Está en la página 1de 166

IBM System Storage 

N6000 Series Hardware and Service


Guide

GC53-1142-03
IBM System Storage 
N6000 Series Hardware and Service
Guide

GC53-1142-03
Note:
Before using this information and the product it supports, be sure to read the general information in “Notices”
on page 121.

The following paragraph does not apply to any country (or region) where such provisions are inconsistent with local
law.
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MACHINES CORPORATION PROVIDES THIS PUBLICATION “AS IS” WITHOUT
WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EITHER EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED
WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. Some states (or regions) do
not allow disclaimer of express or implied warranties in certain transactions; therefore, this statement may not apply
to you.
Order publications through your IBM representative or the IBM branch office serving your locality.
© Copyright International Business Machines Corporation 2008, 2009.
US Government Users Restricted Rights – Use, duplication or disclosure restricted by GSA ADP Schedule Contract
with IBM Corp.
Safety notices
This section contains information about:
v “Safety notices and labels”
v “Laser safety” on page vii
v “Rack safety” on page viii
v “Fire suppression systems ” on page xi

For information about environmental notices, see the IBM® Environmental


Notices and User Guide, Z125-5823.

Safety notices and labels


When using this product, observe the danger, caution, and attention notices
contained in this guide. The notices are accompanied by symbols that
represent the severity of the safety condition.

The following sections define each type of safety notice and provide
examples.

The following notices and statements are used in IBM documents. They are
listed below in order of increasing severity of potential hazards. Follow the
links for more detailed descriptions and examples of the danger, caution, and
attention notices in the sections that follow.
v Note: These notices provide important tips, guidance, or advice.
v “Attention notices” on page vii: These notices indicate potential damage to
programs, devices, or data.
v “Caution notices” on page vi: These statements indicate situations that can
be potentially hazardous to you.
v “Danger notices”: These statements indicate situations that can be
potentially lethal or extremely hazardous to you. Safety labels are also
attached directly to products to warn of these situations.
v In addition to these notices, “Labels” on page vi may be attached to the
product to warn of potential hazards.
Danger notices
A danger notice calls attention to a situation that is potentially lethal or
extremely hazardous to people. A lightning bolt symbol accompanies a danger
notice to represent a dangerous electrical condition. A sample danger notice
follows.

© Copyright IBM Corp. 2008, 2009 iii


DANGER
An electrical outlet that is not correctly wired could place
hazardous voltage on metal parts of the system or the devices
that attach to the system. It is the responsibility of the
customer to ensure that the outlet is correctly wired and
grounded to prevent an electrical shock. (D004)

A general danger notice provides instructions on how to avoid shock hazards


when servicing equipment. Unless instructed otherwise, follow the procedures
in the following danger notice.

iv IBM System Storage: N6000 Series Hardware and Service Guide


DANGER
When working on or around the system, observe the following
precautions:

Electrical voltage and current from power, telephone, and


communication cables are hazardous. To avoid a shock hazard:
v Connect power to this unit only with the IBM provided
power cord. Do not use the IBM provided power cord for
any other product.
v Do not open or service any power supply assembly.
v Do not connect or disconnect any cables or perform
installation, maintenance, or reconfiguration of this product
during an electrical storm.
v The product might be equipped with multiple power cords.
To remove all hazardous voltages, disconnect all power
cords.
v Connect all power cords to a properly wired and grounded
electrical outlet. Ensure outlet supplies proper voltage and
phase rotation according to the system rating plate.
v Connect any equipment that will be attached to this product
to properly wired outlets.
v When possible, use one hand only to connect or disconnect
signal cables.
v Never turn on any equipment when there is evidence of fire,
water, or structural damage.
v Disconnect the attached power cords, telecommunications
systems, networks, and modems before you open the device
covers, unless instructed otherwise in the installation and
configuration procedures.
v Connect and disconnect cables as described below when
installing, moving, or opening covers on this product or
attached devices.

To Disconnect:
1. Turn off everything (unless instructed otherwise).
2. Remove power cords from the outlet.
3. Remove signal cables from connectors.
4. Remove all cables from devices.

To Connect:
1. Turn off everything (unless instructed otherwise).
2. Attach all cables to devices.
3. Attach signal cables to the connectors.
4. Attach power cords to the outlets.
5. Turn on the devices.
Safety notices v
(D005)
Labels
As an added precaution, safety labels are often installed directly on products
or product components to warn of potential hazards.

The actual product safety labels may differ from these sample safety labels:

DANGER
Hazardous voltage, current, or energy levels are
present inside any component that has this label
attached. Do not open any cover or barrier that
contains this label.
(L001)

DANGER
Multiple power cords. The product might be equipped
with multiple power cords. To remove all hazardous
voltages, disconnect all power cords.
(L003)

Caution notices
A caution notice calls attention to a situation that is potentially hazardous to
people because of some existing condition. A caution notice can be
accompanied by different symbols, as in the examples below:

If the symbol is... It means....


A hazardous electrical condition with less severity than
electrical danger.

A generally hazardous condition not represented by


other safety symbols.

A hazardous condition due to the use of a laser in the


product. Laser symbols are always accompanied by the
classification of the laser as defined by the U. S.
Department of Health and Human Services (for
example, Class I, Class II, and so forth).

vi IBM System Storage: N6000 Series Hardware and Service Guide


Attention notices
An attention notice indicates the possibility of damage to a program, device,
or system, or to data. An exclamation point symbol may accompany an
attention notice, but is not required. A sample attention notice follows:

Attention: Do not bend a fiber cable to a radius less than 5 cm (2


in.); you can damage the cable. Tie wraps are not recommended for
optical cables because they can be easily overtightened, causing
damage to the cable.

Laser safety
CAUTION:
This product contains a Class 1M laser. Do not view directly with
optical instruments. (C028)

This equipment contains Class 1 laser products, and complies with FDA
radiation Performance Standards, 21 CFR Subchapter J and the international
laser safety standard IEC 825-2.

CAUTION:
Data processing environments can contain equipment transmitting on
system links with laser modules that operate at greater than Class 1
power levels. For this reason, never look into the end of an optical
fiber cable or open receptacle. (C027)

Attention: In the United States, use only SFP or GBIC optical transceivers
that comply with the FDA radiation performance standards, 21 CFR
Subchapter J. Internationally, use only SFP or GBIC optical transceivers that
comply with IEC standard 825–1. Optical products that do not comply with
these standards may produce light that is hazardous to the eyes.
Usage restrictions
The optical ports of the modules must be terminated with an optical
connector or with a dust plug.

Safety notices vii


Rack safety
Rack installation
DANGER
Observe the following precautions when working on or
around your IT rack system:
v Heavy equipment - personal injury or equipment damage
might result if mishandled.
v Always lower the leveling pads on the rack cabinet.
v Always install stabilizer brackets on the rack cabinet.
v To avoid hazardous conditions due to uneven mechanical
loading, always install the heaviest devices in the bottom of
the rack cabinet. Always install servers and optional devices
starting from the bottom of the rack cabinet.
v Rack-mounted devices are not to be used as shelves or work
spaces. Do not place objects on top of rack-mounted
devices.

v Each rack cabinet might have more than one power cord. Be
sure to disconnect all power cords in the rack cabinet when
directed to disconnect power during servicing.
v Connect all devices installed in a rack cabinet to power
devices installed in the same rack cabinet. Do not plug a
power cord from a device installed in one rack cabinet into
a power device installed in a different rack cabinet.
v An electrical outlet that is not correctly wired could place
hazardous voltage on the metal parts of the system or the
devices that attach to the system. It is the responsibility of
the customer to ensure that the outlet is correctly wired and
grounded to prevent an electrical shock.

(R001 part 1 of 2

viii IBM System Storage: N6000 Series Hardware and Service Guide
CAUTION:
v Do not install a unit in a rack where the internal rack ambient
temperatures will exceed the manufacturer’s recommended ambient
temperature for all your rack-mounted devices.
v Do not install a unit in a rack where the air flow is compromised. Ensure
that air flow is not blocked or reduced on any side, front, or back of a
unit used for air flow through the unit.
v Consideration should be given to the connection of the equipment to the
supply circuit so that overloading of the circuits does not compromise the
supply wiring or overcurrent protection. To provide the correct power
connection to a rack, refer to the rating labels located on the equipment
in the rack to determine the total power requirement of the supply
circuit.
v (For sliding drawers.) Do not pull out or install any drawer or feature if the
rack stabilizer brackets are not attached to the rack. Do not pull out more
than one drawer at a time. The rack might become unstable if you pull
out more than one drawer at a time.
v (For fixed drawers) This drawer is a fixed drawer and should not be moved
for servicing unless specified by manufacturer. Attempting to move the
drawer partially or completely out of the rack may cause the rack to
become unstable or cause the drawer to fall out of the rack.

(R001 part 2 of 2)

Safety notices ix
Rack relocation (19″ rack)

CAUTION:
Removing components from the upper positions in the rack cabinet
improves rack stability during relocation. Follow these general guidelines
whenever you relocate a populated rack cabinet within a room or building:
v Reduce the weight of the rack cabinet by removing equipment starting at
the top of the rack cabinet. When possible, restore the rack cabinet to the
configuration of the rack cabinet as you received it. If this configuration
is not known, you must do the following:
– Remove all devices in the 32U position and above.
– Ensure that the heaviest devices are installed in the bottom of the rack
cabinet.
– Ensure that there are no empty U-levels between devices installed in
the rack cabinet below the 32U level.
– If the rack cabinet you are relocating is part of a suite of rack cabinets,
detach the rack cabinet from the suite.
– Inspect the route that you plan to take when moving the rack to
eliminate potential hazards.
– Verify that the route that you choose can support the weight of the
loaded rack cabinet. Refer to the documentation that came with your
rack cabinet for the weight of a loaded rack cabinet.
– Verify that all door openings are at least 760 x 2030 mm (30 x 80 in.).
– Ensure that all devices, shelves, drawers, doors, and cables are secure.
– Ensure that the four leveling pads are raised to their highest position.
– Ensure that there is no stabilizer bracket installed on the rack cabinet
during movement.
– Do not use a ramp inclined at more than ten degrees.
– Once the rack cabinet is in the new location, do the following:
- Lower the four leveling pads.
- Install stabilizer brackets on the rack cabinet.
- If you removed any devices from the rack cabinet, repopulate the
rack cabinet from the lowest position to the highest position.
– If a long distance relocation is required, restore the rack cabinet to the
configuration of the rack cabinet as you received it. Pack the rack
cabinet in the original packaging material, or equivalent. Also, lower
the leveling pads to raise the casters off of the pallet and bolt the rack
cabinet to the pallet.
(R002)

x IBM System Storage: N6000 Series Hardware and Service Guide


Fire suppression systems
A fire suppression system is the responsibility of the customer. The customer’s
own insurance underwriter, local fire marshal, or a local building inspector, or
both, should be consulted in selecting a fire suppression system that provides
the correct level of coverage and protection. IBM designs and manufactures
equipment to internal and external standards that require certain
environments for reliable operation. Because IBM does not test any equipment
for compatibility with fire suppression systems, IBM does not make
compatibility claims of any kind nor does IBM provide recommendations on
fire suppression systems.

