Está en la página 1de 375

CATIA

PART DESIGN
Getting Started
Before getting into the detailed instructions for using CATIA Version 5 Part Design,
the following tutorial aims at giving you a feel as to what you can do with the product. It
provides a step-by-step scenario showing you how to use key functionalities.
The main tasks described in this section are:

All together, the tasks should take about ten minutes to


complete.

The final part will look like this:

Now, let's get to sketching the profile!


Entering the Part Design Workbench
This first task shows you how to enter the Part Design workbench.

1. Select the File -> New commands (or click the New icon).
The New dialog box is displayed, allowing you to choose the type of document you need.

2. Select Part in the List of Types field and click OK.


The Part Design workbench is loaded and an empty CATPart document opens.

The commands for creating and editing features are available in the workbench toolbar. Now, let's perform the
following task Sketching a Profileto see the Sketcher workbench.
Sketching a Profile
In this task you will learn how to:
enter the Sketcher workbench
create the profile which you will later extrude to create a pad

1. Click the Sketcher icon to start the Sketcher workbench.

2. Select xy plane to define the sketch plane.

Now, the Sketcher workbench is displayed. It contains the tools you need to sketch any profile.

The Select command is the default Sketcher mode.


The grid you can see has been designed to make your sketch easier to do. You can redefine the grid of your
choice or simply hide it using the Tools -> Options... Sketcher tab command.

Before starting, we recommend to zoom out . Now, start to sketch your profile.

3. Click the Profile icon . Activating this command displays three options in the Tools toolbar. The Line

command is activated by default.


4. First, create a line: click a point, drag the cursor and click a second point to end your first line.
CATIA uses a green symbol to call your attention on the line property. This line is horizontal.

5. Click at the points as shown to sketch two additional lines:


CATIA uses another green symbol to mention that the second line you created is vertical.

6. To end the profile, click at the starting point.


The profile now looks like this:
7. To complete the profile shape, create two arcs tangent to two lines: click the Corner icon . Activating

this command displays the Corner toolbar which contains three options. The Corner trim all command
is activated by default.
8. Select both lines as indicated.
The lines are then joined by a rounded corner which moves as you move the cursor.
9. Click in the area as shown to define the first corner:

Your first corner is created. Do not be concerned about the radius value. You will modify it later.
10. Now, click anywhere outside the sketch to unselect the corner and repeat the operation to create a
second corner at the bottom of the profile.
You should obtain this:

The alternative method for creating a corner consists in selecting the intersection point between the two lines
instead of selecting both lines.

11. Now, set a dimension between two lines. First, multiselect the lines as indicated.
12. Click the Constraint icon .
This command sets a length constraint. The distance between the lines you have selected is 200 mm.
13. Click anywhere to locate the dimension.

14. Now, double-click the radius value of the first corner.


The Constraint Edition dialog box is displayed.

15. Enter 45mm in the Value field to edit the corner radius.
16. Click OK to confirm the operation.

17. Repeat the operation to edit the second corner. Enter 53mm.

Eventually, your profile looks like this:


When performing this task, you may have noticed that CATIA never required you to update your
operations. Actually, whatever operations you are accomplishing in the Sketcher, the application
automatically updates the geometry.

Now, you are going to quit the Sketcher workbench to continue the rest of the scenario.
Creating a Pad
Now that you have sketched your profile, you can create a pad. This task will
show you how to:
return to the 3D world
create a pad, that is extrude the profile.
If you have not performed the previous task, open the GS_sketch1.CATPart
document from the GSsamples/part_design directory.

1.Click the Exit Sketcher icon .


Now, the Part Design workbench is displayed and your profile looks like this:

2. Click the Pad icon .


The Pad Definition dialog box appears. Default options allow you to create
a basic pad.
3. As you prefer to create a larger pad, enter 60 mm in the Length field.
The application previews the pad to be created.
4. Click OK.
The pad is created. The extrusion is performed in a direction which is
normal to the sketch plane. CATIA displays this creation in the
specification tree:
Drafting a Face
This task will show you how to draft a face.

1. Click the Draft icon .


The Draft Definition dialog box appears.
2. Check the Selection by neutral face option to determine the selection mode.

3. Select the upper face as the neutral element.


This selection allows CATIA detect the faces to be drafted. The neutral face appears in blue and
the faces to be drafted in dark red.

4. Enter 9 degrees in the Angle field.

5. Click OK. The part is drafted:


Filleting an Edge
In this task you will learn how to use one of the fillet commands designed to fillet
edges.

1. Click the Edge Fillet icon .


The Edge Fillet Definition dialog box appears. It contains default values.

2. Select the edge to be filleted, that is, to be rounded.


A default filleted edge is previewed.

3. Enter 7 mm as the new radius value and click OK.


Here is your part:
Editing the Pad
Actually, you would like the pad to be thicker. This task shows you how to edit
the pad, then how to color the part.

1. Double-click the pad.


You can do it in the specification tree if you wish.

2. In the Pad Definition dialog box that appears, enter 90 mm as the new
length value.
3. Click OK.
The part is modified.

4. Now select the Edit -> Properties command and click the Graphic tab to
change the color of your part.

5. Click the color of your choice and click OK.


Mirroring the Part
Now, you are going to duplicate the part using symmetry. This task will show you
how easy it is.

1. Click the Mirror icon .


The Mirror Definition dialog box is
displayed.
2. Select the reference face you need
to duplicate the part.
The name of this face appears in the
Mirroring element field.

3. Click OK.

The part is mirrored and the specification tree indicates this operation.

The next task proposes you to use the new large face you have just created on
top of the part.
Sketching a Circle from a Face
In this task, you will learn how to:
open a sketch on an existing face
create a circle in order to create a pocket

1. Select this face to define the working


plane.

2. Click the Sketcher icon to enter the


Sketcher workbench.

3. Once in the Sketcher workbench, click

this Circle icon to create a basic circle.

4. Click the circle center in the middle of the


face and drag the cursor to sketch the circle.

5. Click once you are satisfied with the size


of the circle.

6. Then, click the exit Sketcher icon to return to the 3D world.


This is your part:
Creating a Pocket
In this task, you will learn a method to create a pocket using the profile you have
just created.

1. Select the circle you have just sketched, if it is


not already selected.

2. Click the Pocket icon .


The Pocket Definition dialog box is displayed and
CATIA previews a pocket with default parameters.

3. Set the Up to last option to define the limit of


your pocket.
This means that the application will limit the pocket
onto the last possible face, that is the pad bottom.
4. Click OK.
This is your pocket:
Shelling the Part
To end the scenario, you will learn how to shell the part.

1. Select the bottom face of the part.

2. Click the Shell icon .


The Shell Definition dialog box is
displayed.

3. Select the face to be removed.

4. Click OK to shell the part using the default inner thickness value.
You have defined a positive value, which means that the application is
going to enter a thin part thickness.
Opening a New CATPart Document
This task shows you how to open a new CATPart document.

1. Select the File -> New commands (or click the New icon).
The New dialog box is displayed, allowing you to choose the type of document you need.

2. Select Part in the List of Types field and click OK.


The Part Design workbench is loaded and a CATPart document opens.

The Part Design workbench document is divided into:


two windows: the specification tree and the geometry area
specific toolbars : refer to Part Design Workbench
a number of contextual commands available in the specification tree and in the geometry. Remember that these
commands can also be accessed from the menu bar.
Creating Sketch-Based Features
Features are entities you combine to make up your part. The features presented here are obtained by applying
commands on initial profiles created in the Sketcher workbench (See Sketching Profiles ).
Some operations consist in adding material, others in removing material. In this section, you will learn how to create the
following features:

Pad Up to Next Pad Up to Last Pad Up to Plane Pad

Pad not Normal to Sketch Pocket not Normal to Sketch


Up to Surface Pad Pocket
Plane Plane

Hole not Normal to Sketch


Hole Locating Holes Shaft
Plane

Groove Stiffener Rib Slot

Loft Removed Loft


Pad
Creating a pad means extruding a profile in one or two directions. CATIA lets you choose the limits of creation as well as
the direction of extrusion.

Basic Pads
This task shows you how to create a basic pad using a closed profile, the Dimension and Mirrored extent options.

Open the Pad1.CATPart document from the \online\samples\part_design directory.

1. Select the profile to be extruded.

By default, CATIA will extrude normal to the plane used to create the profile. To see how to change the extrusion
direction, refer to Pad not Normal to Sketch Plane .

2. Click the Pad icon .


The Pad Definition dialog box appears and CATIA previews the pad to be created.

You will notice that by default, CATIA specifies the length of your pad. To see other creation options, see Up to Next
Pad, Up to Last Pad, Up to Plane Pad, Up to Surface Pad.
3. Enter 69 in the Length field or select LIM1 and drag it upwards to 69
to increase the length value.

4. Click the Mirrored extent option to extrude the profile in the


opposite direction too.

4. Click OK.
The pad is created. The specification tree indicates that it has been
created.

A Few Notes About Pads


CATIA allows you to create pads from open profiles provided existing geometry can trim the pads. The pad below
has been created from an open profile which both endpoints were stretched onto the inner vertical faces of the
hexagon. The option used for Limit 1 is "Up to next". The inner bottom face of the hexagon then stops the
extrusion. Conversely, the Up to next option could not be used for Limit2.

Initial open profile Preview Result

Note that reversing the arrow of Limit 2 creates material in the opposite side:
Pads can also be created from sketches including several profiles. These profiles must not intersect.
In the following example, the sketch to be extruded is defined by a square and a circle. Applying the Pad
command on this sketch lets you obtain a cavity:
`Up to Next' Pads
This task shows you how to create a pad using the `Up to Next' option. This
creation mode lets the application detect the existing material to be used for
limiting the pad length.
Open the Pad2.CATPart document from the \online\samples\part_design
directory.
1. Select the profile to be
extruded, that is the
circle.

2. Click the Pad icon .


The Pad Definition dialog
box appears and CATIA
previews a pad with a
default dimension value.
3. Click the arrow in the
geometry area to reverse
the extrusion direction (or
click the Reverse Direction
button).

4. In the Type field, set


the Type option to `Up to
next'.
This option
assumes an
existing face can
be used to limit the
pad. CATIA
previews the pad to
be created. The
already existing
body is going to
limit the extrusion.
5. Click OK.
The pad is created. The
specification tree
indicates this creation.
'Up to Last' Pads
This task shows how to create pads using the `Up to last' option.

Open the Pad3.CATPart document from the \online\samples\part_design


directory.

1. Select the profile to be extruded, that is the circle.

2. Click the Pad icon .


The Pad Definition dialog box appears and CATIA previews a pad with 10
mm as the default dimension value.
3. Click the arrow in the geometry area to reverse the extrusion direction
(or click the Reverse Direction button).

4. In the Type field, set the Type option to `Up to last'.


CATIA previews the pad to be created.The last face encountered by the
extrusion is going to limit the pad.
5. Click OK.
The pad is created. The specification tree indicates this creation.
'Up to Plane' Pads
This task shows how to create pads using the Up to plane option.

Open the Pad4.CATPart document from the \online\samples\part_design


directory.
1. Select the profile to be extruded.

2. Click the Pad icon .


The Pad Definition dialog box appears
and CATIA previews a pad with 10
mm as the default dimension value.
3. Click the arrow in the geometry
area to reverse the extrusion direction
(or click Reverse Direction).

4. In the Type field, set the Type


option to `Up to plane'.

5. Select Plane.4.
CATIA previews the pad to be
created. The plane is going to
limit the extrusion.

6. Click OK.
The pad is created. The specification
tree indicates this creation.
`Up to Surface' Pads
This task shows how to create pads using the Up to Surface option.
Open the Pad5.CATPart document from the \online\samples\part_design
directory.
1. Select the profile to be extruded.

2. Click the Pad icon .


The Pad Definition dialog box appears
and CATIA previews a pad with a
default dimension value.

3. In the Type field, set the Type


option to Up to surface.

4. Select the face as shown.


CATIA previews the pad to be
created. The plane is going to limit the
extrusion.
5. Click OK.
The pad is created. The specification
tree indicates this creation.
Pad not Normal to Sketch Plane
This task shows how to create a pad using a direction that is not normal to the
plane used to create the profile.

Open the Pad6.CATPart document from the \online\samples\part_design


directory.
1. Select the profile you
wish to extrude.

2. Click the Pad icon .


The Pad Definition dialog box appears and CATIA previews the pad
to be created.

3. Set the Up to plane option and select plane yz. For more about this
type of creation, refer to Up to Plane Pads.

4. Click the More button to display the whole dialog box.

5. Uncheck the Normal to sketch option and select the linee as shown
to use it as a reference.
CATIA previews the
pad with the new
creation direction.

6. Click OK to confirm the creation.


The pad is created. The specification tree indicates this creation.
Pocket
Creating a pocket consists in extruding a profile and removing the material resulting
from the extrusion. CATIA lets you choose the limits of creation as well as the direction
of extrusion. The limits you can use are the same as those available for creating pads.
To know how to use them, seeUp to Next Pockets , Up to Last Pads , Up to Plane
Pads , Up to Surface Pads .

Basic Pockets
This task shows you how to create a pocket, that is a cavity, in an already
existing part.
Open the Pocket1.CATPart document from the \online\samples\part_design
directory.
1. Select the profile.

2. Click the Pocket icon .


The Pocket Definition dialog box is displayed and CATIA previews a
pocket.
You can define a specific depth for your
pocket or set one of these options:
up to next
up to last
up to plane
up to surface

3. To define a specific depth,


set the Type parameter to
Dimension, and enter 30mm.
Alternatively, select LIM1 and
drag it downwards to 30.
The direction of creation is by
default normal to the plane
used to sketch the profile. To
know how to specify another
direction, refer to Pocket not
Normal to Sketch Plane .
4. Click OK.
The specification tree indicates
this creation. This is your
pocket:

A Few Notes About Pockets


CATIA allows you to create pockets from open profiles provided existing
geometry can trim the pockets. The example below illustrates this concept.

If your pocket is the first feature of a new body, CATIA creates material:
Pockets can also be created from sketches including several profiles. These
profiles must not intersect.

In the following example, the initial sketch is made of eight profiles. Aplying
the Pocket command on this sketch lets you create eight pockets:

The "Up to next" creation mode behaves differently depending on the release of
the product you are using. Using CATIA Version 5 Release 2, the "up to next"
limit is the very first face the application detects while extruding the profile. This
is an example of what you can get:
Preview Result
Using CATIA Version 5 Release 3, the "up to next" limit is the first face the
application detects while extruding the profile. This face must stops the
whole extrusion, not only a portion of it, and the hole goes thru material, as
shown in the figure below:

Preview Result
Pocket not Normal to Sketch Plane
This task shows how to create a pocket using a direction that is not normal to the plane used to
create the profile.

Open the Pocket2.CATPart document from the \online\samples\part_design directory.

1. Select the profile.

2. Click the Pocket icon .


The Pocket Definition dialog box appears and CATIA
previews a pocket normal to the sketch plane:

3. Set the First Limit type


to Up to next.

4. Click the More button to display the whole dialog box.

5. Uncheck the Normal to sketch option.


6. Select the bottom edge as indicated to define a new creation direction.
7. Click OK to create the pocket.
The specification tree indicates it has been
created.
Hole
Creating a hole consists in removing material from a body. Various shapes of standard holes can be
created. These holes are:

Simple Tapered Counterbored Countersunk Counterdrilled

If you choose to create a...

Counterbored hole: the counterbore diameter must be greater than the hole diameter and the
hole depth must be greater than the counterbore depth.
Countersunk hole: the countersink diameter must be greater than the hole diameter and the
countersink angle must be greater than 0 and less than 180 degrees.
Counterdrilled hole: the counterdrill diameter must be greater than the hole diameter, the hole
depth must be greater than the counter drill depth and the counterdrill angle must be greater than 0
and less than 180 degrees.

Whatever hole you choose, you need to specify the limit you want. There is a variety of limits:

Blind Up to Next Up to Last Up to Plane Up to Surface

The "Up to next" creation mode behaves differently depending on the release of the product you are
using. In CATIA Version 5 Release 2, the "up to next" limit is the very first face the application
detects while extruding the profile.
Preview Result

In CATIA Version 5 Release 3, the "up to next" limit is the first face the application detects while
extruding the profile, but this face must stops the whole extrusion, not only a portion of it, and the
hole goes thru material.

Preview Result

You can also choose the shape of the end hole (flat or pointed end hole) and specify a threading.
Creating a Hole
This task illustrates how to create a counterbored hole while constraining its location.

Open the Hole1.CATPart document from the \online\samples\part_design directory.

1. Click the Hole icon .


2. Select the circular edge and upper face as shown.
CATIA can now define one distance constraint to
position the hole to be created. The hole will be
concentric to the circular edge.

The Hole Definition dialog box appears and CATIA


previews the hole to be created. The Sketcher grid is
displayed to help you create the hole. By default,
CATIA previews a simple hole whose diameter is
10mm and depth 10mm.

Contextual creation commands are available on the


BOTTOM text.

4. Now, define the hole you wish to create. Enter 24mm as the diameter value and 25mm as the
depth value.

6. Set the Bottom option to V-Bottom to create a pointed hole and enter 110 in the Angle field.
You could also define a creation direction normal to the surface of your choice and a threading.
7. Now, click the Type tab to access the type of hole you wish to create. You are going to create a
counterbored hole.

You will notice that the glyph assists you in defining the desired hole.
8. Enter 30mm in the Diameter field and 8mm as the depth value .
The preview lets you see the new diameter.

14. Click OK.


The hole is created. The specification tree indicates
this creation.
You will notice that the sketch used to create the hole
also appears under the hole's name. This sketch
consists of the point at the center of the hole.
Locating a Hole
This task shows how to constrain the location of the hole to be created without
using the Sketcher workbench `s tools.

1. Multiselect two edges and the face on which you wish to position the
hole.

2. Click the Hole icon and specify the required data in the dialog box to
create the desired hole (see Creating a Hole).

CATIA previews the constraints you are creating.

3. Click OK to create the hole.


CATIA positions the hole using default constraints.

4. To access the constraints, edit the hole and double-click the constraint of
interest or double-click the sketch in the specification tree to enter the
Sketcher workbench.
You can edit the constraints if you wish to reposition the hole.
Remember That...

The area you click determines the location of the hole, but you can drag
the hole onto desired location during creation using the left mouse button.
If the grid display option is activated, you can use its properties.

Selecting a circular face makes the hole concentric with this face.
However, CATIA creates no concentricity constraint.

Multiselecting a circular edge and a face makes the hole concentric to the
circular edge. In this case, CATIA creates a concentricity constraint.
CATIA always limits the top of the hole using the Up to next option. In
other words, the next face encountered by the hole limits the hole.

In the following example, the hole encounters a fillet placed above the
face initially selected. The application redefines the hole's top onto the
fillet.
Hole not Normal to Sketch Plane
This tasks shows you how to create a hole whose direction is not normal to the sketch plane.

Open the Hole2.CATPart document from the \online\samples\part_design directory.

1. Select the face on which you wish to position the hole.

2. Click the Hole icon .

3. Create a blind hole entering the values as follows : 18 to define the


diameter and 15 for the depth.

4. Examine the preview.


By default, CATIA creates the hole normal to the sketch face.
5. Now, uncheck the Normal to surface option and select the edge as shown to specify the new
creation direction.
To use a new direction, you could also select a line.

6. Now, select Bottom and right-click to display a contextual menu.


7. Select V-Bottom from the menu. Note that this option is available in the dialog box too.

8. Enter 90deg in the Angle field to define the angle of the V shape.
9. Click OK to confirm the creation.
The hole is created. The specification tree indicates it has been created.
Shaft
This task illustrates how to create a shaft, that is a revolved feature.

The sketch must include a profile and an axis about which the feature will revolve.
Open the Shaft.CATPart document from the \online\samples\part_design directory.

1. Select the closed profile.

2. Click the Shaft icon .


The Shaft Definition dialog box is displayed and CATIA previews a round
feature. The First Angle value is by default 360 degrees.

3.CATIA previews the limits


LIM1 and LIM2 of the shaft to
be created. Select LIM1 and
drag it onto 250.
3. Now enter 40 degrees in
the Second angle field.

4. Click OK.
The shaft is created. The
specification tree mentions it
has been created.

Open profile Result


Groove
Grooves are revolved features that retrieves material from existing features. This task
shows you how to create a groove, that is how to revolve a profile about an axis (or
construction line).
Open the Groove.CATPart document from the \online\samples\part_design directory.

