designer clothing & accessories -
new and almost new sold at 50% off.
Bloom Bloom Again T Again Tanning anning
918 Exeter Avenue, Rte. 92, Exeter PA 18643
(Next to Rodano’s Express)
Hours:
Tue-Fri: 11:00am-7:00pm
Sat: 12:00pm-6:00pm
39 Prospect St • Nanticoke
570-735-1487
WE PAY
THE MOST
INCASH
BUYING
11am
to 11pm
512 Business/
Strategic
Management
DEVELOPMENT
DIRECTOR
The SPCA of
Luzerne Co. is seek-
ing a full time Devel-
opment Director to
promote its pro-
grams and services,
develop funding
opportunities in the
community through
effective corpo-
rate/community
relations, events
planning, new grant
research and writ-
ing. This position is
responsible for
overall fund raising
including the plan-
ning and coordina-
tion of fund raising
events, and the
research and devel-
opment of new
funding opportuni-
ties.
In addition to out-
standing interper-
sonal, communica-
tion, and organiza-
tional skills,
qualified candidates
will possess a bach-
elor’s degree, and
have extensive pub-
lic relations, events
planning, and fund
raising experience
with a proven track
record of results.
SPCA offers an
excellent compen-
sation and benefits
package along with
a rewarding career
experience. Please
forward your
resume with salary
history to:
SPCA of
Luzerne Co.
c/o Search
Committee
524 East Main St.
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18702
518 Customer
Support/Client Care
TELEPHONE
TROUBLESHOOTER/
CSR
Do you have
digital, telephone,
or modem
experience?
RFM is looking for
someone with the
ability to prioritize
and organize
requests. Self-
motivated individual
with a dedicated
sense of follow
through. Call center
or help desk experi-
ence is necessary.
Must have comput-
er knowledge &
possess good peo-
ple skills. Competi-
tive starting rate.
Pleasant office
environment. Must
be dependable.
Company offers a
voluntary health
benefits package
and 401k plan. Call
1-888-514-8883
for details,
ask for Theresa.
Fax resume to:
570-517-5003
524 Engineering
NETWORK SYSTEMS
ENGINEER
Local I.T. solution
provider has an
opening for a Net-
work Systems Engi-
neer. The individual
will provide techni-
cal expertise to our
customer base in
the design, installa-
tion, implementation,
operation and main-
tenance of Windows
based Servers and
Clients. Expertise in
Networking Basics
i.e.: Topologies,
Cabling, Gateways
& Networking Com-
munications. Server
experience w/Win-
dows 20xx + SBS a
must.
Send Resume with
wage requirements
to: Northeast Micro
1021 N. Washington
St., Wilkes-Barre,
PA 18705
Or e-mail bkovach@
northeastmicro.com
542 Logistics/
Transportation
DRIVERS CDL - A:
Local Dedicated
Route! Home every
night! Great Pay,
Benefits! Estenson
Logistics. Apply
www.goelc.com
1-866-336-9642
Drivers: Start up to
$.41/mi. Home
Weekly or Bi-Weeky.
CDL-A 6 months
OTR experience
required.
Equipment you’ll be
proud to drive!
(888) 247-4037
Warehouse Position
in Hazleton PA. Part
Time, Flexible hours
within shift times
$15.50/hour. Inde-
pendent responsi-
ble person needed.
Experience required.
610-262-9799
Send Resume to
Fax 610-262-7120
or amybreininger@
nazpallet.com
FORKLIFT/PALLET
HANDLING
548 Medical/Health
LIFEGUARDS
Morning & afternoon
shifts – 6:30 a.m. &
3 p.m. Must have
current CPR, First
Aid, AED and Oxy-
gen certifications.
Call 570-655-2255
ext. 107
548 Medical/Health
NURSING
PrimeCare Medical
is seeking
PRN LPN’S
to work in the
medical
department in the
Luzerne County
Juvenile Detention
Center. Contact HR
at 1-800-245-7277
or fax resumes to:
717-651-1865
EOE REF #642
OPTICAL
Looking for a part
time self motivated
individual. Experi-
ence preferred, but
will train. Apply in
person at 35
Gateway Shopping
Center, Edwardsville
HELPMATES, INC.
Leading home care
provider in PA
since 1987.
Now hiring part-time
PERSONAL CARE
AIDES for Luzerne/
Wyoming Counties.
The successful can-
didates will be
responsible for trav-
eling home to home
providing personal
care. Are you willing
to assist with
bathing, light house-
keeping and meal
preparation? We
provide travel time
and a voluntary ben-
efit package. We
are also seeking an
RN Consultant. You
will be responsible
for patient initial
assessments, quar-
terly visits, as well
as aide verification
of competencies
and aide superviso-
ry visits. RN certifi-
cation and liability
insurance is
required. Interested
candidates should
call 1-855-444-2037
to set up an inter-
view. EOE.
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
RN’S/LPN’S
wanted for
Pediatric Home
Care in the Clarks
Summit and
Thornhurst area’s.
Competitive pay
rates and sign on
bonus available.
Contact Kristen @
610-310-8409.
551 Other
ARCHER DANIELS
MIDLAND COMPANY
is one of the world’s
largest agricultural
processing compa-
nies. ADM is hiring
for Production Per-
sonnel, Mainte-
nance Technicians,
Laboratory Techni-
cians, and Produc-
tion Supervisory
positions at its
newest Cocoa Pro-
cessing facility in
Humboldt industrial
park in Hazle Town-
ship. Apply online at
www.adm.jobs. All
positions are full
time, offer a com-
plete benefits pack-
age, and competi-
tive wages. ADM is
an equal opportunity
employer.
554 Production/
Operations
MAIL PROCESSOR
ZODIAC PRINTING
Seeking an experi-
enced mail depart-
ment processor.
Must understand
postal regulations
and procedures and
have experience
operating ink jet
addressing and
inserting equipment.
Part time to full time
available. Forward
resume to Tomz@
zodiacprinting.com
or call 570-474-9220
MANUFACTURING
MACHINE OPERATORS /
PRODUCTION
$9/HR.TO START
60-90 day evalua-
tion with $ increase
$ based on YOUR
performance, atten-
dance etc. Benefit
Package includes:
Medical, Dental,
Vision, Life Insur-
ance, Vacation, Hol-
iday pay PLUS.
Full-time 12 hour
shifts on alternating
3 & 4 day work
weeks. Every other
weekend a must.
Previous manufac-
turing experience
preferred. Some
heavy lifting.
Accepting
applications at
AEP INDUSTRIES,
INC.
20 Elmwood Ave
Crestwood
Industrial Park
Mountaintop, PA
18707
EOE
We are a drug free
workplace.
566 Sales/Retail/
Business
Development
EAST MOUNTAIN
APARTMENTS
A luxury apartment
community, is
looking for a per-
sonable, customer
service and sales
oriented person to
be part of our Pro-
fessional Apartment
Management team.
Applicant must be
detail oriented,
computer literate &
able to multi task.
Excellent salary.
Apply in person to:
Charlene Poulos,
680 Wildflower Dr,
Plains Township or
by email: Cpoulos@
themanorgroup.com
No phone calls
please.
569 Security/
Protective Services
SECURITY OFFICERS
Join Vector Security
Patrol and become
a name on a winning
team. We have
career opportunities
for Security Officers
and those wishing
to begin a career in
the security field
with openings for
Part Time hours in
Wilkes-Barre and
Noxen. Previous
security experience
a plus. 800-682-
4722. EOE
600
FINANCIAL
610 Business
Opportunities
BAR/TAVERN
FOR SALE
Turn key business.
Liquor license &
patio license. Air
conditioned. Lower
level 1 bedroom
apt. Reduced to
$159,000 Owner
Retiring.
570-929-3214
JAN-PRO
Commercial Cleaning
Of Northeastern PA
Concerned about
your future?
BE YOUR OWN BOSS
Work Full or Part
time. Accounts
available NOW
throughout Luzerne
& Lackawanna
counties. We guar-
antee $5,000 to
$200,000 in annual
billing. Investment
Required. We’re
ready – are you?
For more info call
570-824-5774
Jan-Pro.com
POPCORN/
CANDY/ICE
CREAM SHOP
Tunkhannock. Mak-
ing over 25 flavors
of popcorn. Ideal
family business.
Selling equipment
supplies and inven-
tory Turnkey oper-
ation. Full training.
Unlimited potential
$44,900.
570-650-2451
630 Money To Loan
“We can erase
your bad credit -
100% GUARAN-
TEED.” Attorneys
for the Federal
Trade Commission
say they’ve never
seen a legitimate
credit repair opera-
tion. No one can
legally remove
accurate and timely
information from
your credit report.
It’s a process that
starts with you and
involves time and a
conscious effort to
pay your debts.
Learn about manag-
ing credit and debt
at ftc. gov/credit. A
message from The
Times Leader and
the FTC.
