Está en la página 1de 14

Investigations  on  the  Prehistoric  salt  exploitation  in  Villafáfila 

(Zamora,  Spain)  salinas:  evidences  on  the  low  fired  earthenware 


pottery used  
 
 
 
P. Martín‐Ramos, J. Martín‐Gil, F.J. Martín‐Gil 
CyL  Heritage  Conservation  Laboratory  (LICOPCYL),  Higher  Technical  School  for  Agrarian  Engineering, 
Avenida de Madrid, 57, Palencia‐34004, Spain 
 
G. Delibes‐de‐Castro 
Department of Archaeology, University of Valladolid 
 
Key words: salt exploitation; earthenware; firing temperatures; Villafáfila archaeologica 
 
 
Abstract 
Some  information  on  the  firing  temperatures,  one  of  the  most  intriguing  aspects  in  the 
investigations  on  ancient  pottery,  has  been  inferred  by  the  XRD,  ATR‐FTIR  and  TG/DTA  data  on 
shards excavated in archaeological salt‐making installations (Molino‐Sanchón and Santioste) located 
in  Villafáfila  wetland  (Zamora,  Spain).  From  such  data  it  can  be  concluded  that  oven  and  bowl 
plinths pastees were fired at temperatures above those used in the bowls for brine evaporation. The 
temperature at which these pottery pastes were fired varies between 600 and 800 ºC. 
 
 
Introduction 
Among the mineral substances extracted since the ancient times, salt was one of the most precious. 
It  was  used  for  preservation  of  meat  and  fish,  as  well  as  for  tanning,  cuppelation,  religious  and 
magical rituals, parturition, and funerary activity.  
The general term salina describes the site or the installation where salt‐making takes place through 
brine evaporation as a result of a natural or artificial processing (Petanidou, 1997). In salinas, brine 
evaporation  has  been  generally  assisted  by  solar  irradiance,  although  there  is  archaeological 
evidence  that  ebullition  has  been  also  in  use  since  Prehistoric  Times  until  Medieval  Times 
(Escacena‐Carrasco and Rodríguez de Zuloaga, 1994; Rodríguez‐Rodríguez, 2000; Valiente‐Cánovas 
et al., 2002, WARP Conference 2005; Coles, 1984).  
Villafáfila (41º49’N 005º37’W), in Castilla‐León, Spain, is an inland wetland of 2,854 ha, included in 
the Ramsar sites with international importance, where salt‐making installations in Molino Sanchón 
and  Santioste  sites  were  active  since  Copper  Age  and  Bronze  Age  (Delibes  de  Castro  et  al.,  2009). 
Pottery  artifacts  found  in  these  installations  (figure  1)  are  similar  those  reported  in  Mesopotamia, 
Bosnia, Romania, Poland and Turkey (figures 2‐5). 
Our approach is to analize the clayey materials that resulted of the archaeological research in order 
to see how the processes of salt extraction were carried out. 
 