Safety notices xi
xii IBM System Storage: N6000 Series Hardware and Service Guide
Contents
Safety notices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . iii
Safety notices and labels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . iii
Danger notices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . iii
Labels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vi
Caution notices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vi
Attention notices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vii
Laser safety . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vii
Usage restrictions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vii
Rack safety . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . viii
Rack installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . viii
Rack relocation (19″ rack) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . x
Fire suppression systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xi

Figures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xix

Tables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxi

About this document. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxiii


Who should read this document . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxiii
Supported features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxiii
How this document is organized . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxiv
Getting information, help, and service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxiv
Before you call . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxv
Using the documentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxv
Web sites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxv
Hardware service and support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxv
Supported servers and operating systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxvi
Firmware updates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxvi
Conventions and terminology used in this document . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxvi
Terminology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxvi
Command conventions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxvii
Formatting conventions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxvii
Keyboard conventions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxviii
How to send your comments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxix

Chapter 1. Preparing for the installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1


Required manuals, tools and equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Handling static-sensitive devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Planning and organizing the installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Hardware specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Checking shipment package contents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Rules for installing the system in a rack . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Guide to the installation process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11

© Copyright IBM Corp. 2008, 2009 xiii


Chapter 2. Connecting an N6000 series system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Handling fiber-optic cables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Connecting your system to an IP network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
About the e0M interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Connecting your system to a power source . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Connecting your system to storage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Connecting a filer to storage expansion units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Cabling your system using Fibre Channel expansion adapters . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Connecting a gateway to external storage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Connecting to a third-party device . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Rules for connecting the third-party devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Connecting your system to an ASCII terminal console . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
ASCII terminal console wiring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
DB-9 to RJ-45 console adapter pin connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Connecting to an ASCII terminal console . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22

Chapter 3. Configuring an N6000 series system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25


Configuring the N6000 series system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
System setup information worksheet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Configuring the Fibre Channel port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
N6000 series system active/active or high availability configurations . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Configuring for initiator mode. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Configuring and using the RLM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29

Chapter 4. Monitoring your system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31

Chapter 5. Replacing N6000 series system devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33


Shutting down a controller module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
Shutting down a node in an active/active or high availability configuration . . . . . . . . 34
Shutting down a node in an single-controller configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
Opening the system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
Closing the system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
Replacing the controller module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
Removing the controller module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
Shutting down the controller module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
Removing the PCI card and riser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
Removing the CompactFlash card . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
Removing the RLM module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
Removing the NVRAM memory DIMM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Removing the system memory DIMMs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Removing the NVRAM battery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Installing the controller module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Installing the CompactFlash card . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
Installing the riser and PCI card . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
Installing the RLM module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
Installing the NVRAM and system memory DIMMs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
Installing the NVRAM battery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
Closing the system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
Installing the firmware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
Reassigning disks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44

xiv IBM System Storage: N6000 Series Hardware and Service Guide
Testing the system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
Rebooting the controller module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
Restoring the onboard port configuration (active/active or high availability SAN configurations
only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
Completing the replacement process. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
Replacing the fan module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
Removing a fan module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
Installing the replacement fan module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
Completing the replacement process. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
Replacing DIMMs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
Removing a DIMM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
Installing a DIMM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
Completing the replacement process. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
Replacing a PCIe card and riser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
Removing a PCIe card . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
Installing a PCIe card. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
Removing a riser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
Installing a riser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
Completing the replacement process. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
Replacing a power supply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
Removing a power supply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
Installing a power supply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
Completing the replacement process. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
Replacing an NVRAM battery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
Removing the NVRAM battery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
Installing the NVRAM battery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
Completing the replacement process. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
Battery disposal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
Replacing the Real-time Clock (RTC) battery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
Removing the RTC battery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
Installing the RTC battery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
Resetting the date and time on the controller module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
Completing the replacement process. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
Battery disposal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
Installing or replacing a Remote LAN Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
Removing the RLM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
Shutting down the controller module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
Installing an RLM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
Testing the RLM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
Testing and booting the system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
Completing the replacement process. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
Information on using the RLM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
Replacing a CompactFlash card in N6000 series systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
Verifying system requirements. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
Replacing a CompactFlash card in a single-controller system . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
Removing the CompactFlash card . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
Installing the CompactFlash card . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
Placing the system files on the CompactFlash card . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
Updating the CompactFlash card . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
Restoring environment variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84

Contents xv
Replacing a CompactFlash card in an active/active or high availability configuration . . . . . 84
Preparing for the CompactFlash card replacement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
Removing the CompactFlash card . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
Installing the replacement CompactFlash card . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
Updating the CompactFlash card . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
Restoring environment variables and onboard Fibre Channel port configurations . . . . . . 89
Completing the replacement process. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90

Appendix A. Recommended power line sizes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91


Recommended AC power line sizes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91

Appendix B. FRU/CRU and power cord list for N series products. . . . . . . . . . . . 93


FRU/CRU list for N series products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
Power cord list for N series products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93

Appendix C. Optional adapter cards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97


Dual-port Gigabit Ethernet (GbE) adapter (optical) (FC 1012) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98
Dual-port 10/100/1000 Ethernet adapter (copper) (FC 1013) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
Dual-port 4-Gbps Fibre Channel HBA for disk attachment (FC 1014) . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
Dual-port 4-Gbps Fibre Channel HBA for tape attachment (FC 1015) . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
Dual-port 4-Gbps Fibre Channel target HBA (FC 1017) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Dual-port GbE iSCSI adapter (optical) (FC 1021) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Quad-port GbE Ethernet TOE adapter (copper) (FC 1022) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
Quad-port GbE Ethernet adapter (copper) (FC 1023) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
Dual-port Ultra320 SCSI HBA for tape attachment (FC 1024) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
Dual-port GbE iSCSI target adapter (copper) (FC 1026) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
Quad-port 4-Gbps Fibre Channel HBA for disk and tape attachment (FC 1029) . . . . . . . . 102
Quad-port 4-Gbps Fibre Channel Target adapter (FC 1030) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102
Dual-port 10 GbE Ethernet adapter (FC 1031) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
Dual-port MetroCluster VI HBA (Models A20/A21/A22 only) (FC 1032) . . . . . . . . . . 103
SnapMirror over Fibre Channel HBA (FC 1033). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
Quad-port 4-Gbps Fibre Channel HBA for tape and disk attachment (FC 1035) . . . . . . . . 104
Dual-port 8-Gbps Fibre Channel target HBA (FC 1036) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
16 GB Performance Acceleration Module (FC 1056) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
512 GB Performance Acceleration Module II (FC 1057) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
256 GB Performance Acceleration Module II (FC 1058) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
Quad-port 3-Gbps SAS Adapter (FC 1061) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
Dual-port Fibre Channel over Ethernet (FCoE) Target Adapter (optical) (FC 1063) . . . . . . . 107
Dual-port Fibre Channel over Ethernet (FCoE) Target Adapter (copper) (FC 1064) . . . . . . . 107
Dual-port 10-Gbps NIC (FC 1065) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107

Appendix D. Installing or replacing a Performance Acceleration Module . . . . . . . . . 109


System requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
Before you begin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
First time installations: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
Replacement or additional module installations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110
Installing or replacing a Performance Acceleration Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110
Enabling the WAFL extended cache software license and functionality . . . . . . . . . . . 111
Enabling the WAFL extended cache configuration options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112
Completing the replacement process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113

xvi IBM System Storage: N6000 Series Hardware and Service Guide
Appendix E. IBM System Storage N series documentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
N7000 series systems library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
N6000 series systems library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
N5000 series systems library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
N3300 and N3600 storage systems library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
N3700 storage system library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116
EXN1000, EXN2000, EXN3000and EXN4000 storage expansion units library . . . . . . . . . 116
Data ONTAP 7.3 filer library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116
Data ONTAP 7.2 filer library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117
Data ONTAP 7.1 filer library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118
Data ONTAP 7.2 and 7.3 gateway systems library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118
Data ONTAP 7.1 gateway systems library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119
Other N series and N series-related documents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120

Notices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121
Trademarks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122
Important notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123
Electronic emission notices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124
Federal Communications Commission (FCC) Class A Statement . . . . . . . . . . . . 124
Industry Canada Class A Emission Compliance Statement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125
Avis de conformité à la réglementation d’Industrie Canada. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125
European Union (EU) Electromagnetic Compatibility Directive . . . . . . . . . . . . 125
Germany Electromagnetic Compatibility Directive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125
People’s Republic of China Class A Electronic Emission Statement . . . . . . . . . . . 127
Japan VCCI Class A ITE Electronic Emission Statement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127
Taiwan Class A warning statement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127
Korea Class A Electronic Emission Statement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127
Power cords . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127

Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129

Contents xvii
xviii IBM System Storage: N6000 Series Hardware and Service Guide
Figures
1. Onboard port locations (Ethernet) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
2. e0M interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
3. Onboard port locations (Fibre Channel) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
4. Cabling ports 0b and 0d to switches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
5. Cabling ports 0a and 0c to storage expansion units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
6. Cabling expansion cards to storage expansion units for dual-path Fibre Channel cabling 20
7. N6000 series system components - Front . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
8. N6000 series system components - Rear . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
9. N6000 series exterior components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
10. N6000 series system components - Exploded view . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
11. Fan module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
12. Replacing DIMMs on an N6070 system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
13. Replacing DIMMs on an N6040 system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
14. Lifting the DIMM from the slot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
15. Replacing a PCIe card and riser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
16. Replacing a power supply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
17. NVRAM locations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
18. NVRAM battery removal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
19. RTC battery removal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
20. CompactFlash card removal. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80

© Copyright IBM Corp. 2008, 2009 xix


xx IBM System Storage: N6000 Series Hardware and Service Guide
Tables
1. N6000 series physical characteristics and environmental requirements . . . . . . . . . . 3
2. N6000 series systems maximum electrical power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
3. N6040 electrical requirements–one controller module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
4. N6040 electrical requirements–two controller modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
5. N6040 electrical requirements with two PAM I or II cards–one controller module . . . . . . 5
6. N6040 electrical requirements with four PAM I or II cards–two controller modules . . . . . . 6
7. N6060 electrical requirements–one controller module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
8. N6060 electrical requirements–two controller modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
9. N6060 electrical requirements with two PAM I or II cards–one controller module . . . . . . 7
10. N6060 electrical requirements with four PAM I or II cards–two controller modules . . . . . . 7
11. N6070 electrical requirements–one controller module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
12. N6070 electrical requirements–two controller modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
13. N6070 electrical requirements with four PAM I or II cards–one controller module . . . . . . 9
14. N6070 electrical requirements with eight PAM I or II cards–two controller modules . . . . . 9
15. Filer installation process procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
16. RJ-45 connection pinout for the ASCII terminal wiring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
17. Console adapter pin number connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
18. Communication parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
19. N series system setup worksheet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
20. RLM configuration manuals. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
21. 110V, single phase recommended conductor sizes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
22. 220V, single phase recommended conductor sizes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
23. American Wire Gage to Harmonized Cordage equivalents . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
24. Optional adapter cards supported by N6000 series systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
25. Dual-port 4-Gbps Fibre Channel HBA for disk (FC 1014) - maximum cable lengths . . . . . 99
26. Dual-port 4-Gbps Fibre Channel HBA for tape (FC 1015) - maximum cable lengths . . . . . 100
27. Dual-port 4-Gbps Fibre Channel target HBA (FC 1017) - maximum cable lengths . . . . . 100
28. Quad-port 4-Gbps Fibre Channel HBA for disk and tape attachment (FC 1029) - maximum
cable lengths . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102
29. Quad-port 4-Gbps Fibre Channel Target adapter (PCIe) (FC 1030) - maximum cable lengths 102
30. Quad-port 4-Gbps Fibre Channel HBA for tape and disk attachment (FC 1035) - maximum
cable lengths . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
31. Dual-port 8-Gbps Fibre Channel target HBA (FC 1036) - maximum cable lengths . . . . . 104

© Copyright IBM Corp. 2008, 2009 xxi


xxii IBM System Storage: N6000 Series Hardware and Service Guide
About this document
This guide describes how to connect and manage the following IBM System
Storage™ N6000 series systems:
v N6040 (model numbers 2858-A10 and 2858-A20)
v N6060 (model numbers 2858-A12 and 2858-A22)
v N6070 (model numbers 2858-A11 and 2858-A21)

Note: Throughout this document, the N6040, N6060, and N6070 systems are
referred to generically as N6000 series systems unless information applies
only to a specific product, in which case the specific machine name is
used.

