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aomework 1 MIE 201 Fall 10


Ca ER 2

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ROBLEM SOLUIONS


2.4 Π     
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Solution

he electron configurations for the ions are determined using able 2.2.

 From able 2.2, the electron configuration for at atom of phosphorus is 1222263233. In order
to become an ion with a plus five charge, it must lose five electrons²in this case the 3 and 3 electrons. hus,
the electron configuration for a  ion is 122226.
3- From able 2.2, the electron configuration for at atom of phosphorus is 1222263233. In order
to become an ion with a minus three charge, it must acquire three electrons, which in this case will be added to and
fill the 3 subshell. hus, the electron configuration for a 3- ion is 1222263236.
Ni2 From able 2.2, the electron configuration for at atom of nickel is 12222632363 842. In
order to become an ion with a plus two charge, it must lose two electrons²in this case the 4 electrons. hus, the
electron configuration for an Ni2 ion is 12222632363 8.

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2.6   
  
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Solution

(a) he 122226323 electron configuration is that of a halogen because it is one electron deficient
from having a filled  subshell.
(b) he 12222632363 104246 electron configuration is that of an inert gas because of filled 4 and
4 subshells.
(c) he 12222632363 1042464 2 electron configuration is that of a transition metal because of
an incomplete subshell.

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2.11 - .0        %   %    


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Solution

(a) he main differences between the various forms of primary bonding are
2 --there is electrostatic attraction between oppositely charged ions.
  --there is electron sharing between two adjacent atoms such that each atom assumes a
stable electron configuration.
3  --the positively charged ion cores are shielded from one another, and also "glued"
together by the sea of valence electrons.
(b) he auli exclusion principle states that each electron state can hold no more than two electrons,
which must have opposite spins.

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2.13   +  ))%   


               
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Solution

For silicon, having the valence electron structure 3232, (4 = 4; thus, there are 8 ± (4 = 4 covalent bonds
per atom.
For nitrogen, having the valence electron structure 2223, (4 = ; thus, there are 8 ± (4 = 3 covalent
bonds per atom.
For neon, having the valence electron structure 2226, (5 = 8; thus, there are 8 ± (4 = 0 covalent bonds
per atom, which is what we would expect since neon is an inert gas.

Ca ER 3

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ROBLEM SOLUIONS


 

3.1 2  


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Solution
Lead has an FCC crystal structure (able 3.1). he FCC unit cell volume may be computed from
Equation 3.4 as

â = 163 2 = (16) (0.17 Ñ 10-9 m)3 ( 2 ) = 1.213 Ñ 10 -28 m3


 

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3.2       0 

Solution
he atomic packing factor is defined as the ratio of sphere volume to the total unit cell volume, or

â
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â


Since there are two spheres associated with each unit cell for BCC
´

ù 4ë3  8ë3
â = 2 (sphere volume) = 2   =
  3  3

lso, the unit cell has cubic symmetry, that is â = 3. But depends on  according to Equation 3.3, and
´

ù 4R 3 64 R3
â X  X
  3 3 3
hus,

´
â 8ë R3 /3
{  X  X X 0.68

â 64 R3 /3 3

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enrolled in courses for which the textbook has been adopted. { 
              
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