1
Methods 
X‐ray  diffraction  data  (XRD),  infrared  analysis  (ATR‐FTIR  spectra)  and  thermal  analysis  (TG  and 
DTA  curves)  were  used  in  a  complementary  way  in  the  determination  of  the  chemical  and 
mineralogical composition of clayey samples from Molino‐Sanchón and Santioste sites and to gain 
some information on the firing temperatures, one of the most intriguing aspects in the investigation 
on ancient pottery.  
Diffraction  patterns.  The  XRD  patterns  (figure  6)  were  recorded  on  a  Philips  PW1710  BASED 
diffractometer with Cu anode equipped with PC‐APD software for data collection and calculation of 
average  crystallite  size.  Generator  conditions  were  40  kV  in  voltage  and  30  mA  in  current.  Metal 
oxide composition is reported in table 1. 
Infrared  analysis.  Each  simple  was  prepared  for  infrared  analysis  using  the  potassium  bromide 
pellet  method:  half  a  gram  of  ceramic  powder  was  scraped  off  each  shard  and  crushed.  The  fine 
divided ceramic (0,2‐0,5 mg) was mixed with 300 mg reagent grade KBr. The sample was dispersed 
throughout  the  KBr  by  grinding  manually  in  an  agate  mortar  for  about  10  min.  The  mixture  of 
sample  and  KBr  was  pressed  in  an  steel  die  at  a  pressure  of  about  10  tons  to  form  a  transparent 
pellet, having a 0.8 cm diameter and a thickness of about 1 mm. The pellet was transferred to the 
ATR‐FTIR  spectrometer  for  analysis.  ATR‐FTIR  spectra  were  performed  using  a  spectrometer 
BRUKER IFS 66, equipped with a DLaTGS detector. The spectra were obtained covering the 4000‐
400 cm‐1 range with a spectral resolution of 1 cm‐1 (figure 7). The spectra are reported in figure 6 and 
their characteristic frequencies are reported in table 2. 
Thermal analysis. The thermogravimetric analysis (TG) and differential thermal analysis (DTA) of 
the pottery materials under study were carried out using a Mettler Toledo TGA/SDTA 851e/ SF/1100 
apparatus, covering the 25 – 1000 ºC range.  TG curves are shown in figure 8. DTA curves including 
heating ‐cooling‐heating cycles are shown in figure 8. 
 
 
Results and discussion 
Mineralogical  composition  of  the  shards  according  XRD  and  chemical  analysis.  Both,  pottery 
shards  from  Molino‐Sanchón  and  furnace  walls  fragments  from  Santioste  are  fired  carbonate‐
bearing  clays  of  Vindoboniense  origin.  The  clayey  materials  are  composed  of  quart,  feldspar, 
plagioclases, illite and kaolinite with sparse pedogenic carbonates and organic material ash (figure 
6). Carbonates have been characterised as calcite (CaCO3), dolomite (MgCO3) and natron. Natron is 
a  sodium  carbonate  (Na2CO3)  which  is  formed  when  saline  continental  water  rich  in  bicarbonate 
anion is evaporated. In both sediments and waters from Villafáfila lagoons, natron is a secondary 
product since most of the sodium present is as halite (NaCl). Our analysis on the Barrillos Lagoon 
water (one of the places where the mud could be drawn) have given 2300 mg/L in Cl‐, 1500 mg/L in 
Na+, 400 mg/L in CO3H, 100 mg/L in Ca2+ and 50 mg in Mg2+.  
From  the  table  1,  concerning  to  metal  oxide  composition  of  pottery  fragments  by  XRD,  different 
types  of  pottery  fragments  can  be  recognized  in  basis  the  Ca  content:  those  Ca‐rich,  as  the  bowl 
samples; those Ca‐poor, as the bowl plinth shards; and those Ca‐intermediate, as the oven fragments; 
By  analyzing  Si,  Al  and  Fe  contents,  can  be  observed  that  SiO2+Al2O3+Fe2O3  values  vary  from  88 
%wt  for  plinth  shards  to  35%  for  bowl  samples,  being  intermediate  for  oven  fragments.  Thus, 
through  their  metal  oxide  composition,  three  types  of  pottery  fragments  can  be  distinguished 
without difficulty. 