For information about installation and setup, see the Installation and Setup
Instructions that came with your system.

For information about error messages and troubleshooting, see the IBM System
Storage N series Platform Monitoring Guide.

Compliance ID 2858-NAS covers MT/models 2858-A10, 2858-A11, 2858-A20,


2858-A21, 2858-A12, and 2858-A22.

Who should read this document


This guide is for qualified system administrators and service personnel who
are familiar with IBM storage systems. This document is for customer use. It
addresses setup, operation, and servicing of the 2858 models A10, A11, A20,
A21, A12, and A22. This document is intended to provide information to
customers, operators, administrators, installers, and service personnel.

Supported features
IBM System Storage N series storage systems and expansion boxes are driven
by NetApp Data ONTAP software. Some features described in the product
software documentation are neither offered nor supported by IBM. Please
contact your local IBM representative or reseller for further details.

Information about supported features can also be found at the following web
site:

www.ibm.com/storage/support/nas/

© Copyright IBM Corp. 2008, 2009 xxiii


A listing of currently available N series products and features can be found at
the following web site:

www.ibm.com/storage/nas/

How this document is organized


This document contains the following chapters:
v Chapter 1, “Preparing for the installation,” on page 1 provides an overview
of the entire system installation process, hardware specifications, and the
appropriate documentation references for the procedures.
v Chapter 2, “Connecting an N6000 series system,” on page 13 describes how
to connect an N6000 series system.
v Chapter 3, “Configuring an N6000 series system,” on page 25 describes how
to configure an N6000 series system.
v Chapter 4, “Monitoring your system,” on page 31 describes how to monitor
your system based on the LEDs for your system.
v Chapter 5, “Replacing N6000 series system devices,” on page 33 describes
how to replace devices in your system.
v Appendix A, “Recommended power line sizes,” on page 91 discusses how
to determine the power line lengths running from your system to the
power source.
v Appendix B, “FRU/CRU and power cord list for N series products,” on
page 93 lists the feature codes for the power cords for N6000 series systems.
v Appendix C, “Optional adapter cards,” on page 97 describes the optional
adapter cards supported for N6000 series systems.
v Appendix D, “Installing or replacing a Performance Acceleration Module,”
on page 109 describes the PAM I and II cards supported for the N6000
series systems.
v Appendix E, “IBM System Storage N series documentation,” on page 115
lists the documents in the IBM System Storage N series hardware and Data
ONTAP product libraries, as well as other related documents.

Getting information, help, and service


If you need help, service, or technical assistance or just want more
information about IBM products, you will find a wide variety of sources
available from IBM to assist you. This section contains information about
where to go for additional information about IBM and IBM products, what to
do if you experience a problem with your IBM System Storage N series
product, and whom to call for service, if it is necessary.

The following applies in Taiwan:

xxiv IBM System Storage: N6000 Series Hardware and Service Guide
IBM Taiwan Product Service Contact Info:
IBM Taiwan Corporation
3F, No 7, Song Ren Rd., Taipei Taiwan
Tel: 0800-016-888

Before you call


Before you call, make sure that you have taken these steps to try to solve the
problem yourself:
v Check all cables to make sure that they are connected.
v Check the power switches to make sure that the system is turned on.
v Use the troubleshooting information in your system documentation and use
the diagnostic tools that come with your system.
v Check the IBM support web site for known problems and limitations.
Using the documentation
Information about the N series product and Data ONTAP software is available
in printed documents and a documentation CD that comes with your system.
The same documentation is available as PDF files on the IBM NAS support
web site:

www.ibm.com/storage/support/nas/
Web sites
IBM maintains pages on the World Wide Web where you can get the latest
technical information and download device drivers and updates.
v For NAS product information, go to the following web site:
www.ibm.com/storage/nas/
v For NAS support information, go to the following web site:
www.ibm.com/storage/support/nas/
v For AutoSupport information, go to the following web site:
www.ibm.com/storage/support/nas/
Hardware service and support
You can receive hardware service through IBM Integrated Technology
Services. Visit the following web site for support telephone numbers:

www.ibm.com/planetwide/

About this document xxv


Supported servers and operating systems
IBM N series products attach to many servers and many operating systems.
To determine the latest supported attachments, visit the following web site
and access the IBM System Storage N series interoperability matrix:

www.ibm.com/storage/support/nas/
Firmware updates
As with all devices, it is recommended that you run the latest level of
firmware, which is embedded in Data ONTAP. If there are changes, they will
be posted to the following web site:

www.ibm.com/storage/support/nas/

Note: If you do not see new changes on the web site, you are running the
latest level of firmware.

Verify that the latest level of firmware is installed on your machine before
contacting IBM for technical support.

Conventions and terminology used in this document


This guide uses the following terminology, command conventions, format
conventions and keyboard conventions:
Terminology
In this and other IBM N series documents, the term filer describes IBM N
series systems that either contain internal disk storage or attach to the disk
storage expansion units specifically designed for the IBM N series systems.
The following disk storage expansion units specifically designed for the IBM
N series filers:
v IBM EXN4000 Fibre Channel disk storage expansion unit
v IBM EXN3000 SAS/SATA disk storage expansion unit
v IBM EXN2000 Fibre Channel disk storage expansion unit
v IBM EXN1000 serial advanced technology attachment (SATA) storage
expansion unit
The term gateway describes IBM N series storage controller models that are
configured as storage gateways. Gateways do not contain internal disk storage.
IBM N series gateways attach to external storage devices on a Storage Area
Network (SAN).

The terms system or storage system refer to either a gateway by itself or a filer,
either by itself or with additional disk drives.

In addition, this guide uses the following terms:

xxvi IBM System Storage: N6000 Series Hardware and Service Guide
v AT-FCX refers to the controller module of the serial advanced technology
attachment (SATA) storage expansion unit (EXN1000).
v Active/active configuration or high availability configuration refers to a High
Availability system with at least two nodes that share resources to provide
redundancy.
v Device carrier refers to the container that encases a fan/power supply unit
or a disk.
v Disk applies to any hard disk drive.
v Disk shelf or shelf refers to any storage expansion unit containing hard disk
drives.
v ESH2 refers to the controller module of the EXN2000 Fibre Channel disk
storage expansion unit.
v ESH4 refers to the controller module of the EXN4000 Fibre Channel disk
storage expansion unit.
v IOM refers to the Input/Output module of the EXN3000 SAS/SATA disk
storage expansion unit.
v Loop or Fibre-Channel Arbitrated Loop refers to one or more daisy-chained
EXN1000, EXN2000, or EXN4000 storage expansion units connected to an N
series storage system.
v Node refers to the system controller module that executes the software on
an N series system. There is one node in the A10/A11/A12
(single-controller) models; there are two nodes in the A20/A21/A22
(active/active or high availability) models. In a dual-controller N6000 series
system, the nodes are located one over the other. The top one is controller
module A and the bottom one is controller module B, as labeled on the
system chassis.
v Stack or SAS stack refers to a stack of one or more EXN3000 storage
expansion units using IOM modules connected to the storage system. The
maximum number of storage expansion units in a stack of storage
expansion units and the number of storage expansion unit stacks in a
configuration are dependent on the type of storage system.
Command conventions
You can enter commands on the system console or from any client that can
obtain access to the storage system using a Telnet session. In examples that
illustrate commands executed on a UNIX® workstation, the command syntax
and output might differ, depending on your version of UNIX.
Formatting conventions
The following table lists different character formats used in this guide to set
off special information.

About this document xxvii


Formatting convention Type of information
Italic type v Words or characters that require special
attention.
v Placeholders for information you must
supply. For example, if the guide
requires you to enter the fctest
adaptername command, you enter the
characters “fctest” followed by the
actual name of the adapter.
v Book titles in cross-references.
Monospaced font v Command and daemon names.
v Information displayed on the system
console or other computer monitors.
v The contents of files.
Bold monospaced font Words or characters you type. What you
type is always shown in lowercase letters,
unless your program is case-sensitive and
uppercase letters are necessary for it to
work properly.

Keyboard conventions
This guide uses capitalization and some abbreviations to refer to the keys on
the keyboard. The keys on your keyboard might not be labeled exactly as they
are in this guide.

What is in this guide... What it means...


hyphen (-) Used to separate individual keys. For
example, Ctrl-D means holding down the
Ctrl key while pressing the D key.
Enter Used to refer to the key that generates a
carriage return, although the key is
named Return on some keyboards.
type Used to mean pressing one or more keys
on the keyboard.
enter Used to mean pressing one or more keys
and then pressing the Enter key.

xxviii IBM System Storage: N6000 Series Hardware and Service Guide
How to send your comments
Your feedback is important in helping us provide the most accurate and
high-quality information. If you have comments or suggestions for improving
this document, send us your comments by e-mail to starpubs@us.ibm.com.

Be sure to include the following:


v Exact publication title
v Publication form number (for example, GC26-1234-02)
v Page, table, or illustration numbers
v A detailed description of any information that should be changed

About this document xxix


xxx IBM System Storage: N6000 Series Hardware and Service Guide
Chapter 1. Preparing for the installation
This chapter provides an overview of the entire IBM System Storage N6000
series system installation process, hardware specifications, and the appropriate
documentation references for the procedures.

Refer to the Installation and Setup Instructions that came with your system for
further information about installing your equipment.

This chapter discusses the following topics:


v “Required manuals, tools and equipment”
v “Handling static-sensitive devices” on page 2
v “Planning and organizing the installation” on page 2

Required manuals, tools and equipment


You need the following manuals in addition to this manual:
v Installation and Setup Instructions for your system and storage expansion
units
v Data ONTAP Software Setup Guide for your version of Data ONTAP, if
applicable
v Data ONTAP Active/Active Configuration Guide or Data ONTAP High
Availability Configuration Guide for your version of Data ONTAP, if
applicable

You need to supply the following tools and equipment:


v Ethernet LAN cables
v Fibre Channel cables
v Console (for example, a PC or laptop) with a serial port
v #2 Phillips screwdriver and slotted screwdriver
v Grounding leash and ESD strap
v 7-mm nut driver (required if removing or installing storage expansion
units)

© Copyright IBM Corp. 2008, 2009 1


Handling static-sensitive devices
CAUTION:
This system uses electronic components that are sensitive to static
electricity. Static discharge from your clothing or other fixtures around
you can damage these components. Put on an antistatic ESD strap and
grounding leash to free yourself of static electricity before touching any
electronic components.