700
MERCHANDISE
702 Air
Conditioners
R-12 FRIGC refriger-
ant 30lb unopened
automotive, refrig-
erant, and A/C use
$350. 262-1279
WASHER & DRYER
Kenmore apartment
style stackable
washer/ electric
dryer $175.
570-239-6586
708 Antiques &
Collectibles
HESS TRUCKS new
from 1990 to 2008
$450. plus 11 extras
@20. 570-825-3688
HESS TRUCKS new
in boxes 2000-2008
$60.-$100.
570-675-4383
710 Appliances
APPLIANCES (4)
washer, dryer,
stove, dishwasher,
Kenmore, 3 years
old $300. each Four
for $1,000.
570-235-7170
REFRIGERATOR:
small cube, very
good condition,
$35. 570-675-4383
710 Appliances
KITCHEN UNIT ideal
for cabin, cottage or
camper. Unit a “king
unit” consists of 2
burner electric
stove top, stainless
steel sink, under
counter refrigerator
with freezer, meas-
ures 4”wx23” deep
X41”h, covered with
formica lid. $100.
firm. 570-735-2694
WASHER $15 Dryer
$10. $20 for
both, must haul
away. 406-5857
712 Baby Items
CAR SEAT Graco
children’s, like new
condition $45.
570-693-0811
HIGH CHAIR: Fisher
Price Space Saver
$25. 570-288-7905
716 Building
Materials
KITCHEN CABINETS
flat doors, approxi-
mately 10 linear ft.
Top & bottom with
formica counter top
bathroom sink with
faucet. $600. Call
570-301-8200
720 Cemetery
Plots/Lots
MEMORIAL SHRINE
CEMETERY
6 Plots Available
May be Separated
Rose Lawn Section
$450 each
570-654-1596
MEMORIAL SHRINE
LOTS FOR SALE
6 lots available at
Memorial Shrine
Cemetery. $2,400.
Call 717-774-1520
SERIOUS INQUIRES ONLY
726 Clothing
COAT long, black
leather, size large,
never worn, tags
still on $50.
570-606-1136
COATS 3 cashmere
size 6 $40 each.
Toddler bed & bed-
ding, toybox, rug,
complete $50.
Phaltzgraph dishes
over 100 pieces
sacrifice $150. or
best offer. 6 wood-
en folding chairs
$40. Rocking chair
$30. Wood mirror
full length $25.
Antique victorian
floor lamp $200.
570-592-8414
GIRLS CLOTHING
3T winter $5. 4 win-
ter $10. 5 winter
with boots $10.
570-868-0481
732 Exercise
Equipment
BICYCLE: Miami Sun
3-wheel, great con-
dition $225.
570-239-6586
742 Furnaces &
Heaters
COAL STOVE: Warm
Morning coal stove,
hand fired $250.
570-287-2247
HEATER Dyno Glo
kerosene heater
23,000 BTU, like
new includes
kerosene container
& fuel. $50.
570-868-6655
VENT FREE
propane & natural
gas heaters brand
new in unopened
box, can be mount-
ed on wall or floor.
has thermostat &
blower Full manu-
facturer warranty
20,000 btu -
$190.00, 30,000 btu
- $220.00
(570)675-0005
WOODBURNER
750 Taylor
outside, heats
4,000 sq. ft. Need
more info call
Karen. $4,500.
570-675-4206
744 Furniture &
Accessories
BEDROOM SET 5
piece, gray, full size
bed new $150.
beige sofa bed
$100. Living room
end tables $25,.
Metal desk $50.
570-417-3940
COMPUTER DESK:
$40. or best offer.
570-332-4536
CONTEMPORARY
COUCH, light
beige, excellent
condition. $350.00
Contemporary side
chair, print fabric,
beige, brown and
teal, excellent con-
dition. $200.00
Sleeper sofa, olive
color, excellent
condition. $200.00
Area rug, 8’x11’,
teal and gold.
$250.00 Bar stools.
3 white, 3 black
and tan. $25.00
Cash only
(570) 696-2584
DINING ROOM SET
solid oak table with 1
leaf, 6 chairs, light-
ed hutch. $500.
Recliner sofa & love
seat blue velour,
$275. End tables 2
light color wood,
$100. 570-954-1440
744 Furniture &
Accessories
FURNI SH FURNI SH
FOR LESS FOR LESS
* NELSON *
* FURNITURE *
* WAREHOUSE *
Recliners from $299
Lift Chairs from $699
New and Used
Living Room
Dinettes, Bedroom
210 Division St
Kingston
Call 570-288-3607
FURNITURE SALE
Virginia House Oak
Dining Room Set:
Includes 1 hutch, 1
buffet, table with 2
leaves, 2 arm chairs,
6 side chairs. Excel-
lent condition,
$1,750. Call
570-262-5028
GARAGE SALE
LEFTOVERS
bedroom set,
French Provincial
set includes 2 twin
beds, dresser with
mirror & chest $125.
Loveseat, sea foam
green, very good
condition $75.
570-826-1407
ROCKER/RECLINER
black vinyl, like new
$135. 793-4000
ROCKING CHAIR,
antique outdoor
$15. 570-287-1644
or 655-1959
STOOLS: 24” wood
stools (3) black lad-
der back with natu-
ral seat $75.
570-333-0470
TV STAND black
with 3 shelves bare-
ly used $100.
570-592-7723
BUYING
US/FOREIGN/
CANADIAN
COINS &
CURRENCY
PREMIUMS FOR
SILVER DOLLARS
& BETTER COINS
GOLD &
SILVER
JEWELRY &
INGOTS
STERLING SILVER
Old Postcards &
Local Photo’s,
Lead Soldiers &
Old Toys, Mining
& Military Stuff,
Old Crocks, Jugs
Local Advertising
STAMPS
PAYING
HONEST
CA$H
PRICES
Over 35 years, a
respected coin
dealer.
HERITAGE
GALLERIES
DALLAS, PA
Across from
Dallas Agway
on Rt. 415
Look for blue
& white signs
NEW HOURS
TUES-FRI, 10-6
SAT, 10-5
570-674-2646
754 Machinery &
Equipment
SNOW THROWER,
Craftsman 26” 4
cycle Tecumseh
Snow King engine,
rarely used. $475.
570-288-4340
756 Medical
Equipment
BRUNO STAIR LIFT
For a bi-level home.
Like new. Paid
$12,000. Selling for
$4,500, negotiable.
Call 570-752-4869
COMPASS POWER
WHEELCHAIR
By Golden. Red.
Like new. With
Ramp. $2,000
negotiable. Call
570-752-4869
DYNEX II Neurostim-
ulator (TENS unit) all
necessary equip-
ment included.
$150. 570-829-1611
HOSPITAL BED.
All electricaly con-
troled, in good con-
dition. Delivered.
$295.00
(610)589-9902
758 Miscellaneous
BARREL, cider or
wine, 53 gallon,
$175. 570-876-3830
CANOPY covered
metal swing set 3’
wide seat with
cushions $25.
570-824-0591
GUITAR acoustic
guitar & hardcase.
$295. 823-3835
758 Miscellaneous
BABY GIRL clothes
size 0-24 months,
large crate $100.
Graco high chair
$30. Mizuno golf
cart bag $25.Bo-
flex XTL, lat bar, leg
machine all acces-
sories included
$200. Strollers
Graco $30. Safety
1st $30. Pink
umbrella stroller $5.
Black leather rock-
ing chair with rock-
ing footrest $75.
Klipsch home the-
ater system in-
cludes 2 front, cen-
ter & sub $250.
Sony 19” flat screen
computer monitor
with speakers $100.
AB shaper & sit up
bench $25. Evenflo
booster car seat
$35. 570-212-2347.
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
FREE AD POLICY
The Times Leader
will accept ads for
used private party
merchandise only
for items totaling
$1,000 or less. All
items must be
priced and state
how many of each
item. Your name
address, email and
phone number must
be included. No ads
for ticket sales
accepted. Pet ads
accepted if FREE
ad must state
FREE.
One Submission per
month per
household.
You may place your
ad online at
timesleader.com,
or email to
classifieds@
timesleader.com or
fax to 570-831-7312
or mail to Classified
Free Ads: 15 N.
Main Street, Wilkes-
Barre, PA. Sorry
no phone calls.
GARAGE SALE
LEFTOVERS
Good, Clean & Use-
ful. TAKE ALL FOR
FREE. 820-3359
GARAGE SALE
LEFTOVERS
Sturdy 42” oak table
$15. Twin bed frame
with bookcase
headboard, $15.
Wooden carrom
board $15. Big
Bertha leather clas-
sic golf bag $10.