2
The bowl samples are thick pastes that show irregular or reducing firing with inorganic and organic 
degreasers, sometimes including carbonized organic components. Their surfaces are grey, black or 
dark  brown.  The  main  constituents  of  both  the  bowl  and  their  residue  are  quartz  and  calcite,  as 
reported.  The  absence  of  any  firing  mineral  in  these  pastes  is  a  clear  indication  of  a  low  firing 
temperature (beyond 600 ºC). In other hand, their high content of P2O5 (1.74 % in bowl and 2.23 % in 
bowl residue) is an uncommon fact in primitive ceramics but has been found in some Roman and 
Egyptian  archaeological  sites.  Phosphorus  could  came  from  either  an  (Al,Fe)‐phosphate 
concentrated  in  the  organic  humus  of  soils  (Rodica‐Mariana  et  al.,  2009)  or  from  Ca‐phosphate 
(apatite  or  bone  powder)  incorporated  by  the  potter  as  food  cooking  residue  with  strengthening 
purposes. 
Concerning  to  the  bowl  plinths  or  holders,  their  inner  side  shows  a  red  colour  due  to  their 
composition  as  a  ferruginous  clay  (4.3  %  in  Fe2O3).  The  grey  colour  of  the  outer  skin  of  the  bowl 
plinth  can  be  explained  by  the  high  content  of  organic  matter  and  their  yellowish  tonality  by 
deferrugination. The outer side of plinth has illite, kaolinite and a relatively high content in natron 
(2.1% Na2O). 
In connection with the samples taken of the oven, we found compositions very close to those of the 
bowl  plinths:  quartz,  illite  and  some  amount  of  carbonates  and  kaolinite  for  the  inner  side  and 
quartz, kaolinite and illite for the outer side. 
The  presence  of  peaks  at  2θ  =  40.5º  and  50.5º  in  the  XRD  spectra  of  all  the  samples  suggest  the 
presence  of  KCl.  This  species  can  be  formed  in  detectable  amounts  from  straw  combustion  above 
400 ºC (Olander and Steenari, 1995).  
 
ATR‐FTIR  spectra.  It  is  not  difficult  to  draw  among  the  constituents  of  the  bowl  from  Molino 
Sanchón  site  the  presence  of  calcite,  indicated  by  the  peak  at  1420  cm‐1  (figure  7).  Concerning  the 
bowl residue, their spectrum shows together with the presence of carbonate (711 cm‐1) the presence 
of orthoclase (1010 cm‐1) and straw hemicelluloses (982 cm‐1) as minor constituents. The band at 1396 
cm‐1 could be assigned to goethite (whose presence suggest reducing conditions). 
The spectra of bowl plinth samples show the presence of quartz (775 cm‐1), aluminosilicates (972 
cm‐1) and calcium oxide (1461 cm‐1) but does not contain firing minerals. 
The two samples excavated from the Santioste oven contain carbonate (1425 cm‐1), illite (1640 cm‐1) 
and diopside (871 cm‐1). Diopside is a pyroxene formed as a result of thermally induced reactions, 
i.e., those are formed during firing at temperatures between 600 °C and 780 °C. 
 
Thermal analysis. Since 1993 (Misiego‐Tejeda et al.) is well known that successive  heating‐cooling 
cycles  on  a  ceramic  material  lead  to  a  thermal  hysteresis  that  results  in  loss  of  all  thermal  effects 
previous to the heating temperature reached. In the DTA curves from Molino Sanchón samples we 
observe absence of thermal effects before 700 °C (except for the endothermic at 92 °C corresponding 
to desorption of water) and the persistence, after a cycle heating‐cooling‐heating, of those who are 
above that temperature. This finding is suggestive that the materials studied can be defined more as 
earthenware or low temperature fired clays bodies as ceramics themselves.  
The  highest  percentages  of  weight  loss  during  the  first  heating  have  been  exhibited  by  the  bowl 
residue  and  then  by  the  bowl  itself  (figure  8).  The  bowl  residue  in  TG  showed  maximum  weight 
loss between 700 °C and 813 °C which was sensitized by an endotherm in DTA at 800 °C. The bowl 
experienced its maximum weight loss between 600 °C and 730 °C and was sensitized, in DTA, by an 
endotherm at 720 °C (figure 9).  