1. Click the Groove icon .

2. Select the sketch.


The profile and the axis must
belong to the same sketch.

The Groove Definition dialog box is displayed and CATIA previews a


groove entirely revolving about the axis.

3.CATIA previews the limits LIM1 and LIM2 of the groove to be created.
You can select these limits and drag them onto the desired value or enter
angle values in the appropriate fields. For our scenario, select LIM1 and
drag it onto 100, then enter 60 in the Second angle field.
4. Examine the
preview. Just a portion
of material is going to
be removed now.

5. Click OK to confirm the


operation.
CATIA removes material
around the cylinder. The
specification tree indicates
the groove has been created.
This is your groove:
Stiffener
This task shows you how to create a stiffener by specifying creation directions.

Open the Stiffener.CATPart document from the \online\samples\part_design


directory.

1. Select the profile to be


extruded.
This open profile has been
created in a plane normal
to the face on which the
stiffener will lie.

If you need to use an open profile, make sure that existing material can fully limit
the extrusion of this profile

2. Click the Stiffener icon .


The Stiffener Definition dialog box is displayed, providing a default
thickness value.
CATIA previews a stiffener which thickness is equal to 10mm.
The extrusion will be made in three directions, two of which are
opposite directions. Arrows point in these directions.

3. Uncheck the Symmetrical extent option.


The extrusion will be made in two directions only.
To obtain the directions you need, you can also click the arrows. Note
that you can access contextual commands on these arrows. These
commands are the same as those available in the dialog box.

4. Check the
Symmetrical extent
option again.

5.Just to examine the Depth option, click the Reverse direction option
in the dialog box, or click the arrow in the geometry area.
The result differs very much from the previous stiffener. Just a small
portion of material will be created:
6. As you prefer to create material forming a transition between the basis of
the part and the triangle, reverse the direction again, and click OK.
The stiffener is created. The specification tree indicates it has been
created.
Rib
This task shows you how to create a rib, that is a profile you sweep along a center curve to create
material.

Open the Rib.CATPart document from the \online\samples\part_design directory.

1. Click the Rib Icon .


The Rib Definition dialog box is displayed.

2. Select the profile you wish to sweep. Your profile has been designed in a plane normal to the plane
used to define the center curve. It is a closed profile.
The Merge ends option is to be used in specific cases. It create materials between the ends of the rib
and existing material.

4. Click OK.
The rib is created. The specification tree mentions this
creation.

A Few Words about the Keep Angle Option


The position of the profile in relation to the center curve determines the shape of the resulting rib. When
sweeping the profile, the application keeps the initial position of the profile in relation to the nearest point of
the center curve. The application computes the rib from the position of the profile.
In the example below, the application computes the intersection point between the plane of the profile and
the center curve, then sweeps the profile from this position.
Slot
This task shows you how to create a slot, that is a profile you sweep along a
center curve to remove material .

Open the Slot.CATPart document from the \online\samples\part_design


directory.

1. Click the Slot icon .


The Slot Definition dialog box is displayed.

2. Select the profile.


The profile has been designed in a plane
normal to the plane used to define the
center curve. It is closed.
You can control its position by choosing
one of the following options:
Keep angle: keeps the angle value
between the sketch plane used for
the profile and the tangent of the
center curve.
Pulling direction: sweeps the profile
with respect to a specified direction.
Reference surface
3. To go on with our scenario, let's maintain
the Keep angle option. To know more this
option, please refer to A Few Notes about
the Keep Angle Option.

Now, select the center curve along which


CATIA will sweep the profile.
The center curve is open. To create a rib
you can use open profiles and closed
center curves too. Center curves can be
discontinuous in tangency.

The application previews the slot.


The Merge ends option is to be used in specific cases. It lets the application
create material between the ends of the slot and existing material.
4. Click OK.
The slot is created. The specification tree
indicates this creation.
Loft
This task shows how to create a loft feature.
You can generate a loft feature by sweeping one or more planar section curves
along a computed or user-defined spine. The feature can be made to respect one
or more guide curves. The resulting feature is a closed volume.
Open the Loft.CATPart document from the samples/part_design directory.

1. Click the Loft icon .


The Loft Definition dialog box appears.
2. Select the three section
curves as shown:

They are
highlighted in
the geometry
area.

3. Select the four guide curves.


They are highlighted in the geometry area.

4. It is possible to edit the loft reference elements by first selecting a


curve in the dialog box list then choosing a button to either:
Remove the selected curve
Replace the selected curve by another curve.
Add another curve.
By default, the application computes a spine, but if you wish to impose a curve as
the spine to be used, you just need to click the Spine tab then the Spine field and
select the spine of your choice in the geometry.
5. Click OK to create
the volume.
The feature
(identified as
Loft.xxx) is added to
the specification tree.
Remove Lofted Material
This task shows how to remove lofted material.
The Remove Loft capability generates lofted material surface by sweeping one or
more planar section curves along a computed or user-defined spine then
removes this material. The material can be made to respect one or more guide
curves.
Open the Remove_Loft.CATPart document from the samples/part_design
directory.

1. Click the Remove Loft icon .


The Remove Loft Definition dialog box appears.
2. Select both section curves as shown Sketch.3 and Sketch.4):

They are highlighted in the geometry area.


3. Select the point as shown on section 2 to define the closing point.

4. Select the four guide curves.


They are highlighted in the geometry area.
5. It is possible to edit the loft reference elements by first selecting a
curve in the dialog box list then choosing a button to either:
Remove the selected curve
Replace the selected curve by another curve.
Add another curve.

By default, the application computes a spine, but if you wish to impose a curve as
the spine to be used, you just need to click the Spine tab then the Spine field and
select the spine of your choice in the geometry.
6. Click OK to create the lofted surface.
The feature (identified as RemovedLoft.xxx) is added to the
specification tree.
Creating Dress-Up Features
Dressing up features is done by applying commands to one or more supports. CATIA provides a large
number of possibilities to achieve the features meeting your needs. The application lets you create the
following dress-up features:

Variable Radius
Edge Fillet Round Corner Fillet Face-Face Fillet Tritangent Fillet
Fillet

Draft with parting


Chamfer Basic Draft Shell Thickness
element
Edge Fillet
A fillet is a curved face of a constant or variable radius that is tangent to, and
that joins, two surfaces. Together, these three surfaces form either an inside
corner or an outside corner.
In drafting terminology, the curved surface of an outside corner is generally
called a round and that of an inside corner is normally referred to as a fillet.
Edge fillets are smooth transitional surfaces between two adjacent faces.
The purpose of this task is to create a fillet by selecting a face and four edges.
The case illustrated here is a simple one using a constant radius: the same
radius value is applied to the entire edge.
Open the Edge_Fillet.CATPart document from the \online\samples\part_design
directory.

1. Click the Edge Fillet icon .


The Edge Fillet Definition dialog
box appears.

2. Select the upper face as well as


the four vertical edges.

3.The face and the edges


selected then appear in the
Objects to fillet field. CATIA
previews the fillets to be
created. The radius value is
displayed too.
3. Click OK to confirm the
operation.
The edges are filleted. The
creation of this fillet is indicated in
the specification tree.
Round Corner Fillet
Round corner fillets are fillets whose ends have been rounded off. This task
shows how to create this type of fillet.
Open the Round_Fillet.CATPart document from the \online\samples\part_design
directory.
1. Select the edge to be filleted.

2. Click the Edge Fillet icon .


The Edge Fillet Definition dialog
box appears.
3. Enter a radius value. For
example, enter 9mm.

CATIA previews the fillet.

4. Click OK.
The specification tree indicates this
creation. This a round corner fillet:
You will notice that an edge has
been modified.
Face-Face Fillet
You generally use the Face-face fillet command when there is no intersection
between the faces or when there are more than two sharp edges between the
faces.
This task shows how to create a face-face fillet.

Open the Face_Fillet.CATPart document from the \online\samples\part_design


directory.
1. Click the Face-Face Fillet

icon .
The Face-Face Fillet
Definition dialog box appears.

2. Select the faces to be


filleted.

The application previews the


fillet to be created:

3. Enter a radius value in the


Radius field if you are not
satisfied with the default
one.For example, enter
31mm.
4. Click OK.
The faces are filleted.This fillet
is indicated in the specification
tree.
Variable Radius Fillet
Variable radius fillets are curved surfaces defined according to a variable radius.
A variable radius corner means that at least two different constant radii are
applied to two entire edges.
This task shows how to create a variable radius fillet.

Open the Variable_Fillet.CATPart document from the


\online\samples\part_design directory.

1. Click the Variable Radius Fillet icon .


The Variable Radius Fillet Definition dialog box appears.

2. Select the edge to be filleted.


CATIA detects the two vertices and displays two radius values.

3. Enter a new radius value to


change the radius of the
vertex on the left.
The new radius value is
displayed.
4. To add an additional point on the edge to make the variable radius fillet
more complex, click the Points field.

You can also add points by selecting planes. For more information, refer to
the end of the task.

Now, you can add as many points as you wish.

5. Click a point on the edge to be filleted.


CATIA displays a radius value on this point.
Note that to remove a point from the selection, you just need to click this
point.
6. Enter a new radius value for this point: enter 4.

7. The propagation mode is set to Cubic: keep this mode. To see the
Linear propagation mode, refer to the end of the task.

8. Now, click OK to confirm the


operation.
The edge is filleted. The
specification tree indicates this
creation.
More About Variable Radius Fillets
This is the fillet you would obtain
using the Linear propagation mode.
Examine the difference!

To add additional points on the edge to be filleted, you can select


planes. CATIA computes the intersections between these planes and
the edge to determine the useful points.
In this example, three planes were selected.
Now, if you move these planes later, CATIA will compute the
intersections again and modify the fillet accordingly.

Points can be added too by selecting 3D points.

You can use the radius value R=0 to create a variable radius fillet.
Tritangent Fillet
The creation of tritangent fillets involves the removal of one of the three faces
selected.
This task shows hows to create a tritangent fillet.
You need three faces two of which are supporting faces.
Open the Tritangent_fillet.CATPart document from the
\online\samples\part_design directory.

1. Click the Tritangent Fillet icon .


The Tritangent Fillet Definition dialog box appears.

2. Select the faces to be filleted.

3. Select the face to be


removed, that is the upper
face.

The fillet will be tangent to


this face.
This face appears in dark
red.
4. Click OK.
The faces are filleted. The
creation of this fillet is
indicated in the
specification tree.
Chamfer
Chamfering consists in removing or adding a flat section from a selected edge to
create a beveled surface between the two original faces common to that edge.
You obtain a chamfer by propagation along one or several edges.
This task shows how to create two chamfers by selecting two edges. One case
illustrates how material is added, the other case shows how material is retrieved.
Open the Chamfer1.CATPart document from the \online\samples\part_design
directory.

1. Click the Chamfer icon .


The Chamfer Definition dialog box
appears. The defautl parameters to
be defined are Length and Angle.
2. Select the edges to be chamfered.

3. Keep the default mode: enter a length value and an angle value.

CATIA previews the chamfers with the given values.


4. Click OK.

The specification tree indicates this


creation.
These are your chamfers:
Basic Draft
Drafts are defined on molded parts to make them easier to remove from
molds.
The characteristic elements are:
pulling direction: this direction corresponds to the reference from
which the draft faces are defined.
draft angle: this is the angle that the draft faces make with the pulling
direction. This angle may be defined for each face.
parting element: this plane, face or surface cuts the part in two and
each portion is drafted according to its previously defined direction.
For an example, please refer to Draft with Parting Element.
neutral element: this element defines a neutral curve on which the
drafted face will lie. This element will remain the same during the
draft. The neutral element and parting element may be the same
element.
There are two ways of determining the objects to draft. Either by explicitely
selecting the object or by selecting the neutral element, which makes CATIA
detect the appropriate faces to use.
This task shows you how to create a basic draft by selecting the neutral
element.
Open the Draft2.CATPart document from the \online\samples\part_design
directory.

1. Click the Draft icon .


The Draft Definition dialog
box is displayed and an
arrow appears on the part,
indicating the default pulling
direction.

2. Check the Selection by neutral face option to determine the selection


mode.
3. Select the upper face as the neutral element. This selection allows CATIA
to detect the face to be drafted.
The neutral element is now displayed in blue, the neutral curve is in pink.
The faces to be drafted are in dark red. You can also note that the pulling
direction is now displayed on top of the part. It is normal to the neutral face.

Note that when using the other selection mode (explicit selection), the
selected objects are displayed in dark pink.
4. The default angle value is 5. Enter 7 degrees as the new angle value.
CATIA displays the new angle value in the geometry.

You can create drafts using a negative value.

7. Click OK to confirm the operation.


The faces are drafted. You can notice that material has been added.

A Few Notes about Drafts


If you edit the sketch used for
defining the initial pad, CATIA
integrates this modification and
computes the draft again. In the
following example, a chamfer was
added to the profile.
If you need to draft several faces using a pulling direction normal to the neutral
element, keep in mind the following operating mode that will facilitate your
design:

Click and first select the neutral element of your choice. The pulling
direction that appears is then normal to the neutral element. Select the face to
be drafted and click OK to create your first draft.
Now, to create the other drafts in the same CATPart document, note that by
default the application uses the same pulling direction as the one specified for
creating your first draft. As designers usually use a unique pulling direction,
you do not need to redefine your pulling direction.
Draft with Parting Element
This task shows how to create two basic drafts using parting elements.

Open the Draft1.CATPart document from the \online\samples\part_design


directory.
1. Select the face to be drafted.

2. Click the Draft icon .


The Draft Definition dialog box appears and
an arrow appears on the part, indicating the
default pulling direction.

3. Click the Selection field and select plane


xy to define the neutral element.
The application displays the neutral curve in
pink.
4. Enter 13 degrees as the new angle value.

You can create drafts using a negative value.


5. Now click the More button to display the whole dialog box and
access the Parting Element option. Check the Draft with parting
element option if not already done.

6. Select plane xy, that is the sketch plane, as the parting


element. The initial part is a pad created using the Mirrored
extent option. For more about this option, refer to Basic Pads .
7. Click OK.
The face is drafted. You can notice that
material has been removed.
Shell
Shelling a feature means emptying it, while keeping a given thickness on its
sides. Shelling may also consist in adding thickness to the outside. This task
shows both operations.

Open the Shell.CATPart document from the \online\samples\part_design


directory.

1. Click the Shell icon . The


Shell Definition dialog box appears.

2. Select the faces to remove.

3. Enter 1mm in the inside


thickness field.

4. Click OK.
The feature is shelled: the selected
faces are left open. This creation
appears in the specification tree.

5. Now, double-click Shell.1 in the specification tree to edit it.


6. Enter 3mm in the outside
thickness field.
7. Click OK.
Thickness has been added to the
outside.
Thickness
Sometimes, some thickness has to be added or removed before machining the
part. The thickness command lets you do so.
This task shows you how to add thickness to a part.

Open the Thickness.CATPart document from the \online\samples\part_design


directory.

1. Click the Thickness icon .


The Thickness Definition dialog box
is displayed.
2. Select the faces to thicken.
CATIA displays the thickness value
in the geometry.

3. Enter a positive value. For


example, enter 20 mm.

4. Click OK.
The part is thickened
accordingly. This creation
appears in the specification
tree.
Creating Surface-Based Features
The features presented here are obtained by applying commands on surfaces or by
using surfaces for modifying features of any types.

Split Thick Surface

Close Surface Sew Surface


Split
You can split a body with a plane, face or surface. The purpose of this task is to
show how to split a body by means of a surface.

Open the Split.CATPart document from the \online\samples\part_design


directory.
1. Select the blue pad as the body to be
split.

2. Click the Split icon .

3. Select the splitting surface.


The Split Definition dialog box is
displayed, indicating the splititng element.

An arrow appears indicating the portion of


body that will be kept. If the arrow points
in the wrong direction, you can click it to
reverse the direction.
5. Click OK.
The body is split. Material has been
removed.
The specification tree indicates you
performed the operation.
Close Surface
This task shows you to close surfaces.

Open the Close.CATPart document from the \online\samples\part_design


directory.
1. Select the surface to be closed.

2. Click the Close Surface icon

.
The Close Surface Definition
dialog box is displayed.

5. Click OK.
The surface is closed . The
specification tree indicates you
performed the operation.
Sew Surface
Sewing means joining together a surface and a body. This capability consists in
computing the intersection between a given surface and a body while removing
useless material. You can sew all types of surfaces onto bodies. This task shows
you how to do it.
Open the Sew.CATPart document from the \online\samples\part_design
directory.
1. Select the surface you wish to sew onto the body, that is the orange
surface.

2. Click the Sew Surface icon .


The Sew Surface Definition dialog box
is displayed, indicating the object to be
sewn.

3.An arrow appears indicating the portion of material that will be kept. Click
the arrow to reverse the direction. The arrow must point in the direction as
shown:
5. Click OK.
The surface is sewn onto the body. Some material has been removed.The
specification tree indicates you performed the operation.
Thick Surface
You can add material to a surface in two opposite directions by using the Thick
Surface capability. This task shows you how to do so.

Open the ThickSurface.CATPart document from the \online\samples\part_design


directory.
1. Select the object you wish to
thicken, that is the extrude element.

2. Click the Thick Surface icon

.
The Thick Surface Definition
dialog box is displayed.

In the geometry area, the arrow


that appears on the extrude
element indicates the first offset
direction.

3. Enter 25mm as the first offset


value and 12mm as the second
offset value .
5. Click OK.
The surface is thickened . The
specification tree indicates you
performed the operation.
Note that the resulting feature
does not keep the color of the
original surface.
Creating Transformation Features
Transformation features are obtained by applying commands on existing features. This
section illustrates the creation of the following features:

Translation Rotation Symmetry Mirror

Rectangular Pattern Circular Pattern User Pattern Scaling


Translation
The Translate command applies to current bodies.
This task shows you how to translate a body.

1. Click the Translate icon .


The Translate Definition dialog box appears

2. Select a line to take its orientation as the translation direction or a


plane to take its normal as the translation direction. For example,
select zx plane.
You can also specify the direction by means of X, Y, Z vector
components by using the contextual menu on the Direction area.
3. Specify the translation distance by entering a value or using the Drag
manipulator. For example, enter 100mm.

4. Click OK to create the


translated element.
The element (identified as
Translat.xxx) is added to the
specification tree
Rotation
This task shows you how to rotate geometry about an axis. The command applies to current
bodies.
Open the Rotate.CATPart document from the \online\samples\part_design directory.

1. Click the Rotate icon .


The Rotate Definition dialog box appears.

2. Select a line as the rotation axis.


3. Enter a value for the
rotation angle.
The element is rotated. You
can drag it by using the
graphic manipulator to adjust
the rotation.

4. Click OK to create the rotated element.


The element (identified as Rotate.xxx) is added to the specification tree.
Symmetry
This task shows how to transform geometry by means of a symmetry operation.
The Symmetry command applies to current bodies.
Open the Symmetry.CATPart document from the \online\samples\part_design
directory.

1. Click the Symmetry icon .


The Symmetry Definition dialog box appears.

2. Select a point, line or plane as reference element. For our scenario,


select plane zx.

3. Click OK to create the


symmetrical element.
The original element is no
longer visible but remains in
the specification tree.
The new element (identified as
Symmetry.xxx) is added to the
specification tree.
Pattern
You may need to create several identical features from an existing one and to
simultaneously position them on an part. Patterns let you do so.
CATIA allows you to define three types of patterns: rectangular , circular and
user patterns. These features make the creation process easier.

Rectangular Pattern
This task shows you how to duplicate the original feature right away at the
location of your choice using a rectangular pattern. Then, you will learn how
to modify the location of the initial feature.
Open the Rectangular_pattern.CATPart document from the
\online\samples\part_design directory.

1. Click the Rectangular Pattern icon .

2. Select the feature you wish to copy, that is the pocket.

The Rectangular Pattern Definition dialog box is displayed. Each tab is


dedicated to a direction you will use to define the location of the duplicated
feature. In this task, you will first set your specification for the first direction.
The feature's name displays in the Object field.

Checking the Keep specifications option lets you create instances with the
limit defined for the original feature. In the example below, the limit defined
for the pad, that is the "Up to surface" limit, applies to all instances. As the
limiting surface is not planar, the instances have different lengths.
But for our scenario, as the pocket's height is specified, activating the Keep
specifications option is meaningless.

3. Click the Reference element field and select the edge as shown above to
specify the first direction of creation.
An arrow is displayed on the pad. You will notice that you can check the
Reverse button or click the arrow to modify the direction.
To define a direction, you may select an edge or a planar face.