570-678-5488
MOVIE LOT kids vhs
movie lot reduced
to $2. each or all 22
vhs for $35. All
have their covers &
most are the plastic
ones. VHS stand-
black, holds many
movies for $5. COS-
TUMES Old Navy
pumpkin hat &
shoes, black jump-
suit underneath,
$15. Plus size but-
terfly $25. Pirate
queen 12-14 girls.
$10. SKUNK 1 piece,
medium $15. Skele-
ton bride, girls 12-14
lace up bodice, tulle
trim cuffs, head-
band, veil $15. 12-14
Vampire dracula
gothic costume 12-
14, $15. 50’s Girl
sock hop 1 piece
dress $15. 735-2661
PANS cast iron, 6.5
fry pan $6. 11” grid-
dle $16. 12” broiler
pan $17. 570-287-
1644 or 655-1959
PIANO Story &
Clark $700 or best
offer! 822-4593
PURSES: large black
Dooney & Bourke
purse canvas &
leather preowned
$85. Black all
leather Dooney &
Bourke wallet,
checkbook cover
like new $65. New
with tag dark teal
patent Kathy Van
Zeeland purse $42.
Spongebob monop-
oly new $8. Sorry
ubuild new $7.
570-823-7818
TIRES: 2 General
Grabber 275x40
x20, excellent con-
dition $300.
570-823-3425
WARMER Creators
brand, inside slide
doors front & back,
2 racks, $750.
570-636-3151
WHEELS. 4 Chevy
steel rally with stain-
less steel centers
and beauty rings.
Great condition.
$450
570-762-4914
762 Musical
Instruments
DRUM SET: WJM
Percussion 5-piece
complete with cym-
bals, throne, metal-
lic blue, slightly used
$200. firm. Radio
Shack MD-1121 Syn-
thesizer/Piano w/
stand, like new,
$100. firm
570-574-4781
766 Office
Equipment
PRINTER Minolta
Page Pro 1250W
caution; does NOT
work with Windows
7 64-bit operating
system. Worked
when last tried in
Windows XP. $30.
570-824-1986
768 Personal
Electronics
PHONES, extremely
rare, rotary dial
desk phones, (1)
bright red (1) bright
orange, like new..
$125.each or best
offer. 570-696-2008
770 Photo
Equipment
CANON EOS DIGI-
TAL 300D 18-55 mm
lens, 75mm-300mm
zoom lens, 2 batter-
ies, 1 charger, 1-1gb
card, 1-512 mb card,
1 128mb card, 1-lens
filter, manual & soft-
ware $500.
570-819-2174
776 Sporting Goods
BACK PACK BAG-
GAGE, (2) large with
compartments $30
eaCh. 280-24782
BACK PACK
Lightweight, navy,
like new $50.
570-675-4383
BIKE: Next slumber
party brand girls 20
“ bike. $40.
570-735-2661
BIKE: Peugeot 12
speed english rac-
ing bike $50.
570-696-4912
BOOTS Burton snow
board, size 9. Excel-
lent condition $50.
at 570-301-3484 or
570-631-6635.
BOWFLEX XTREME
2, like new. $800.
Weslo treadmill
$125.570-542-5823
CAMPING COTS (2)
metal frame $25.
each. Metal ham-
mock frame $15.
Murray 20” 18
speed bike/Her-
culite micro-alloy
$50. Hillary camping
tent, sleeps 6 $50.
570-824-0591
MAILBOX Lake
Lehman airbrushed
mailbox. $60. Harry
Potter airbrushed
table $300. Golfers
toilet seat, unique
handpainted $75
570-477-1269
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
RECUMBENT BIKE
Edge 288R magnet-
ic $100. 570-901-
1095 or 594-0057
784 Tools
COMPOUND MITER
SAW, Chicago Elec-
tric Power Co. 10’
blade, 15 amp, 5300
RPM includes dust
bag, extension
wings, 60 tooth car-
bide blade, spring
load blade guard,
table tilts 45
degrees. New,
never used $50.
Delta bench saw 10”
blade, 120v, 13mps,
Type 2, angle cut
bracket $50.
570-735-2694
TOOLS/ASSORTED
nails, iron pipes,
take all $22. 570-
287-1644/655-1959
788 Stereo/TV/
Electronics
TAPE PLAYER, reel
to reel master work
model m-812, good
condition. 9 tapes
included $125.
570-283-3686
790 Swimming
Pools/Hot Tubs
HOT TUB / SPA
QCA turquoise + 3
deluxe deep depth.
Accommodates 6
people. 32 water
jets. 10 air jets. 82”
x 79” x 38 1/2”.
$1,500. Chemicals
included with tub.
For for info, call
570-823-1686
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
NEED CASH?
We Buy:
Gold & Gold coins,
Silver, Platinum,
old bills, Watches,
Costume Jewelry,
Diamonds, Gold
Filled, Sterling Sil-
ver Flatware,
Scrap Jewelry,
Military items, old
Tin & Iron Toys,
Canadian coins &
paper money,
most foreign
money (paper/coin).
Visit our new loca-
tion @ 134 Rt. 11,
Larksville
next to WOODY’S
FIRE PLACE
& PRO FIX.
We make house calls!
Buyer & seller of
antiques! We also
do upholstering.
570-855-7197
570-328-3428
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
VITO’S
&
GINO’S
Wanted:
Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Highest
Prices
Paid!!
FREE
PICKUP
288-8995
800
PETS & ANIMALS
810 Cats
KITTENS FREE 12
weeks old, liter box
trained. 594-2975
815 Dogs
PAWS
TO CONSIDER....
ENHANCE
YOUR PET
CLASSIFIED
AD ONLINE
Call 829-7130
Place your pet ad
and provide us your
email address
This will create a
seller account
online and login
information will be
emailed to you from
gadzoo.com
“The World of Pets
Unleashed”
You can then use
your account to
enhance your online
ad. Post up to 6
captioned photos
of your pet
Expand your text to
include more
information, include
your contact
information such
as e-mail, address
phone number and
or website.
AKC Registered
Black Great Dane
Puppies. Vet
checked, shots,
wormings, micro-
chipped. Tempera-
ment tested. Ear
cropping available.
$500.
570-384-0593
CHOW CHOW
Loving,caring,
gentle, adorable
puppies available
11/12/11. Papers and
first shots included.
570-655-3189
GERMAN SHEPHERD
PUPPIES - AKC
Great Pedigrees.
Multiple V ratings.
Titled from
Schutzhund to ther-
apy dog. Father
imported from Ger-
man. Call for more
info. 570-474-5409
GERMAN SHORT-
HAIRED POINTER
pups, excellent pets
and hunters, par-
ents are health test-
ed, sire is AKC
titled. $350 to $550.
570-926-0873
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
SHIH-TZU MIX PUPPIES
Parents on premises
Shots Current. $350
Pomeranians - $500
607-217-8303
STANDARD POODLE
PUPS
AKC & ACA full
registration. Cham-
pion blood lines,
show quality, shots,
wormed, and
guaranteed. $225.
570-458-6947
900
REAL ESTATE
FOR SALE
906 Homes for Sale
Having trouble
paying your mort-
gage? Falling
behind on your
payments? You
may get mail from
people who promise
to forestall your
foreclosure for a fee
in advance. Report
them to the Federal
Trade Commission,
the nation’s con-
sumer protection
agency. Call 1-877-
FTC-HELP or click
on ftc.gov. A mes-
sage from The
Times Leader and
the FTC.
BERWICK
FOR SALE BY OWNER
50% below Market
Value. Fixer upper.
Not in flood zone. 3
bedroom, 1 bath.
Corner lot. $46,500.
(570) 394-9537
DALLAS
NEW CONSTRUCTION
2,400 sq feet
$329,000
OPEN HOUSE
SUNDAYS, 11-1
patrickdeats.com
570-696-1041
DURYEA
NOT IN FLOOD
ZONE
5 rooms. For sale
by owner. 2 bed-
rooms and bath
upstairs, 3 rooms
and 1/2 bath
downstairs, cor-
ner lot with small
yard. $56,000
570-885-4913
570-885-3367
DURYEA
PRICE REDUCED!
314 Bennett Street
Refashioned 3 or 4
bedroom, two full
modern baths. Two
story, 2300sf, with
level yard with love-
ly new landscaping
and 1 car garage.
New EVERYTHING
in this charming
must see property.
Custom blinds
throughout the
home. Great neigh-
borhood with Park
beyond the back-
yard. MLS# 11-3776
$174,900
Call Patti
570-328-1752
Liberty Realty
& Appraisal
Services LLC
EXETER
OPEN HOUSE
Sunday 12pm-5pm
362 Susquehanna Ave
Completely remod-
eled, spectacular, 2
story Victorian
home, with 3 bed-
rooms and 1.5
baths, new rear
deck, full front
porch, tiled baths
and kitchen, granite
countertops, all
Cherry hardwood
floors throughout,
all new stainless
steel appliances
and lighting, new oil
furnace, washer
dryer in first floor
bath. Great neigh-
borhood, nice yard.