3
The clay bodies of the bowl plinth, both inside and offside, have proved to be very thermally stable. 
In  the  course  of  heating  to  1000  °C  did  not  lose  significant  weight  and  TG  records  have  proved 
virtually  flat.  Their  DTA  curves  showed  diffuse  thermal  effects  prior  at  600  °C  (attributed  to 
decomposition of the most common clay minerals) and well defined thermal effects at 875 °C and 
about 990 °C (figure 9).  
The sample for the inside of the oven suffered, in TG, significant weight loss between 686 °C and 
745 °C, which was accompanied in DTA by an endotherm at 723 °C. The sample of the outdoor of 
the oven gives, in the course of the heating DTA curve, a fine endothermic peak at 600 °C and by 
continuing the heating, another at 723 °C in correspondence with the weight loss recorded between 
673 °C and 732 °C. The thermal effect at 600 °C should be attributed to the softening or pre‐melting 
of kaolinite (figure 9).  
 
 
Conclusions 
The  studied  shards  of  this  report  are  pottery  and  that  pottery  is  in  the  form  of  low  fired 
earthenware. The true pottery is made by forming clay into a desired shape, allowing it to dry and 
heating it in a very hot oven, called a kiln, at a sufficient temperature, and for a sufficient period of 
time  until  the  clay  particles  fuse  together.  If  insufficient  firing  is  gained  the  clay  body  is  only  a 
fragile  pile  of  microscopic  rocks  held  together  (a  “greenware”)  and  little  feldspathic  glass  is 
produced (as supported by XRD and FTIR in our fragments). The thermal history of the shards of 
this study, evidenced through DTA curves, showed that they never were fired above 800 °C. Thus, 
although the availability of the alkaline metal ions (fluxes) from the feldspar present in the studied 
bodies encourages bonding of the outer layers of the refractory quartz particles to the surrounding 
feldspathic  glass  matrix,  a  coherent  skeletal  internal  structure  lacks.  This  low  feldespathic  glass 
content explains the poor properties observed in the clay bodies: mainly, low density, low strength 
and friability. On the possibility that sintering has taken place, we think that is possible because the 
kaolinite in a clay body that would ordinary melt at 1200 °C sinters at temperatures as low as 600 
°C.   Sintering  appears  to  happen  not  so  much  because  of  melting,  but  because  of  diffusion  of  the 
rapidly moving atoms between the neighbouring refractory particles. Villafáfila potters could made 
use of this characteristic in a low temperature firing which is now called a “biscuit bake”.   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