4. Let the Instances & Spacing options to define the parameters you wish to
specify.
The parameters you can choose are:
Instances & Length
Instances & Spacing
Spacing & Length

Choosing Instances & Spacing dims the Length field because the application
no longer needs this specification to space the instances.

5. Enter 3 as the number of instances, that is pockets you wish to obtain in


the first direction.
Deleting the instances of your choice is possible when creating the pattern.
In the pattern preview, just select the points materializing instances.
Conversely, selecting these points again will make CATIA create the
corresponding instances.
6. Define the spacing along the grid: enter 14 mm.

Defining the spacing along the grid and length of your choice would make
the application compute the number of possible instances and space them at
equal distances.
7. Now, click the Second Direction tab to define other parameters.
Note that defining a second direction is not compulsory. Creating a
rectangular defining only one direction is possible.

8. Click the Reference element field and select the edge as shown below to
define the second direction.

9. Check the Reverse option to make the arrow point in the opposite
direction.

10. Let the Instances & Spacing option: enter 3 and 10 mm in the
appropriate fields.
11. Examine the preview to make
sure the pattern meets your needs.
Additional pockets will be aligned
along this second direction.

12. Click OK to repeat the pocket


nine times.
This is the resulting pattern. You now
have nine pockets.

13. Let's now edit the pattern to make it more complex: double-click the
pattern to display the dialog box.
14. Click the More button to display the whole dialog box.
The options available makes it possible to position the pattern.

15. To modify the position of the pockets, enter -5 degrees as the rotation
angle value.
16. Click Apply.
You will notice that all pockets have
moved slightly:

17. Now, modify the location of the


initial pocket. To do so, enter 2 in the
Row in Direction 1 field.
The application previews how the
pattern will be moved. It will be
moved along the direction as
indicated:
18. Finally, enter 2 in the Row in
Direction 2 field.
The application previews how the
pattern will be moved. It will be
moved along these two directions
defined in steps 17 and 18:

19. Click OK.


The application has changed the
location of all pockets. Only four of
them remain on the pad.
Circular Pattern
This task will show you how to duplicate the original feature right away at the location of your
choice using a circular pattern.

Make sure the item you wish to duplicate is correctly located in relation to the circular
rotation axis.
Open the Circular_pattern.CATPart document from the \online\samples\part_design
directory.

1. Click the Circular Pattern icon .

2.Select the pad you wish to copy.

The Circular Pattern Definition dialog box is displayed and the feature's name
appears in the Object field.

Checking the Keep specifications option lets you create instances with the limit defined for
the original feature. The example below shows you that the limit defined for the pad, that is
the "Up to surface" limit, applies to all instances. As the limiting surface is not planar, the
instances have different lengths.

But for our scenario, as the pad is going to be repeated on a planar surface, activating the
Keep specifications option is meaningless.
The Parameters field lets you choose the type of parameters you wish to specify
so that CATIA will be able to compute the location of the items copied.
These parameters are:
Instances & total angle
Instances & angular spacing
Angular spacing & total angle
Complete crown

3. Set the Instances & Angular spacing options to define the parameters you
wish to specify.
4. Enter 7 as the number of pads you wish to obtain.

5. Enter 50 degrees as the angular spacing.

6. Click the Reference element field and select the upper face to determine the
rotation axis. This axis will be normal to the face.

Clicking the Reverse button reverses the direction.

Two arrows are then displayed on the pad.


To define a direction, you can select an edge or a planar face.

7. Define an angular space between each instance: enter 45 degrees.

If you modify the angular spacing, CATIA previews the result: arrows 1 and 2 are moved
accordingly.

8. Click OK.
CATIA previews the pattern: the
pad will be repeated seven times.

9. Now, you are going to add a crown to your part. To do so, click the Crown Definiton
tab.
10. Set the Circle & Circle spacing options to define the parameters you wish to
specify.
11. Enter 2 in the Circle(s) field.

12. Enter -10 mm in the Circle spacing field.

This figure may help you to


define your parameters:

13. Click OK.


These are your new instances:
14. Now, you are going to modify the position of the initial pad. Such a modification will
affect all instances too. To do so, click the More button to display the whole dialog box.

15. Enter 15 in the Rotation angle


field.
CATIA previews the rotation.

16. Click OK.


All instances are moved
accordingly.

Applying the Delete command on one instance deletes the whole pattern. However, deleting
the instances of your choice is possible when creating or editing the pattern. To do so,
just select the points materializing instances in the pattern preview. Selecting these points
again will enable CATIA maintain the corresponding instances.
The scenario above does not show the use of the "Radial alignment of instances" option. In
addition to performing the steps described, you could have use this option that allows you to
define the instance orientations.

The option is checked: all instances have the same The option is unchecked: all instances
orientation as the original feature. are normal to the lines tangent to the
circle.
User Pattern
The User pattern command lets you duplicate a feature (pad, pocket, shaft, groove, hole) as many times as
you wish at the locations of your choice. Locating occurences consists in specifying anchor points. These
points are created in the Sketcher.
This task shows you how to duplicate a hole at the points defined in a same sketch plane.

Open the UserPattern.CATPart document from the \online\samples\part_design directory.

1. Click the User Pattern icon .

2. Select the hole you wish to duplicate


The User Pattern dialog box is displayed. The hole appears in the Object field.

Checking the Keep specifications option lets you create instances with the limit (Up to Next, Up to Last, Up
to Plane or Up to Surface) defined for the original feature. In our scenario, the hole was created using the
Up to Next option, but as the support for holes is a pad of an even thickness (20 mm), this makes the use
of the option meaningless.
2. Select 'Sketch 4' in the specification tree. This
sketch includes the nine points you need to locate
the duplicated holes.
3. Actually, you just need seven points. Click
both points you do not need to unselect them.

3. Click OK.
The seven holes are created at the points of the sketch. The specification tree indicates this creation.
Mirror
Mirroring a body consists in duplicating the body using a symmetry. You can
select a face or a plane about which you will mirror a body.
This task shows how to mirror a body.

Open the Mirror1.CATPart document from the \online\samples\part_design


directory.
1. Select the face used as the
reference.

2. Click the Mirror icon .


The Mirror Definition dialog box
appears.

3. Click OK to confirm the operation.


The body is mirrored and the original
element is unchanged.
The specification tree mentions this
creation.

Using a plane to mirror a body lets you obtain two independent portions of
material in a same body. The following mirror is obtained by using plane zx as
the reference.
Scaling
Scaling a body means resizing it to the dimension you specify.
This task shows how to scale a body in relation to a point.

Open the Scaling.CATPart document from the \online\samples\part_design


directory.
1. Select the body to be scaled.

2. Click the Scaling icon .


The Scaling Definition dialog box
appears.

3. Select the reference point and


enter 1.5 as the factor value.

4. Click OK.
The body is scaled accordingly. The specification tree indicates you
performed this operation.
You can also resize a body in relation to a face or plane. In the example below,
the upper face is the reference element and the factor value is 1.5. You obtain
an affinity.
Displaying and Editing Properties
This section discusses the ways of accessing and editing information concerning parts, bodies
and features. The data you access varies depending on the element you select, but you
always access it using the Edit -> Properties command.

Displaying and Editing Parts


Properties

Displaying and Editing Bodies


Properties

Displaying and Editing


Features Properties
Displaying and Editing the Part
Properties
Gathered in a same dialog box, the part properties consist of different indications
you will have sometimes to refer to. This task explains how to access and if
needed, edit this information.
1. Select the part in the
specification tree.

2. Select the Edit->Properties command or select the Properties command


on the contextual menu.
The Properties dialog box displays, containing the following tabs dealing
with the part:
Product
Mass
3. The Product tab
contains editable fields.
Enter a new name for the
part in the Part Number
field.
The new name appears
in the specification tree.

4. The other fields allow you to freely describe the part. Enter the
information describing your part in the context of your company.
5. Set the Source option. You can choose between Unknown, Made
or Bought.
6. Now, clicking the Mass tab displays technical information you
cannot edit:Note however that you can edit the density of a part by
applying a new material. To know how to apply materials to parts,
please refer to CATIA- Real Time Rendering User's Guide Version 5.

7. Once you are satisfied with your operation, click OK to confirm the
operation and close the dialog box.
Displaying and Editing Bodies
Properties
This task shows how to display and edit bodies properties. To know how to edit
the graphic properties of a body refer to the Infrastructure documentation,
Displaying and Editing Graphic Properties.
1. Select the body in the specification tree.

2. Select the Edit->Properties command or select the Properties command


on the contextual menu.
The Properties dialog box displays, containing two tabs concerning bodies:
Feature properties
Graphic
3. In the Feature properties tab, only the name of the feature is editable.
Enter Body1 in the Name field. This name is editable if the part is not read
only.

The new name appears in the specification tree.


4. Click the Graphic tab to change the color of the body. To have
details about how to change graphic properties, please refer to

5. Click OK.
CATIA takes these modifications into account and displays the new body
Displaying and Editing Features
Properties
This task shows how to display and edit the properties of a pad.

1. Select the feature in the specification tree, that is pad2.

2. Select the Edit->Properties command or select the Properties command


on the contextual menu.
The Properties dialog box displays, containing these tabs:
Feature Properties
Mechanical
Graphic

3. Enter a new name for the pad in the Name field.


This field is not available if the file is read only.
4. Click Apply to display the new name in the specification tree.

5. Click the Mechanical tab to access other information.


The Mechanical tab displays the status of the pad.
The following attributes characterize features:
Deactivated: checking this
option will prevent CATIA
from taking deactivated
features into account during
an update operation.
To Update: indicates that
the selected feature is to be
updated.
Unresolved: indicates that
the selected feature has not
been computed by the
application.
You cannot control the last
two options. The symbol
displayed in front of each
attribute may appear in the
specification tree in some
circumstances.

6. Check the Deactivated option to deactivate the pad.


You will note that a new frame is displayed, providing additional
information. CATIA actually warns you that the operation will affect the only
child of the pad, that is the hole.
In certain cases, features may have several children. What you need to do
is select the children in the list and check the first option if you wish to
deactivate them or just check the second option to deactivate all of the
children affected.
7. Click the Graphic tab to change the color of the feature. To have details
about how to change graphic properties, please refer to
.
8. Press OK to confirm the operation and close the dialog box.
The geometry no longer shows the deactivated features and the
specification tree displays red brackets on them to symbolize their status.
Modifying Parts
Editing a feature or a sketch is a simple operation but you need to know some details about the way of doing it.

There are many ways of modifying parts. You can redefine parameters before or during updates or use the
Reorder capability to rectify design mistakes.

But prior to modifying parts, you can use commands that facilitate the modifications you need to perform. For
example, you can view the genealogical relationships between the different components of a part. You can even
access bodies locally.

In a nutshell, this section deals with the different modifications you can perform but it also describes how you can
delete features.

Redefining Feature Parameters Reordering Features Parent and Children

Scanning the Part and Defining Local


Updating Parts Deleting Features
Objects
Editing Parts, Bodies and Features
Editing a part may mean for example modifying the density of the part (See Displaying
and Editing Properties ), but most often editing consists in modifying the features
composing the part. This operation can be done at any time.
There are several ways of editing a feature. If you modify the sketch used in the
definition of a feature, CATIA will take this modification into account to recompute the
feature: in other words, associativity is maintained.
Now, you can also edit your features through definition dialog boxes in order to
redefine the parameters of your choice.

Redefining Feature Parameters


This task shows how to edit a draft and a pad. The process described here is
valid for any other feature to be edited.

Open the Edit.CATPart document from the \online\samples\part_design


directory.
1. Double-click the draft to be edited (in the specification tree or in the
geometry area). For more abour draft, refer to Basic Draft.

The Draft Definition dialog box appears and CATIA shows the
current draft angle value. Generally speaking, CATIA always shows
dimensional constraints related to the feature you are editing.
Concerning sketch-based features, CATIA also shows the sketches
used for extrusion as well as the constraints defined for these
sketches.

Instead of double-clicking the element you wish to edit, you can also click this
element and select the XXX.object -> Definition... command which will display
the edit dialog box.
2. Enter a new draft angle value.

3. Click OK.
This is your new feature:

4. Now, double-click the pad.


The Pad Definition dialog box appears
and CATIA shows the pad only, not the
next operation.
You will notice that the pad was created
in symmetric extent mode and that
CATIA displays information about the
initial profile.
5. Enter a new length value.

6. Uncheck the Mirrored extent option.

7. Enter a length value for the second limit in the Length field.
CATIA previews the new pad to be created.
8. Click OK.
The modifications are taken into
account. Your part now looks like this:
You can also access the parameters you wish to edit in the following way:
1. Select the feature in the specification tree and use the feature.n object
-> Edit Parameters contextual command.
You can now view the feature parameters in the geometry area.

2. Double-click the parameter of interest.


A small dialog box appears displaying
the parameter value:

3. Enter a new value and click OK.


Reordering Features
The Reorder capability allows you to rectify design mistakes. This task shows
how to reorder, that is move a pad.

Open the Reorder.CATPart document from the \online\samples\part_design


directory.
1. Your initial data consists of a pad that was mirrored and a second pad
created afterwards. As the order of creation is wrong, you are going to
reorder the second pad so as to mirror the whole part. Position your cursor
on Pad.2. and select Edit -> Pad.2 object -> Reorder...

The Feature Reorder dialog box


appears.
2. Select Pad.1 to specify the
new location of the feature.
This name appears in the After:
field.
3. Click OK.
The part rebuilds itself. The mirror feature appears after the creation of the
second pad, which explains why this second pad is now mirrored.
Parent and Children
The Parent and Children command enables you to view the genealogical relationships between
the different components of a part. If the specification tree already lets you see the operations you
performed and respecify your design, the graph displayed by the Parent and Children capability
proves to be a more accurate analysis tool. Before deleting a feature, we recommend the use of
this command.

Open the Parent.CATPart document from the \online\samples\part_design directory.

1. Select the feature of


interest, that is Pad1.

2. Select the Tools -> Parent / Children... command (or the Parent/Children contextual
command).
A new window appears containing a graph. This graph shows the relationships between the
different elements constituting the pad previously selected.
3. Position the cursor on Pad 1 and select the Show All Children contextual command.
You can now see that
Sketch 2 and Sketch 3
have been used to
create two additional
pads.

4. Now, select
EdgeFillet1 in the graph.
The application
highlights the fillet in the
specification tree, in the
graph and in the
geometry area.

5. Position the cursor on EdgeFillet1 and select the Show Parent and Children contextual
command.
EdgeFillet1 is now the feature whose relationships you wish to see. Pad1 and Draft.1 are two
parents.

6. To see all parents, position the cursor on EdgeFillet1 and select the Show All Parents
contextual command.
The sketch upon which the pad and therefore the edge fillet depend is displayed.

7. Once you have got the useful information, click OK to quit the command.
Scanning the Part and Defining Local
Objects
In Part Design, you can access, view and operate all features or bodies locally.
The Scan and Define in Work Object capability allows you to design part
features without taking the complete part into account.
This task shows how to scan the part and define a local object.

Open the Active.CATPart document from the \online\samples\part_design


directory.
1. Select the Edit -> Scan or Define in Work Object... command.
The Scan toolbar appears enabling you to navigate through the structure
of your part.
You actually need to click the buttons allowing you to move from one local
feature to the other. Sketches are not taken into account by the command.
2. Click the Backwards button to
move to the previous feature, that is
a pocket.
The application highlights the feature
in question in the specification tree
as well as in the geometry area.

3. Click the Backwards arrow once more to move to the previous


feature, that is a mirror.

4. Now that you have accessed the


feature of your choice, that is the
mirror, isolate it from the current part
by clicking the Exit button.
In the geometry area, the application
displays the local object only. In the
specification tree, this local object is
underlined.
You are now ready to work on this
feature.
.

Defining a feature as local without scanning the whole part is possible using the
Define in Work Object contextual command on the desired feature.
Deleting Features
Whenever you will have to delete geometry, you will not necessarily have to delete the elements used to create it.
CATIA lets you define what you really want to delete.
This task shows how to delete a sketch on which geometry has been defined and what this operation involves.

Open the Delete.CATPart document from the \online\samples\part_design directory.


1. Select the rectangle you wish to delete.

2. Select the Edit -> Delete... commands.


The Delete dialog box is displayed, showing the element to be deleted and two options.
Delete exclusive parents: deletes the geometry on which the element was created. This
geometry can be deleted only if it is exclusively used for the selected element
Children: deletes the geometry based upon the element to be deleted, in other words,
dependent elements
Here, the first option cannnot be used because the rectangle has no parents.
3. Click More.
Additional options and the elements affected by the deletion are displayed. If you can delete the sketch, you can
also replace it with another element.
4. Select Sketch4, that is the hexagon to replace Sketch 2 .
This operation is now displayed in the dialog box.
5. Click OK.
The sketch is deleted as well as its children : two pads one of which is filleted.

A Few Notes About Deletion


Deleting Features Built upon Dress-up Features

If you delete a feature (dress-up or not) previously used to create a dress-up feature, the dress-up
feature is recomputed.
In this example, thickness was added to the pad, then material was
removed from the whole part using the shell capability. In other
words, the existence of the shell depends upon the existence of
the thickness.

You will notice that only the thickness has been deleted. CATIA
keeps the shell feature.

Keep in mind you can apply the Undo command if you inadvertently deleted a feature.
You are not allowed to delete a profile used to define a feature, unless you delete the profile to construct
another one.
Patterns

Concerning patterns, applying the Delete command on one instance deletes the whole pattern.
Updating Parts
The point of updating a part or feature is to make the application take your very last operation into
account. Indeed some changes to a sketch, feature or constraint require the rebuild of the part. To warn
you that an update is needed, CATIA displays the update symbol next to the part's name and displays
the geometry in bright red.
To update a part, the application provides two update modes:

automatic update, available in Tools -> Options -> General. If checked, this option lets the
application updates the part when needed.
manual update, available in Tools -> Options -> General. Lets you control the updates of your

part. What you have to do is just click the Update icon whenever you wish to integrate
modifications. The Update capability is also available via Edit -> Update and the Update
contextual command.
However, the progression bar indicating the evolution of the operation displays only if you use the icon

What Happens When the Update Fails?


Sometimes, the update operation is not straightforward. In this case, CATIA requires you to reconsider your
design.
The following scenario exemplifies what you can do in such circumstances.

Open the Update.CATPart document from the \online\samples\part_design directory.


Suppose you have just entered 14mm as the new value radius to edit your fillet. You actually attempted to
fillet the following edge:

Fortunately, CATIA detects an invalid operation. A yellow symbol displays on the Part Body and the feature
causing trouble and a dialog box appears providing the diagnosis of your difficulties:
2. What you need to do is click the name of the fillet causing trouble.
Three options are then available. You can
edit the feature
deactivate the feature
delete the feature

3. Click the Edit button to modify the fillet.


The Edge Fillet Definition dialog box appears to let you enter a
correct radius value.

4. Enter 8 mm.

5. Click OK to confirm the operation.


The fillet is now valid:
Replacing Elements
This theme shows you how to modify features by replacing surfaces, faces, planes or
sketches used for defining them.

Replacing a Changing Sketch


Replacing a Sketch
Surface Supports
Replacing a Surface
The Replace command lets you replace sketches, faces, planes and surfaces by
other appropriate elements.
This task shows you how to replace a surface used for creating geometry with
another surface. The operating mode described here is valid for replacing
sketches (for an example, see Replacing a Sketch), faces and planes too.
Open the Replace1.CATPart document from the \online\samples\part_design
directory.
1. Select Extrusion1, that is the red surface used for trimming both the pocket
and the hole.

2. Right-click to display the contextual menu and select the Replace... command.
The Replace dialog box is displayed, indicating the name of the surface to be
replaced.
3. Select Extrusion 2 as the replacing surface. Extrusion 2 now appears in the
With field of the dialog box.
4. Check the Delete option to delete Extrusion1.

5.Click OK to confirm the operation.

The pocket and the hole are


now trimmed by Extrusion 2.
Extrusion 1 has been deleted.
Replacing a Sketch
The Replace command lets you replace sketches, faces, planes and surfaces by
other appropriate elements.
This task shows you that features based on sketches can have their sketches
replaced by new ones.
Open the Replace.CATPart document from the \online\samples\part_design
directory.
1. Select Sketch2, that is the square used in the definition of the blue filleted pad.
Note that this pad has been copied eight times. This is the result of the use of the
Rectangular Pattern command. For more about this command, refer to
Rectangular Pattern.