$174,900 (30 year
loan, $8,750 down,
$887/month, 30
years @ 4.5%)
100% OWNER
FINANCING
AVAILABLE
Call Bob at
570-654-1490
FORTY FORT
70 Wesley Street
Very nice, move-in
condition or good
rental property. 1.5
double, 3 bedroom,
living room, kitchen,
dining room, base-
ment & full attic.
Great deal, must
sell, only $30,000.
Call (570) 762-5119
LAFLIN
210 Beechwood Dr
Rare brick & vinyl
tri-level featuring 8
rooms, 4 bed-
rooms, 1.5 baths,
family room with
fireplace, rear
patio, sprinkler
system, alarm sys-
tem & central air.
$204,900
CALL DONNA
570-613-9080
906 Homes for Sale
PITTSTON
Handyman Special
Pine Street
House, and/or sep-
arate corner lot
property $10,000.
each, or $15,000.
for both.
Call (215) 295-6951
PITTSTON
NEW PRICE!!
92 Tompkins Street
Totally remodeled
2-story; 7 rooms, 3
bedrooms, 2 baths,
2-car garage, deck,
rear fence.
MLS# 11-2770
$103,500
CALL JOE OR DONNA
570-613-9080
PLAINS
KEYSTONE SECTION
9 Ridgewood Road
TOTAL BEAUTY
1 ACRE- PRIVACY
Beautiful ranch 2
bedrooms, 1 bath,
attic for storage,
washer, dryer & 2
air conditioners
included. New
Roof & Furnace
Furnished or unfur-
nished.
Low Taxes! New
price $118,500
570-885-1512
WANAMIE
Newport Twp
East Main Street
Handyman Special
Double Block
Two 2 story, 3-bed-
room units each
with attic, cellar,
bath and pantry.
Large 4 car garage.
Upper and lower
floors. As is for
$25,000. Call
570-379-2645
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
WHITE HAVEN
LARGE SINGLE
FAMILY HOME
Buffalo Street
Two story, 4 bed-
rooms, 1 bath-
room, eat-in
kitchen, office/
study, family room,
living room, bonus
room, utility room,
Large back yard,
Three large walk-in
closets $52,500.
after 5:00 p.m.
570-582-5907 or
email
paulmichelle@
pa.metrocast.net.
909 Income &
Commercial
Properties
PITTSTON
Township Blvd.
MAKE AN OFFER!
Ideal location
between Wilkes-
Barre & Scranton.
Ample parking with
room for additional
spaces. Perfect for
medical or profes-
sional offices. Con-
tact agent to show.
Asking $945,000
Contact Judy Rice
570-714-9230
MLS# 10-1110
912 Lots & Acreage
EXETER
Ida Acres, Wyoming
Area School District.
6 lots remain, start-
ing at $38,000. Pri-
vate setting. Under-
ground utilities.
570-947-4819
EXETER
Out of flood area.
100x125ft. All utili-
ties in place. Build-
ing moratorium
does not apply to
this lot. $45,000
reduced to $42,000
Call 570-655-0530
PITTSTON
19 Ziegler Road
Picture a sunrise
over the mountain.
Ready to build, resi-
dential lot. Secluded
entrance road from
Route 502. Priced
to sell! Under-
ground telephone
and electric service
in place. Make this
the site of your
future home.
MLS#11-486
REDUCED!!
$50,000
Ron Skrzysowski
(570) 696-6551
746 Garage Sales/
Estate Sales/
Flea Markets
SUNDAY DISPATCH SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 PAGE 11
412 Autos for Sale
551 Other
542 Logistics/
Transportation
412 Autos for Sale
551 Other
542 Logistics/
Transportation
412 Autos for Sale
551 Other
566 Sales/Business
Development
412 Autos for Sale
551 Other
566 Sales/Business
Development
412 Autos for Sale
548 Medical/Health
554 Production/
Operations
412 Autos for Sale
548 Medical/Health
554 Production/
Operations
412 Autos for Sale
548 Medical/Health
542 Logistics/
Transportation
412 Autos for Sale
548 Medical/Health
542 Logistics/
Transportation
412 Autos for Sale
468 Auto Parts
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
412 Autos for Sale
468 Auto Parts
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
IN THE HEART OF WILKES-BARRE
Immediate Occupancy!!
Efficiencies available
@30% of income
MARTIN D. POPKY APARTMENTS
61 E. Northampton St.
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18701
• Affordable Senior Apartments
• Income Eligibility Required
• Utilities Included! • Low cable rates;
• New appliances; • Laundry on site;
• Activities! •Curbside Public Transportation
Please call 570-825-8594
D/TTY 800-654-5984
543 Pierce Street º Kingston, PA 18704 º 570-288-3000
View our entire pre-owned inventory onIine at: www.piercestmotorsnepa.com
FoIIow us on facebook: www.facebook.comJpiercestmotors
PRE-OWNED
lNVENTORY
Pierce Street
MOTORS
W
e
have
50+
vehicIes ready for immediate deIivery with financing
on
the
sp
o
t!
IF BAD CREDIT IS HOLDING YOU BACK, AND YOU HAVE A CASH DOWN PAYMENT,
OR A FREE AND CLEAR TRADE WE MAY BE ABLE TO HELP, HURRY DOWN!
2005
Ford
F150 XLT
$13,995
STK# K2072A
2005
Nissan
Murano SL
$13,995
STK# 22078C
2007
Chrysler
Sebring Touring
$9,995
STK# 81739A
2004
Chrysler
PT Cruiser GT
$8,995
STK# H65172
2006
Chrysler
Pt Cruiser Touring
$7,995
STK# 356844
2002
Dodge
Durango SLT
$6,995
STK# 81595A
1997
Subaru
Legacy Outback
$3,995
STK# 81620B
2007
Toyota
Corolla CE
$12,995
STK# 22084A
2002
Ford
Escape 4X4
$8,495
STK# 81731A
2004
Buick Park Avenue
Ultra Sedan
$8,995
STK# 81730A
2006
Chevrolet
Cobalt
$9,995
STK# 81703A
2003
Chevrolet
Trailblazer 4x4 LT
$9,995
STK# 82001A
2007
Hyundai
Sonata SE
$10,995
STK# 2242A
2002
Chevrolet
Malibu
$3,995
STK# 41041B
2005
Ford
Escape XLT
$7,995
STK# 81488A
2002
Dodge
Ram 1500
$6,995
STK# 81596B
2003
Jeep Liberty
Sport Utility 4D
$8,395
STK# 81723A
2000
Subaru
Outback
$8,495
STK# 81742A
2001
Chevrolet
Impala
$5,495
STK# 81719M
2001
Suabaru
Outback Limited
$8,995
STK# 61193A
2004
Toyota
Corolla CE
$7,495
STK# 82002A
2006
Subaru
Forester AWD
$11,995
STK# 82023A
TAKE A VIRTUAL TOUR!
2005
Jeep
Liberty Sport
$10,995
STK# 2395A
TAKE A VIRTUAL TOUR!
1999
Toyota
RAV4
$7,995
STK# 81638A
TAKE A VIRTUAL TOUR!
2004
Honda
Accord LX
$8,995
STK# 2297A
An Equal Opportunity/Affrmative Action Employer • M/F/D/V
Sallie Mae is a Drug-Free Workplace
Dream. Invest. Succeed.
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WE’RE HIRING - We are the Nations #1 fnancial services
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and data entry experience or experience in a production-based
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Customer Service Research Rep (1100886) – Prior offce and data
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preferred (Class starts on November 28
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Detailed Job Descriptions found on www.salliemae.com
Since 1975, Bayada Nurses has provided
nursing, rehabilitative, therapeutic
hospice, and personal home health care
services to children, adults, and seniors in
the comfort of their own homes.
Now hiring RNs, LPNs,
and Home Health Aides!
Apply today! www.bayada.com
Adults - Pittston
(570) 883-5600
Pediatrics - Pittston
(570) 883-9022
Local trucking company
looking for
OTR/REGIONAL
TRACTOR
TRAILER DRIVERS
3 years minimum experience
with clean MVR. Full time
& part time needed.
Medical benefits after 90 days.
Off on weekends.
Home often.
Earning potential
$50,000 to $55,000 per year.
DRIVERS
Please call 570-270-5145
or Mail resume to:
J & S Ralston Trucking, Inc.
8 East Ann Street
Plains, Pa 18705
AUTOMOTIVE SALES
CONSULTANTS
Valley Chevrolet is seeking
individuals who are self-starters,
team-oriented and driven.