Attention: Static electricity can damage electronic devices and your system.
To avoid damage, keep static-sensitive devices in their static-protective
packages until you are ready to install them.

To reduce the possibility of electrostatic discharge (ESD), observe the


following precautions:
v Limit your movement. Movement can cause static electricity to build up
around you.
v Handle the device carefully, holding it by its edges or its frame.
v Do not touch solder joints, pins, or exposed printed circuitry.
v Do not leave the device where others can handle and possibly damage the
device.
v While the device is still in its static-protective package, touch it to an
unpainted metal part of the system unit for at least two seconds. This
drains static electricity from the package and from your body.
v Remove the device from its package and install it directly into your system
unit without setting it down. If it is necessary to set the device down, place
it in its static-protective package. Do not place the device on your system
unit cover or on a metal table. Take additional care when handling devices
during cold weather because heating reduces indoor humidity and
increases static electricity.

Planning and organizing the installation


This section identifies the shipment contents and the rules and regulations
you need to observe for the proper installation of your system. It also
provides an overview of the entire system installation process and the
appropriate documentation references for the procedures.

For detailed information, see the following topics:


v “Hardware specifications” on page 3
v “Checking shipment package contents” on page 9
v “Rules for installing the system in a rack” on page 10
v “Guide to the installation process” on page 11

2 IBM System Storage: N6000 Series Hardware and Service Guide


Hardware specifications
The following table lists the characteristics and requirements for your
hardware.
svc00168

32-55 kg (70.5-121.2 lbs)

DANGER
The weight of this part or unit is between 44 and 54 kg (97 and 118 lb). It
takes three persons to safely lift this part or unit. (C010)

Table 1. N6000 series physical characteristics and environmental requirements


Physical characteristics
Weight v A10: 44.4 kg (97.8 lb)
v A20: 52.2 kg (115 lb)
v A11: 44.9 kg (99 lb)
v A21: 53.2 kg (117.3 lb)
v A12: 44.8 kg (98.8 lb)
v A22: 53.1 kg (117 lb)
Rack units 6U
Height 25.9 cm (10.2 in.)
Width 44.7 cm (17.6 in.)
Depth 61.7 cm (24.3 in.) without cable
tray

71.3 cm (28.1 in.) with cable


tray
Clearance dimensions
Front-cooling All versions 6 in. (15.2 cm)
Rear-cooling All versions 12 in. (30.5 cm)
Front-maintenance All versions 30 in. (76.2 cm)
Rear-maintenance All versions 36 in. (91.4 cm)
Environmental requirements
Note: Operating at the extremes of the following environmental requirements might
increase the risk of device failure.
Operating temperature maximum range 50° F to 104° F

(10° C to 40° C)

Chapter 1. Preparing for the installation 3


Table 1. N6000 series physical characteristics and environmental
requirements (continued)
Operating temperature recommended range 68° F to 77° F

(20° C to 25° C)
Nonoperating temperature range -40° F to 149° F

(-40° C to 65° C)
Relative humidity 20 to 80% noncondensing
Recommended operating temperature relative 40 to 55%
humidity range
Maximum wet bulb temperature 28° C (82° F)
Maximum altitude 3050 m (10,000 ft.)
Acoustic level 56 dBA @ 23° C

7.4 bels @ 23° C

The following tables list the maximum electrical power for the N6000 series
systems and the electrical requirements for different configurations of the
N6000 series systems.
Table 2. N6000 series systems maximum electrical power
System Maximum electrical power
N6000 series systems 100-240 V ac, 12-8 A, 47-63 Hz

In the following tables, Worst-case indicates a system running with one PSU
and high fan speed. Typical Per PSU/System, two PSUs indicates a system
running one PSU on one circuit and a system running two PSUs on two
circuits.
Table 3. N6040 electrical requirements–one controller module
Input voltage 100 to 120V 200 to 240V
Worst- Typical Worst- Typical
case, case,
single Per PSU System, single Per PSU System,
PSU two PSUs PSU two PSUs

Input current 3.98 1.89 3.77 1.97 0.97 1.93


measured, A
Input power 396 187 373 385 183 366
measured, W

4 IBM System Storage: N6000 Series Hardware and Service Guide


Table 3. N6040 electrical requirements–one controller module (continued)
Input voltage 100 to 120V 200 to 240V

Thermal 1350 636 1272 1313 625 1249
dissipation,
BTU/hr
Input power 50 to 60
frequency, Hz

Table 4. N6040 electrical requirements–two controller modules


Input voltage 100 to 120V 200 to 240V
Worst- Typical Worst- Typical
case, case,
single Per PSU System, single Per PSU System,
PSU two PSUs PSU two PSUs

Input current 7.38 2.99 5.97 3.60 1.49 2.98


measured, A
Input power 736 297 594 712 291 581
measured, W
Thermal 2509 1013 2026 2427 991 1981
dissipation,
BTU/hr
Input power 50 to 60
frequency, Hz

Table 5. N6040 electrical requirements with two PAM I or II cards–one controller


module
Input voltage 100 to 120V 200 to 240V
Worst- Typical Worst- Typical
case, case,
single Per PSU System, single Per PSU System,
PSU two PSUs PSU two PSUs

Input current 4.06 1.93 3.86 2.01 0.99 1.98


measured, A
Input power 402 192 383 396 190 379
measured, W
Thermal 1372 654 1307 1352 647 1293
dissipation,
BTU/hr
Input power 50 to 60
frequency, Hz

Chapter 1. Preparing for the installation 5


Table 6. N6040 electrical requirements with four PAM I or II cards–two controller
modules
Input voltage 100 to 120V 200 to 240V
Worst- Typical Worst- Typical
case, case,
single Per PSU System, single Per PSU System,
PSU two PSUs PSU two PSUs

Input current 7.69 3.29 6.58 3.75 1.58 3.15


measured, A
Input power 769 328 655 745 315 630
measured, W
Thermal 2625 1117 2234 2543 1075 2150
dissipation,
BTU/hr
Input power 50 to 60
frequency, Hz

Table 7. N6060 electrical requirements–one controller module


Input voltage 100 to 120V 200 to 240V
Worst- Typical Worst- Typical
case, case,
single Per PSU System, single Per PSU System,
PSU two PSUs PSU two PSUs

Input current 4.80 2.25 4.50 2.38 1.16 2.32


measured, A
Input power 476 220 440 460 225 450
measured, W
Thermal 1625 751 1502 1570 768 1535
dissipation,
BTU/hr
Input power 50 to 60
frequency, Hz

Table 8. N6060 electrical requirements–two controller modules


Input voltage 100 to 120V 200 to 240V
Worst- Typical Worst- Typical
case, case,
single Per PSU System, single Per PSU System,
PSU two PSUs PSU two PSUs

Input current 9.25 3.88 7.76 4.40 2.15 4.30


measured, A

6 IBM System Storage: N6000 Series Hardware and Service Guide


Table 8. N6060 electrical requirements–two controller modules (continued)
Input voltage 100 to 120V 200 to 240V
Input power 916 380 760 860 419 838
measured, W
Thermal 3126 1297 2594 2935 1430 2860
dissipation,
BTU/hr
Input power 50 to 60
frequency, Hz

Table 9. N6060 electrical requirements with two PAM I or II cards–one controller


module
Input voltage 100 to 120V 200 to 240V
Worst- Typical Worst- Typical
case, case,
single Per PSU System, single Per PSU System,
PSU two PSUs PSU two PSUs

Input current 4.90 2.31 4.62 2.44 1.19 2.38


measured, A
Input power 487 227 453 478 230 460
measured, W
Thermal 1662 773 1546 1631 785 1570
dissipation,
BTU/hr
Input power 50 to 60
frequency, Hz

Table 10. N6060 electrical requirements with four PAM I or II cards–two controller
modules
Input voltage 100 to 120V 200 to 240V
Worst- Typical Worst- Typical
case, case,
single Per PSU System, single Per PSU System,
PSU two PSUs PSU two PSUs

Input current 9.65 4.09 8.17 4.51 2.28 4.55


measured, A
Input power 959 405 809 890 441 882
measured, W
Thermal 3273 1381 2761 3037 1505 3010
dissipation,
BTU/hr

Chapter 1. Preparing for the installation 7


Table 10. N6060 electrical requirements with four PAM I or II cards–two controller
modules (continued)
Input voltage 100 to 120V 200 to 240V
Input power 50 to 60
frequency, Hz

Table 11. N6070 electrical requirements–one controller module


Input voltage 100 to 120V 200 to 240V
Worst- Typical Worst- Typical
case, case,
single Per PSU System, single Per PSU System,
PSU two PSUs PSU two PSUs

Input current 5.07 2.37 4.74 2.52 1.19 2.38


measured, A
Input power 505 235 470 493 230 459
measured, W
Thermal 1722 801 1602 1680 782 1564
dissipation,
BTU/hr
Input power 50 to 60
frequency, Hz

Table 12. N6070 electrical requirements–two controller modules


Input voltage 100 to 120V 200 to 240V
Worst- Typical Worst- Typical
case, case,
single Per PSU System, single Per PSU System,
PSU two PSUs PSU two PSUs

Input current 9.74 4.07 8.14 4.69 2.02 4.03


measured, A
Input power 969 405 810 930 394 788
measured, W
Thermal 3305 1381 2761 3170 1343 2686
dissipation,
BTU/hr
Input power 50 to 60
frequency, Hz

8 IBM System Storage: N6000 Series Hardware and Service Guide


Table 13. N6070 electrical requirements with four PAM I or II cards–one controller
module
Input voltage 100 to 120V 200 to 240V
Worst- Typical Worst- Typical
case, case,
single Per PSU System, single Per PSU System,
PSU two PSUs PSU two PSUs

Input current 5.27 2.49 4.98 2.62 1.25 2.5


measured, A
Input power 525 247 494 513 241 482
measured, W
Thermal 1790 843 1685 1749 822 1644
dissipation,
BTU/hr
Input power 50 to 60
frequency, Hz

Table 14. N6070 electrical requirements with eight PAM I or II cards–two controller
modules
Input voltage 100 to 120V 200 to 240V
Worst- Typical Worst- Typical
case, case,
single Per PSU System, single Per PSU System,
PSU two PSUs PSU two PSUs

Input current 10.54 4.49 8.98 5.08 2.22 4.44


measured, A
Input power 1048 447 894 1006 434 868
measured, W
Thermal 3574 1525 3049 3430 1480 2960
dissipation,
BTU/hr
Input power 50 to 60
frequency, Hz

Checking shipment package contents


Make sure that your shipment package includes the following items, in
addition to the IBM System Storage N6000 Series Hardware and Service Guide.
v Single-controller system
– 1 single-controller system containing the power supplies and any options
you ordered
– 1 console adapter cable, RJ-45 to DB-9

Chapter 1. Preparing for the installation 9


– 1 cable management tray
– 1 ESD wrist strap
– 1 serial null modem cable
– 1 set of IBM publications
– 2 power cords
– 4 SFPs
There will also be envelopes with the software EULA and license keys.
A rail kit for mounting the single-controller system in a standard IBM
19–inch rack may also be present.
v Dual-controller (active/active or high availability) system
– 1 dual-controller system containing the power supplies and any options
you ordered
– 2 console adapter cables, RJ-45 to DB-9
– 2 cable management trays
– 1 wrist ESD straps
– 2 serial null modem cables
– 1 set of IBM publications
– 2 power cords
– 8 SFPs
There will also be envelopes with the software EULA and license keys.
A rail kit for mounting the dual-controller (active/active or high
availability) system in a standard IBM 19–inch rack may also be present.
Rules for installing the system in a rack

Attention: The rack installation instructions provided in this document and


in the Installation and Setup Instructions for your N series product apply
specifically to the installation of the N series product in an IBM 19-inch rack.
IBM service personnel cannot install the N series product in a non-IBM rack.