2. Right-click to display the contextual menu and select the Replace... command.
The Replace dialog box is displayed, indicating the name of the sketch to be
replaced.
3. Select sketch3 as the
new sketch. Sketch 3 now
appears in the With field of
the dialog box.
Sketch 3 is an hexagon
created in the Sketcher.
Note that If you wish to, you
can delete Sketch 2 by
checking the Delete option.

4. Click OK to confirm the


operation.

A new pad based on sketch 3 is created. The pattern is updated too, and the
fillets are maintained.
Sketch3 is now displayed below Pad 2, that is the original pad, in the
specification tree and Sketch2 is still available.
Changing Sketch Planes
You can replace sketch planes with new ones. Replacing a sketch plane with
another one is a way of moving a sketch but it may also be a way of modifying
design specifications. This task shows you how to do so.
1. The initial data is composed of a green open body and a gray pad. You are
going to replace the plane used for the sketch of this pad with another plane.
Select Sketch1 in the specification tree.

2. Select the Sketch1.object -> Change Sketch Support command.

3. Now, select the replacing plane.


The operation is immediately performed. You will notice that the bottom side of
the pad adjusts itself to the open body shape. Actually, the original profile of the

pad was partially created with the Intersect command , which explains why
the pad integrates the open body shape.
Setting Constraints
CATIA Version 5 lets you set geometrical and dimensional constraints on various types of elements in the 3D
geometry area.
This section shows you how to use both constraint commands:

Constraint defined in Dialog Box .

Constraint
and how to modify them. Note also that you can customize symbols dedicated to constraints. To have details about
it, please refer to Customizing Constraints.

Setting Constraints Defined in Dialog


Setting Constraints Modifying Constraints
Box
Setting Constraints in the 3D Area
3D area constraints are defined by means of the commands.
Depending on the creation mode chosen for creating wireframe geometry and
surfaces (see CATIA Wireframe and Surface User's Guide), constraints set on
these elements may react in two ways. You create measures if support elements
were created with the Datum mode disactivated. Conversely, you create
constraints with no links to the other entities that were used to create them if
you constrain datums. For more about datums, please refer to Creating Datums.

This task shows you how to set a distance constraint between a face and a
plane.
1. Select the face you wish to constrain.

2. Select the plane.

3. Click the Constraint icon .


CATIA detects the distance value between the face
and the plane. Moving the cursor moves the
graphic symbol of the distance.
4. Click where you wish to position the constraint
value.

Now, if you wish to set another constraint between the


plane and another face, CATIA will create a measure.
Creating a measure means that each time CATIA
integrates modifications to the geometry, this measure
reflects the changes too.
The measure is displayed in brackets.
Likewise, you cannot constrain a distance between two faces. In the example
below, CATIA creates a measure constraint between the faces, not a driving
constraint.
Setting Constraints Defined in Dialog
Box

This task shows you how use this constraint command which detects
possible constraints between selected elements and lets you choose the
constraint you wish to create.
1. Multiselect the elements you wish to constrain, that is both faces as
shown.

2. Click the Constraint Defined in Dialog Box icon .


CATIA detects three possible constraints you can set between the faces:
Distance
Angle
Fix

The other constraints are grayed out indicating that they cannot be set for the
elements you have selected.
3. Check the Distance option and click OK to confirm.
The distance constraint is created.
Modifying Constraints
Editing Constraints
You can edit constraints by:

double-clicking on the desired constraints and modify related data in the Constraint Definition dialog box that
displays.

selecting the desired constraints and use the XXX.N.object -> Definition.. contextual command...

...to display the Constraint Definition dialog box and modify related data.

Renaming Constraints
You can rename a constraint by selecting it and by using the XXX.N.object -> Rename parameter contextual
command.... In the dialog box that appears, you just need to enter the name of your choice.

Deactivating or Activating Constraints

You can deactivate a constraint by selecting it and by using the XXX.N.object -> Deactivate contextual command.
Deactivated constraints appear preceded by red brackets.
Conversely, to activate a constraint, use the Activate contextual command.
Associating Bodies
To design a part, you need to create features within the same Part body but you also need to insert
additional bodies which you will combine together in various ways to create material. Once your bodies
are well-defined, you can assemble them performing an assembly or request CATIA to compute their
possible intersections. You can also add or remove bodies from other bodies or even use the Trim
capability, which combines addition and removal of material.

This section will show you the different ways of associating bodies to form a part in the .CATPart
document, the first task being the insertion of a new body.

Inserting a New Body Assembling Bodies Intersecting Bodies Adding Bodies

Removing Bodies Trimming Bodies Removing Lumps


Inserting a New Body
This task shows you how to insert a new body into the part.

1. To add a body to the part,


select the Insert -> Body
command.
CATIA displays this new body
in the specification tree. It is
underlined, indicating that it is
the active body.

2. Now, let's construct this new body: for example, sketch a circle on one of
the part faces.

3. Leave the Sketcher and extrude this circle to create a pad.


Eventually, the specification tree looks like this:
You will notice that the Part body and Body1 are autonomous. The operations
you would accomplish on any of them would not affect the integrity of the other
one. Now, if you wish to combine them, refer to the following tasks which show
the different ways of attaching bodies.
Adding Bodies
This tasks illustrates how to add a body to a part.

Open the Add.CATPart document from the \online\samples\part_design


directory.
1. This is your initial data: the pads are independent. To perform the

addition, you need to select Body.1. and click the Add icon (or select
the Edit -> Body.1.object -> Add... command).

The result is immediate. However, if the specification tree is


composed of several bodies, a dialog box displays to let you
determine the second body you wish to use. By default, the
application proposes to add the selected body to the Part body.
The specification tree and the part now look like this:
Assembling Bodies
Assembling is an operation integrating your part specifications. This task shows
you two assemble bodies to let you see how the resulting parts look different
depending on your specifications.
Open the Assemble.CATPart document from the \online\samples\part_design
directory.
First, you are going to assemble a pocket to the Part Body. You will note that as
this pocket is the first feature of the body, material has been added (see Basic
Pockets , key point).

1. To assemble them, you need to select Body 2 and click the Assemble

icon (or select the Edit -> Body2.object -> Assemble... command).
The Assemble dialog box displays to
let you determine the assembly you
wish to perform. By default, CATIA
proposes to assemble the selected
body to the Part body, and displays the
name of the last feature of the Part
body in the After field.
2. As you wish to perform this operation, click OK.
During the operation, CATIA retrieves the material defined by the pocket
from the Part body.
This is your new Part body:

3. Now delete the assemble operation to go back to the previous state. You
are going to perform a new assemble operation.
4. Select Body 2 and the Edit -> Body2.object -> Assemble command.
The Assemble dialog box displays again.

5. Select Body1 in the specification tree to edit the After field. Pad2
appears in the field, indicating that you are going to assemble Body2 to
Body1.
6. Click OK.
The material defined by the pocket from Body1has been retrieved during
the operation.
Removing Bodies
This tasks illustrates how to remove a body from a part.

Open the Remove.CATPart document from the \online\samples\part_design


directory.
1. The part is composed of two pads. To remove Body 1 from the Part
body, select Body.1

2. Click the Remove icon (or select the Edit -> Body.1.object ->
Remove... command).

The result is immediate. However, if the specification tree is composed of several


bodies, a dialog box displays to let you determine the second body you wish to
use. By default, the application proposes to remove the selected body from the
Part body.
The cylinder is removed from the Part body:
Intersecting Bodies
The material resulting from an intersection operation between two bodies is the
material shared by these bodies. This tasks illustrates how to compute two
intersections.
Open the Intersect.CATPart document from the \online\samples\part_design
directory.
This is your initial data: the three pads belong to distinct bodies.

7. To compute the intersection between the Part body and Body 2, select
Body.2.

8. Click the Intersect icon (or select the Edit -> Body.2.object ->
Intersect... command).
The Intersect dialog box displays to let you determine the second body you
wish to use. By default, the application proposes to intersect the selected
body to the Part body.
9. As you wish to perform this
operation, click OK.
CATIA computes the intersection
between the two bodies.

The Part body now looks like this:

10. Now delete the intersection to go back to the previous state. You are
going to create a new intersection.
11. Position your cursor on Body 2 and select the Edit -> Body2.object ->
Intersect contextual command to display the Intersect dialog box.

12. Select Body1 in the specification tree to edit the After field. Pad2
appears in the field, indicating that you are going to compute the
intersection between Body2 and Body1.
13. Click OK. Body1 now looks like this:
Trimming Bodies
Applying the Union Trim command on a body entails defining the elements to be kept
or removed while performing the union operation.
The following rules are to be kept in mind:

Concretely speaking, you need to select the two bodies of interest and specify the
faces you wish to keep or remove. This section provides two parts you can obtain
using the Union Trim capability: a flange and a stiffener.

Flange
This tasks illustrates how to create a flange using the Union Trim capability.

Open the Union_Trim1.CATPart document from the \online\samples\part_design


directory.
1. Select in the specification tree the body
you wish to trim.

2. Click the Union Trim icon (or select the Edit -> Body.1.object
-> Union Trim... command).
The Trim Definition dialog box is displayed, and the part becomes
red, meaning that an operation is being performed.

3. Click the Faces to keep field and select the side face.
The selected face now appears in blue, meaning that the application is
going to keep it.

4. Click the field again and select the top face.


This face becomes blue too.
5. Click OK.
The application computes the material to be removed to leave the part
open. The operation (identified as Trim.xxx) is added to the specification
tree.
Stiffener
This tasks illustrates how to create a stiffener using the Union Trim capability.

Open the Union_Trim2.CATPart document from the \online\samples\part_design


directory.
1. Select in the specification tree
the body you wish to trim.

2. Click the Union Trim icon (or select the Edit -> Body1.object ->
Union Trim... command).
The Trim Definition dialog box appears:

3. Click the Faces to remove field and select the face as shown.
The selected face now appears in pink, meaning that it will be removed
during the Trim operation.
4. Click OK.
The stiffener is created.
Keeping and Removing Faces
The Remove Lump command lets you reshape a body by removing material. To
remove material, either you specify the faces you wish to remove or conversely,
the faces you wish to keep. In some cases, you need to specify both the faces to
remove and the faces to keep.
This task illustrates how to reshape a body by removing the faces you do not
need. Depending on the faces you select for removal, you will obtain two distinct
bodies.
Open the Remove_Lump.CATPart document from the
\online\samples\part_design directory.

1. Select the body you wish to reshape, that is Part Body.

2. Click the Remove Lump icon


(or select the Part Body object ->
Remove Lump... contextual command).
The Remove Lump dialog box appears.
The application prompts you to specify
the faces you wish to remove as well as
the faces you need to keep.

3. Click the Faces to remove field and


select the face as shown.
The selected face now appears in pink,
meaning that it will be removed during
the operation.
4. Click OK.
The new body looks like this :

5. Now, double-click Remove


Lump in the specification tree to
edit it.
6. In the Dialog box that appears,
click the Faces to remove field
and select the face as shown.
This face appears in pink.

5. Click OK.
The new body looks like this :
Tools
This theme shows you how to measure distances and angles between geometrical
entities or between points.It also explains how to measure the properties associated to
a selected item.

Draft Analysis Curvature Analysis

Measuring Minimum Distances


Measuring Elements
and Angles
Performing a Draft Analysis
This task explains how to detect if the part you drafted will be easily removed from
the associated mold. For more about drafts, please refer to Basic Draft.

The discretization option should be set to a maximum (the 3D Accuracy -> Fixed
option should be set to 0).

Prior to analyzing the draft, you need to


define a direction by using the compass.
This direction is supposed to be the
pulling direction used for removing the
part from its mold.
1. Drag the compass and drop it onto
plane zx.
Y axis always indicates the direction of
analysis.
Once the compass is snapped to the
plane, you can begin to start using the
Draft Analysis command.

2. Click the Draft Analysis icon .


3. Select the part. Selecting a face is enough for taking the whole part into account.
To improve the display, drag the compass away from the plane and drop it.
The Draft Analysis dialog box is displayed, and the analysis is visible on the part.
The part has three colors: red, light blue and green. Each color is defined in the
dialog box. Each color is associated to a range of draft angle values, as specified in
the fields below. The values range from -20 to 20 degrees. However, these colors
defined for minimum and maximum ranges apply to values inferior to -20 or superior
to 20 degrees too.
4. You can customize these colors. For example, double-click the light blue arrow to
display a color palette you are going to use for creating your own yellow.

5. In the palette that appears, drag the cross inside the spectrum to instantaneously
change the color in the small box below the spectrum. Drag the cross so as to
obtain a yellow color.

6. If needed, move the arrow up or down to vary the brightness of the custom color
and click OK to create your own color.
The Color palette closes and the Draft Analysis displays the yellow color instead of
the light blue one.

7. Select the dark blue arrow and move it down to remove the associated dark blue
field.
The dialog box now displays three colors only.
8. Keep the Sharp left option. The different displays for the color range are:
linear,
sharp left,
sharp center (reserved for surfaces, see the CATIA FreeStyle Shaper &
Optimizer User's Guide),
sharp right (reserved for surfaces, see the CATIA FreeStyle Shaper &
Optimizer User's Guide)
The linear option is available too for analyzing drafted faces. Depending on the
complexity of the part, it may sometimes be more efficient.

9.Enter 2.0 in the field associated to the green arrow. Note that you can manipulate
the draft angle values by clicking on the arrows too. This value is the minimum draft
angle value which makes the removal of the part possible.
The dialog box now looks like this...

.. and the part like this:


Using the values and colors set and the direction defined at the beginning of this
task, you can analyze the results as follows:
- the red areas cannot be removed from the mold. These areas are assigned a draft
angle value set between -90 and 0 degrees.
- the yellow areas cannot be removed from the mold either. These areas are
assigned a draft angle value set between 0 and 2 degrees.
- the green areas can be removed from the mold. These areas are assigned a draft
angle value set between 2 and 90 degrees.

10. Check the On the fly analysis option and move the pointer over a yelow area.
Arrows are displayed under the pointer, identifying the normal to the face at the
pointer location (green arrow). As you move the pointer over the surface, the normal
display is dynamically updated.
The displayed value indicates the angle between the draft direction and the normal
to the surface at the current point.
If you click the green arrow (Normal) you can invert it. You can therefore obtain the
opposite result.
If you click the red arrow, it freezes the location for the arrow allowing general
manipulations according to the compass.
11.Once you have finished analyzing the draft, click Close. Otherwise click Reset to
come back to default values for the color range.
Curvature Analysis
This task explains how to how to analyze the Gaussian curvature of a body.

The visualization mode should be set to Shading with Texture and Edges, and
the discretization option should be set to a maximum (the 3D Accuracy -> Fixed
option should be set to 0).

1. Select a body.

2.Click the Curvature Analysis icon .


The Curvature Analysis dialog box is displayed, and the analysis is visible on the
selected element.
3.Choose the linear option from the dialog box.
Available options to display the color range are:
linear,
sharp left,
sharp center,
sharp right.

The values are ranging from 0 to 1, corresponding to the minimum and maximum
Gaussian curvature respectively.
4.Modify the values in the color range to highlight specific areas of the selected
face.
To do this, click and drag the arrows delimiting the colors, or directly enter the
values.
5.Click Close to exit the command, or reset to come back to default values for the
color range.
Measuring Minimum Distances &
Angles between Geometrical Entities
or Points
This task explains how to measure distances and angles between geometrical
entities (surfaces, edges, vertices and entire products) or between points.

To get the most out of this tool, set the Render Style to Shading with Edges.
For example, open the Measure_Between.CATPart document from the
\online\samples\part_design directory.

1. Click the Measure Between icon .


The Measure Between dialog box appears.

2.Set the desired measure type in the Measure type drop-down list box
Defining measure types:
Between (default type): measures distance and angle between
defined reference and target items
Chain: sets the target item as the reference item for the next
measure
Fan: fixes the reference item selection so that you always
measure from this item
3. Set the desired measure mode in the Target and Reference
drop-down list boxes
Defining measure modes:
Any geometry (default mode): measures distances and angles
between defined geometrical entities (points, edges, surfaces,
etc.)
Any geometry, infinite: measures distances and angles
between planar faces mapped onto infinite planes and straight
line segments mapped onto infinite lines. For all other
selections, the measure mode is the same as any geometry
Point on geometry: measures distances and angles between
points selected on defined geometrical entities
Point only, Edge only, Surface only: measures distances and
angles between points, edges and surfaces respectively.
Dynamic highlighting is limited to points, edges or surfaces
and is thus simplified compared to the Any geometry mode.
Intersection: measures distances and angles between
intersection points between two edges or an edge and a
surface. In this case, two selections are necessary to define
target and reference items
Edge limits: measures distances and angles between
endpoints or midpoints of edges. Endpoints only are proposed
on curved surfaces.
Arc center: measures distances and angles between the
centers of arcs
Coordinate: measures distances and angles between
coordinates entered for target and/or reference items

4. Click to select a surface, edge or vertex.

The appearance of the cursor has


changed to reflect the measure command
you are in. A number (1 for the reference
item and 2 for the target item) also helps
you identify where you are in your
measure.
Dynamic highlighting as you move your cursor over surfaces, faces
and vertices helps you locate the reference and target items.

5. Click to select another surface, edge or vertex.


A line representing the minimum distance vector is drawn between the selected
items in the geometry area. Appropriate distance values are displayed in the
dialog box.
The overall minimum distance as well as distance vector components
between the selected items and x,y,z coordinates of points between
which the minimum distance was measured are given in the Measure
Between dialog box.

The number of decimal places is controlled by the DMU Navigator tab in the
Options dialog box (Tools -> Options, Product).

6. If necessary, adjust the presentation of the measure. You can move the
lines and text of the measure

7. Select another reference item

8. Set the Measure type to Fan to fix the reference item selection so
that you can always measure from this item

9. Select the target item

10. Select another target item

Customizing Your Measure:


You can, at any time, customize the display of the results in both the
geometry area and the dialog box. To do so, click Customize... in the
Measure Between dialog box and set your display in the Measure
Between Customization dialog box. By default, all results are
displayed.
11. Click Close.
Measuring Elements
This task explains how to measure the properties associated to a selected item
(points, edges and surfaces)
To get the most out of this tool, set the Render Style to Shading with Edges.
For example, open the Measure_Between.CATPart document from the
\online\samples\part_design directory.
1. Set View -> Render Style to Shading with Edges

You cannot use this command, if Shading only is selected.

2. Click to select the desired item.

3. Click the Measure Item icon.


The appearance of the cursor has changed to reflect the measure
command you are in.

Dynamic highlighting as you move your cursor over objects helps you locate the
reference item.
The dialog box is updated.
The dialog box gives information about the selected item, in our case a surface.
The center of gravity of the surface is visualized by a point. In the case of non
planar surfaces, the center of gravity is attached to the surface over the
minimum distance.
5. Click Customize... in the Measure Item dialog box to see the
properties the system detects for the various types of item you can
select

Customizing Your Measure:


You can, at any time, customize the display of the results in both the geometry
area and the dialog box. To do so, click Customize... in the Measure Item dialog
box and set your display in the Measure Item Customization dialog box. By
default, all results are displayed.
6. Try selecting other items to measure associated properties
The system detects whether the edge is a line, curve or arc, taking model
accuracy into account. If a line or curve is detected, the dialog box indicates the
length as well as X, Y, Z coordinates of the start and end points. If an arc is
detected, the dialog box also indicates the arc angle, radius or diameter and the
X, Y, Z coordinates of the center point.

7. If necessary, adjust the presentation of the measure:


You can move the lines and text of the measure
The number of decimal places is controlled by the DMU Navigator tab in the
Options dialog box (Tools -> Options).
8. Click Close when done.
Handling Parts in a Multi-Document
Environment
In this task, you are going to copy a part body from one CATPart document to
another, then edit the initial part body. This scenario shows you how the
application harmonizes this type of ulterior modifications. Thanks to the
underlying methodology, you can work in concurrent engineering.
Open the Multi_Document.CATPart document from the
\online\samples\part_design directory.

This scenario assumes there are two CATPart documents. Part2.CATPart is the
target document, Part1.CATPart contains the part body that will be copied, then
edited in Part2.
The part body to be copied looks like this:
1. Select Part Body.

2. Select the Edit -> Copy command to copy the part body.

3.Open a new CATPart document 'Part2.CATPart' and position the cursor


anywhere in the specification tree.
4. Select the Edit -> Paste Special... command.
The Source Definition dialog box appears. Two paste options are available:
AsSpec: the object is copied as well as its design
specifications
AsResultWithLink: the object is copied without its design
specifications

4. For our scenario, select the AsResultWithLink option if not already selected,
and click OK .
The Part Body is copied into the Part2.CATPart document. You will notice that
the specification tree displays it under the name of `Solid'.
5.Now, if you wish, you can fillet four edges. You can actually perform any
modifications you need.