4
References 
 
Petanidou,  T.  (1997)  Salt  –  Salt  in  European  History  and  Civilization,  Hellenic  Saltworks  S.A., 
Athens. 
Escacena‐Carrasco, J.L. and Rodriguez de Zuloaga, M. (1994) La Marismilla – Una salina neolítica 
en el Bajo Guadalquivir, Revista de arqueología, 9(89), 14‐24. 
Rodríguez‐Rodríguez, E. (2000) Historia de las explotaciones salinas en las Lagunas de Villafáfila. 
Cuadernos de Investigación Florián de Ocampo, Diputación de Zamora, Zamora. 
Valiente‐Cánovas, S., Ayarzagüena‐Sanz, M., Moncó‐García, C. and Carvajal D. (2002) Excavación 
arqueológica en las Salinas de Espartinas (Ciempozuelos) y prospecciones en su entorno, Archaia, 2, 
33–45. 
VV.  AA.  Archaeology  from  the  Wetlands:  Recent  Perspectives:  Proceedings  of  the  11th  WARP 
Conference, Edinburgh 2005. Society of Antiquaries of Scotland (6 May 2007). ISBN‐10: 0903903407. 
Coles, J. (1984) The archaeology of wetlands. Edinburgh : Edinburgh University Press, 1984, 111 p. 
ISBN 0852244894. 
Delibes  de  Castro,  G.  (2009).  La  explotación  de  la  sal  en  la  edad  del  Bronce:  el  testimonio  de  las 
salinas de Villafáfila (Zamora). Conferencia en el MARQ (9th Dec 2009). Alicante 
Moga,  I.  (2009).  Salt  Extraction  and  Imagery  in  the  Ancient  Near  East.  Journal  for  Interdisciplinary 
Research on Religion and Science, No. 4, January 2009 
Erdoğu,  B.,  Özbaşaran,  M.,  Erdoğu,  R.  and  Chapman,  J.  (2003).  Prehistoric  Salt  Exploitation  in  Tuz 
Gölü, Central Anatolia: Preliminary Investigations, Anatolia Antiqua. 
Buccellati, G. (1991), Salt at the Dawn of History: The Case of the Bevelledrim Bowls), in E. van Donzel et 
al.  (eds.),  Resurrecting  the  Past.  A  Joint  Tribute  to  Adnan  Bounni,  Nederlan 
Historisch‐Archaeologisch Instituut te Istanbul, İstanbul, 1991. 
Olander,  B.  and  Steenari,  B.‐M.  (1995).  Characterization  of  ashes  from  Wood  and  Straw.  Biomass 
and Bioenergy,8(2), 105‐115 
Misiego‐Tejeda, J.C, Marcos‐Contreras, G.J., Sarabia‐Herrero, F.J., Martín‐Gil, J. and Martín‐Gil, 
F.J.  (1993).  Un  horno  doméstico  de  la  Primera  Edad  del  Hierro  de  “El  Soto  de  Medinilla”  y  su 
análisis por ATD. Bol Semin Estud Arte Arqueol (BSAA), 59, 89‐111. ISSN: 02109573 
Ion, R.M., Ion M.L., Fierascu R.C., Servan, S., Dumitriu, I., Radovici, C,, Bauman, I., Cosulet, S. 
and Niculescu. V.I.R. (2009). Thermal analysis of Romanian ancient ceramics. J Therm Anal Calorim. 
DOI 10.1007/s10973‐009‐0226‐x 
 

5
 
 
 

 
Figure 1. Pottery shards involved in the salt exploitation in Santioste (Zamora, Spain) 

 
 
Figure 2. Bevelled‐rim bowls from Qraya, Mesopotamia (apud Buccellati, 1991) 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
6
 
 
 

 
 
 
Figure 3. Pottery ladles and reconstruction of a hypothetical salt‐making installation  
(apud Buccellati,1991). 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
7
 
 

 
 
Figure 4. Salt‐pots from Bosnia, Romania, Poland and Turkey (apud Erdoğu, 2003). 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
8
 
 
 

 
 
 
Figure 5. Plinths (or holders) of clay that were used to hold ceramic vessels in ovens  
(apud Valiente‐Canovas, 2002) 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

9
 

 
Molino Sanchón ‐ Bowl residue Molino Sanchón ‐ Bowl 
 

Bowl plinth (inside)  Bowl plinth (outside) 
 

Santioste – Oven (inside)  Santioste ‐ Oven (outside) 
 
Figure 6. XRD patterns of pottery shards and oven wall fragments from sites of Prehistoric salt exploitation 
in Villafáfila, Zamora, Spain 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

10
 

3368.77

1396.44

1008.58

711.46
870.62

3380.19

1419.71

981.66
0.4

0.4
0.3

0.3
ATR Units

ATR Units
0.2

0.2
0.1

0.1
0.0

0.0
3500 3000 2500 2000 1500 1000
3500 3000 2500 2000 1500 1000
W avenumber cm- 1
Wavenumber cm-1
 
Molino Sanchón ‐ Bowl residue  Molino Sanchón ‐ Bowl 
 
3385.27

977.23

775.35

3389.58

1461.41

967.80

775.20
0.30
0.25

0.25
0.20

0.20
0.15
ATR Units

ATR Units
0.15
0.10

0.10
0.05

0.05
0.00

0.00

3500 3000 2500 2000 1500 1000 3500 3000 2500 2000 1500 1000
W avenumber cm- 1 Wavenumber cm- 1

Bowl plinth (inside)  Bowl plinth (outside) 
 