(No experience necessary)
We Offer:
• Salary & Commission • Benefts
• 401k Plan • 5 Day Work Week
• Huge New & Used Inventory
Apply in person to:
Blake Gagliardi, Sales Manager
Rick Merrick, Sales Manager
601 Kidder Street, Wilkes-Barre
QUALITY CONTROL
TECHNICIAN
– Entry Level -
Will assist QC Supervisor, establish, examine
and maintain quality on production floor.
Position will be “on hands” in production
dept., on floor testing and sampling. $
13/hour to start. Hours: 7 a.m. to 4 p.m Mon.
– Fri. Must have prior experience in QC and
with Microsoft Word & Excel. Will operate
forklift and some heavy lifting may be
required. Must be detailed oriented and have
ability to multi-task. Competitive benefit
pckage. Candidates meeting qualifications
should forward resume with wage require-
ments to:
AEP Industries, Inc.,
Attn: Human Resources,
20 Elmwood Ave., Mountain Top, Pa. 18707
Fax 570-474-9257
We are a Drug Free Workplace. EOE
TeamOne
New Routes, New Pay Structure
New Compensation Package
$2K Sign on Bonus
Affordable Benefit Plan Options 1st day
of employment.
Dedicated Route Drivers Needed
Home Weekly
Solo, Co Driver & Casual Positions
Automotive Industry Gouldsboro, PA
The route drivers will be delivering auto parts
to dealerships throughout the NE portion of the
US. Qualified candidates should be 23 years of
age and possess a valid CDLAdrivers licenses
with a minimum of two years OTR verifiable
experience. Candidates must have an accept-
able BI and MVR with doubles and Haz Mat
endorsements. Interested candidates can call
866-851-9902 to set up an interview.
TeamOne is an equal opportunity Employer
M/F/H/V
BUYING JUNK
VEHICLES
$300 AND UP
$125 EXTRA IF DRIVEN,
DRAGGED OR PUSHED IN!
NOBODY Pays More
570-760-2035
Monday thru Saturday 6am-9pm • Happy Trails!
915 Manufactured
Homes
ASHLEY PARK
Laurel Run & San
Souci Parks, Like
new, several to
choose from,
Financing&Warranty,
MobileOneSales.net
Call (570)250-2890
915 Manufactured
Homes
LAUREL RUN ESTATES
We have mobile
home sites for new
and used single &
double wides.
LARGE WOODED LOTS
overlooking
Wilkes-Barre
Call 570-823-8499
CELL 570-241-1854
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
DALLAS
Š Large 3 bedroom
2nd floor.
Off street parking.
Call Joe570-881-2517
HANOVER TOWNSHIP
Great location, 1
bedroom apartment
in residential area,
all utilities included.
$600/month
+ security.
908-482-0335
KINGSTON
2nd Floor. Available
Nov-1. 2 bedrooms,
renovated bath-
room, balcony off
newly renovated
kitchen with refrig-
erator & stove, cen-
tral air, newly paint-
ed, off-street park-
ing, no pets. $600
per month plus utili-
ties, & 1 month
security deposit.
570-239-1010
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
FORTY FORT
AMERICA REALTY
RENTALS
“ALL UNITS
MANAGED”
VARIOUS LOCATIONS
Call for
availability
1-2 bedrooms,
all modern.
• Employment/
Application
Required
• No Pets/
Smoking
• Leases
• Very Clean
Standards
288-1422
KINGSTON
EATON TERRACE
317 N. Maple
Ave. Large Two
story, 2 bed-
room, 1.5 bath,
Central Heat &
Air, washer/dryer
in unit, parking.
$830 + utilities &
1 month security
570-262-6947
PAGE 12 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 SUNDAY DISPATCH
906 Homes for Sale
554 Production/
Operations
906 Homes for Sale
554 Production/
Operations
906 Homes for Sale
554 Production/
Operations
906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale
7
1
3
9
8
0
DON’T CALLUS.
(Unlessyoureallywant tosavemoneyonyour car &homeownersinsurance.)
Sodon’t call us andkeeppayingbig
moneyfor your car andhomeinsurance.
We’vebeensavingpeopleBIGMONEYwith
our newauto/homecombopolicy, offering
DEEPDISCOUNTS.
Charles Borocci of Swoyersville savedover $1,000bycombininghis car andhomeowners
insurance. He is pictured above with Debbie Ferack, Agent of Atlas Insurance Group.
(Unlessyoureallyw
Charles Borocc
insurance. He
Atlas Realty, Inc. Makes It Happen!
Atlas Insurance Group, Inc.
829-6200
Serving our community since 1938
23YEARSINBUSINESS. OVER$100,000,000SOLD!
Call nowfor your FREE market Analysis
829-6200
S e e a l l a r e a l i s t i n g s a t www. a t l a s r e a l t y i n c . c o m
Seeking Parts Shippers, Material Handler & Fork Lift
Operator for Duryea Manufacturing Facility. Generous
benefits include affordable healthcare with minimal co-pays.
Hiring for Hourly Positions
401 York Ave, Duryea, PA 18642
Apply online at www.pridemobility.com/careers
EOE/MF/DV/AA
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
KINGSTON
42 Third Avenue
2nd floor, newly
remodeled 2 bed-
room, 1 bath, fridge
& stove included.
Washer/dryer
hookup. $550 +
security. Water &
sewer included. No
pets. 570-417-2919
KINGSTON
Page Avenue
2 bedroom, living
room, dining room,
off street parking.
$450 + utilities. Call
570-752-6399
Sell your own home!
Place an ad HERE
570-829-7130
KINGSTON
West Bennett St.
Twinkle in Kingston’s
Eye, 2nd floor, 1000
sq. ft. 2 bed, Central
Air, washer/dryer
and appliances. No
pets. Non-smoking.
1 car off street park-
ing. Available Nov-1.
$725/month + gas,
electric, 1 year lease
& security.
570-814-1356
LARKSVILLE
Very clean, 1st floor
3 Bedroom with
modern bath and
kitchen. New floor-
ing, large closets.
Off Street Parking,
fenced yard. Water
& garbage included.
Tenant pays electric
& gas service.
$575/month. No
pets. One year
lease.
570-301-7723
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
MOUNTAIN TOP
WOODBRYN
1 & 2 Bedroom.
No pets. Rents
based on income
start at $405 &
$440. Handicap
Accessible. Equal
Housing Opportuni-
ty. 570-474-5010
TTY711
This institution is an
equal opportunity
provider and
employer.
Immediate Opennings!
Say it HERE
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
NANTICOKE
2 bedroom, 1st
floor. Large eat in
kitchen, fridge,
electric stove,
large living room,
w/w carpeting,
master bedroom
with custom built
in furniture. Ample
closet space.
Front/back porch-
es, off street
parking, laundry
room available.
No dogs, smok-
ing, water, sewer,
garbage paid.
$550/mo + gas,
electric, security,
lease, credit,
background
check.
(570) 696-3596
NANTICOKE
347 Hanover St.
1 bedroom, 1st
floor, wall to wall
carpet, eat-in
kitchen with appli-
ances, washer/
dryer hookup,
porch & shared
yard. $400/mo +
utilities and
security. New
energy efficient
gas furnace.
Call 570-814-1356
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
NANTICOKE
603 Hanover St
2nd floor, 1 bed-
room. No pets.
$500 + security, util-
ities & lease. Photos
available. Call
570-542-5330
PITTSTON
2 apartments avail-
able. 2 bedrooms.
All appliances
included. All utilities
paid; electricity by
tenant. Everything
brand new. Off
street parking.
$675-$750 + securi-
ty & references. Call
570-969-9268
PITTSTON
5 room apartment
includes 3 bed-
rooms, 1 bathroom,
refrigerator, stove
and washer/dryer.
Water & garbage
included. Cats OK.
$500 per month,
+ security deposit.
Century 21
Smith Hourigan
Group
Call Ben at
570-715-7739
PITTSTON
Jenkins Township
Newly renovated, 4
bedrooms, 2 full
baths, living room,
kitchen, stove, &
fridge included
washer/dryer
hookup, off-street
parking. Heat &
water included.
$875. per month +
security deposit.
Credit check and
references.
Cell 917-753-8192
WILKES-BARRE
1 bedroom. Heat &
hot water included,
$550 month +
Security required
973-879-4730
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
PITTSTON
Modern 2 bedroom,
2nd floor. Includes
appliances. Laundry
hookup. Heated
garage, off street
parking. Heat,
sewer, water &
garbage included.
$675/month
+ security & lease.
No smoking/pets.
570-430-0123
GET THE WORD OUT
with a Classified Ad.
570-829-7130
PITTSTON-
HUGHESTOWN
Completely remod-
eled, modern 2 bed-
room apt. Lots of
closet space, with
new tile floor and
carpets. Includes
stove, refrigerator,
washer, dryer, gas
heat, nice yard and
neighborhood, no
pets. $600/month
$1000 deposit.