If the N series product is being installed in a non-IBM rack, the rails shipped
with the N series product may or may not work with the non-IBM rack.
Physical installation of the N series product in a non-IBM rack is the
customer’s responsibility.

You need to observe the following rules and restrictions when installing an
N6000 series system in a standard IBM 19-inch (48.26 cm) equipment rack
with mounting rails:

10 IBM System Storage: N6000 Series Hardware and Service Guide


svc00168

32-55 kg (70.5-121.2 lbs)

DANGER
The weight of this part or unit is between 44 and 54 kg (97 and 118 lb). It
takes three persons to safely lift this part or unit. (C010)

v You must work with two other people.


CAUTION:
The system is extremely heavy. To avoid injuring yourself or damaging
the system, you must work with at least two other people when you
install the system in the rack.
v Install the system at the bottom of your configuration, so that loops extend
above your system.
DANGER
To avoid hazardous conditions due to uneven mechanical loading,
always install the heaviest devices in the bottom of the rack cabinet.
Always install servers and optional devices starting from the bottom of
the rack cabinet. (R001 part 1 of 2)

v When installing storage expansion units in a rack, do not exceed the


maximum storage limit for your system.
v Make sure that the ID on the back panel of each storage expansion unit
matches the ID specified on its label.
v Always install the storage expansion units fully loaded. Do not remove disk
drives to reduce the weight.
Guide to the installation process
The following table provides a guide to the filer installation process.

Refer to the Installation and Setup Instructions that came with your system or
storage expansion unit for complete installation details.

Note: The initial hardware installation of an N6000 series gateway is


performed by IBM. Additional installation services can be performed by
IBM through an IBM services offering. Contact your IBM representative
for more information.

Chapter 1. Preparing for the installation 11


Table 15. Filer installation process procedures
Is the Procedure is performed by...
procedure
Stage Procedure required? Filer Gateway For instructions, see...
1 Install the system Yes Customer IBM The Installation and Setup
in a standard Instructions for your
IBM 19-inch rack. system
2 Connect the Yes Customer Customer “Connecting your system
system to the IP to an IP network” on
(Internet page 13, or the Installation
Protocol) and Setup Instructions that
network. came with your system
3 Filer: Connect Yes Customer n/a “Connecting a filer to
the storage storage expansion units”
system to storage on page 16, or the
expansion units. Installation and Setup
Instructions that came
with your system
Gateway: Yes n/a Customer Refer to the
Connect the documentation for your
system to the external storage for
back-end storage. additional information.
4 Connect the Yes Customer Customer “Connecting your system
system to a to a power source” on
power source. page 15, or the Installation
and Setup Instructions that
came with your system
5 Configure the Yes Customer Customer The IBM System Storage N
system. series Data ONTAP
Software Setup Guide for
your version of Data
ONTAP, or the Installation
and Setup Instructions that
came with your system
6 Connect the No Customer Customer “Connecting your system
system to a to storage” on page 15
third-party
device.

12 IBM System Storage: N6000 Series Hardware and Service Guide


Chapter 2. Connecting an N6000 series system
This chapter describes how to connect an N6000 series system in the following
topics:
v “Handling fiber-optic cables”
v “Connecting your system to an IP network”
v “Connecting your system to a power source” on page 15
v “Connecting your system to storage” on page 15

Handling fiber-optic cables


Before you use fiber-optic cables, read the following precautions.

Attention: To avoid damage to the fiber-optic cables, follow these guidelines:


v Do not route the cable along a folding cable-management arm.
v When attaching to a device on slide rails, leave enough slack in the cable so
that it does not bend to a radius of less than 38 mm (1.5 in.) when extended
or become pinched when retracted.
v Route the cable away from places where it can be snagged by other devices
in the rack cabinet.
v Do not overtighten the cable straps or bend the cables to a radius of less
than 38 mm (1.5 in.).
v Do not put excess weight on the cable at the connection point. Be sure that
the cable is well supported.

CAUTION:
Data processing environments can contain equipment transmitting on
system links with laser modules that operate at greater than Class 1
power levels. For this reason, never look into the end of an optical
fiber cable or open receptacle.

Connecting your system to an IP network


Each node of your system connects to an IP network. If you have an
active/active or high availability system, both nodes need to connect to the
network. For information that describes how to connect your system, refer to
the Installation and Setup Instructions that came with your system.

© Copyright IBM Corp. 2008, 2009 13


The N6000 series system has two onboard Ethernet ports per node, labeled
e0a and e0b, as shown in Figure 1. Up to four Network Interface Cards (NICs)
per node can be plugged into the PCI slots to provide additional Ethernet
ports.

The integrated Ethernet RJ-45 twisted-pair connectors are compatible with the
IEEE 802.3 Ethernet network 10/100/1000 BASE-TX link. When connecting to
the Ethernet port, connect a twisted-pair (CAT-5 or better) cable to the RJ-45
Ethernet port located on the back of the system drawer.

If you are connecting to a copper NIC, use RJ-45 CAT-5 or better copper
cables.

If you are connecting to a fiber NIC, use (50- or 62.5-micron) fiber-optic cables
with LC connectors.

e0a e0b 0a 0b 0c 0d
!

n6hw014

Figure 1. Onboard port locations (Ethernet)

For information about monitoring the Ethernet port LEDs, see the IBM System
Storage N Series Platform Monitoring Guide.
About the e0M interface
The e0M is the preferred Data ONTAP interface for the management LAN for
environments that use dedicated LANs to isolate management traffic from
data traffic. You use the e0M interface for Data ONTAP administrative tasks.
See Figure 2 on page 15.

The e0M interface is separate from the RLM interface, but both interfaces sit
behind the RJ-45 port (labeled with a wrench icon). This port is called the
Management port and connects to an internal Ethernet switch, which provides
connectivity to both interfaces. It is recommended that you configure both
interfaces.

14 IBM System Storage: N6000 Series Hardware and Service Guide


Management Data
LAN LAN

Ethernet e0a e0b


switch

Data
RLM e0M ONTAP
n6hw015

Storage controller

Figure 2. e0M interface

See the Data ONTAP System Administration Guide for more information.

Connecting your system to a power source


The N6000 series systems are shipped with redundant power supplies,
referred to as PSU1 and PSU2. Each power supply has its own AC power
cord. You should have separate circuit breakers for each power supply to
ensure power redundancy.

For information on connecting your N6000 series system to a power source,


see the Installation and Setup Instructions that came with your system.

Connecting your system to storage


The N6000 series system has four onboard Fibre Channel ports per node,
labeled 0a thru 0d, as shown in Figure 3 on page 16. Up to four HBAs per
node can be plugged into the PCI slots to provide additional Fibre Channel
ports. Attach the (50- or 62.5-micron) fiber-optic cables with LC connectors to
the Fibre Channel ports.

Note: SFPs must be firmly seated in the Fibre Channel ports before making
connections.

Chapter 2. Connecting an N6000 series system 15


e0a e0b 0a 0b 0c 0d
!

n6hw014
Figure 3. Onboard port locations (Fibre Channel)

Connecting a filer to storage expansion units


You must connect at least one storage expansion unit per node to your N6000
series filer. A single-controller filer (A10/A11/A12) must be connected to at
least one storage expansion unit. A dual-controller (active/active or high
availability) filer (A20/A21/A22) must be connected to at least two storage
expansion units. Fiber-optic cables must be used for the connection from the
filer to the first storage expansion unit.

Attention: Make sure that all storage expansion unit (1Gb/2Gb/4Gb)


switches are set to the 2Gb or 4Gb (if supported) position. If necessary, refer
to the documents that came with the storage expansion unit for information
about checking and changing the switch setting.

For information that describes how to connect your N6000 series filer using
the onboard Fibre Channel ports to storage expansion units, see the Installation
and Setup Instructions that came with your system.

Attention: If you are using optional adapter cards instead of the onboard
Fibre Channel ports to connect your N6000 series filer to storage expansion
units, see the cabling instructions described in “Cabling your system using
Fibre Channel expansion adapters.”

Dual-path Fibre Channel cabling is supported for N6000 series filers.


Dual-path Fibre Channel cabling is designed to improve reliability, availability
and serviceability of the storage expansion units attached to the storage
controller by creating two redundant paths from each storage controller to
each loop of the storage expansion units. For more information about using
dual-path Fibre Channel cabling, see the Installation and Setup Instructions that
came with your system.

Cabling your system using Fibre Channel expansion adapters


The illustrations in this section provide an example of cabling for a dual-node
active/active or high availability N6000 series filer SAN configuration with
four FCP host-side SAN connections and two loops of disk storage expansion
units, each with dual-path (also called multipath) Fibre Channel cabling to the

16 IBM System Storage: N6000 Series Hardware and Service Guide


disk storage expansion units in each loop. The cabling shown in this example
uses both onboard Fibre Channel ports and Fibre Channel expansion adapters
for connections to expansion unit storage.

Attention: If you are connecting to EXN3000 storage expansion units, refer


to the cabling instructions provided in the IBM System Storage EXN3000
Storage Expansion Unit Hardware and Service Guide.

For additional information about optional adapter cards, see Appendix C,


“Optional adapter cards,” on page 97.

Important: If you are not using the onboard ports for storage, then you must
set your onboard ports to Target mode, as described in the IBM
System Storage N series Data ONTAP Block Access Management Guide
for your version of Data ONTAP.
Notes:
1. The illustrations in the following sections show N6000 series storage
system connections to EXN4000 or EXN2000 storage expansion units. In
EXN1000 storage expansion units, the positions of the In and Out ports are
reversed from those of the EXN4000 or EXN2000.
2. The ESH4 and ESH2 are self-terminating and do not have a terminate
switch. The AT-FCX is self-terminating as long as no cable is plugged into
the Out port of the last storage expansion unit.
3. Terminate unused Fibre Channel ports with Fibre Channel loopback plugs.

Step 1: Connecting the storage controller to the Fibre Channel SAN:


Connect Fibre Channel ports 0b and 0d of each storage controller to separate
(dual-fabric) SAN switches, as shown in Figure 4 on page 18.