3380.06

1637.94

1428.93
3386.44

1639.84

1420.51

977.30

976.64

870.86
870.83

0.8
1.0

0.7
0.8

0.6
0.5
0.6

ATR Units
ATR Units

0.4
0.4

0.3
0.2
0.2

0.1
0.0
0.0

350 0 3000 2500 200 0 150 0 1000 3500 3000 2500 2000 1500 1000
W aven umber cm- 1 W avenumber cm- 1

Santioste – Oven (inside)  Santioste ‐ Oven (outside) 
 
 
 
Figure  7.  ATR‐FTIR  spectra  of  pottery  shards  and  oven  wall  fragments  from  sites  of  Prehistoric  salt 
exploitation in Villafáfila, Zamora, Spain 
 
 

 
11
 
 
 

 
 
Figure 8. TG curves of pottery shards and oven wall fragments from sites of Prehistoric salt exploitation in 
Villafáfila, Zamora, Spain. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

12
Molino Sanchón - Bowl residue

Molino Sanchón - Bowl

Bowl plinth (inside)

Bowl plinth (outside)

Santioste oven (inside)

Santioste oven (outside)


 
Figure 9. DTA curves of pottery shards and oven wall fragments from sites of Prehistoric salt exploitation 
in Villafáfila, Zamora, Spain 
13
 
 
 
Table 1. Chemical composition (% in weight) for pottery shards from Molino Sanchón and for an ancient 
fournace in Santioste. 
 
  Fe2O3  MnO  TiO2  CaO  K2O  SiO2  Al2O3  P2O5  MgO  Na2O 

Bowl residue  1.6  0.14  0.24  33.9  1.4  28.4  5.8  2.23  2.3  0.2 

Bowl  1.8  0.12  0.24  29.8  1.5  28.2  6.4  1.74  2.0  0.1 

Bowl plinth (inside)  4.2  0.06  0.78  2.8  3.4  69.4  14.6  0.08  1.5  0.9 

Bowl plinth (outside)  3.3  0.04  0.70  3.3  2.6  73.1  12.1  0.07  1.3  2.1 

Oven (inside)  3.5  0.06  0.60  8.5  2.9  58.5  12.1  0.29  2.0  0.9 

Oven (outside)  3.4  0.05  0.65  4.0  2.7  70.3  12.1  0.10  1.6  1.5 

  
 
 

 
 
Table 2. Predominant ATR‐FTIR peaks (in cm‐1) for pottery shards from Molino Sanchón and 
for an ancient fournace in Santioste. 
 
Bowl residue  711    871    1009  1396      3369 

Bowl        982    1420      3380 

Plinth, inside (red)    775    977          3385 

Plinth, outside (grey)    775    968      1461    3389 

Oven, inside      871  977    1420    1640  3386 

Oven, outside      871  977    1429    1638  3380 

 
 
Peak assignments: 
 
  711 cm‐1    Characteristic for calcite, dolomite and natron 
  775 cm‐1    Characteristic for quartz and orthoclase 
  871 cm‐1    Characteristic for diopside  
  977 cm‐1    Assigned to Si‐O‐Al mixtes vibration modes from aluminosilicate moities 
  982 cm‐1    Characteristic for gehlenite. Characteristic of arabinosyl units from straw 
1009 cm ‐1    Si‐O‐Si vibration. Characteristic for orthoclase (alkaline feldspar) 
1396 cm ‐1    Characteristic for natrón and goethite (b‐FeOOH) 
1420 cm‐1    Characteristic for CO3 vibrations from calcite/dolomite 
1461 cm ‐1    Characteristic for CaO in the structure 
1640 cm ‐1    Characteristic for illite 
3369 cm‐1    Characteristic for gibsite (hidrargilite), Al(OH)3 
3380 cm  
‐1 Molecular water and Al‐OH stretching vibration from Al2O3.xH2O amorphous forms  
 

14