570-479-6722
PLAINS
15 & 17 E. Carey St
Clean 2nd floor,
modern 1 bedroom
apartments. Stove,
fridge, heat & hot
water included. No
pets. Off street
parking. $490-$495
+ security, 1 yr lease
Call 570-822-6362
570-822-1862
Leave Message
PLYMOUTH
Large 2 bedroom 1
bath, ground floor.
$525/ month +
security. Includes
heat, water &
sewer. Pets accept-
ed at an additional
fee. 310-431-6851
WEST PITTSTON
203 Delaware Ave.
Out of flood zone. 4
rooms, no pets, no
smoking, off street
parking. Includes
heat, water, sewer,
fridge, stove, w/d.
High security bldg.
1st floor $700, 2nd
floor $600.
570-655-9711
WEST PITTSTON
East Packer Avenue
2 bedroom Town-
house with full
basement, 1 bath,
off street parking.
$625/mo + utilities.
No Pets. 570-283-
1800 M-F, 570-388-
6422 all other times
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
WEST PITTSTON
HIGH AND DRY
Spacious 1 bedroom
apartment, 2nd floor.
Recently renovated,
sewer & appliances
included. Off street
parking. Security.
No pets.
$500/month +
utilities & gas heat.
570-586-0417
WEST WYOMING
AVAILABLE NOW!!
2nd floor 1 bed-
room, nice kitchen
with appliances,
$450 month plus
utilities No animals.
No smoking. Call
570-693-1000
WILKES-BARRE
Mayflower
Crossing
Apartments
570.822.3968
2, 3 & 4
Bedrooms
- Light & bright
open floor plans
- All major
appliances included
- Pets welcome*
- Close to everything
- 24 hour emergency
maintenance
- Short term
leases available
Call TODAY For
AVAILABILITY!!
www.mayflower
crossing.com
Certain Restrictions
Apply*
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
WILKES-BARRE
22 Terrace Street
2 bedroom, 3rd
floor. Hardwood
flooring. Appliances,
heat, water, sewer
& trash included.
Pet friendly. $700 +
electric & natural
gas. 570-969-9268
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
WILKES-BARRE SOUTH
SECURE BUILDINGS
1 & 2 bedroom
apartments.
Starting at $440
and up. References
required. Section 8 ok.
570-332-5723
Need to rent that
Vacation property?
Place an ad and
get started!
570-829-7130
WYOMING
Corner of Wyoming
Ave and 6th St. 2nd
floor, 1 bedroom,
non smoking apart-
ment. Parking.
Includes heat, water
sewer & garbage.
No pets. $650 + util-
ities & security.
Available 12/1. Call
570-430-8000
944 Commercial
Properties
Center City WB
WE HA WE HAVE SP VE SPACE!! ACE!!
Come see us
now- you’ll be
surprised! Afford-
able modern
office space avail-
able at the
Luzerne Bank
Building on Public
Square. Rents
include heat, cen-
tral air, utilities,
trash removal and
nightly cleaning -
all without a
sneaky CAM
charge. Super fast
internet available.
Access parking at
the new inter-
modal garage via
our covered
bridge. 300SF to
5000SF available.
We can remodel
to suit. Brokers
protected. Call
Jeff Pyros at
570-822-8577
for details.
DOLPHIN PLAZA
Rte. 315
1,700 - 2,000 SF
Office / Retail
4,500 SF Office
Showroom,
Warehouse
Loading Dock
Call 570-829-1206
OFFICE SPACE
Bennett St.
Luzerne
1100 to 1600 sq ft,
1st floor, off street
parking.
570-283-3184
944 Commercial
Properties
OFFICE OR RETAIL
LUZERNE
Out of flood plain.
2,200 SF. Near
Cross Valley High-
way. Loading dock.
Newly painted.
570-288-6526
PITTSTON
COOPERS CO-OP
Lease Space
Available, Light
manufacturing,
warehouse,
office, includes
all utilities with
free parking.
I will save
you money!
PROFESSIONAL
COMMERCIAL SPACE
West Pittston
Village Shop
918 Exeter Ave
Route 92
1500 sq. ft. &
2,000 sq. ft.
OUT OF FLOOD ZONE
570-693-1354 ext 1
315 PLAZA
900 & 2400 SF
Dental Office -
direct visibility to
Route 315 between
Leggios & Pic-A-
Deli. 750 & 1750 SF
also available. Near
81 & Cross Valley.
570-829-1206
947 Garages
WEST PITTSTON
5 locking garages/
storage units for
rent. 9’x18’ &
11’x18’. $90/month.
Call 570-357-1138
950 Half Doubles
NANTICOKE
3 bedroom. Washer
dryer hookup. $600
+ utilities. Call
570-954-7919
950 Half Doubles
DURYEA
2 bedrooms, 1 bath-
room, washer/dryer
hookup, no pets, no
smoking, not in
flood zone. Hard-
wood floors living
room, dining room,
large kitchen. Refer-
ences, security,
$650/per month,
plus utilities.
Call 570-881-8267
or email
cw95150@aol.com.
HANOVER TWP.
2 BEDROOM
3 Oaklawn Ave.
For lease, available
immediately, 2 bed-
rooms, 1 bath room,
stove provided,
washer/dryer hook-
up, off-street park-
ing, no pets, 1st
floor duplex Newly
remodeled and
painted. Hardwood
Floors. $600/per
month, water and
sewer paid, $570/
security deposit.
Call (570)417-8874
after 10:00 a.m. for
a private showing
KINGSTON
E. Bennett St.
Charming 3 bed-
room, 1.5 bath, con-
venient to Cross
Valley. Stained glass
window, original
woodwork, laundry
room off spacious
kitchen, off-street
parking, private
yard, ample base-
ment / attic storage.
NO PETS. $600 +
utilities, security &
lease. Call
570-793-6294
KINGSTON
Two bedrooms,
newly remodeled,
hardwood floors,1
ceramic bath and
kitchen,oak cabi-
nets, refrigerator,
stove and dish-
washer, off-street
parking, no pets, no
smoking. $750/per
month, security &
references.
Call (570) 417-4821
950 Half Doubles
PLAINS
2 bedroom. No
pets. References &
security deposit
$500/mos + utilities
Call (570) 430-1308
WEST PITTSTON
2 bedroom. Off
street parking.
Maintenance free.
No smoking. $625
+utilities, security &
last month.
570-885-4206
WILKES-BARRE
1/2 double. 3 bed-
rooms. Wall to wall
carpeting, washer /
dryer hookup.
Fenced in yard.
$475 plus security.
570-472-2392
WILKES-BARRE HEIGHTS
293 S. Hancock St.
Two bedrooms, with
wall-to-wall carpet-
ing, 1.5 baths, all
appliances, off-
street parking, no
pets, $595. per
month, plus utilities
& security deposit.
(570) 814-1356
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
953Houses for Rent
EDWARDSVILLE
Off street parking,
garage. All appli-
ances provided.
Section 8 Approved.
Section 8 Welcome.
$700/month + utili-
ties. Full months
security required at
lease signing.
Call (570) 592-5764
ask for Steve
PLYMOUTH
Quiet & Cozy 2 bed-
room. Large kitchen
& bath. Washer
dryer hookup. Small
hedged & fenced
yard. All situated
high & dry on a 1-
way street. No pets.
$575 + first, last &
security. Call
570-829-3902 or
570-235-4981
953Houses for Rent
FORTY FORT
ONE OF A KIND
3 bedrooms, 2
bathrooms, all
appliances provid-
ed, washer/dryer
on premises, off-
street parking, no
pets, Completely
renovated, $1200./
per month, water
and sewer paid,
$1200./security
deposit. Call
(570) 847-8138
after 9:00 a.m. to
set an appoint-
ment or email
Chad.schleig@
att.com.
WILKES-BARRE
2 bedrooms with
lots of storage.
Hardwood floors. 5
minute walk to Gen-
eral Hospital. $670.
+ utilities.
570-814-3838
1000
SERVICE
DIRECTORY
1054 Concrete &
Masonry
***
AFFORDABLE
***
General Masonry
& Concrete
NO JOB TOO BIG
OR TOO SMALL!
Masonry /Concrete
Work. Licensed &
insured. Free est.
John 570-573-0018
Joe 570-579-8109
1057Construction &
Building
GARAGE DOOR
Sales, service,
installation &
repair.
FULLY INSURED
HIC# 065008
CALL JOE
570-606-7489
570-735-8551
1105 Floor Covering
Installation
C & S CARPET
INSTALLATION
27 YRS EXPERIENCE
Professional,
Courteous Service
Discount To
Flood Victims
570-736-6204 or
570-991-3219
1129 Gutter
Repair & Cleaning
GUTTER 2 GO, INC.
PA#067136- Fully
Licensed & Insured.
We install custom
seamless rain
gutters & leaf
protection systems.
CALL US TODAY ABOUT
OUR 10% OFF WHOLE
HOUSE DISCOUNT!
