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PICs are voting issues.

Interpretation: Neg can run the net benefit to the PIC as a disadvantage, and they don¶t
have to steal aff ground. This still points out the flaws of the plan without mooting 8
minutes of the 1AC.

1. Education

A. Resolutional shift- Concentrates the debate on insignificant aspects of the


counterplan that have nothing to do with the topic, but we have a limited amount of
time to debate the resolution and now is the only time we can learn about this
resolution.

B. Encourages vague plan writing to avoid PICs, which decreases the development
of the debate since it takes several speeches to actually know what the aff plan does.

2. Ground- Explodes neg ground because there are an infinite number of parts of the plan
text that can be PIC-ed out of. For example, they could say to do the plan except spend one
penny less.

3. Fairness- They kill the debate by forcing us to debate ourselves- they adopt all
components of the plan except for what links to a disad, meaning they can just kick the
counterplan and cross-apply our arguments against us, which steals aff ground
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1.Y Turn²there is no one Khorasan people, attempting to create such a label homogenizes
a vast variety of cultures²this is the actual genocidal mislabeling
Encyclopedia Britannica 10[a general English-language encyclopaedia published by Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc.It is regarded
as the most scholarly of encyclopaedias, http://www.britannica.com/bps/edit/266739]

Khorāsān, also spelled Khurasan, historical region and realm comprising a vast territory now lying in
northeastern Iran, southern Turkmenistan, and northern Afghanistan. The historical region extended,
along the north, from the Amu Darya (Oxus River) westward to the Caspian Sea and, along the south, from
the fringes of the central Iranian deserts eastward to the mountains of central Afghanistan. Arab geographers
even spoke of its extending to the boundaries of India. The history of the area stretches back to very ancient
times, being part of the Achaemenid empire of the 6th and 5th centuries bc and the Parthian empire of the 1st
century bc. (Khorāsān is sometimes loosely identified synonymously with Parthia.) Khorāsān was first
named, however, by the Sāsānians (beginning in the 3rd century bc), who organized their empire into four
quarters (named from the cardinal points),Khorāsān being literally the ³Land of the Sun.´ After the Arab
conquest in ad 651±652, the name was retained both as the designation of a definite province and in a looser
sense. At first the Arabs used the area as a march, or garrisoned frontier, but soon large colonies of Arabs
moved in, especially around Merv, and a meld of Islāmic and eastern Iranian cultures ensued. Later
Khorāsān regained virtual independence under the āhirid, affārid, and Sāmānid dynasties (821±
999). Successively it formed part of the Ghaznavid, Seljuq, and Khwārezm-Shāh kingdoms but was
overrun by Genghis Khanin 1220 and again by Timur (Tamerlane) about 1383. The Iranian afavid
kings (1502±1736) fought over it against Uzbek invasions. It was occupied by the Afghans from 1722 to
1730. NāderShāh, born in Khorāsān, broke the Afghan supremacy and made Meshed the capital of his
Iranian empire. Ferdowsī, author of the ü   (³Book of Kings´), and Omar Khayyam, the celebrated
poet and sage, were born in the region. Khorāsān¶s current Iranian frontiers were defined in 1881 and in a
convention of July 8, 1893.Khorāsān, as a result of its troubled history, is peopled by a great variety of
ethnic groups: Turkmen in the northwest; Kurds around Bojnūrd and Qūchān; Tīmūrīs and Jamshīdīs
(ChaharAimak) in the east, some of whom are still nomadic; farther southwest, eydarīs; and southeast,
Baloch. The highlands in the south are home to a settled population of old Iranian stock. Here and there are
found Berberis of Mongol origin, Arabs, Roma (Gypsies), and a few Jews in the towns. The largest cluster of
settlements and cultivation stretches around the city of Meshed northwestward, containing the important
towns of Qūchān, Shīrvān, and Bojnūrd. The languages spoken in Khorāsān are Turkish, Persian, and
Kurdish.

2.Y Plan fails to take into account labels prior to Khorisan²double bind²either the cp
links into it¶s own discursive criticism or confirms that modern labels are best when
being used in modern situations

Hindu Website 02 [provides free information on Hinduism and Hinduism resources, Hinduwebsite.com, January 2002,
http://www.hinduwebsite.com/history/afghan_name.asp]
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3.Y Perm do the counter plan

ƒ.Y They attempt to sanitize our discourse by applying a juridical model where our words
can be attached to a stable subject. Prosecuting us for our speech destroys effective
activism.
Butler 95Judith, Professor of Rhetoric and Comparative Literature, UC Berkeley, Performativity and Performance, Ed. Parker and Sedgwick, 1995, p. 204
Y
That words wound seems incontestably true, and that hateful, racist, misogynist, homophobic speech
should be vehemently countered seems incontrovertibly right. Butdoes understanding from where speech
derives its power to wound alter our conception of what it might mean to counter that wounding powerš Do
we accept the notion that injurious speech is attributable to a singular subject and actš If we accept
such a juridical constraint on thought - the grammatical requirements of accountability - as a point of
departure, what is lost from the political analysis of injury when the discourse of politics becomes fully
reduced to juridical requirements?šIndeed, when political discourse is collapsed into juridical
discourse, the meaning of political opposition runs the risk of being reduced to the act of prosecution.
How is the analysis of the discursive historicity of power unwittingly restricted when the subject is presumed
as the point of departure for such an analysis? A clearly theological construction, the postulation of the
subject as the causal origin of the performative act is understood to generate that which it names; indeed, this
divinely empowered subject is one for whom the name itself is generative.