Chapter 2. Connecting an N6000 series system 17


Controller
A PSU
0a 0b 0c 0d

Controller
PSU
B 0a 0b 0c 0d

Loop 1 Module A OUT IN


PSU IN OUT PSU
Disk EXN 1 Module B
n6hw016

Loop 2 OUT IN
Disk EXN 1 PSU IN OUT PSU

Figure 4. Cabling ports 0b and 0d to switches

2. Connecting the storage controllers to the disk storage expansion units:


Using Fibre Channel ports 0a and 0c on each storage controller, connect the
storage controllers to each of the two loops of disk storage expansion units as
follows.
1. Connect upper storage controller A Fibre Channel port 0a to the FC IN
port of the upper ESH4 (or AT-FCX) controller in the first disk storage
expansion unit of loop 1.
2. Connect lower storage controller B Fibre Channel port 0a to the FC IN
port of the lower ESH4 (or AT-FCX) controller in the first disk storage
expansion unit of loop 1.
3. Connect lower storage controller B Fibre Channel port 0c to the FC IN port
of the upper ESH4 (or AT-FCX) controller in the first disk storage
expansion unit of loop 2.
4. Connect upper storage controller A Fibre Channel port 0c to the FC IN
port of the lower ESH4 (or AT-FCX) controller in the first disk storage
expansion unit of loop 2.

Figure 5 on page 19 shows the Fibre Channel connections from the onboard
Fibre Channel ports on the N6000 series active/active or high availability
system to storage expansion units.

18 IBM System Storage: N6000 Series Hardware and Service Guide


Controller
A 0a 0b 0c 0d

Controller
B 0a 0b 0c 0d

Loop 1 OUT IN
Disk EXN 1 IN OUT
n6hw017

Loop 2 OUT IN
Disk EXN 1 IN OUT

Figure 5. Cabling ports 0a and 0c to storage expansion units

Step 3: Connecting disk storage expansion units to disk storage expansion


units: If there are more than one disk storage expansion units in each loop,
connect the disk storage expansion units together as follows. For each storage
expansion unit in the loop:
1. Connect the FC OUT port of the upper ESH4 (or AT-FCX) controller to the
FC IN port of the upper ESH4 (or AT-FCX) on the next disk storage
expansion unit in the loop.
2. Connect the FC OUT port of the lower ESH4 (or AT-FCX) controller to the
FC IN port of the lower ESH4 (or AT-FCX) on the next disk storage
expansion unit in the loop.

Step 4. Connecting the last disk storage expansion unit in each loop back to
the storage controller (dual-path Fibre Channel cabling): If implementing
dual-path Fibre Channel cabling, connect the last disk storage expansion unit
in each loop back to the other storage controller, as shown in Figure 6 on page
20. In this example, the dual-path cabling is achieved using expansion adapter
cards.
1. Connect the upper ESH4 (or AT-FCX) controller FC OUT port of the last
disk storage expansion unit in loop 1 to a Fibre Channel port in the lower
storage controller B (shown being connected to Fibre Channel port A in
the optional expansion adapter in slot 4 of the lower storage controller B).
2. Connect the lower ESH4 (or AT-FCX) controller FC OUT port of the last
disk storage expansion unit in loop 1 to a Fibre Channel port in the upper

Chapter 2. Connecting an N6000 series system 19


storage controller A (shown being connected to Fibre Channel port A in
the optional expansion adapter in slot 4 of the upper storage controller A).
3. Connect the upper ESH4 (or AT-FCX) controller FC OUT port of the last
disk storage expansion unit in loop 2 to a Fibre Channel port in the upper
storage controller A (shown being connected to Fibre Channel port B in
the optional expansion adapter in slot 4 of the lower storage controller A).
4. Connect the lower ESH4 (or AT-FCX) controller FC OUT port of the last
disk storage expansion unit in loop 2 to a Fibre Channel port in the lower
storage controller B (shown being connected to Fibre Channel port B in the
optional expansion adapter in slot 4 of the upper storage controller B).

Controller
A 0a 0b 0c 0d

Controller
B 0a 0b 0c 0d

Loop 1 OUT IN
Disk EXN 1 IN OUT
PSU
n6hw018

Loop 2
OUT IN
Disk EXN 1 IN OUT PSU

Figure 6. Cabling expansion cards to storage expansion units for dual-path Fibre Channel cabling

Connecting a gateway to external storage


You must use fiber-optic cables to connect a gateway to external storage on a
Fibre Channel SAN.

See the Interoperability Matrix at the following web site for supported devices
for your N6000 series system.

www.ibm.com/storage/support/nas/

Refer to the documentation for your external storage for additional


information.

20 IBM System Storage: N6000 Series Hardware and Service Guide


Connecting to a third-party device
You can connect third-party devices to your system through an optical Fibre
Channel interface using any Fibre Channel port on the back of the chassis.

The N6000 series systems only support third-party devices with an optical
Fibre Channel interface. See the Interoperability Matrix at the following web
site for supported devices for your N6000 series system.

www.ibm.com/storage/support/nas/

Refer to the documentation that comes with the third-party device for
connection information.

Rules for connecting the third-party devices


Observe the following rules for connecting the third-party devices:
v Use a fiber-optic cable that is:
– Appropriate to the Fibre Channel connection on your N6000 series
system
– Of an approved length for the third-party device

Note: See the documentation for the third-party device.


v Check the Interoperability Matrix at the following web site to verify support
for your third-party device:
www.ibm.com/storage/support/nas/
An unsupported tape backup device might cause the system to halt.
v For additional information about Fibre Channel cables, see the following
web site:
www.ibm.com/storage/support/nas/

Connecting your system to an ASCII terminal console


The ASCII terminal console enables you to monitor the boot process, helps
you configure your system after it boots, and enables you to perform system
administration.
ASCII terminal console wiring
The following table lists the RJ-45 connection pinout for the ASCII terminal
console wiring.
Table 16. RJ-45 connection pinout for the ASCII terminal wiring
Pin number Signal
1 Connected to pin 8
2 Not connected

Chapter 2. Connecting an N6000 series system 21


Table 16. RJ-45 connection pinout for the ASCII terminal wiring (continued)
Pin number Signal
3 TXD (from system)
4 GND
5 GND
6 RXD (to system)
7 Not connected
8 Connected to pin 1

DB-9 to RJ-45 console adapter pin connections


You use the DB-9 to RJ-45 console adapter to connect the ASCII terminal
console to your N6000 series system. Its purpose is to convert the RJ-45 pinout
on the system to the DB-9 pinout, like those on other IBM products, and all
PCs.

The following table lists the console adapter pin number connections between
the PC-style DB-9 male connector and the RJ-45 connection on your system.
Table 17. Console adapter pin number connections
RJ-45 Signal DB-9 male
1 [not connected]
2 [not connected]
3 (connected to pin 3 on TXD 3 (connected to pin 3 on RJ-45)
DB-9)
4 (connected to pin 5 on GND 5 (connected to pin 4 on RJ-45)
DB-9)
5 [not connected]
6 (connected to pin 2 on RXD 2 (connected to pin 6 on RJ-45)
DB-9)
7 [not connected] [not connected] 1
8 [not connected] [not connected] 4
[not connected] 6 through 9

Connecting to an ASCII terminal console


To connect an ASCII terminal console to the system, complete the following
steps.
1. Set the following communications parameters to the same values for both
the N series system and ASCII terminal.

22 IBM System Storage: N6000 Series Hardware and Service Guide


Table 18. Communication parameters
Parameter Setting
Baud 9600
Data bit 8
Parity None
Stop bits 1
Flow control None

Note: See your terminal documentation for information about changing


your ASCII console terminal settings.
2. Connect the DB-9 null modem cable to the DB-9 to RJ-45 adapter cable,
and then connect the RJ-45 end to the console port on the system and the
other end to the ASCII terminal.

Chapter 2. Connecting an N6000 series system 23


24 IBM System Storage: N6000 Series Hardware and Service Guide
Chapter 3. Configuring an N6000 series system
This chapter describes how to configure an N6000 series system in the
following topics:
v “Configuring the N6000 series system”
v “Configuring the Fibre Channel port” on page 27

Configuring the N6000 series system


Gather and record information about each N6000 series system node in
“System setup information worksheet.”

For information about how to boot your filer for the first time, refer to the
Installation and Setup Instructions that came with your system.

For gateway systems, initial startup and configuration tasks must be


performed by IBM. For additional information about gateway systems, see the
documentation listed in Appendix E, “IBM System Storage N series
documentation,” on page 115.
System setup information worksheet
This worksheet is a planning aid for setting up either a stand-alone system or
an active/active or high availability configuration. The entries in this
worksheet are based on the typical questions you encounter while running
setup. You might encounter slightly different questions, depending on your
answers to some questions and also which version of Data ONTAP your
system is running. To use this worksheet, complete the following steps:
1. Copy this form; make one copy for each node in your system.
2. Gather the appropriate information for your system and fill in the blanks
with the data for the node. You may not need all rows or columns in this
form.
3. Rack and cable your system, as described in the documentation
accompanying your system.
4. Run the setup script. The script automatically loads and runs when you
first apply power to your system. Use the data you collected in this
worksheet to complete the initial setup process.

© Copyright IBM Corp. 2008, 2009 25


Table 19. N series system setup worksheet
Hostname:
Network Configuration Information e0a e0b e0c e0d e0e e0f
Virtual interfaces: [Y/N]
IP addresses: First 3 #s
______._____._____
Netmask: First 3 #s ______._____._____
Should interface e0a/e0b take over N/A N/A N/A N/A
partner IP address during failover?
[Y/N] (N3600/N3300)
Media type/speed (100tx-fd, 100tx, auto
[100/1000])
Flow control (none, receive, send, full):
Enable jumbo frames?
Complete setup through the web interface?
[Y/N]
Default gateway IP address/name:
IP address or name of administration host:
(Leave blank for root access to /etc from
any NFS client)
Timezone (name of city or region in
/etc/zoneinfo file) [EST5EDT]
Where is the N series system located? (Text
string)
Enter the root directory for the HTTP files
[/vol/vol0/home/http]
Do you want to run DNS resolver? [Y/N]
DNS domain name (you can enter up to 3 nameservers)
IP address for DNS first nameserver
Do you want another nameserver? [Y/N]
IP address for alternate nameserver
Do you want another nameserver? [Y/N]
IP address for alternate nameserver
Do you want to run NIS client? [Y/N]
Remote system management (RLM, RM, or BMC):

26 IBM System Storage: N6000 Series Hardware and Service Guide


Table 19. N series system setup worksheet (continued)
RLM:
Would you like to configure the RLM
LAN interface? [y]
Would you like to enable DHCP on the
RLM LAN interface? [y]
Please enter the name or IP address of
the mail host:
BMC: (N3600/N3300)
The Baseboard Management Controller (BMC) provides remote management capabilities
including console redirection, logging, and power control. It also extends AutoSupport by
sending down filer event alerts.
Would you like to configure the BMC?
[Y/N]
Enable DHCP on the BMC LAN
interface? [Y/N]
IP address for the BMC
Netmask for the BMC
IP address for the BMC Gateway
Gratuitous ARP interval for the BMC
[10 second (max 60)]
The mail host is required by your system to enable BMC to sense AutoSupport messages when the
filer is down.
IP address or name of the mail host
IP address for the mail host
Note: You may use AutoSupport options to configure alert destinations.