570-561-2328
1183 Masonry
STONE MASON
47 Years Experience
Creative. All types
of masonry. Pre-
cast stone, pavers,
stucco & general
remodeling. Call
570-301-8200
1204 Painting &
Wallpaper
A.B.C. Professional
Painting
36 Yrs Experience
We Specialize In
New Construction
Residential
Repaints
Comm./Industrial
All Insurance
Claims
Apartments
Interior/Exterior
Spray,Brush, Rolls
WallpaperRemoval
Cabinet Refinish-
ing
Drywall/Finishing
Power Washing
Deck Specialist
Handy Man
FREE ESTIMATES
Larry Neer
570-606-9638
House in Shambles?
We can fix it!
Cover All Painting & Cover All Painting &
General Contracting General Contracting
PA068287. Serving
Northeast PA &
North Jersey since
1989. All phases of
interior & exterior
repair & rebuilding.
Call 570-226-1944 Call 570-226-1944
or 570-470-5716 or 570-470-5716
Free Estimates
And yes, I am a
lead paint removal
certified contractor
1213 Paving &
Excavating
EDWARD’S ALL COUNTY
PAVING & SEAL COATING
Modified stone,
laid & compacted.
Hot tar and chips,
dust and erosion
control. Licensed
and
Insured.
Call Today
For Your
Free Estimate
570-474-6329
Lic.# PA021520
SUNDAY DISPATCH SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 PAGE 13
TEST
D R IV E
th e
2012
CH EV Y
V OL T
*Tax & Tags additional. LowAPR to qualified customers. See dealer for details. Select vehicles may not be GM Certified. Photos may not represent actual vehicle. Prior use daily rental on select vehicles. Not responsible for typographical errors.
EXIT 170B OFF I-81 TO EXIT 1. BEAR RIGHT ON BUSINESS ROUTE 309 TO SIXTH LIGHT. JUST BELOW WYOMING VALLEY MALL.
821- 2772 •1- 800- 444- 7172
601 KIDDER STREET, W ILKES-BA RRE, PA
MON.-THURS. 8:30-8:00pm; FRI. 8:30-7:00pm; SAT. 8:30-5:00pm
V AL L EY CH EV R OL ET
www.v alleyc hev ro let.c o m K EN W AL L ACE’S
THE BEST COVERAGE IN AMERICA.
100,000-M IL E
5 Y EA R P O W ER TR A IN LIM ITED W A R R A NTY
100,000-M IL E S
5 Y EA R S O F C O U R TESY TR A NSP O R TA TIO N
100,000-M IL E S
5 Y EA R S O F R O A DSIDE A SSISTA NC E
W hichever com es first.See dealer for lim ited w arranty details.
S E RV ICE HOURS
OPEN SATURDAY
8AM - 12 NOON
MON. - FRI. 8AM - 4:30PM
221 ConynghamAve., Wilkes-Barre
570.821.2778
F in d th e v eh ic le
you w a n tto bu y
from you r
m obile d ev ic e!
SCA N H E R E >
w w w .va lleych evro let.co m
*Tax & tags additional. Price includes all rebates. LowAPR in lieu of rebates. CRUZE LS w/ manual trans.- “S” Tier (800+) lease for 39 mos. at $169 per month plus tax, 12K miles per year $1589 due at signing to qualified buyers;
MALIBU - “S” Tier (800+) - lease for 39 mos. at $179 per month plus tax, 12K miles per year $2319 due at signing to qualified buyers; EQUINOX FWD LS “S” Tier (800+) - lease for 39 mos. at $269 per month plus tax, 12K miles per
year, $1769 due at signing to qualified buyers; TRAVERSE LS FWD - “S” Tier (800+) Lease for 39 months at $279 per month plus tax, 12K miles per year, $2289 due at signing to qualified buyers. †GM Disaster Relief. $500 Bonus
Cash. Must meet specific guidelines. See dealer for complete details. Prior sales excluded. Artwork for illustration purposes only. Must take delivery by October 31, 2011. Not responsible for typographical errors.
2012 C HE V Y IM P AL A
L S S E D AN
M S R P
$26,665
Stk. #12039,3.5L V 6 A utom atic,D ual Z one A ir
C ond itioning,Stabilitrak,Six-W ay Pow er D river Seat,
PW ,PD L ,T ilt,O nStar,X M Satellite R ad io
3 0
M P G
h wy
S TAR TIN G AT
$
22,999
*
N EW
2011 S IL V E RAD O HD
D URAM AX D IE S E L S
IN S TO C K !!
S AV EOV ER $7 000
OV ER 1 00 S ILV ER AD OS
2011 C HE V Y M AL IBU
1L S S E D AN
M S R P
$23 ,21 0
Stk. #11719,2.4L D O H C M F I A utom atic,
A ir,R em ote K eyless E ntry,A M /F M /C D /
M P3,PW ,PD L ,O nStar,X M Satellite
O
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3 3
M P G
h wy
$
1 9,499
* S TAR TIN G AT
P er
M o . L EAS E
F OR
$
1
7
9
F o r60 M o s F o r60 M o s F o r60 M o s
0
%
0
%
0
%
AP R AP R AP R
M S R P
$42,900
2011 C HE V Y TAHO E
L S 4W D
Stk. #11940,5.3L V 8 A utom atic,A ir,Front
B uckets,PW ,PD L ,B luetooth,R ad io,17” A lum .
W heels,C ruise C ontrol,T hird R ow Seat,O nStar,
X M Satellite
$
3
7
,6
9
9
*
S TAR TIN G AT
F o r60 M o s F o r60 M o s F o r60 M o s
0
%
0
%
0
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AP R AP R AP R
Stk. #11471,4.8L V 8,A ir C ond itioning,A M /F M
Stereo,L ocking R ear D ifferential,16” W heel,F ull
F loor C overing,C ustom C loth Seats
2011 C HE V Y E X P RE S S
2500 C ARG O V AN
M S R P
$27 ,61 5
$
2
4
,5
9
9
* S TAR TIN G AT
L O W AP R L O W AP R L O W AP R
AV AIL ABL E AV AIL ABL E AV AIL ABL E
L O W AP R L O W AP R L O W AP R
AV AIL ABL E AV AIL ABL E AV AIL ABL E
2011 C HE V Y S IL V E RAD O
1500 E X T C AB 4W D
Stk. #11971,V 8 AT ,A /C ,Stabilitrak,PosiR ear,
C ruise,T inted G lass,O n/O ffT ires,40/20/40 Seatings
M S R P
$3 1 ,655
$
2
5
,9
9
9
*
S TAR TIN G AT
L O W AP R L O W AP R L O W AP R
AV AIL ABL E AV AIL ABL E AV AIL ABL E
2011 C HE V Y S IL V E RAD O
1500 4W D C RE W C AB
Stk. #11136,V 8 AT ,A /C ,Stabilitrak,B ed liner,R ail Protector,
W heel H ouse L iner,M old ed M ud F lap s,H D F loor M ats
M S R P
$3 5,458
$
2
8
,9
9
9
*
S TAR TIN G AT
L O W AP R L O W AP R L O W AP R
AV AIL ABL E AV AIL ABL E AV AIL ABL E
P R E O W N E D !
A V A ILA BLE O N SELEC T
C ERTIFIED PRE-O W NED
1
.9%
A P R
V IS IT US 24/7 W W W .V A L L E YCHE V ROL E T.COM
08 P ON TIA C G6
#Z2460,O nly 36K M iles..................................
$
15,999
*
08 CHE V Y S IL V E RA DO 1500 E XT CA B
#Z2410,4W D,O nly 33K M iles..........................
$
22,999
*
08 S A TURN OUTL OOK XE A W D
#Z2485,O nly 25K M iles .................................
$
25,999
*
07 CHE V Y M A L IBU L S
#Z2464,49K M iles........................................
$
14,999
*
07 CHE V Y IM P A L A L TZ
#11655A ,32K M iles......................................
$
16,899
*
07 CHE V Y E QUIN OX L S
#11786A ,A W D.............................................
$
17,999
*
08 CHE V Y A V E O L S
#11872A ,34K M iles......................................
$
12,888
*
07 CHE V Y S UBURBA N
#11041A ,Low M iles......................................
$
28,995
*
07 CHE V Y S IL V E RA DO 4W D RE G CA B
#11552A ,O nly 31K M iles................................
$
19,999
*
10 CHE V Y HHR P A N E L TRUCK
#Z2439,Low M iles........................................
$
13,950
*
10 BUICK L A CROS S E CXL
#Z2497......................................................
$
25,999
*
06 CHE V Y M ON TE CA RL O L T
#Z2342,36K M iles........................................
$
14,999
*
03 CHE V Y S IL V E RA DO 1500 RE G CA B
#11348A ,Low M iles......................................