6.Return into Part1.CATPart.


7. Use the Remove command to remove material from the part body.

8. In the Part2.CATPart document, the graphic symbol used for Solid.1 in the
tree is now orange. This means that the initial Part Body underwent
transformations.
You can also notice that the update symbol is displayed next to Part2.
9.What you need to do is update the copied object. Just click Solid in the
specification tree.
10. Select the Update command to update the whole part.

The solid is updated to reflect the change: material is removed.


The specification tree indicates the part body has integrated the modifications
made in the original part body. Note the white sheet symbol next to Solid.1.
SHEET METAL
Getting Started
Before getting into the detailed instructions for using Version 5 CATIA - Sheet Metal
Design, the following tutorial provides a step-by-step scenario demonstrating how to
use key functionalities.
The main tasks proposed in this section are:

Tasks

All together, these tasks should take about 15 minutes to complete.


Accessing the Sheet Metal Workbench
The Sheet Metal Design functions are available when you are in the Part environment.
Several functions are integrated from Part Design workbench.
This task shows how to enter the workbench.

Choose the Sheet Metal Design item from the Start menu.
The Sheet Metal toolbar is displayed and ready to use.
Defining the Sheet Metal Parameters
This task shows you how to configure the sheet metal parameters.

1. Click the Parameters icon .


The Sheet Metal Parameters dialog box is displayed.

2. Enter 1mm in the Thickness field.


3. Enter 5mm in the Bend Radius field.
4. Select the Bend Extremities tab.

5. Select Tangent in the Bend Extremities combo list.


6. Click OK to validate the parameters and close the dialog box.
The Sheet Metal Parameters feature is added in the specification tree.
Creating the First Wall
This task shows how to create the first wall of the Sheet Metal Part.

1. Click the Sketcher icon then select the xy plane.

2. Select the Profile icon .


3. Sketch the contour as shown below:

4. Click the Exit Sketcher icon to return to the 3D world.

5. Click the Wall icon .


The Wall Definition dialog box opens.

6. Click OK.
The Wall.1 feature is added in the specification tree.
The first wall of the Sheet Metal Part is known as the Reference wall.
Creating the Side Walls
This task shows you how to add other walls to the Sheet Metal part.

1. Select the Wall on Edge

icon .
2. Select the left edge.
The Wall Definition
dialog box opens.

3. Enter 50mm in the Length field.


The application previews the wall.

By default, the Material Side is set to the outside and the Sketch Profile to the
top.
4. Reverse the Sketch Profile.
5. Click OK.
The wall is created.
CATIA displays this creation in the specification tree:

6. Select the Wall on Edge icon again.


7. Select the right
edge.
The Wall Definition
dialog box opens with
the parameters
previously selected.

8. Press OK to validate.
9. Select the Wall on Edge icon again.
10. Select the front edge.
The Wall Definition
dialog box opens with
the parameters
previously selected.
11. Enter 30 mm in the Length field.
12. Press OK to validate.
13. Relimit the last wall:
Select
Sketch.4
Place the
cursor and
right-click on
the top
edge: the
contextual
menu is
displayed.
Select
Mark.1
object ->
Isolate
Click the top
edge left
extremity
and drag it
10 mm to
the right
Click the top
edge right
extremity
and drag it
10 mm to
the left

14. Click the Exit Sketcher icon to return to the 3D world.


Eventually, the final part looks like this:
Creating a Cutout
In this task, you will learn how to:
open a sketch on an existing face
define a contour in order to create a cutout.

1. Select the wall


on the right
(Wall.3) to define
the working plane.

2. Click the
Sketcher icon

3. Click the Oblong Profile icon to create the contour.


To access to the
oblong profile,
click the black
triangle on the
Rectangle icon.
It displays a
secondary
toolbar.
4. Click to create the first point and drag the cursor.
5. Click to create the second point.
The first semi-axis of the profile is created.
6. Drag the cursor
and click to create
the third point.
The second
semi-axis is
created and
CATIA displays
the oblong profile.

7. Click the Exit Sketcher icon to return to the 3D world.


8. Select the

Cutout icon .

The Pocket
Definition dialog
box is displayed
and CATIA
previews a cutout
with default
parameters.

9. Set the Type to


Up to last option
to define the limit
of your cutout.
This means that
the application will
limit the cutout
onto the last
possible face, that
is the opposite
wall.
10. Click OK.
This is your
cutout:
Creating the Bends Automatically
This task shows how to create the bends automatically.

Click the Automatic Bends icon .


The bends are created.

CATIA displays the bends creation in the


specification tree: Automatic Bends.1

The Sheet Metal part looks like this:


Unfolding the Sheet Metal Part
This task shows how to unfold the part.

1. Click the Unfold icon .


The part is unfolded according to the reference wall plane, as shown below.

2. Click this icon again to refold the part for the next task.
Extracting Drawings
from the Sheet Metal Part
This task shows how to create the Sheet Metal Part views in the Drafting workbench.

The Sheet Metal part is displayed.

1. Click or select File -> New...


2. Select the Drawing type and click OK.

The Drafting workbench is launched.


The New Drawing dialog box opens.

3. Keep the default parameters and click OK.

For more information about this workbench, refer to CATIA -


Generative Drafting User's Guide.

4. The drawing sheet appears.


5. Tile the windows horizontally.

6. Select the Unfolded View icon in the Drafting toolbar.

This icon is added to the Drafting toolbar providing the Sheet Metal workbench is present.

7. Choose the xy plane in the Sheet Metal specification tree.


The unfolded view is displayed with the bends axes.

Eventually, the Drafting sheet looks like this:


Basic Tasks
The Basic Tasks section explains how to create and modify various kinds of
features.
The table below lists the information you will find.

Theme
Managing the Default Parameters
This section explains and illustrates how to use or modify various kinds of
features.
The table below lists the information you will find.
Using Sheet Metal Design assumes that you are in a CATPart document.
Editing the Sheet and Tool
Parameters
This section explains how to change the different sheet metal parameters.

1. Click the Parameters icon .


The Sheet Metal Parameters dialog box is displayed.

2. Change the Thickness if need be.


3. Change the Bend Radius if need be.
Convention dictates that the inner angle between the two walls is used to
define the bend.
It can vary from 0° to 180° exclusive. This angle is constant and the bend
axis is rectilinear.
4. Press the Sheet Standards Files... button to access to the company
defined standards, if need be. For more information, refer to the Customizing
section.

5. Click OK to validate the Sheet Metal Parameters.


Modifying the Bend Extremities
This section explains how to change the bend extremities.

Click the Parameters icon .


The Sheet Metal Parameters dialog box is displayed.
The second tab concerns the bend extremities.
A combo box displays the six possible axial relimitations for the straight bend:
Minimum with no relief: the
bend corresponds to the
common area of the
supporting walls along the
bend axis.
Square relief: a square relief
is added to the bend
extremity. The L1 and L2
parameters can be modified
if need be.
Round relief: a round relief
is added to the bend
extremity. The L1 and L2
parameters can be modified
if need be.
Linear: the unfolded bend is
split by two planes going
through the corresponding
limit points (obtained by
projection of the bend axis
onto the edges of the
supporting walls).
Tangent: the edges of the
bend are tangent to the
edges of the supporting
walls.
Maximum: the bend is
calculated between the
furthest opposite edges of
the supporting walls.
These options can also be accessed through the pop-up button:
Defining the Bend Allowance
This section explains the calculations related to folding/unfolding operations.

When a bend is unfolded, the sheet metal deformation is represented by the


bend allowance V defined by the formula:
L=A+B+V
where:
L is the total unfolded length
A and B the dimensioning lengths as defined on the figures below:

bend < 90° bend > 90°


Another way to compute the sheet metal deformation is the neutral fiber
definition (K Factor):
W = α * (R + k * T)
where:
W is the flat bend width
R the inner bend radius
T the sheet metal thickness
α the inner bend angle in radians.
If β is the opening bend angle in degrees:
α = π * (180 - β) / 180

Physically, the neutral fiber represents the limit between the material
compressed area inside the bend and the extended area outside the bend.
Ideally, it is represented by an arc located inside the thickness and centered
on the bend axis. Therefore the K Factor always has a value between 0 and
0.5.
When you define the sheet metal parameters, a literal feature defines the
default K Factor, according to the DIN standard:
K = (0.65 + log(R / T) / 2) / 2
This formula can be deactivated or modified using Knowledge Advisor
workbench.
When a bend is created, the bend K Factor and the bend allowance literals
are created.
Two cases may then occur:
If the Sheet Metal K Factor has an activated formula and uses the
default bend radius as input parameter, the same formula is activated
on the bend K Factor with the bend radius as input.

Else the bend K Factor is a formula equal to the Sheet Metal K Factor.
The bend allowance literal is equal to a formula representing the use of the
bend K Factor. This formula is fairly complex and it is strongly recommended
not to delete it.
V = α * (R + k * T) – 2 * (R + T) * tan ( min(π/2,α) / 2)
Though it is possible to deactivate the formula to enter a fixed value.
Finally, the bend flat width is computed from the bend allowance value.
Creating a Sheet Metal Part from an
Existing Solide
This section explains and illustrates how to create and use various kinds of features.
The table below lists the information you will find.
Using Sheet Metal Design assumes that you are in a CATPart document.
Recognizing Thin Part Shapes
This task illustrates how to create a Sheet Metal part using an existing solide.

Open the Scenario1.CATPart document from the \online\samples\sheetmetal directory.


The document contains a solide
created in the Part Design
workbench and it looks like this:

1. Click the Walls Recognition

icon .
2. Indicate a face to be the
reference wall.
The walls are generated from the
Part Design geometry.
The Walls Recognition.1 feature
is added in the tree view.

At the same time, the Sheet Metal parameters are created, deduced from the Part
geometry.

3. Select the icon to edit the


Parameters:
the Thickness is equal to 1
mm
the Bend radius is twice
the thicknessvalue

the Bend Extremities field


is set to Square relief.

The solide is now a Sheet Metal part. All the features are displayed in the specification tree.
You can modify the parameters and add new features from the Sheet Metal workbench to
complete the design.
Generating Bends from Walls
This task explains two ways to generate the bends in the Sheet Metal part.
The Scenario1.CATPart document is still open from the previous task.
If not, open the Scenario1_2.CATPart document from the \online\samples\sheetmetal directory.

1. Select the Bend icon .


The Bend Definition dialog box
opens.

Note that the Radius field is in


gray because it is driven by a
formula: at that time, you cannot
modify the value.
2. Select Wall.1 and Wall.2 in the
specification tree.
The Bend Definition dialog box is
updated.
3. Right-click the Radius field: the
contextual menu appears.

4. Deactivate the formula: you can


now change the value.

5. Enter 4mm for the Radius and


click OK.
The Bend is created.

6. Select now the Automatic

Bends icon .

The bends are created and the


part looks like this:

It is also possible to create first all


the bends, using Automatic
Bends, then modify the
parameters for one or more
1. Select the Automatic Bends

icon .
The bends are created.

2. Select the bend of interest:


Bend.3
The Bend Definition dialog box
opens.

3. Right-click the Radius field: the


contextual menu appears.

4. Deactivate the formula:


you can now change the value.

5. Enter 4mm for the Radius and


click OK.

Bend.3 is modified.
Adding a Sheet Metal Feature
This task shows you how to complete the design by adding an oblong wall-cut across the bend area on the unfolded
view.
The Scenario1.CATPart document is still open from the previous task.
If not, open the Scenario1_3.CATPart document from the \online\samples\sheetmetal directory.

1. Unfold the part using this icon .

2. Select the Sketcher icon and choose the xy plane.

3. Select the Oblong icon .


4. Sketch the following profile and quit the

Sketcher using the Exit icon .

5. Select the Cutout icon .


The Pocket Definition dialog box opens.
6. Enter 1mm in the Length field and click OK.

7. Fold the part again using this icon


Eventually, the part looks like this:
Designing in Context
This section explains and illustrates how to create and use various kinds of
features.
The table below lists the information you will find.
Designing...
This tasks explains how to create a Sheet Metal part in an Assembly context.

Open the Scenario2.CATProduct document from the \online\samples\sheetmetal directory.

You are in Assembly Design workbench.

The document contains two parts.

1. Right-click Product1 in the file tree and


select New Part...
A dialog box is displayed:

2. Enter Part3 in the New part Number


field and click OK.
A New Part dialog box proposes two
locations to define the origin point.
For more information, refer to Inserting a
New Part.
3. Click No to locate the part origin
according to the Product1 origin point.

Select Product1
Choose Edit -> Design Mode
4. Switch to Sheet Metal Design
workbench.

5. Activate Part3.

6. Select the Parameters icon to


create the Sheet Metal characteristics for
the part:
1mm for the Thickness,
3mm for the Bend radius,
Linear for the Bend extremities,
and click OK.

7. Click the Sketcher icon and select


the zx plane.

8. Select the Profile icon .

9. Sketch the contour and set the contraints as shown below:

5mm between the Sheet Metal


vertical walls and each pad
0mm between the Sheet Metal
horizontal walls and each pad top
0mm between the last point of the
Sheet Metal sketch and the right
pad side.

10. Click the Exit icon to return to the 3D world.

11. Select the Extrusion icon .


12. Select the Sheet Metal profile.
The Extrusion Definition dialog box
appears.

13. Enter 50mm for Length1 then click


OK.
The Material Side should be set to the
outside.

14. Select the Automatic Bends icon .


The bends are created.
The new features are shown in the
specification tree:
Extrusion.1 with five walls
Automatic Bends.1 with four
bends.

Eventually, the Sheet Metal part looks


like this:
Modifying the Design
In this task, you are going to modify the height and the sketch of Pad.1.

The Scenario2.CATProduct document is open from the previous task.


if not, open the Scenario2_2.CATProduct document from the
\online\samples\sheetmetal directory.
1. Double-click Part1\Pad.1 in the
specification tree.
The dialog box is displayed.

2. Enter 40mm for the Length and click OK.


The pad is updated.

3. Select the Product and Update the Sheet Metal part.


4. Select Part1\Pad.1\Sketch.1.
5. Modify the sketch:

6. Click the Exit icon to return to


the 3D world.
The constraints are respected.

After the Product update, the document looks like this:


Creating Swept Walls
This section explains and illustrates how to create and use various kinds of

The table below lists the information you will find.


Creating a Flange
This task explains how to generate a flange from a spine and a profile.

Open the SweptWall01.CATPart document from the \online\samples\sheetmetal directory.

1. Select the Flange icon

The Flange Definition


dialog box opens.

2.Select the edge as


shown in red.
3. Enter 2 mm in the
Radius field,
10 mm in the Length field
and 120° for the Angle.

4. Click OK to create the


flange.

The feature is added to the specification tree.


Creating a Hem
This task explains how to generate a hem from a spine and a profile.

The SweptWall01.CATPart document is still open from the previous task.


If not, open the SweptWall02.CATPart document from the \online\samples\sheetmetal directory.

1. Select the Hem icon

The Hem Definition


dialog box opens.

2.Select the edges as


shown in red.

3. Enter 2 mm in the
Radius field, and 3 mm
in the Length field.

4. Click OK to create the


hem.
The feature is added to the specification tree.
Creating a Tear Drop
This task explains how to generate a tear drop from a spine and a profile.

The SweptWall01.CATPart document is still open from the previous task.


If not, open the SweptWall03.CATPart document from the \online\samples\sheetmetal directory.

1. Select the Tear Drop

icon .

The Tear Drop


Definition dialog box
opens.

2.Select the edge as


shown in red.

3. Enter 3 mm in the
Radius field, and 8 mm
in the Length field.

4. Click OK to create the


tear drop.
The feature is added to the specification tree.
Creating a Swept Flange
This task explains how to generate a swept from a spine and a user-defined profile.

The SweptWall01.CATPart document is still open from the previous task.


If not, open the SweptWall04.CATPart document from the \online\samples\sheetmetal directory.

1. Using the Sketcher , define a profile as shown below:

Then quit the Sketcher, using the Exit icon

2. Select the Swept Flange icon .

The User Defined Flange Definition


dialog box opens.

3. Select the edge and the profile, as


shown in red.

The dialog box looks like this:

4. Click OK to create the swept flange.


The feature is added in the specification tree.
Stamping
This section explains and illustrates how to create and use various kinds of
stamps.
The table below lists the information you will find.
Creating a Point Stamp
This task shows you how to create a point stamp by specifying the punch geometrical parameters.

Open the Stamping.CATPart document from the \online\samples\sheetmetal directory.


1. Click the Point Stamp icon

.
2. Select a point on the top
face.
The Point Stamp Definition
dialog box opens, providing
default values.
3. Change the value in the
different fields, if need be:
Height H,
Radius R1,
Radius R2,
Angle A,
Diameter D.

4. Click OK to validate.

The specification tree indicates


the point stamp has been
created.
Extruded Hole
This task shows you how to create an extruded hole by specifying the punch geometrical parameters.

The Stamping.CATPart document is still open from the previous task.


If not, open the Stamping2.CATPart document from the \online\samples\sheetmetal directory.

1. Click the Extruded Hole icon .


2. Select a point on the top face
where you want to place the hole.
The Extruded Hole Definition dialog
box opens, providing default values.
3. Change the value in the different
fields, if need be:
Height H,
Radius R,
Angle A,
Diameter D.

4. Click OK to validate.

The specification tree indicates that


the extruded hole has been created.
Curve Stamp
This task shows you how to create a curve stamp by specifying the punch geometrical parameters.
The Stamping.CATPart document is still open from the previous task.
If not, open the Stamping3.CATPart document from the \online\samples\sheetmetal directory.
1. Click the Curve Stamp icon

.
2. Select Sketch.4, the curve
previously defined.
The Curve Stamp Definition
dialog box opens, providing
default values.

3. Change the value in the


different fields, if need be:
Height H,
Radius R1,
Radius R2,
Angle A,
Length L.

4. Click OK to validate.

The specification tree indicates


that the curve stamp has been
created.
Surface Stamp
This task shows you how to create a surface stamp by specifying the punch geometrical parameters.
The Stamping.CATPart document is still open from the previous task.
If not, open the Stamping4.CATPart document from the \online\samples\sheetmetal directory.

1. Click the Surface Stamp icon .


2. Select Sketch.5, the profile
previously defined.
The Surface Stamp Definition dialog
box opens, providing default values.

3. Change the value in the different


fields, if need be:
Height H,
Radius R1,
Radius R2,
Angle A.

4. Click OK to validate.

The specification tree indicates that the


surface stamp has been created.
Bridge
This task shows you how to create a bridge by specifying the punch geometrical parameters.

The Stamping.CATPart document is still open from the previous task.


If not, open the Stamping5.CATPart document from the \online\samples\sheetmetal directory.

1. Click the Bridge icon .


The Bridge Definition dialog
box opens, providing default
values.
2. Change the value in the
different fields, if need be:
Height H,
Radius R1,
Radius R2,
Angle A,
Length L1,
Length L2.

3. Select a point on the top


face where you want to place
the bridge.
4. Select an edge to give the
direction of the bridge.
5. Click OK to validate.

The specification tree


indicates that the bridge has
been created.
been created.
Creating a Louver
This task shows you how to create a louver by specifying the punch geometrical parameters.

The Stamping.CATPart document is still open from the previous task.


If not, open the Stamping6.CATPart document from the \online\samples\sheetmetal directory.

1. Click the Louver icon .


2. Select Sketch.8, the profile
previously defined on Wall.2.
The Louver Definition dialog box
opens, providing default values.
3. Change the value in the different
fields, if need be:
Height H,
Radius R1,
Radius R2,
Angle A1,
Angle A2.

4. Click OK to validate.

The specification tree indicates that


the louver has been created.
Stiffening Rib
This task shows you how to create a stiffness rib by specifying the punch geometrical parameters.

The Stamping.CATPart document is still open from the previous task.


If not, open the Stamping7.CATPart document from the \online\samples\sheetmetal directory.

1. Click the Stiffness Rib icon .


2. Select Bend.1, where you want to
place a stiffener.
Note that the stiffener will always be
centered on the bend radius,
wherever the point may be along the
curve.
The Stiffening Rib Definition dialog
box opens, providing default values.
3. Change the value in the different
fields, if need be:
Radius R1,
Radius R2,
Angle A,
Length L.