5.Y ±ote affirmative to do the right things for the wrong reasons.
Alinsky 71 Saul, radical organizer, Rules for Radicals: A Practical Primer for Realistic Radicals, 1971, p. 66-67.
With very rare exceptions, the right things are done for the wrong reasons. It is futile to demandthat men
do theright thing for the right reason²this is a fight with a windmill. The organizer should know and
accept that the right reason is only introduced as a moral rationalization after the right end has been
achieved, although it may have been achieved for the wrong reason²thereforeheshould search for and
use the wrong reasons to achieve the right goals. He should be able, with skill and calculation, to use
irrationality in his attempts to progress toward a rational world.

6.Y Perm do both

7.Y Counter plan does not take history into account²the ³Afghan´ existed long before
imperialist western influence reached the region

Encyclopedia iranica 83[a project of Columbia University, started in 1973 at its Center for Iranian Studies, and is considered the
standard encyclopaedia of the academic discipline of Iranistics, December 15, 1983, http://www.iranica.com/articles/afgan-in-current-
political-usage-any-citizen-of-afghanistan-whatever-his-ethnic-tribal-or-religious-affiliation]

From a more limited, ethnological point of view, ³Af ān´ is the term by which the Persian-
speakers of Afghanistan (and the non-Pa tō-speaking ethnic groups generally) designate the
Pa tūn. The equation Afghans = Pa tūn has been propagated all the more, both in and beyond
Afghanistan, because the Pa tūn tribal confederation is by far the most important in the country,
numerically and politically. The Afghans or Pa tūn are characterized by: (1) Their language,
Pa tō, the most important Iranian language of the east, with a remarkably rich literature. (2) Their
clan structure, which clearly distinguishes them from the Tajik of Afghanistan who generally have
none at all (see Pa tūn). (3) Their social code, î   (see Pa tūn) or simply î , that
governs relations among some Pa tūn, as a code of honor, and defines the essential principles of
the individual ethic and the national virtues. (4) Certain characteristics, both social and cultural,
extinct or living, (e.g., , the periodic redistribution of lands; nomadism, etc.). The term
³Af ān´ has probably designated the Pa tūn since ancient times. Under the form Avagā a,
this ethnic group is first mentioned by the Indian astronomer VarāhaMihirain the beginning of
the 6th century A.D. in his 0  
.
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8.Y Counter plan ignores other cultural groups in Afghanistan region and forces ethnic
generalization²only the plan provides a common identity under which all people in the
region identify

9.Y Our plan does not claim to represent for the Khorosan²we represent the afghan and
thus the Pashtun and we do so correctly
Encyclopedia Britannica 10[a general English-language encyclopaedia published by Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc.It is regarded
as the most scholarly of encyclopaedias, http://www.britannica.com/bps/edit/266739]

Pashtun, also spelled Pushtun, or Pakhtun, Hindustani Pathan, Persian Afghan, Pashto-speaking people of
southeastern Afghanistan and northwestern Pakistan. They constitute the majority of the population
of Afghanistan and bore the exclusive name of Afghan before that name came to denote any native of
the present land area of Afghanistan.

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Textual Competition is bad:

A. Kills Policy Making: debate as semantics turns the activity into who can write good
plans, not what the best policy option for the real world is.

B. Increases judge intervention: the critic still has to pull texts and compare, which is
removed from the flow and the actual arguments against the counterplan.

C. Contextual analysis inevitable: its quite possible to pass conflicting legislation at the
same time. only a contextual lense of how they would interact on the books can show
competition, making our method best.

D. Encourages shifty debate: adding µreject plan¶ to bottom of counterplan text makes any
counterplan textually competitive. Makes it artificially competitive

E. Allows aff abuse: any µdo both¶ permutation would win a round because they don¶t
weigh whether the perm is net beneficial, destroying all negative counterplan ground which
is uniquely key on such a broad topic.

F. Encourages and rewards bad plans: ±ague plans undermine neg ground and offer the
aff the advantage of clarifying later what the loose plan means. Both undermine balanced
competition.

G. Education: We¶re not Congress so there¶s no reason to over-technicalize plans. Textual


concerns trade-off with in-depth discussion on the merits of the plan vs. CP, sacrificing
topic education

Functional Competition is Better:

A. Predictable- The function of the CP is limited by normal means and the literature, if our
ev. Says the CP competes, the aff should defend it

B. Checks abusive CPs: Excludes picking out of one word with a shady net-benefit. These
are uneducational tests of the plan. Most every CP is textually competitive, but they force a
reliance on textual competition

C. Best test for exclusivity: The ban the plan CP wouldn¶t compete because the aff could
just write not into their perm text to prove lack of competetiveness