$
13,888
*
10 CHRYS L E R TOW N & COUN TRY
#Z2526,Touring Edition..................................
$
22,500
*
04 CHE V Y A V E O 5DR
#Z2501..........................................................
$
6,995
*
04 CHE V Y COL ORA DO E XT CA B
#Z2405,44K M iles.....................................
$
13,999
*
08 HON DA CIV IC E X CP E
#12143A ,Sunroof......................................
$
15,985
*
07-08 CA DIL L A C S RX A W D
#Z2213,Low M iles..........................S ta rtin g A t
$
22,900
*
09 HYUN DA I E L A N TRA GL S
#12029A ,35K M iles......................................
$
13,995
*
08 HUM M E R H3
#Z2422,O nly 36K M iles....................S ta rtin g A t
$
25,987
*
07 FORD RA N GE R XL T E XT CA B
#11992A ,O nly 45K M iles.............................
$
16,767
*
L O W AP R L O W AP R L O W AP R
AV AIL ABL E AV AIL ABL E AV AIL ABL E
0% AP R
u p to 60 m os .
P lu s
$1000 O N M O S T
C HE V RO L E TTRUC K S
0.9% AP R
u p to 72 m os .
AV AIL ABL E
O R
2012
C HE V Y C RUZE
Stk. #12160 L S • LT • LT Z • E C O
M S R P
$1 7 ,7 40
42
M P G
h wy
(ECO)
$
1 6,995
*
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P er
M o .
$
1 69
Stk. #11721
L S • LT • LT Z • 4 C yl. • 6 C yl.
3 2
M P G
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$
500
D IS AS TE R
RE L IE F
BO N US C AS H

2011 C HE V Y S IL V E RAD O
1500 2W D RE G UL AR C AB
Stk. #11991,4.3L V 6 4 Sp eed A utom atic,A ir
C ond itioning,L ocking R ear D ifferential,
17” SteelW heels,Stabilitrak w / T raction C ontrol
M S R P
$23 ,945
S TAR TIN G AT
$
1 8,599
*
2011 C HE V Y TRAV E RS E
FW D & AW D
F o r60 M o s F o r60 M o s F o r60 M o s
0
%
0
%
0
%
AP R AP R AP R
Stk. #11738
M S R P
$3 0,280
L S • LT • LT Z
S TAR TIN G AT
$
26,999
*
P er
M o .
$
27 9
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L EAS EF OR
$
22,999
*
P er
M o .
$
269
S TAR TIN G AT
O
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L EAS EF OR S TAR TIN G AT
2011-2012 C HE V Y
E Q UIN O X AW D a n d FW D
2012 C HE V Y C AM ARO
C O UP E
1LT • 2LT • 1SS • 2SS
C O N V E R T IB L E
$
2
3
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9
9
*
S TAR TIN G AT
3 0
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4
CAM AR O
CON V ER TIBL ES
AV AIL ABL E
AL L
N E W 2012
C HE V Y
S O N IC
IN S TO C K !
Stk. #12088
M S R P
$55,400
19 19 19
AVAILABLE AVAILABLE AVAILABLE
IN-STOCK & IN-STOCK & IN-STOCK &
IN-BOUND IN-BOUND IN-BOUND
06 CHE V Y COL ORA DO L T CRE W CA B
#11997A ,Low M iles .....................................
$
19,450
*
07-08 S A TURN A URA
XE 4DR
#Z2436
$
13,999
* $
13,999
*
SA L E
P R ICE
L OW
M IL E S
S ta rtin g A t
07-10 CHE V Y COBA L TS
L S •L T •2DR •4DR
$
12,999
* $
12,999
*
SA L E
P R ICE
L OW
M IL E S
S ta rtin g A t
CHE V Y TRA IL BL A ZE RS
L S •L T
$
12,999
* $
12,999
*
SA L E
P R ICE
L OW
M IL E S
S ta rtin g A t
$
19,999
* $
19,999
*
2007 CHE V Y S IL V E RA DO
1500 RE G CA B
#11552A
SA L E
P R ICE
ON L Y
3 1K
M IL E S
L OW A P R
A V A IL A BL E
2009 P ON TIA C TORRE N T
A W D
#12048A
$
15,999
* $
15,999
*
SA L E
P R ICE
L OW
M IL E S
S ta rtin g A t
M ORE
S IL V E RA DOS
A V A IL A BL E
L OW
M IL E S
2011 CHE V Y HHR
L S
#Z2560
SA L E
P R ICE
$
14,975
* $
14,975
*
2007 CHE V Y IM P A L A L S
#Z2402,37K M iles........................................
$
13,999
*
2010 CHE V Y COBA L T L T
#Z2476,31K M iles........................................
$
14,999
*
2008 CHE V Y E XP RE S S P A S S V A N
#Z2480,Low M iles........................................
$
19,900
*
2009 P ON TIA C G6 4DR
#11785A ,33K M iles......................................
$
16,499
*
HURRY ! S AL E E N D S
M O N D AY , O C T 31
S T
06 CHE V Y E QUIN OX L S
#11892A ,Low M iles......................................
$
16,389
*
PAGE 14 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 SUNDAY DISPATCH
CONSTRUCTION
CHRIS LATONA
General Contractor
Ceramic Tile Work - Kitchens
- Bathrooms - Garages
- Replacement Windows
- New Homes - Additions - Doors -
Complete Remodeling
FREE Estimates - Insured
457-8145 or 655-0777
Quality Works at Affordable Prices
PA008322
The Dispatch
LOCAL PROS
ROOFING
TRAVEL
HOME IMPROVEMENT
To Place Your Ad Call 1-800-273-7130
Complete Home
Remodeling, Kitchens,
Baths, Drywall, Windows,
Siding & Roofs.
570-457-0087
PA# HIC EA 18685
JOHN
PREGMON
CONSTRUCTION
FLOORING
Falcone’s City Carpet Center
35 North Main St, Pittston, PA 18640
Flood Damage - Free Estimates!
We were there for you in the food of -72 & will help you get your
home back together after the -11 food. All your fooring needs:
carpet, vinyl, laminate, hardwood; Window treatments: blinds,
shades, custom drapes. 498-0977, 822-3494, or 592-4060
NORTHEAST
WINDOW, INC.
Locally Owned & Operated Since 1987
Exterior Home Improvements By
FREE ESTIMATES
570.654.4220
www.northeastwindow.com
• Windows
• Siding
• Enclosures
• Fiberglass Doors
• Storm Doors
• Vinyl Railings
• Roofing
• And More
PA018418
FLOORING
PLUMBING, HEATING & A/C
ATTENTION
FLOOD VICTIMS
Call Northeast Plumbing, Heating
& Air Conditioning
For all your needs. Licensed / Insured
570-499-3225
LANDSCAPING
Robert Smith-Owner
570-602-LAWN• 570-602-5296
West Pittston
Shrub Trimming • Grass Cutting • Aerating
Detaching • Insured • Senior Discount
• Seasonal & Storm Cleanup
&
Lawn Services, Inc
.
G
a
rden Village Landscapin
g
HIC#
PA-005521 655-6710
SMITH & MILLER
ROOFING, INC.
• Flat Roofs • Shingles • Siding • Replacement Windows
Free Estimates - Licensed & Insured
ROBERT SMITH, WEST PITTSTON
WORKMANSHIP GUARANTEED
member
Northeastern
& Central PA
PREFERRED CONTRACTOR
SINCE 1976
Tuesday, November 8 & 9
Complementary room, transportation
& baggage handling. Food, Beverages
& Snacks served on bus.
$25 per person.
Al Lispi: 570-814-3137
or 570-823-9578
Overnight Junket to
Atlantic City’s
Golden Nugget!
LET US HELP FIX WHAT
IRENE AND LEE
TOOK AWAY!!
WE SPECIALIZE IN THE
REPLACEMENT OF:
• FURNACES & BOILERS
• REGULAR & TANKLESS
WATER HEATERS
• ALL PLUMBING FIXTURES
• BROKEN PIPES
PA CONTRACTOR
LICENSE #PA003006
POWER WASHING
BEE CLEAN
457-1840
Power Wash &Landscaping
Gutter Cleaning • Snow Removal
Firewood & More
MOVING
J. CAWLEY MOVING, LLC
JASON CAWLEY, PITTSTON
Local & long distance moves.
Residential, Offices & Institutional moves.
(570) 299-7852 jcawleymoving@yahoo.com
HIC PA 026831
90 N. First Street
Stroudsburg, PA 18360
800-600-3033
www.colortilepoconos.com
Free shop at
home service!
CONCRETE & MASONRY
A+ MASONRY
ALL ASPECTS OF MASONRY
Lic. & insured.
Specializing in waterproofing
basements with stone walls.
570-468-3988 • 570-780-8339
For Home Delivery!
CALL 829.5000
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