Está en la página 1de 8

Solutions to Homework Assignment 2:  Fall 2009 

Traffic Stream Characteristics 

5‐1.  A volume of  1,200 veh/h is observed at an intersection approach. Find the peak rate 
of flow within the hour for the following peak‐hour factors: 1.00, 0.90, 0.80, 0.70. 
Plot and comment on the results. 
 
The  peak  rate  of  flow  is  computed  as  v  =  V/PHF.    The  table  below 
summarized  the  results  for  the  information  given.    A  plot  of  the  results  is 
also shown. 
 
Peak Flow Rate vs. PHF 
 
Volume Peak
Flow
PHF Rate
(veh/h) (veh/h)
1200 1.00 1200
1200 0.90 1333
1200 0.80 1500
1200 0.70 1714
 
Flow Rate vs. PHF

1800

1600

1400
Peak Flow Rate (veh/h)

1200

1000

800

600

400

200

0
0.60 0.65 0.70 0.75 0.80 0.85 0.90 0.95 1.00
PHF

Even with the same hourly volume, a small difference in PHF leads to an 
enormous difference in peak flow rates.  Traffic engineers must be able to 
deal with this peaking characteristic on a regular basis. 

1
5‐2.  A traffic stream displays average vehicle headways of 2.4s at 55mi/h. Compute the 
density and rate of flow for this traffic stream. 
 
  A headway can be converted to a flow rate as follows: 

3600 3600
v= = = 1,500 veh / h / ln
h 2 .4

Knowing both flow rate and speed (given), the density may now be 
computed as: 
 
v 1500
D= = = 27.3 veh / h / ln  
S 55
 
5‐3.  A  freeway  detector  records  an  occupancy  of  0.26  for  a  15‐minute  period.  If  the 
detector  is  3.5  ft  long,  and  the  average  vehicle  has  a  length  of  18  ft,  what  is  the 
density implied by this measurement? 

Density is obtained from occupancy as follows: 
 
5280 * O 5280 * 0.26
D= = = 63.9 veh / mi / ln  
Lv + Ld 18 + 3.5
 
Such a high value is indicative of highly congested conditions within a 
queue. 

2
5‐4  The following traffic count data were taken from a permanent detector location on a 
major state highway. 
1.  2.  3.  4.  5. 
Month  No. of  Total Days in  Total Monthly  Total Weekday 
Weekdays In  Month (days)  Volume (vehs)  Volume (vehs) 
Month (days) 
Jan  22  31  200,000  170,000 
Feb  20  28  210,000  171,000 
Mar  22  31  215,000  185,000 
Apr  22  30  205,000  180,000 
May  21  31  195,000  172,000 
Jun  22  30  193,000  168,000 
Jul  23  31  180,000  160,000 
Aug  21  31  175,000  150,000 
Sep  22  30  189,000  175,000 
Oct  22  31  198,000  178,000 
Nov  21  30  205,000  182,000 
Dec  22  31  200,000  176,000 
From  this  data,  determine  (a)  the  AADT,  (b)  the  ADT  for  each  month,  (c)  the 
AAWT,  and  (d)  the  AWT  for  each  month.  From  this  information,  what  can  be 
discerned about the character of the facility and the demand it serves? 

The table below illustrates the computation of monthly ADT and AWT 
values. 
Table:  ADT and AWT Computed 
1 2 3 4 5 6=4/2 7=5/3
Days Weekdays Total Weekday ADT for AWT for
Month in in Volume Volume Month Month
Month Month (vehs) (vehs) (veh/day) (veh/day)
Jan 31 22 200,000 170,000 6,452 7,727
Feb 28 20 210,000 171,000 7,500 8,550
Mar 31 22 215,000 185,000 6,935 8,409
Apr 30 22 205,000 180,000 6,833 8,182
May 31 21 195,000 172,000 6,290 8,190
Jun 30 22 193,000 168,000 6,433 7,636
Jul 31 23 180,000 160,000 5,806 6,957
Aug 31 21 175,000 150,000 5,645 7,143
Sep 30 22 189,000 175,000 6,300 7,955
Oct 31 22 198,000 178,000 6,387 8,091
Nov 30 21 205,000 182,000 6,833 8,667
Dec 31 22 200,000 176,000 6,452 8,000
Total 365 260 2,365,000 2,067,000 77,868 95,507

3
  The AADT is computed as the total annual volume divided by 365 days, or: 
 
2,365,000
AADT = = 6,479 veh / day  
365
 
The AAWT is computed as the total weekday volume divided by 260 days, 
or: 
 
2,067,000
AAWT = = 7,950 veh / day  
260
 
Because  the  average  weekday  volume  is  higher  than  the  total  average 
volume,  it  is  likely  that  this  is  a  commuter  route.    The  difference  is  even 
clearer  if  the  average  weekend  traffic  is  computed.    The  total  weekend 
volume for the year is 2,365,000 – 2,067,000 = 298,000 vehs.  There are 365‐
260 = 105 Saturdays and Sundays in the year.  Then, the average weekend 
traffic is computed as: 
 
298,000
AAWET = = 2,838 veh / day  
105
 
This is clearly NOT a recreational route, but one that serves a substantial 
proportion of regular commuters. 