Configuring the Fibre Channel port


Each system controller module provides four independent Fibre Channel
ports, identified as 0a, 0b, 0c and 0d. SFPs must be firmly seated in all four
ports before connecting cables.

The Fibre Channel ports can operate in target or initiator mode. Fibre Channel
ports do not support mixed initiator/target mode. The default mode for the
ports is initiator mode. You do not need to configure the ports to use them in
initiator mode.

The Fibre Channel ports should be used in initiator mode to communicate


with tape backup devices, such as in a TapeSAN backup configuration.

Chapter 3. Configuring an N6000 series system 27


Fibre Channel ports on HBAs cannot be configured in target mode. They can
only be used in initiator mode.
N6000 series system active/active or high availability configurations
Active/active or high availability configurations must be cabled to switches
that support public loop topology. To connect an N6000 series system to a
fabric topology that includes switches that only support point-to-point
topology, such as McDATA Director class switches, you must connect the
active/active or high availability configuration to an edge switch and use this
switch as a bridge to the fabric. For information about specific switch models
supported and fabric configuration guidelines, see the IBM System Storage N
series FCP and iSCSI Configuration Guide at the following web site:

www.ibm.com/storage/support/nas/
Configuring for initiator mode
To configure the system back to initiator mode, complete the following steps.
1. Set the specified onboard ports to operate in initiator mode by entering the
following command:
fcadmin config -t initiator adapter

where adapter is the port number. You can specify more than one port.
Example: The following example sets onboard ports 0c and 0d to initiator
mode.
fcadmin config -t initiator 0c 0d
2. Reboot the system by entering the following command:
reboot
3. Verify that the Fibre Channel ports are online and configured in the correct
state for your configuration by entering the following command:
fcadmin config
Example: The following output example shows two ports configured as
Fibre Channel targets and two ports configured as initiators.
n6000a> fcadmin config
Local
Adapter Type State Status
---------------------------------------------------
0a target CONFIGURED online
0b target CONFIGURED online
0c initiator CONFIGURED online
0d initiator CONFIGURED online

For information on converting the onboard ports to target mode and


configuring your SAN, see the IBM System Storage N series Data ONTAP Block
Access Management Guide for your version of Data ONTAP.

28 IBM System Storage: N6000 Series Hardware and Service Guide


Configuring and using the RLM
The following table provides a list of manuals for configuring and using the
RLM. You can view the manuals at www.ibm.com/storage/nas.
Table 20. RLM configuration manuals
Manual Title Information Provided
Installation and Setup Instructions that came Describes the system and RLM cabling.
with your system
IBM System Storage N series Diagnostics Lists and describes the diagnostic tests for
Guide a new or existing RLM.
IBM System Storage N series Data ONTAP Describes RLM configuration and use.
System Administration Guide for your
version of Data ONTAP
IBM System Storage N series Platform Lists RLM error messages and gives
Monitoring Guide corrective action for the error.

Chapter 3. Configuring an N6000 series system 29


30 IBM System Storage: N6000 Series Hardware and Service Guide
Chapter 4. Monitoring your system
For information about monitoring the LEDs for your N6000 series system and
optional adapter cards, refer to the IBM System Storage N series Platform
Monitoring Guide.

© Copyright IBM Corp. 2008, 2009 31


32 IBM System Storage: N6000 Series Hardware and Service Guide
Chapter 5. Replacing N6000 series system devices
This chapter describes how to replace parts in your N6000 series system.

This chapter discusses the following topics:


v “Shutting down a controller module” on page 34
v “Opening the system” on page 35
v “Closing the system” on page 37
v “Replacing the controller module” on page 38
v “Replacing the fan module” on page 48
v “Replacing DIMMs” on page 51
v “Replacing a PCIe card and riser” on page 55
v “Replacing a power supply” on page 60
v “Replacing an NVRAM battery” on page 62
v “Replacing the Real-time Clock (RTC) battery” on page 67
v “Installing or replacing a Remote LAN Module” on page 71
v “Replacing a CompactFlash card in N6000 series systems” on page 78

Figure 7 shows the locations of components at the front of your N6000 series
system.

Cam handle with


Fan fault LED tab release

6 Fan modules
for Active/Active
configurations
3 Fan modules
Power for single-controller
configurations
Fault

Controller A
activity
Controller B
n6hw011

activity

Figure 7. N6000 series system components - Front

Figure 8 on page 34 shows the locations of components at the rear of your


N6000 series system.

© Copyright IBM Corp. 2008, 2009 33


Thumbscrew
and cam handle Controller module A

Cam handle with 4 Expansion


tab release adapter slots

4 Onboard
2 Power supplies Fibre Channel ports
with power and
fault LEDs
Fault status LED

Controller module B Management port


(for Active/Active

n6hw010
configurations only) 2 Network ports

Console port

Figure 8. N6000 series system components - Rear

Shutting down a controller module


To shut down a controller module (called a node in an active/active or high
availability configuration), complete the applicable procedure:
Shutting down a node in an active/active or high availability configuration
1. Check the status of the target node by entering the following command at
the system console of either node:
cf status
2. Take one of the following actions, depending on the result of the cf
status command:
v If clustering is enabled and neither node is in takeover mode, go to step
3.
v If clustering is enabled and the partner node took over the target node,
go to “Opening the system” on page 35 if you plan to open the system.
v If clustering is enabled and the target node took over the partner node,
correct the problem, run the cf giveback command from the target node
console, and go back to 1.
3. Take over the target node by entering the following command from the
partner node’s console:
partner> cf takeover
4. Go to “Opening the system” on page 35 when the takeover is complete if
you plan to open the system.

Note: Leave the power supplies turned on.

34 IBM System Storage: N6000 Series Hardware and Service Guide


Shutting down a node in an single-controller configuration
1. Enter the following command from the system console:
halt
2. Turn off the power supplies and unplug both power supplies from the
power source.
3. Check the NVRAM LEDs on the controller module (see Figure 17 on page
64).
If the LEDs are not flashing, go to “Opening the system” if you plan to
open the system.
If the LEDs are flashing red, there is content in the NVRAM that has not
been saved to disk. Reconnect the power supplies to the power source,
reboot the controller module, and repeat steps 1 through 3. If repeated
attempts to cleanly shut down the controller module fail, be aware that
you might lose any data that was not saved to disk.
4. Go to “Opening the system” if you plan to open the system.

Opening the system


Perform the following steps to open the N6000 series system, using Figure 9
on page 36 and Figure 10 on page 37 for reference.
1. Properly ground yourself.
2. Loosen the thumbscrew on the controller module cam handle.
3. Pull the controller module cam handle downward and slide the controller
module toward you until it stops.
4. Unplug system cables from the controller module, as needed, and keep
track of where the cables were connected to the controller module. Leave
the cables in the cable clips of the cable management tray.
5. Grasp the cable management tray by the blue touch points on the arms,
gently push one arm of the tray so that the arm slides off the retaining
pin, and then lift the tray off the back of the controller module and set it
aside.
6. Push in the controller module release tab on the left side of the controller
module and slide the controller module out of the system. Release the tab
after you can slide the controller module. Make sure that you support the
bottom of the controller module with your free hand.

Chapter 5. Replacing N6000 series system devices 35


Figure 9 shows a view of the exterior components of your N6000 series
system.

Fan module

Power supply

Controller module

n6hw013

Folding handles

Cable management tray

Figure 9. N6000 series exterior components

36 IBM System Storage: N6000 Series Hardware and Service Guide


Figure 10 shows an exploded view of the components of your N6000 series
system.

System memory DIMMs


RLM card
CompactFlash card
RTC battery
DIMM
cover NVRAM
memory
DIMM
Controller module
release tab

NVRAM
battery

Side panel

NVRAM LED NVRAM LED


PCIe riser

NVRAM
memory
DIMM
n6hw012

Console,
network and Controller system board
management
ports

Figure 10. N6000 series system components - Exploded view

Closing the system


1. Close the DIMM cover, and close the side panel if needed.
2. Align the end of the controller module with the opening in the chassis.
3. Gently push the controller module halfway into the chassis, recable the
controller module, and attach the cable management tray. Then push the
controller module all the way into the chassis.

Note: For active/active or high availability configurations, recable the


controller before seating it all the way into the chassis, since it
reboots once fully seated.

Chapter 5. Replacing N6000 series system devices 37


4. Firmly push up the cam handle to finish seating the controller module in
the system, and then push the cam handle to the closed position and
tighten the thumbscrew beneath the cam handle.
5. Complete the boot process.
If your system has a single controller module, plug in the power supply
and turn on the power.
If your system is in an active/active or high availability configuration,
wait a few seconds for the node to boot, then enter the following
command from the partner console:
cf giveback

Replacing the controller module


The controller module field-replaceable unit (FRU) arrives without the PCI
cards, PCI card riser, CompactFlash card, RLM module, nonvolatile RAM
(NVRAM) DIMM, NVRAM battery, system memory DIMMs, and SFP
modules. You must remove these components from the old controller module
and install them in the replacement controller module.

Note: To reduce the possibility of damage to the FRU parts, minimize the
handling of the parts by installing them into the new controller module
as soon as you have removed them from the old controller module.

This section describes how to perform the following tasks:


v “Removing the controller module”
v “Installing the controller module” on page 41
v “Installing the firmware” on page 44
v “Reassigning disks” on page 44
v “Testing the system” on page 46
v “Rebooting the controller module” on page 46
v “Completing the replacement process” on page 48
Removing the controller module
This section describes how to perform the following tasks:
v “Shutting down the controller module” on page 39
v “Removing the PCI card and riser” on page 40
v “Removing the CompactFlash card” on page 40
v “Removing the RLM module” on page 40
v “Removing the NVRAM memory DIMM” on page 41
v “Removing the system memory DIMMs” on page 41
v “Removing the NVRAM battery” on page 41

38 IBM System Storage: N6000 Series Hardware and Service Guide


Shutting down the controller module
1. Shut down the target controller module (called a node in an active/active
or high availability configuration) by completing the applicable procedure:
v Shutting down a node in an active/active or high availability
configuration
– If your system is in an active/active or high availability NAS
configuration, go to substep c.
– If your system is in an active/active or high availability SAN
configuration, complete substeps a and b, and then go to substep c.
a. Enter the following command from Node B to save Node A’s
onboard Fibre Channel port configuration information: partner
fcadmin config
b. Copy and save the screen display to a safe location for the steps in
“Restoring the onboard port configuration (active/active or high
availability SAN configurations only)” on page 47”.

Note: To perform this procedure, the partner node must be able to


take over the target node. If this criteria cannot be met,
contact technical support.
c. Check the status of the target node by entering the following
command at the system console of either node:
cf status
d. Take one of the following actions, depending on the result of the cf
status command:
If clustering is enabled and neither node is in takeover mode, go to
substep e.
If clustering is enabled and the partner node took over the target
node, go to step 2 on page 40.
If clustering is enabled and the target node took over the partner
node, correct the problem, run the cf giveback command from the
target node console, and go back to substep c.
e. Take over the target node by entering the following command from
the partner node’s console:
cf takeover
f. Go to step 2 on page 40 when the takeover is complete.
v Shutting down a controller module in a single-controller configuration
a. Enter the following command from the system console:
halt
b. Turn off the power supplies, unplug both power cords from the
power source, and then remove the power cords.