4. Click OK to validate.

The specification tree indicates the


stiffness rib has been created.
Patterning
In this task, you are going to create cutouts according to a pattern.
CATIA allows you to define two types of patterns: rectangular and circular
patterns.
These features make the creation process easier.
Open the Scenario3.CATPart
document from the Samples/sheet
metal directory.
The Sheet Metal part looks like this:

1. Select the cutout you want to


duplicate, that is the rectangular one.

2. Click the Rectangular Pattern icon

.
The Rectangular Pattern Definition
dialog box is displayed. Each tab is
dedicated to a direction to define the
location of the duplicated feature.

Set the specification for the First


Direction:
3. Select the Edge.1, as shown, to
specify the first direction of creation.
An arrow is displayed on the wall.

4. Click the Reverse button or select


the arrow to modify the direction.
5. Keep the Instances & Spacing
options to define the parameters.

Choosing these parameters types


dims the Length field because the
application no longer needs this
specification to space the instances.

6. Enter 2 as the number of instances


you wish to obtain in the first direction.

7. Define the spacing along the grid:


enter 30mm.

Defining the spacing along the grid


and the length of your choice, would
make the application compute the
number of possible instances and
space them at equal distances.

8. Now, click the Second Direction tab


to define the other parameters.

Note that defining a second direction


is not compulsory. Creating a
rectangular pattern defining only one
direction is possible.

9. Select the Edge.2, as shown, to


define the second direction.

10. Keep the Instances & Spacing


option: enter 8 and 10 mm in the
appropriate fields.

Additional cutouts have been aligned


along this second direction.
12. Click OK to repeat the cutouts.
After the update, the Sheet Metal part
looks like this:

13. Select this icon to unfold the


part:
The pattern is updated on the
unfolded view.

Using a similar scenario, you can define a circular pattern.

To know more about patterns, refer to CATIA - Part Design


Interoperability
In a CATPart document, you may have Part Design features and Sheet Metal features
according to the following rules:
Part Design features can be created before Sheet Metal features.
a Part Design feature can also be created after Sheet Metal features as long as
the part is in folded view.
in the unfolded view, the Part Design feature will not be displayed.
it is no longer possible to create Sheet Metal features after this last Part Design
feature in folded view.
1. Create
two walls
with an
Automatic
Bend.
2.Switch to
Part
Design
workbench.
3. Launch
the
Sketcher
and draw
an oblique
line in the
yz plane.
4. Click the

icon to
create a
Stiffener.

5. Switch to the Sheet Metal workbench.

6. Click the Unfold icon .


SHAPE DESIGN
Getting Started
Before getting into the detailed instructions for using CATIA Generative Shape Design,
the following tutorial aims at giving you a feel of what you can do with the product. It
provides a step-by-step scenario showing you how to use key functionalities.
The main tasks described in this section are:

This tutorial should take about 20 minutes to complete.


Entering the Workbench
This first task shows you how to enter the Shape Design workbench and open a
wireframe design part.

Before starting this scenario, you should be familiar with the basic commands
common to all workbenches. These are described in the CATIA Version 5
Infrastructure User's Guide.

1. Select Shape -> Generative Shape Design from the Start menu.
The Shape Design workbench is displayed.

2. Select File -> Open then select the GettingStartedShapeDesign.CATPart


document from the samples/ShapeDesign directory.
A wireframe design part is displayed.

In the rest of this scenario, you will use the construction elements of this part to
build up the following shape design.
Lofting and Offsetting
This task shows you how to create a lofted surface and an offset surface.

Click the Loft icon .


The lofted Surface Definition
dialog box appears.
Select the two section curves.
Select the two guide curves.

4. Click OK to create the lofted surface.

5. Click the Offset icon .

6. Select the lofted surface.


7. Enter an offset value of 2mm.
The offset surface is displayed
normal to the lofted surface.
8. Click OK to create the offset surface.
Splitting, Lofting and Filleting
This task shows how to split surfaces then create a lofted surface and two fillets.

1. Click the Split icon .


The Split Definition dialog box
appears.

2. Select the offset surface by


clicking on the portion that you
want to keep after the split.
3. Select the first plane as
cutting element.
4. Click OK to split the surface.
5. Repeat the previous
operation by selecting the
lofted surface then the second
plane as cutting element.
6. Click OK to split the surface.

7. Click the Loft icon .


The Lofted Surface Definition dialog box appears.
8. Select the edges of the two split surfaces as sections.
9. Click OK to create the lofted surface between the two split surfaces.

10. Click the Shape Fillet icon

.
The Fillet Definition dialog box
appears.
11. Select the first split surface
as the first support element.
12. Select the lofted surface as
the second support element.
13. Enter a fillet radius of 3mm.
The orientations of the
surfaces are shown by means
of arrows.
14. Make sure that the surface
orientations are correct, then
click OK to create the first fillet
surface.
15. Select the second split
surface as the first support
element.
16. Select the lofted surface as
the second support element.
17. Enter a fillet radius of 3mm.
18. Make sure that the surface
orientations are correct, then
click OK to create the second
Sweeping and Filleting
This task shows how to create swept surfaces and fillets on both sides of the

You will use the profile element on the side of the part for this. In this task you will
also create a symmetrical profile element on the opposite side of the part.

1. Click the Sweep icon .


The Swept Surface Definition
dialog box appears.
2. Use the combo to choose the
Explicit profile type.

3. Select the guide curve.


4. Select the profile element.
5. Select the central curve as the
spine.
6. Click OK to create the swept
surface.
7. Click the Symmetry icon .
The Symmetry Definition dialog
box appears.
8. Select the profile element to
be transformed by symmetry.
9. Select the YZ plane as
reference element.
10. Click OK to create the
symmetrical profile element.

11. Click the Sweep icon


again.
12. Select the guide curve and
the profile element.
13. Select the central curve as
the spine.
14. Click OK to create the swept
surface.

15. To create a fillet between the


side portion and the central part

click the Shape Fillet icon .


16. Select the side sweep
element and the central portion
of the part then enter a fillet
radius of 1mm.
17. Click Apply to preview the
fillet.
18. Select the other sweep
element and the central portion
of the part then enter a fillet
radius of 1mm.
19. Click OK to create the fillet.
Using the Historical Graph
This task shows how to use the historical graph.

1. Select the element for which you want to display the historical graph.

2. Click the Show Graph icon .


The Historical Graph dialog box appears.

In this case, you can examine the history of events that led to the construction of
the Loft.1 element. Each branch of the graph can be expanded or collapsed
depending on the level of detail required.
The following icon commands are available.
Add graph
Remove graph
Reframe graph
Surface or Part representation
Parameters filter
Constraints filter.
3. Just click the Close icon to exit this mode.
Transforming the Part
This task shows you how to modify the part by applying an affinity operation.

1. Click the Affinity icon .


The Affinity Definition dialog
box appears.

2. Select the end section


profile to be transformed by
the affinity.
3. Specify the characteristics
of the axis system to be used
for the affinity operation:
point PT0 as the origin
plane XY as reference
plane
horizontal edge of the
corner profile as
x-axis.

4. Specify the affinity ratios:


X=1, Y=1 and Z=1.5.
5. Click OK to create the new profile.
6. Edit the definition of the lofted surface to replace the section profile by the new
profile.

7. If needed, click the Update icon to update your design.


Basic Tasks
The basic tasks you will perform in the CATIA - Generative Shape Design
workbench will involve creating and modifying wireframe and surface geometry
that you will use in your part.
The table below lists the information you will find in this section.
Theme
Creating Wireframe Geometry
CATIA - Generative Shape Design allows you to create wireframe geometry such as points,
lines, planes and curves. You can make use of this elementary geometry when you create
more complex surfaces later on.

Creating Points Creating Lines Creating Circles

Creating Splines Creating Corners Creating Connect Curves

Creating Parallel Curves Creating Boundary Curves Creating Planes


Creating Projections Creating Intersections
Creating Points
This task shows the various methods for creating points:
by coordinates
on a curve
on a plane
on a surface
at a circle center
tangent points on a curve.

1. Click the Point icon .


The Point Definition dialog box appears.
2. Use the combo to choose the desired
point type.

Coordinates
Enter the X, Y, Z coordinates.

The corresponding point is displayed.

On curve
Select a curve
Optionally, select a reference point.

If this point is not on the curve, it


is projected onto the curve.
If no point is selected, the
curve's extremity is used as
reference.
Select an option button to determine
whether the new point is to be
created:
a given distance along
the curve from the
reference point
a given ratio between the
reference point and the
curve's extremity.
Enter the distance or ratio value.

The corresponding point is


displayed.
You can click the Nearest
extremity button to display the
point at the nearest extremity of
the curve.
You can click the Middle Point
button to display the mid-point
of the curve.
You can use the Reverse Direction
button to display:
the point on the other
side of the reference
point (if a point was
selected originally)
the point from the other
extremity (if no point was
selected originally).
On plane
Select a plane.
Optionally, select a point to define a reference for computing coordinates
in the plane.

If no point is selected, the projection of the local axis system's origin


on the plane is taken as reference.
Click in the plane to display a point.

On surface
Select the surface where the point is to be created.
Optionally, select a reference point.
Select a line to take its orientation as reference direction or a plane to take
its normal as reference direction.
You can also use the contextual menu to specify the X, Y, Z components
of the reference direction.
Enter a distance along the reference direction to display a point.
Circle center
Select a circle or circular arc.

A point is displayed at the circle center.


Tangent on curve
Select a curve and a direction line.

A point is displayed at each


tangent.

3. Click OK to create the point.


The point (identified as Point.xxx) is added to the specification tree.
Creating Lines
This task shows the various methods for creating lines:
point to point
point and direction
angle or normal to curve
tangent to curve
normal to surface.

1. Click the Line icon .


The Line Definition dialog box appears.
2. Use the combo to choose the desired line type.

A line type will be proposed automatically in some cases depending on your first element
selection.

Point - Point
Select two points.
The corresponding line is displayed.

Point - Direction
Select a reference Point and a Direction line.

A vector parallel to the direction line is displayed at the reference point.


Proposed Start and End points of the new line are shown.
Specify the Start and End points of the new line.

The corresponding line is displayed.

Start and End points are specified by entering distance values or by using the graphic
manipulators.
You can reverse the direction of the line by either clicking the displayed vector or selecting the
Reverse Direction button.
Angle or normal to curve
Select a reference Curve and a
Support surface containing that
curve.
Select a Point on the curve.
Enter an Angle value.

A line is displayed at the given


angle with respect to the
tangent to reference curve at
the selected point. These
elements are displayed in the
plane tangent to the surface at
the selected point.
You can click on the Normal to
Curve button to specify an
angle of 90 degrees.
Proposed Start and End points
of the line are shown.
Specify the Start and End points of
the new line.
The corresponding line is
displayed.
Tangent to curve
Select a reference Point and a
Curve.

A vector tangent to the curve


is displayed at the reference
point.
Proposed Start and End points
of the new line are shown.
Specify Start and End points to
define the new line.
The corresponding line is
displayed.
Normal to surface
Select a reference Surface and a Point.
A vector normal to the surface is displayed at the reference point.
Proposed Start and End points of the new line are shown.
Specify Start and End points to define the new line.

The corresponding line is displayed.

3. For most line types you can select the Geometry on Support check box if you want the line to
be projected onto a support surface.
In this case just select a support surface.
The figure below illustrates this case.

4. Click OK to create the line.


The line (identified as Line.xxx) is added to the specification tree.
Creating Circles
This task shows the various methods for creating circles and circular arcs:
center and radius
center and point
two points and radius
three points
bitangent and radius
bitangent and point
tritangent.

1. Click the Circle icon .


The Circle Definition dialog box appears.
2. Use the combo to choose the desired circle
type.

Center and radius


Select a point as circle Center.
Select the Support plane or surface
where the circle is to be created.
Enter a Radius value.

Depending on the active Circle Limitations icon,


the corresponding circle or circular arc is
displayed.
For a circular arc, you can specify the Start and
End angles of the arc.

If a support surface is selected, the plane tangent to the surface at the selected point is used.
Start and End angles can be specified by entering values or by using the graphic manipulators.
Center and point
Select a point as Circle center.
Select a Point where the circle is to be created.
Select the Support plane or surface where the circle is to be created.

Depending on the active Circle Limitations icon, the corresponding circle or circular arc is displayed.
For a circular arc, you can specify the Start and End angles of the arc.
Two points and radius
Select two points where the circle is to be
created.
Select the Support plane or surface
where the circle is to be created.
Enter a Radius value.
Depending on the active Circle Limitations icon,
the corresponding circle or circular arc is
displayed.
For a circular arc, you can specify the trimmed
or complementary arc using the two selected
points as end points.
You can use the Second Solution button, to
display the alternative arc.

Three points
Select three points where the circle is to be created.
Depending on the active Circle Limitations icon, the corresponding circle or circular arc is displayed.
For a circular arc, you can specify the trimmed or complementary arc using the two of the selected
points as end points.
3. In each of the methods above, you can select
the Geometry on Support check box if you want
the circle to be projected onto a support surface.
In this case just select a support surface.

Bitangent and radius


Select two curves (in Curve 1 and Element 2 fields) to which the circle is to be tangent.
Select a Support surface.
Enter a Radius value.
Several solutions may be possible, so click in the region where you want the circle to be.
Depending on the active Circle Limitations icon, the corresponding circle or circular arc is displayed.
For a circular arc, you can specify the trimmed or complementary arc using the two tangent points as
end points.
Bitangent and point
Select two curves to which the circle is to be tangent.
Select a Point on the second curve.
Select a Support plane or surface.
Several solutions may be possible, so click in the region where you want the circle to be.
Depending on the active Circle Limitations icon, the corresponding circle or circular arc is displayed.
Complete circle

For a circular arc, you can choose the trimmed or complementary arc using the two tangent points as
end points.

Trimmed circle Complementary trimmed circle


Tritangent
Select three curves to which the circle is to be tangent.
Select a Support surface.
Several solutions may be possible, so click in the region where you want the circle to be.
Depending on the active Circle Limitations icon, the corresponding circle or circular arc is displayed.
For a circular arc, you can specify the trimmed or complementary arc using the two tangent points as
end points.
4. Click OK to create the circle or circular arc.
The circle (identified as Circle.xxx) is added to the specification tree.
Creating Splines
This task shows the various methods for creating spline curves.

1. Click the Spline

icon .
The Spline Definition
dialog box appears.
2. Select two or more
points where the
spline is to be
created.
An updated spline is
visualized each time
a point is selected.

3. You can select the


Geometry on support
check box if you want
the spline to be
projected onto a
support surface.
It is better when the
tangent directions
belong to the
support, that is when
a projection is
possible.
In the figure above, the spline was created
on a planar support grid.
In this case just
select a surface or
plane.
4. If you want to set
tangency conditions
at the spline's
extremities, you can
right-click on the
Tangent Dir. field to
display a contextual
menu. Using this
menu, you can:
Edit
components
(specify the
tangent
direction at the
start and end
points of the
spline)
Specify the
line direction
by choosing
the X, Y or Z
axis.

You only have to


select a plane or a
line to create a
tangent.

5. It is possible to edit the spline by first selecting a point in the dialog box list
then choosing a button to either:
Add a point after the selected point
Add a point before the selected point
Remove the selected point
Replace the selected point by another point.
Note that there are prerequisites for the Points Specifications and you must
enter your information in the following order:
Tangent Dir. (tangent direction)
Tangent Tension
Curvature Dir. (curvature direction)
Curvature Radius (to select it, just click in the field)

The fields become active as you select values.

6. Click OK to create the spline.


The spline (identified as Spline.xxx) is added to the specification tree.

To add a parameter to a point, select a line in the Points list. This list is
highlighted.
You have two possibilities:
extended parameters
select any line or plane for the direction.
Creating Corners
This task shows you how to create a corner between two curves or between a point and
a curve.

1. Click the Corner icon .


The Corner Definition dialog box appears.

2. Select a curve or a point as first reference element.


3. Select a curve as second reference element.
The corner will be created between these two references.
4. Select the Support plane or planar surface.
The reference elements must lie on this support.
5. Enter a Radius value.

6. Several solutions may be possible, so click in the region where you want the corner to
be.
7. You can select the Trim elements check
box if you want to trim and assemble the two
reference elements to the corner.

8. Click OK to create the corner.


The corner (identified as Corner.xxx) is added to the specification tree.
Creating Connect Curves
This task shows how to create a connect curve between two curves.

Open the Connect.CATPart document from the online/Samples/ShapeDesign


directory.

1. Click the Connect Curve icon .


The Connect Curve Definition dialog box
appears.
2. Select the first Curve and a Point on
the curve.
3. Use the combo to specify the desired
Continuity type:
Point, Tangency or Curvature.
4. If needed, enter a tension value.

5. Select the second Curve and a Point on the curve.


6. Use the combo to specify the desired Continuity type:
Point, Tangency or Curvature.
7. If needed, enter a Tension value.
The connect curve is displayed between the two selected points according to the
specified continuity and tension values.
Connect curve with point continuity at Connect curve with point continuity at
both points. one point
and tangent continuity at the other.

Connect curve with point continuity at Connect curve with tangent continuity at
one point one point
and curvature continuity at the other. and curvature continuity at the other.

Connect curve with curvature continuity Connect curve with tangent continuity at
at both points. both points.
8. An arrow is displayed at each extremity of the curve. You can click the arrow
to reverse the orientation of the curve at that extremity.
A graphic manipulator also allows you to modify the tension at the extremity of
the connect curve.

9. You can select the Trim elements check box if you want to trim and assemble
the two initial curves to the connect curve.

10. Click OK to create the connect curve.


The curve (identified as Connect.xxx) is added to the specification tree.
Creating Parallel Curves
This task shows you how to create a curve that is parallel to a reference curve.

Open the Parallelcurves.CATPart document from the


online/Samples/ShapeDesign directory.
1. Click the Parallel
Curve icon .
The Parallel
Curve Definition
dialog box
appears.

2. Select the reference


Curve to be offset.
3. Select the Support
plane or surface on
which the reference
curve lies.
4. Specify the Offset by
entering a value or
using the graphic
manipulator.
The parallel
curve is
displayed on the
support surface
and normal to the
reference curve.
5. Click OK to create the parallel curve.

The curve (identified as Parallel.xxx) is added to the specification


tree.

You can use the Reverse Direction button to display the parallel curve on the
other side of the reference curve.
Creating Boundary Curves
This task shows how to create the boundary curve of a surface.

Open the Boundaries.CATPart document from the online/Samples/ShapeDesign directory.

1.Click the Boundary icon .


The Boundary Definition dialog box
appears.

2. Use the combo to choose the Propagation type:


Complete boundary: the selected edge is propagated around the entire surface
boundary.
Point continuity: the selected edge is propagated around the surface boundary until
a point discontinuity is met.
Tangency continuity: the selected edge is propagated around the surface boundary
until a tangent discontinuity is met.
None: no propagation or continuity condition is imposed, only the selected edge is
kept.

Tangent continuity
None

Point continuity All contours


3. Select a Surface edge.
The boundary curve is displayed according to the selected propagation type.
4. You can relimit the boundary curve by means of two elements.
5. Click OK to create the boundary curve.
The curve (identified as Boundary.xxx) is added to the specification tree.
Creating Planes
This task shows the various methods for creating planes:

from its equation


through three points
through two lines
through a point and a line
through a planar curve
tangent to a surface
normal to a curve
offset from a plane
offset through point
at an angle to a plane
mean plane through several points.

1. Click the Plane icon .


The Plane Definition dialog box
appears.
2. Use the combo to choose the
desired Plane type.

Once you have defined the plane, it is represented by a red square symbol,
which you can move using the graphic manipulator.
Equation
Enter the A, B, C, D components of the Ax + By + Cz = D plane equation.
Through three points
Select three points.

The plane passing through the three points is displayed.

Through two lines


Select two lines.

The plane passing


through the two line
directions is
displayed.

Through point and line


Select a Point and a Line.

The plane passing through the point and the line is displayed.

Through planar curve


Select a planar Curve.

The plane containing the curve is displayed.

Tangent to surface
Select a reference
Surface and a Point.

A plane is displayed
tangent to the
surface at the
specified point.
Normal to curve
Select a reference Curve
and a Point.

A plane is displayed
normal to the curve
at the specified
point.

Offset from plane


Select a reference Plane then enter an Offset value.
A plane is displayed offset from the reference plane.
Offset through point
Select a reference Plane and a Point.