5.5.    A lane on a freeway displays the following characteristics:   (a) the average headway 
between  vehicles  is  2.8  s,  and  (b)  the  average  spacing  between  vehicles  is  235  ft.  
What is the rate of flow for the lane?  What is the average speed (in mi/h)? 
 
Headway  and  Spacing  can  be  converted  to  the  macroscopic  measures  of 
flow rate and density, as follows: 
 
2600 3600
v= = = 1,286 veh / h / ln
h 2 .8
 
5280 5280
D= = = 22.5 veh / mi / ln
d 235
 
  Speed is then computed as: 
 
v 1286
S= = = 57.2 mi / h  
D 22.5

4
 
5.6  The following counts were taken on a major arterial during the evening peak period: 
 
Time Period  Volume (vehs) 
4:00 – 4:15 PM  450 
4:15 – 4:30 PM  465 
4:30 – 4:45 PM  490 
4:45 – 5:00 PM  500 
5:00 – 5:15 PM  503 
5:15 – 5:30 PM  506 
5:30 – 5:45 PM  460 
5:45 – 6:00 PM  445 
 
From this data, determine: 
 
a) The peak hour. 
b) The peak hour volume. 
c) The peak flow rate within the peak hour. 
d) The peak hour factor (PHF). 
 
  The  determination  of  the  peak  hour  is  illustrated  in  the  table  that  follows.  
Note  that  the  determination  is  made  to  the  nearest  15  minutes  by 
computing all overlapping hourly volumes for each possible combination of 
four consecutive 15‐minute periods between 4:00 PM and 6:00 PM. 
 
Table:  Finding the Peak Hour 
 
Time Vol Hourly
Period (vehs) Vol
(vehs)
4:00-4:15 450 NA
4:15-4:30 465 NA
4:30-4:45 490 NA
4:45-5:00 500 1905
5:00-5:15 503 1958
5:15-5:30 506 1999
5:30-5:45 460 1969
5:45-6:00 445 1914
 
 
 

5
a) The highest hourly volume (within the study period) occurs between 
4:30 and 5:30 PM. 
 
b) The hourly volume is the volume for this hour, or 1,999 vehs/h. 
 
c) The highest flow rate is the 15‐minute interval within the peak hour 
with the highest 15‐minute volume.  This is the period between 5:15 
and 5:30 PM.  The flow rate within this period is 506/0.25 = 2,024 veh/h. 
 
d) The peak hour factor is 1999/2024 = 0.988. 
 
5.7.  A peak‐hour volume of 1,200 veh/h is observed on a freeway lane.  What is the peak 
flow rate within this hour if the PHF is 0.87? 
 
  The peak flow rate is found as: 
 
V 1200
v= = = 1,379 veh / h  
PHF 0.87
 
5.8.  The flow rate on an arterial lane is 1,300 vehs/h.  If the average speed in the same 
lane is 35 mi/h, what is the density? 
 
  The density is found as: 
 
v 1300
D= = = 37.1 veh / mi / ln  
S 35
 
5.9.  The  AADT  for  a  section  of  suburban  arterial  is  50,000  vehs/day.    Assuming  that 
this  is  an  urban  radial  facility,  what  range  of  directional  design  hour  volumes 
would be expected? 
 
  From  textbook  Table  5‐2,  Page  109,  for  an  urban  radial  facility,  K  factors  
range from 0.07 to 0.12.  D factors range from 0.55 to 0.60.  Then: 
 
DDHV = AADT * K * D
DDHVlow = 50,000 * 0.07 * 0.55 = 1,925 veh / h  
DDHVhigh = 50,000 * 0.12 * 0.60 = 3,600 veh / h
 

6
  This  is  a  very  broad  range,  and  highlights  the  danger  in  using  such 
generalized factors for estimating demand. 
 
 
5.10. The following travel times were measured for vehicles traversing a 1,000‐ft segment 
of an arterial: 
 
Vehicle  Travel Time (s) 
1  20.6 
2  21.7 
3  19.8 
4  20.3 
5  22.5 
6  18.5 
7  19.0 
8  21.4 
 
Determine  the  time  mean  speed  (TMS)  and  space  mean  speed  (SMS)  for  these 
vehicles. 
 
The  TMS  is  computed  as  the  arithmetic  average  of  individual  vehicle 
speeds.  The SMS is a speed computed using the average travel time of the 
individual vehicles.  These computations are shown in the table below. 
 
Table:  TMS and SMS Computed 
 
Veh Travel Travel Travel Travel
No. Time Distance Speed Speed
(s) (ft) (ft/s) (mi/h)
1 20.6 1000 48.54 33.02
2 21.7 1000 46.08 31.35
3 19.8 1000 50.51 34.36
4 20.3 1000 49.26 33.51
5 22.5 1000 44.44 30.23
6 18.5 1000 54.05 36.77
7 19.0 1000 52.63 35.80
8 21.4 1000 46.73 31.79
Total 163.8 392.3 266.8
 
 

7
The TMS is now merely the average of the vehicle speeds, or 266.8/8 = 33.35
mi/h. 
 
The SMS is based upon the average travel speed, or 163.8/8 = 20.475 s/veh.  
Then: 
 
1,000 48.84
SMS = = 48.84 ft / s = = 33.22 mi / h  
20.465 1.47