A plane is displayed parallel the reference plane and passing through


the selected point.
Angle or normal to plane
Select a reference Plane and a Rotation axis.
Enter an Angle value.

A plane is displayed passing through the line. It is oriented at the


specified angle to the reference plane.
Mean through points
Select three or more points to display the mean plane through these
points.
It is possible to edit the plane by first selecting a point in the dialog
box list then choosing an option to either:
Remove the selected point
Replace the selected point by another point.

3. Click OK to create the plane.


The plane (identified as Plane.xxx) is added to the specification tree.
Creating Projections
This task shows you how to create geometry by projecting an element onto a
support element.
The projection may be normal or along a direction.
You can project:
a point onto a surface or wireframe support
wireframe geometry onto a surface support.
Open the Projection.CATPart document from the online/Samples/ShapeDesign
directory.

If you select Normal as


Projection type:

1. Click the Projection icon


.
The Projection
Definition dialog box
appears.
2. Select the element to be
Projected.
3. Select the Support
element.
4. Use the combo to specify
the direction type for the
projection:
Normal.
In this case,
projection is
done normal
to the support
element.
5. Whenever several projections are possible, you can select the Nearest
Solution check box to keep the nearest projection.
6. Click OK to create the projection element.
The projection (identified as Project.xxx) is added to the specification tree.

If you select Along a direction as


projection type:
1. Click the Projection icon
.
The Projection
Definition dialog box
appears.

2. Select the element to be


Projected.
3. Use the combo to specify
the direction type for the
projection:
Along a direction.
In this case, the
projection is done
along the selected
direction.
4. Select the Direction, that is
a line to take its orientation
as the translation direction
or a plane to take its
normal as the translation
direction.
You can also specify the
direction by means of X, Y,
Z vector components by
using the contextual menu
on the Direction field.
5. Whenever several projections are possible, you can select the Nearest
Solution check box to keep the nearest projection.
6. Click OK to create the projection element.
The projection (identified as Project.xxx) is added to the specification tree.
Creating Intersections
This task shows you how to create wireframe geometry by intersecting two
elements.
You can intersect:
two wireframe elements
two surfaces
a wireframe element and a surface.

Open the Intersectsurface.CATPart and the Intersectsurf.CATPart documents


from the online/Samples/ShapeDesign directory.

1. Click the Intersection icon .


The Intersection Definition dialog box
appears.

2. Select the two elements to be intersected.


The intersection is displayed.

This example shows the line resulting This example shows the curve resulting
from the intersection of a plane and a from the intersection of two surfaces.
surface.

3. Click OK to create the intersection element.


This element (identified as Intersect.xxx) is added to the specification tree.
Creating Surfaces
CATIA - Generative Shape Design allows you to model both simple and complex
surfaces using techniques such as lofting, sweeping and filling.

Creating Extruded
Creating Revolution Surfaces Creating Offset Surfaces
Surfaces

Creating Swept Surfaces Creating Fill Surfaces Creating Lofted Surfaces

Extracting Geometry
Creating Extruded Surfaces
This task shows how to create a surface by extruding a profile along a given direction.

1. Click the Extrude icon .


The Extruded Surface Definition dialog box
appears.

2. Select the Profile to be extruded and specify the desired extrusion Direction.
You can select a line to take its orientation as the extrusion direction or a plane to take
its normal as extrusion direction.
You can also specify the direction by means of X, Y, Z vector components by using the
contextual menu on the Direction area.
3. Enter values or use the graphic manipulators to define the start and end limits of the
extrusion.

4. You can click the Reverse Direction button to display the extrusion on the other side
of the selected profile.
5. Click OK to create the surface.
The surface (identified as Extrude.xxx) is added to the specification tree.
Creating Revolution Surfaces
This task shows how to create a surface by revolving a profile around an axis.

1. Click the Revolve icon .


The Revolution Surface Definition dialog
box appears.

2. Select the Profile and a line indicating the desired Revolution axis.
3. Enter angle values or use the graphic manipulators to define the angular limits
of the revolution surface.

4. Click OK to create the surface.


The surface (identified as Revolute.xxx) is added to the specification tree.
There must be no intersection between the axis and the profile.
Creating Offset Surfaces
This task shows how to create a surface by offsetting an existing surface.

Open the Offset.CATPart document from the online/Samples/ShapeDesign directory.

1. Click the Offset icon .


The Offset Surface Definition dialog box
appears.

2. Select the Surface to be offset.


3. Specify the Offset by entering a value or
using the graphic manipulator.
The offset surface is displayed normal to
the reference surface.
4. An arrow indicates the proposed
direction for the offset.

5. Click OK to create the surface.


You can display the offset surface on the other side of the reference surface by clicking
either the arrow or the Reverse Direction button.

The figure above shows the offset after


clicking the Reverse Direction button

The surface (identified as Offset.xxx) is added to the specification tree.


Creating Swept Surfaces
You can create a swept surface by sweeping out a profile in planes normal to a spine
curve while taking other user-defined parameters
(such as guide curves and reference elements) into account.
You can sweep an explicit profile:
along one or two guide curves (in this case the first guide curve is used as the
spine)
along one or two guide curves while respecting a spine.
The profile is swept out in planes normal to the spine.
In addition, you can control the positioning of the profile while it is being swept by
means of a reference surface.
The profile position may be fixed with respect to the guide curve (positioned profile) or
user-defined in the first sweep plane.
You can sweep an implicit linear profile along a spine. This profile is defined by:
two guide curves and two length values for extrapolating the profile
a guide curve and a middle curve
a guide curve, a reference curve, an angle and two length values for
extrapolating the profile
a guide curve, a reference surface, an angle and two length values for
extrapolating the profile.
You can sweep an implicit circular profile along a spine. This profile is defined by:
three guide curves
two guide curves and a radius value
a center curve and two angle values defined from a reference curve (that also
defines the radius)
a center curve and a radius.

Swept Surfaces using an Explicit Profile


This task shows how to create swept
surfaces that use an explicit profile.
You can use the wireframe elements
shown in this figure.

Open the Sweep.CATPart document from


the online/Samples/ShapeDesign
directory.

1. Click the Sweep icon .


The Swept Surface Definition dialog box
appears.
2. Use the combo to choose the Explicit
profile type.

3. Select a Guide curve. The figure below shows the result


obtained after selecting
4. Select the planar Profile to be swept the first guide curve and the profile.
out.
5. If needed, select a Spine.
If no spine is selected, the guide curve is
implicitly used as the spine.
The figure below shows the result
obtained when you include
a linear spine element in the definition.
.
The figure below shows the result
obtained when you include
a linear spine element in the definition.

6. If needed, select a Second guide


curve.

7. If you want to control the position of the profile during the sweep, you can select
a reference Surface. You can impose a Reference angle on this surface.
By default, the sweep follows the mean plane of the spine, otherwise it follows the
reference.
8. If you want to manually position the profile, click the Position profile >> button to
access the following positioning parameters.
These parameters and the graphic manipulators will allow you to position the
profile in the first sweep plane.
Specify a positioning point in the first sweep plane by either entering
coordinates or selecting a point.
Specify the x-axis of the positioning axis system by either selecting a line or
specifying a rotation angle.
Select the X-axis inverted check box to invert the x-axis orientation (while
keeping the y-axis unchanged).
Select the Y-axis inverted check box to invert the x-axis orientation (while
keeping the y-axis unchanged).
Specify an anchor point on the profile by selecting a point. This anchor point
is the origin of the axis system that is associated to the profile.
If you want to go back to the original profile, click the Sweep original profile <<
button to access the original positioning parameters.
9. Click OK to create the swept surface.
The surface (identified as Sweep.xxx) is added to the specification tree.

Swept Surfaces using a Linear Profile


This task shows how to create swept surfaces that use an implicit linear profile.

1. Click the Sweep icon .


The Swept Surface Definition dialog box
appears.
2. Use the combo to choose the Line
profile type.
The possible cases are described
below.

Select two guide curves.


You can enter one or two length
values to define the width of the
swept surface.

Select two guide curves.


Select the As middle curve check
box to use the second guide
curve as middle curve.
Select a guide curve, then select
the With Angle tab to specify a
reference curve and a reference
angle.
You can enter one or two length
values to define the width of the
swept surface.

Select a guide curve, then select


the With Angle tab to specify a
reference surface and a
reference angle.
You can enter one or two length
values to define the width of the
swept surface.

In any of the above cases, you can select a spine if you want to specify a spine
different from the first guide curve.
3. Click OK to create the swept surface.
The surface (identified as Sweep.xxx) is added to the specification tree.

Swept Surfaces using a Circular Profile


This task shows how to create swept
surfaces that use an explicit profile.
You can use the wireframe elements shown
in this figure.

Open the Sweep.CATPart document from


the online/Samples/ShapeDesign directory.
1. Click the Sweep icon .
The Swept Surface Definition dialog box
appears.
2. Use the combo to choose the Circle
profile type.

The two following cases are possible using


guide curves.
Select three guide curves.

In the figure below, the radius value is 30.

Select two guide curves and enter a


Radius value.
You can then choose between four
possible solutions by clicking the
Other Solution button.
The two following cases are possible using
a center curve.
Select a Center Curve and enter a
Radius value.

In the example above, we selected a spine

Select a Center Curve and a


Reference angle curve.
You can relimit the swept surface by
entering two angle values.

In the example above, we selected the


following values:
Center curve: DemoGuide 3
Reference angle: DemoGuide 1
Angle 1: 0 deg
Angle 2: 60 deg
In any of the above cases, you can select a spine if you want to specify a spine
different from the first guide curve or center curve.
3. Click OK to create the swept surface.
The surface (identified as Sweep.xxx) is added to the specification tree.
Creating Fill Surfaces
This task shows how to create fill surfaces between a number of boundary
segments.
Open the Fill.CATPart document from the online/Samples/ShapeDesign
directory.

1. Click the Fill icon .


The Fill Surface Definition dialog
box appears.
2. Select curves or surface
edges to form a closed
boundary.
You can select a support
surface for each curve or edge.
In this case continuity will be
assured between the fill surface
and selected support surfaces.

3. Use the combo to specify the


desired continuity type between
any selected support surfaces
and the fill surface: Point or
Tangent.
The fill surface is displayed
within the boundary.

4. You can edit the boundary by first selecting an element in the dialog box list
then choosing a button to either:
Remove the selected element
Replace the selected element by another curve or support surface
Add a curve at the end of the list.
5. Click OK to create the fill
surface.

The surface (identified as Fill.xxx) is added to the specification tree.


Creating Lofted Surfaces
This task shows how to create a lofted surface.
You can generate a lofted surface by sweeping two or more planar section curves along an automatically
computed or user-defined spine. The surface can be made to respect one or more guide curves.
Open the Loft.CATPart document from the online/Samples/ShapeDesign directory.

1. Click the Loft icon .


The Lofted Surface Definition dialog
box appears.

2. Select two or more planar section curves.


Example of a loft defined by three planar sections:
The curves must be continuous in point.
You can select tangent surfaces for the start and
end section curves.
A closing point can be selected for a closed
section curves.
Example of a loft defined by 2 planar sections and 2 guide
3. If needed, select one or more guide curves. curves:

Guide curves must intersect each section curve


and must be continuous in point.
The first guide curve will be a boundary of the
loft if it intersects the first extremity of each
section curve.
Similarly, the last guide curve will be a boundary
of the loft if it intersects the last extremity of each
section curve.

You can make a loft tangent to an adjacent surface by selecting an end section that lies on the adjacent
surface.
In Figure 2 a loft tangent to the existing surface has been created:

Figure 2
Figure 1

You can also impose tangency conditions by specifying a direction for the tangent vector (selecting a plane
to take its normal, for example). This is useful for creating parts that are symmetrical with respect to a plane.
Tangency conditions can be imposed on the two symmetrical halves.

4. In the Spine tab page, select the Spine check box to use a spine that is automatically computed by the
program or select a curve to impose that curve as the spine.
Note that the spine curve must be normal to each section plane and must be continuous in tangency.

You can create lofted surfaces between closed section curves. These curves have point continuity at their
closing point.
By default, the closing points of each section are linked to each other.
The red arrows in the figures below represent the closing points of the closed section curves. You can
change the closing point by selecting any point on the curve.
The surface is twisted A new closing point has been imposed
to get a non-twisted surface

5. It is possible to edit the loft reference elements by first selecting a curve in the dialog box list, or by
selecting the text on the figure, then choosing a button to either:
remove the selected curve
replace the selected curve by another curve
add another curve
More possibilities are available with the contextual menu and by right-clicking on the red text or on the
object. For example, it is possible to remove and replace tangent surfaces and closing points.
The following example illustrates the result when the tangency condition is removed between the blue loft
and the adjacent surface.

6. Click OK to create the lofted surface.


The surface (identified as Loft.xxx) is added to the specification tree.

Sections can be 3D curves with following restrictions:


the intersection between one 3D profile and all guides must be coplanar (if three guides or more are
defined)
in case of a user-defined spine, this spine must be normal to the plane implicitely obtained above.

Coupling
This task presents the two kinds of coupling during the creation of the lofted surface:
coupling between two consecutive sections
coupling between guides

These couplings compute the distribution of isoparameters on the surface.


Open the Loftcoupling.CATPart document from the online/Samples/ShapeDesign directory.

Coupling between two consecutive sections

This coupling is based on the curvilinear


abscissa.

1. Click the Loft icon .


The Lofted Surface Definition dialog
box appears.

2. Select the two consecutive sections.

3. Click OK to create the loft.


If you want to create a coupling between particular points, you must add guides.

Coupling between guides

This coupling is performed by the spine.

If a guide is the concatenation of several curves, the resulting loft will contain as many surfaces as curves
within the guide.
Extracting Geometry
This task shows how to perform an extract from elements (curves, points, solids, and so forth.).

1. Select an edge or the face of an element.


The selected element is highlighted.

2. Click the Extract icon .

The extracted element (identified as Extract.xxx) is added to the specification tree.


Performing Operations on Shape Geometry
CATIA - Generative Shape Design allows you to modify your design using techniques such as trimming,
extrapolating and filleting.

Splitting Geometry Trimming Geometry Joining Geometry Shape Fillets

Edge Fillets Variable Radius Fillets Face-Face Fillets Tritangent Fillets

Transforming
Translating Performing Symmetry Transforming Geometry by
Geometry by Rotating Geometry
Geometry on Geometry Affinity
Scaling

Inverting the
Extrapolating Surfaces Extrapolating Curves Orientation of Creating Nearest Sub-element
Geometry
Splitting Geometry
This task shows how to split a surface or wireframe element by means of a cutting element.
You can split:
a wireframe element by a point, another wireframe element or a surface
a surface by a wireframe element or another surface.

1. Click the Split icon .


The Split Definition dialog box appears.

2. Select the element to be split.


You should make your selection by clicking on the portion that
you want to keep after the split.

3. Select the cutting element.


A preview of the split appears. You can change the portion to be
kept by selecting that portion.
You can also select the portion to be kept by clicking the Other
side button.

4. Click OK to split the element.


The created element (identified as Split.xxx) is added to the
specification tree.

When necessary, the cutting element will be extrapolated in order to split a surface correctly (as shown in
following figure).
Trimming Geometry
This task shows how to trim two surfaces or two wireframe elements.

1. Click the Trim icon .


The Trim Definition dialog box appears.

2. Select the two surfaces or two


wireframe elements to be trimmed.
A preview of the trimmed element
appears. You can change the portion to
be kept by selecting that portion.
You can also select the portions to be
kept by clicking the Other side of
element 1 and Other side of element 2
buttons.

You should make your selections by clicking on the portions that you want to
keep after the trim.
When necessary, the cutting elements will be extrapolated in order to trim
surfaces correctly.
3. Click OK to trim the surfaces or
wireframe elements.
The trimmed element (identified as
Trim.xxx) is added to the specification
tree.
Joining Surfaces or Curves
This task shows how to join surfaces or curves.
The surfaces or curves to be joined must be adjacent.

1. Click the Join icon.


The Join Definition dialog box
appears.

2. Select the surfaces or curves to be


joined.
3. You can edit the list of elements in
the definition list by means of the
Remove and Replace buttons.

4. Click OK to create the joined surface or curve.


The surface or curve (identified as Join.xxx) is added to the specification tree.
Shape Fillets
This task shows how to create a shape fillet between two other surfaces.

Open the Shape-fillet.CATPart document from the online/Samples/ShapeDesign


directory.

1. Click the Shape Fillet icon .


The Fillet Definition dialog box appears.

3. Select a surface as the first support element.


4. Select another surface as the second support element.
5. Enter the value of the fillet Radius.
Up to four fillet locations may be possible.
To help you decide on the location an arrow is displayed on each selected surface.
You can click on the arrows to specify the desired fillet location.
6. Use the combo to choose the desired
type of extremity for the fillet:
Straight
Smooth
Maximum
Minimum.

Straight fillet

Maximum fillet
Smooth fillet

7. Click the Trim support elements check box to trim the support elements and
assemble them to the fillet.
8. Click OK to create the shape fillet.
The surface (identified as Fillet.xxx) is added to the specification tree.
Edge Fillets
Edge fillets are useful for providing a transitional surface along a sharp internal
edge of a surface.
This task shows how to create a constant radius fillet along the internal edge of a
joined surface.
Open the Fillet.CATPart document from the online/Samples/ShapeDesign
directory.

1. Click the Edge Fillet icon .


2. Select the joined surface.

The Edge Fillet Definition dialog box


appears.
3. Use the combo to select the
desired type of extremity for the fillet:
Smooth
Straight
Maximum
Minimum.

4. Enter the value of the fillet Radius.


A preview of the fillet appears.
5. You can choose the Propagation
type:
Tangency: the fillet is
propagated up to the first edge
that is not continuous in
tangency.
Minimal: the fillet is
propagated up to the first
geometric limitation.
6. Click OK to create the fillet
surface.
The surface (identified as
EdgeFillet.xxx) is added to the
specification tree.
Variable Radius Fillets
This task shows how to create a variable radius fillet. In this type of fillet the
radius varies at selected points along a selected edge.

1. Click the Variable Radius Fillet icon .


The Variable Edge Fillet Definition dialog box
appears.

2. Select the edge to be filleted.


CATIA detects the two vertices and displays
the default radius value.
3. Use the combo to select the desired type
of extremity for the fillet:
Smooth
Straight
Maximum
Minimum.
4. You can choose the propagation type:
Tangency: the fillet is propagated up
to the first edge that is not continuous
in tangency.
Minimal: the fillet is propagated up to
the first geometric limitation.

5. To add an additional point on the edge to


make the variable radius fillet, click the
Points field and select a point on the edge.
6. Enter a new Radius value for this point.
7. Set the Propagation mode to Cubic to
obtain a smooth transition from one radius to
another.
8. Click OK to confirm the operation.
The edge is filleted. The specification tree indicates this creation.

This is the fillet you would obtain using the


Linear propagation mode. In this case there
is a straight transition from one radius to
another.
Tritangent Fillets
This task shows how to create a tritangent fillet.
The creation of tritangent fillets involves the removal of one of the three faces
selected.
Open the Tritangent.CATPart document from the online/Samples/ShapeDesign
directory.
1. Select the support.

2. Click the Tritangent Fillet icon.


The Tritangent Fillet
Definition dialog box
appears.

3. Select the Extremities that is the


relimitation mode:
Smooth
Straight
Maximum
Minimum
4. Select the two Faces to fillet.

5. Select the Face to remove.


The fillet will be tangent to
this face.
6. Click OK.
The faces are filleted. The
creation of this fillet is
indicated in the specification
tree.
Face-Face Fillets
This task shows how to create a face-face fillet.
You generally use the Face-Face fillet command when there is no intersection
between the faces or when there are more than two sharp edges between the
faces.

Open the Facefillet.CATPart document from the online/Samples/ShapeDesign


directory.
1. Select the
support
2. Click the
Face-Face Fillet

icon .
The
Face-Face
Fillet
Definition
dialog box
appears.

3. Select the
Extremities that
is the
relimitation
mode.
4. Select the two
Faces to fillet.
The
application
previews
the fillet to
be
created.
5. Enter a radius
value in the
Radius field if
you are not
satisfied with the
default one. This
value must be
greater than 0.
6. Click OK.
The faces
are
filleted.
This fillet
is
indicated
in the
specification
tree.
Translating Geometry
This task shows you how to translate a point, line or surface element.

Open the Translate.CATPart document from the online/Samples/ShapeDesign


directory.
1. Click the Translate icon
.
The Translate Definition
dialog box appears.

2. Select the Element to be


translated.
3. Select a line to take its
orientation as the translation
direction or a plane to take
its normal as the translation
direction.
You can also specify the
direction by means of X, Y,
Z vector components by
using the contextual menu
on the Direction field.
4. Specify the translation
Distance by entering a
value or using the drag
manipulator.

5. Click OK to create the translated element.


The element (identified as Translat.xxx) is added to the specification tree.
The original element is unchanged.
Performing a Symmetry on Geometry
This task shows you how to transform geometry by means of a symmetry
operation.
Open the Transform.CATPart document from the online/Samples/ShapeDesign
directory.

1. Click the Symmetry icon .


The Symmetry Definition dialog box
appears.

2. Select the Element to be transformed by symmetry.


3. Select a point, line or plane as Reference element.

The figure below illustrates the resulting


symmetry when the line is used as
reference element. The figure below illustrates the resulting
symmetry when the point is used as
reference element.

4. Click OK to create the symmetrical element.


The element (identified as Symmetry.xxx) is added to the specification tree.
The original element is unchanged.
Transforming Geometry by Scaling
This task shows you how to transform geometry by means of a scaling operation.

Open the Transform.CATPart document from the online/Samples/ShapeDesign


directory.

1. Click the Scaling icon .


The Scaling Definition dialog box
appears.

2. Select the Element to be transformed by scaling.


3. Select the scaling Reference point, plane or planar surface.
4. Specify the scaling Ratio by entering a value or using the drag manipulator.

The figure below illustrates the resulting The figure below illustrates the
scaled element when the plane is used resulting scaled element when the
as reference element (ratio = 2). point is used as reference element
(ratio = 2).

5. Click OK to create the scaled element.


The element (identified as Scaling.xxx) is added to the specification tree.
The original element is unchanged.
Transforming Geometry by Affinity
This task shows you how to transform geometry by means of an affinity
operation.
Open the Transform.CATPart document from the online/Samples/ShapeDesign
directory.

1. Click the Affinity icon .


The Affinity Definition dialog box appears.

2. Select the Element to be transformed by affinity.


3. Specify the characteristics of the Axis system to be used for the affinity
operation:
the Origin
the XY plane
the X axis.

4. Specify the affinity Ratios by entering the desired X, Y, Z values.


The figure below illustrates the resulting affinity with ratios X = 2, Y =1 and Z=1.

The figure below illustrates the resulting affinity with ratios X = 2, Y =2 and Z=1.

The figure below illustrates the resulting affinity with ratios X = 2, Y =2 and Z=1.5

5. Click OK to create the affinity element.


The element (identified as Affinity.xxx) is added to the specification tree.
The original element is unchanged.
Rotating Geometry
This task shows you how to rotate geometry about an axis.

Open the Transform.CATPart document from the online/Samples/ShapeDesign


directory.

1. Click the Rotate icon .


The Rotate Definition dialog box
appears.

2. Select the Element to be rotated.


3. Select a line as the rotation Axis.
4. Enter a value or use the drag
manipulator to specify the rotation
Angle.

5. Click OK to create the rotated element.


The element (identified as Rotate.xxx) is added to the specification tree.
The original surface is unchanged.
Extrapolating Surfaces
This task shows you how to extrapolate a surface boundary .

1. Click the Extrapolate icon


.
The Extrapolate Definition
dialog box appears.

2. Select a surface Boundary.

3. Select the surface to be Extrapolated.


4. Specify the Limit of the extrapolation by either:
entering the value of the extrapolation length
selecting a limit surface or plane.
5. Specify Extremities conditions:
Tangent: the extrapolation sides are tangent to the edges adjacent
to the surface boundary.
Normal: the extrapolation sides are normal to the orginal surface
boundary.

5. Select the Assemble result check box if you want the extrapolated surface to
be assembled to the support surface.

6. Click OK to create the extrapolated surface.


The surface (identified as Extrapol.xxx) is added to the specification tree.
Extrapolating Curves
This task shows you how to extrapolate a curve.

1. Click the Extrapolate icon .


The Extrapolate Definition dialog box
appears.

2. Select a point or a curve.

3. Select the curve to be Extrapolated:


entering the value of the extrapolation length
selecting a limit surface or plane.
4. Specify Continuity conditions:
Tangent: the extrapolation sides are tangent to the edges
adjacent to the surface boundary.
Curvature
5. Click OK to create the extrapolated curve.

The surface (identified as Extrapol.xxx) is added to the specification tree.


Inverting the Orientation of Geometry
This task shows you how to easily invert the orientation of a surface or curve.

1. Select the Insert > Operations > Invert Orientation command.

2. Select the surface or curve whose orientation is to be inverted.


An arrow is displayed indicating the orientation of the element.
3. Click the arrow to invert the orientation of the element.

4. Click Invert Orientation again to accept the inverted element.


Creating the Nearest Entity of a Multiple
Element
This task shows you how to create the nearest entity of an element that is made up from several
sub-elements.

1. Select the Insert > Operations > Near command.


The Near Definition dialog box appears.

2. Select the element that is made up from several sub-elements.


3. Select a reference element whose position is close to the sub-element that you want to create.

This example shows a parallel curve comprising This example shows the sub-element that is nearest
three sub-elements. to the reference point.

4. Click OK to create the element.


This element (identified as Near.xxx) is added to the specification tree.
Editing Surfaces and Wireframe
Geometry
CATIA - Generative Shape Design provides powerful tools for editing surfaces
and wireframe geometry.

Editing Definitions Copying and Pasting Deleting Geometry


Editing Surface and Wireframe
Definitions
This task shows how to edit the definition of an already created geometric
element.
1. Activate the Definition dialog box of the element that you want to edit in
one of the following ways:
Select the element then choose the xxx.object -> Definition
command from the contexual menu
Select the element then choose the Edit -> xxx.object ->
Definition command
Double-click the element identifier in the specification tree.

2. Modify the definition of the element by selecting new reference elements


or by entering new values.

3. Click OK to save the new definition.


Copying and Pasting
This task shows how to copy and paste open body entities in your part design.

1. Select the elements that you want to copy either directly in the part geometry
or in the specification tree.
2. Select the Edit -> Copy command.

3. Click the Open Body entity in the tree where you want to paste the selected
elements.
4. Select the Edit -> Paste command.
The elements are copied into the target Open Body.

The identifiers of copied elements are incremented with respect to the original
elements.
The original elements and copied elements can be edited independently.
Deleting Surfaces and Wireframe
Geometry
This task shows how to delete geometry from your design.

1. Select the entity you want to


delete.
2. Select the Delete command
either from the Edit menu or the
contextual menu.
The Delete dialog box
appears.

3. Set the desired options for managing the deletion of parent and children
entities
4. Click OK to validate the deletion.
Using Tools for Shape Design
CATIA - Generative Shape Design provides powerful tools to help you manage
and analyse your surfaces and wireframe geometry.

Updating Your Design Using the Historical Graph Working with a Support

Creating Datums Creating Constraints Managing Groups

Performing a Mapping Checking Connections


Performing a Draft Analysis
Analysis between Elements
Updating Your Design
This task explains how and when you should update your design.
The point of updating your design is to make the application take your last
operation into account. Indeed some changes to geometry or a constraint may
require rebuilding the part. To warn you that an update is needed, CATIA
displays the update symbol next to the part name and displays the corresponding
geometry in bright red.

1. To update the part, click the Update icon .


However, keep in mind that some operations such as confirming the creation of
features (clicking OK) do not require you to use the update command. By default,
the application automatically updates the operation.

2. To update the feature of your choice, just select that feature and use the
Update contextual command.
Using the Historical Graph
This task shows how to use the Historical Graph.

1. Select the
element for
which you
want to
display the
historical
graph.
2. Click the
Show Graph

icon .
The Historical
Graph dialog
box appears.

The following icon commands are available.


Add graph
Remove graph
Reframe graph
Surface or Part graph representation
Parameters filter
Constraints filter.

3. Just close the dialog box to exit this mode.


Working with a Support
This task shows how to work on a support, which may be either a plane or a
surface.
This will allow you to easily reference a surface or plane whenever you need
one. For example, you will not have to explicitly select the support element again
when creating geometry.
1. Click the Work on Support

icon .
The Work on Support dialog
box appears.

2. Select the plane or surface to be used as support element.


If a plane is selected, a grid is displayed to facilitate visualization.

When you no longer need the support, just click on the icon again then click the
Remove Support button.
Creating Datums
This task shows how to create geometry with the History mode deactivated.
In this case, when you create an element, there are no links to the other
entities that were used to create that element.

1. Click the Create Datum icon to deactivate the History mode.


It will remain deactivated until you click on the icon again.
If you double-click this icon, the Datum mode is permanent. You only have
to click again the icon to disactivate the mode.
A click on the icon activates the Datum mode for the current or the next
command.
The History mode (active or inactive) will remain fixed from one session to
another: it is in fact a setting.
Creating Constraints
This task shows how to set geometric constraints on geometric elements.
Such a constraint forces a limitation. For example, a geometric constraint might
require that two lines be parallel.

To set a
constraint
between
elements:
1. Multi-select two
or three elements
to be constrained.
2. Click the
Constraint with
dialog box icon

.
The Constraint
Definition dialog
box appears
indicating the
types of constraint
you can set
between the
selected elements.
3. Select one of
the available
options to specify
that the
corresponding
constraint is to be
made.
4. Click OK.
The corresponding
constraint symbol
appears on the
geometry.
To set a
constraint on a
single element:
1. Select the
element to be
constrained.
2. Click the
Constraint icon

.
The corresponding
constraint symbol
appears on the
geometry.
Managing Groups
This task shows how to manage groups of elements in an Open Body entity as
follows:
creating a group
editing a group
collapsing and expanding a group
moving a group to a new body.

Creating a group
1. Right-click the desired Open Body entity in the specification tree.
2. Choose the Create Group command from the contextual menu.
The Group dialog box appears.
The Support area indicates the name of the Open Body entity where the group is
to be created.
3. If needed, modify the proposed default group name that appears in the Name
area.
4. Select entities to be included in the group and remain visible in the tree.
5. Click OK to create the group

In the Group dialog box you can:


click the check box to specify whether group is expanded or collapsed.
click the Remove Group button to reset the group definition.

Editing a group
1.Right-click the desired group in the specification tree and select the Edit Group
command from the contextual menu.
2. You can then:
rename the group
remove the group
add entities to the group.

Collapsing and expanding a group


1. To collapse a group, right-click the desired group in the specification tree and
select the Collapse Group command from the contextual menu.
The portion of the specification tree related to the group appears reduced.
2. To expand a collapsed group, right-click the desired group in the specification
tree and select the Expand Group command from the contextual menu.
All the entities belonging to the group are then visible in the specification tree.
Moving a group to a new
body
1. Right-click the desired group
in the specification tree and
select the Change Body
command from the contextual
menu.
A dialog box entitled Change
Body appears.
2. Select the new body where
the group is to be located.
3. Click OK to move the group
to the new body.
Checking Connections between Elements

This task shows how to analyze how two surfaces are connected, following a blend, match or fill operation for
example.
Three types of analyses are available:
1. Distance: the values are expressed in millimeters
2. Tangency: the values are expressed in degrees
3. Curvature: the values are expressed in percentage.

Open the Connectchecker.CATPart document from the online/Samples/ShapeDesign directory.

1. Select both surfaces to be analyzed.

2. Click the Connect Checker icon .

The Connect Checker dialog box is


displayed, identifying by color
ranges the maximum and minimum
values for the analysis. The color
range can be linear, sharp left,
sharp right or center.
The analysis representation in the
color range varies according to the
chosen option.
3. Choose the type of analysis to be
performed: Distance, Tangency or
Curvature.
4. Check the analysis results on the
geometry.
Here you are analyzing the distance
between the surfaces. Each color
section indicates on the geometry
the distance between the surfaces.

From the Connect Checker dialog box, you can choose a number of visualization and computation options:
the comb: that is the spikes corresponding to the distance in each point.
the envelope: that is the curve connecting all spikes together
some information: the minimum and maximum values

Finally, the scaling option lets you define the visualization of the comb. In automatic mode, the
comb size is zoom-independent and always visible on the screen, otherwise you can define a
coefficient multiplying the comb exact value.

5. Check the Information button:


Two texts are displayed on the
geometry localizing the minimum
and maximum values of the
analysis as given in the Connect
Checker dialog box.

You can also choose the


discretization, that is the numbers of
spikes in the comb:
Coarse: 15 spikes are
displayed
Medium: 30 spikes are
displayed
Fine: 45 spikes are
displayed.
6. Switch to Linear mode and check the
Fine discretization then compare with the
previous results.
7. Click the Quick... button in the Connect
Checker dialog box to obtain a simplified
analysis taking into account tolerances
(distance, tangency and curvature).
The comb is no longer displayed.
The Connect Checker dialog box
changes to the Quick Violation
Analysis dialog box :

8. Use the spinners to define the tolerances.


For example, the red area indicates
all points that are distant of more
than 0.1 mm. The green area
indicates points that are closer than
0.1 mm but at which the tangency
difference is greater than 2 degrees.
Points that would match the first two
tolerance constraints and at which
the curvature difference would be
greater than 5% would appear in
blue. There are none in this case.
The maximum deviation values on
the current geometry are displayed
to the right of the dialog box.

9. Click OK to create the analysis as an element in the specification tree.

This allows the automatic update of the analysis when you modify any of the surfaces, using the
control points for example.
If you do not wish to create the analysis, simply click Cancel.

You can edit the color range in both dialog boxes by double-clicking the color range manipulators
(Connect Checker) or color areas (Quick Violation Analysis) to display the Color chooser.
If you wish to edit the Connection Analysis, simply double-click it from the specification tree.
If you no longer need the Connection Analysis, right-click on Connection Analysis in the specification
tree then choose Delete.
Performing a Draft Analysis

This task shows how to analyze the draft angle on a surface.

Open the Draftanalysis.CATPart document from the online/Samples/ShapeDesign directory.

1. Select a surface.

2. Click the Draft Analysis icon .

The Draft Analysis dialog box is displayed and the analysis is


visible on the selected elements.

You can modify the values in the color range to highlight specific
areas of the selected surface. To do this, click and drag the
arrows delimiting the colors, or directly key in the values. You can
also choose a different display for the color range: Linear, Sharp
left, Sharp center or Sharp right.

The values are expressed in degrees, ranging from -90 to 90 degrees.


You can modify them by clicking on their corresponding arrow or by entering a value directly in the
field.
The precision for entering values is 0.1 degree.
The cursor manipulation for colors is limited between -20.0 et 20.0 but the analysis is still performed
between -90 and 90 degrees.
If you see no visualization on the selected element, move the pointers in the dialog box to redefine
the draft values.
3. Activate the On the fly analysis checkbox and move the pointer over the
surface.
Arrows are displayed under the pointer, identifying the normal to the
surface at the pointer location (green arrow). As you move the pointer
over the surface, the normal display is dynamically updated.

If you click the green arrow (Normal), you can invert it.
In this case, the draft analysis is not possible any longer, the
whole surface becomes red (highest value).
If you click the red arrow, it freezes the location for the arrow
allowing general manipulations according to the compass.
The displayed value indicates the angle between the draft
direction and the normal to the surface at the current point.

4. Bring the compass onto the selected surface to locally manipulate it and
have a different view of the analysis without modifying the analysis
values.
These values can be edited by double-clicking the compass which
displays the Compass Manipulation dialog box.

5. Once you have finished analyzing the surface, click Close in the Draft Analysis dialog box.

If you have moved to another capability, you need to redisplay the Draft Analysis dialog box by clicking

the Draft Analysis icon then by clicking Reset to remove the draft analysis from the element.
A draft analysis can be performed just as well on a set of surfaces.
Double-click the arrows from the color range to display the color chooser allowing you to re-define the
color range.
Performing a Mapping Analysis

This task shows how to analyze the mapping curvature of a surface.

Open the Mappinganalysis.CATPart document from the online/Samples/ShapeDesign directory.

1. Select a surface.

2. Click the Mapping Analysis icon .


The curvature analysis dialog box is displayed and the analysis is
visible on the selected element.

3. Choose the linear option from the dialog box.


Available options to display the color range are: linear, sharp left,
sharp center or sharp right.
The values are ranging from 0 to 1, corresponding to the minimum
and maximum Mapping curvature respectively.
The surface now looks like this:

4. Modify the values in the color range to highlight specific areas of the
selected surface.
To do this, click and drag the arrows delimiting the colors, or
directly key in the values.
5. Click Close to exit the analysis capability, or click Reset to come back to default values for the color
range.

Mapping analyses can be performed on a set of surfaces.


Double-click the arrows from the color range to display the color chooser allowing you to re-define the
color range.

You can display the control points by clicking the Control Points icon , still viewing the Mapping
Analysis. This allow you to check the impact of any modification on the surface according to the
Mapping Analysis.
Advanced Tasks
The advanced tasks you will perform in the CATIA - Generative Shape Design
workbench include managing the specification tree and interoperating with other
workbenches.
Tasks
Managing Open Bodies in the
Specification Tree
This task shows how to manage the specification tree. This involves;
inserting open body entities
removing open body entities
changing body.

You will find other useful information in the Managing Groups section.

You can insert and manipulate open bodies in the specification tree in much the
same way as you manage files in folders.
These management functions have no impact on the part geometry.
You should refer to the Copying and Pasting section for information about how
open bodies can be used in a part edition context.

Inserting an Open Body


1. In the specification tree, select the branch where you want the new open body
to be inserted.
This branch is known as a father location which can be a part, a body or another
open body entity.
2. Select the Insert > Open Body menu command.
The Insert Open Body dialog box appears.
3. Select the entities that are to be included in the
new open body.
4. Click OK to create the open body at the desired
location.
Removing an Open Body
This is only possible when the father location of the open body is another open
body.
1. Right-click the desired open body then select the Remove Open Body
contextual command.
The open body is removed and its constituent entities are included in the father
open body.

Moving an open body to a new body


1. Right-click the desired open body in the
specification tree and select the Change Body
command from the contextual menu.
The Change Body dialog box appears.
2. Select the new body where the open body is to
be located.
3. Click OK to move the open body to the new
body.
Using Hybrid Parts
This task shows how to create a hybid part comprising wireframe, surface and solid
geometry.
You must have access to the Part Design product.

1. In the Generative Shape


Design workbench, open a
document comprising solid
entities.

2. Click the Line icon then


create construction lines
between the opposite vertices
of the two pads.
These lines are created in an
Open Body entity.

3. Click the Loft icon and


create a lofted surface between
the curved edges of the two
pads.
Create another lofted surface
between the bottom edges of
the two pads.
4. Click the Sweep icon
and create a swept surface
between two opposite vertical
edges of the two pads.
Create another swept surface
on the other side of the side of
the two pads.

5. Click the Join icon then


select the four surfaces to
create a single joined surface.

6. Open the Part Design workshop and select the Closed Surface icon .
7. Slect the joined surface in
order to close it.
The model and specification is
updated with the Close Surface
feature.
Using Multi-Documents
This task shows how to use multi-documents in order to design in the context of
a product.
You will copy an open body from one document to another, edit the original part
and the copied part independently and finally update the copied part with
modifications made to the original part.

Select Tool -> Options command and in the Part General page make sure that
the Keep link with selected object and Synchronize all external references for
update options are set.
1. Select the
Open Body of
Part1 in the
specification tree.
2. Select the Edit
-> Copy
command.

3. Open a new CATPart document called Part2 and position the cursor anywhere
in the specification tree.
4. Select the Edit
-> Paste Special
command.
The Source
Definition dialog
box appears.

5. Select the
AsResult
WithLink option
and click OK.
In this case the
Open Body is
copied without its
design
specifications.
Note that the
AsSpec option
copies the
selected object
along with its
design
specifications.
The Open Body
is represented in
Part2 as an
External
Reference
object.
6. Edit Part2 by
adding a lofted
surface between
the two curved
end sections.
Remember that
this modification
has no effect on
the original part.

7. Return to the
Part1 document
and edit the two
fillet surfaces by
increasing the
radius values, for
example.
In the Part2
document, an
update symbol is
displayed next to
Part2 in the
specification tree.
The elements in
the part that are
impacted by the
modifications to
Part1 are
highlighted in
red.

8. Select the
Update
command to
update Part2.
Part2 now
includes the
modifications
made to Part1.
The stiffener is not displayed on the unfolded view.
To add a new Sheet Metal feature, select the Bend for example and right-click the
Define In Work Object item.

The new Sheet Metal feature will be added after the Bend but before the Stiffener.