Chapter 5. Replacing N6000 series system devices 39


2. While grounded, remove the controller module, unplug the cables, and
then remove the cable management tray as described in “Opening the
system” on page 35.
3. Check whether the NVRAM LEDs on the controller module are flashing
red (see Figure 17 on page 64).
Flashing red LEDs means there is content in the NVRAM that has not
been saved to disk.
v If your system is in an active/active or high availability configuration,
ignore the LEDs because content in the NVRAM was saved through the
takeover process.
v If your system is in a single-controller module configuration, complete the
following substeps:
a. Reconnect the power supplies to the power source.
b. Reboot the controller module.
Repeat substeps 6a on page 39 and 6b on page 39 from "Shutting
down a controller module in a single-controller configuration", and
then repeat step 2.
4. If you left the SFP modules in the system after removing the cables, move
them to the new controller module.
5. Go to “Removing the PCI card and riser.”

Removing the PCI card and riser


1. While grounded, loosen the thumbscrew on the controller module side
panel.
2. Swing the side panel open until it comes off the controller module.
3. Remove the PCI card or cards.
4. Loosen the PCI card riser thumbscrew and pull the riser up and out of the
sockets.
5. Replace the controller module side panel and tighten the thumbscrew.
6. Go to “Removing the CompactFlash card.”

Removing the CompactFlash card


1. Locate the CompactFlash card using the CF Card label on the controller
module DIMM cover as a reference.
2. Pull the card up and out of the socket.
3. Go to “Removing the RLM module.”

Removing the RLM module


1. Locate the RLM using the RLM label on the controller module DIMM
cover as a reference.

40 IBM System Storage: N6000 Series Hardware and Service Guide


2. Pinch the retaining tabs on the RLM, and then lift the RLM straight out of
the socket and housing.
3. Go to “Removing the NVRAM memory DIMM.”

Removing the NVRAM memory DIMM


1. Locate the NVRAM memory DIMM using the NVRAM Memory label on
the controller module as a reference.
2. Note the orientation of the DIMM in the socket so that you can insert the
DIMM correctly in the new controller module.
3. Push apart the latches on either side of the DIMM to release the DIMM
from its slot, and then lift it out of the slot.
4. Go to “Removing the system memory DIMMs.”

Removing the system memory DIMMs


1. Locate the system memory DIMMs under the controller module DIMM
cover.
2. Note the locations and orientation of the DIMMs in the sockets so that you
can insert the DIMMs correctly in the new controller module.
3. Push apart the latches on either side of the DIMM to release the DIMM
from its slot, and then lift it out of the slot.
4. Repeat step 2 for each DIMM.
5. Go to “Removing the NVRAM battery.”

Removing the NVRAM battery


1. Locate the NVRAM battery using the label on the battery cover as a
reference.
2. Loosen the two thumbscrews on the battery cover.
You might need to push down on the cover with one hand to loosen the
thumbscrews.
3. Swing the cover up and away from the battery.
4. Lift the battery out of the socket and housing.
5. Go to “Installing the controller module.”
Installing the controller module
This section describes how to perform the following tasks:
v “Installing the CompactFlash card” on page 42
v “Installing the riser and PCI card” on page 42
v “Installing the RLM module” on page 42
v “Installing the NVRAM and system memory DIMMs” on page 42
v “Installing the NVRAM battery” on page 43

Chapter 5. Replacing N6000 series system devices 41


Installing the CompactFlash card
1. While grounded, position the CompactFlash card by aligning the card with
the edges of the card socket in the new controller module.
The lip on the top of the card should point in the direction shown in the
CF Card label on the controller module DIMM cover.
2. Seat the card by pushing it into the socket.
The card should be squarely seated and should not move. Reseat the card,
if necessary.

Note: The CompactFlash socket is keyed. If you feel resistance while


pushing the card into the socket, check the orientation of the card.
3. Go to “Installing the riser and PCI card.”

Installing the riser and PCI card


1. Loosen the thumbscrew on the new controller module’s side panel.
2. Swing the side panel open until it comes off the controller module.
3. Align the riser with the guide slots on the chassis, and then firmly push
down until the riser is in place.
4. Examine the riser to make sure that it is seated squarely and completely in
the socket.
If it is not seated squarely, repeat step 3.
5. Tighten the riser thumbscrew.
6. Reinstall the PCI card by properly aligning the card in the slot and
exerting even pressure on the card when seating it in the socket.
7. Repeat step 6 if you are installing additional PCI cards.
8. Reattach the controller module side panel, close it, and then tighten the
thumbscrew.
9. Go to “Installing the RLM module.”

Installing the RLM module


1. Align the edges of the RLM with the guide slots on the edges of the
housing, lower the RLM into place in the housing, and then press it into
the socket by using your thumb in the top center of the RLM. Make sure
the retaining tabs lock firmly in place.
2. Go to “Installing the NVRAM and system memory DIMMs.”

Installing the NVRAM and system memory DIMMs


1. Identify the NVRAM memory DIMM slot using the NVRAM Memory
label on the controller module as a reference.
2. Hold the DIMM by the corners and align it over the slot.
The voltage notch among the pins on the DIMM should line up with the
tab in the socket.

42 IBM System Storage: N6000 Series Hardware and Service Guide


3. Insert the DIMM straight into the slot.
The DIMM fits tightly in the slot, but should go in easily. If not, realign
the DIMM with the slot and reinsert it.
Attention: Visually inspect the DIMM to verify that it is evenly aligned
and fully inserted into the slot. The edge connector on the DIMM must
make complete contact with the slot.
4. Push carefully, but firmly, on the top edge of the DIMM until the latches
snap into place over the notches at the ends of the DIMM.
5. Identify the system memory DIMM slots using the DIMM label on the
controller module DIMM cover as a reference.
6. Repeat steps 2 on page 42 through 4 to install the system memory DIMMs.
7. Go to “Installing the NVRAM battery.”

Installing the NVRAM battery


1. Locate the NVRAM battery using the label on the battery cover as a
reference.
2. Loosen the two thumbscrews on the battery cover.
You might need to push down on the cover with one hand to loosen the
thumbscrews.
3. Swing the cover up and away from the battery.
4. Align the battery socket with the edge connector in the floor of the
housing.
5. Seat the battery.
6. Close the battery cover and tighten the thumbscrews.
You might need to push down on the cover with one hand to tighten the
thumbscrews.
7. Go to “Closing the system.”

Closing the system


1. Reinstall the controller module by completing the following steps:
Attention: For active/active or high availability configurations, the
sequence in which you reinstall the controller module is important because
it attempts to reboot as soon as you completely seat it in the chassis.
a. Gently push the controller module halfway into the chassis.
b. Recable the controller module and PCI cards that you removed at the
beginning of the procedure.
c. Attach the cable management tray.
d. Push the controller module all the way into the chassis.

Note: If you are recabling a gateway system, see the Gateway


Installation Requirements and Reference Guide.

Chapter 5. Replacing N6000 series system devices 43


2. Go to “Installing the firmware.”
Installing the firmware
1. Select the most current version of firmware for your system from those
listed at www.ibm.com/storage/support/nas/ and then follow the
instructions for downloading and installing the new firmware.

Note: Installing a new controller module changes the World Wide Port
Name (WWPN) and World Wide Node Name (WWNN) values
associated with each onboard Fibre Channel port. If your
configuration uses switched-based zoning, you must adjust the
switch zoning to reflect the new WWPN and WWNN values. If
your configuration includes a gateway system, you must also adjust
the WWPN values in the host or volume groups associated with
arrays on the storage subsystem.
2. Go to “Reassigning disks.”
Reassigning disks
Attention: This information does not apply to EXN3000 storage expansion
units, which use software-based disk ownership. For more information, see
the description of software-based disk ownership, as well as the "General cabling
rules for SAS and ACP" section, in the IBM System Storage EXN3000 Storage
Expansion Unit Hardware and Service Guide.

Reassign disks to the failed node, by completing the following steps for
active/active or high availability and single-controller module configurations:
1. Power on to reboot the system.
2. Press Ctrl-C to interrupt the boot process and go to the Special Boot
menu when you see the following message:
Press Ctrl-C for the special boot menu

Note: If your system has the AUTOBOOT option set to False, the system
stops at the boot prompt and you must enter boot_ontap to boot
the system, then press Ctrl-C to interrupt.
3. On the failed node, select Maintenance Mode from the Special Boot
menu.
4. On the failed node, view the old and new system IDs by entering the
following command:
disk show -v
The new ID is listed in the output after Local System ID. The old ID is
listed in parentheses following the host name.

Note: Make note of the new system ID at the very beginning of the
output.

44 IBM System Storage: N6000 Series Hardware and Service Guide


5. Reassign the disks to the new controller module based on your system’s
configuration.
Attention: For an active/active or high availability configuration, the
following commands must be entered from the partner node’s console.
v If the controller module is a node in an active/active or high availability
configuration, complete the following substeps on the partner node:
a. On the partner node, enter the following command to enter
advanced privilege mode:
priv set advanced
b. On the partner node, reassign disk ownership for filer systems (or
LUN ownership for gateway systems), using the system ID
information obtained from the disk show -v command:
disk reassign -s <old_system_ID> -d <new_system_ID>
v If the controller module is part of a single-controller module configuration,
enter the following command at the Maintenance mode prompt:
disk reassign -s <old_system_ID> -d <new system ID>
6. On the partner node, verify that the disks (or gateway LUNs) were
assigned correctly by entering the following command:
disk show -v
Disks are shown as assigned to the system and should show the new
system ID for the failed node. If your system is in an active/active or
high availability configuration, disk ownership must be shown as the
same for both nodes.
7. On the failed node, check the status of your disk aggregates and volumes
by entering the following command:
aggr status
8. On the failed node, halt the system to leave Maintenance Mode and
return to the boot prompt.
halt
9. On the failed node, boot the operating system with the following
command. For active/active or high availability configurations, this puts
the node in Waiting for Giveback state.
boot_ontap
10. If the controller module is part of a single-controller module
configuration, go to step 13 on page 46.
11. On the partner node, enter the following command to return to standard
privilege mode:
priv set admin
12. On the partner node, give back the failed node with the following
command:

Chapter 5. Replacing N6000 series system devices 45


cf giveback -f
13. Go to “Testing the system.”
Testing the system
After you update the controller module firmware, you should run diagnostics
on the controller module and controller module FRUs. If the system passes
the diagnostic tests, boot the system and bring it back online.
1. Enter the following command to stop the system and bring up the boot
loader prompt:
halt
2. Enter the following command at the boot loader prompt to enter
diagnostics:
boot_diags
3. Enter the following command at the main diagnostics prompt to begin
the diagnostics tests on the new controller module:
run mb
4. Enter the following command at the prompt:
config
5. Confirm that the output shows all adapters plugged into the PCI riser are
detected.
6. Enter the following command at the prompt to access the memory menu:
mem
7. Confirm that the total memory output is consistent with expectations.
8. If the RLM is connected, go to the Agent menu to run the RLM-Agent
interface test.
9. Enter the following command at the prompt to exit diagnostics:
exit
10. Go to “Rebooting the controller module.”
Rebooting the controller module
1. Boot your system.
If your system is in an active/active or high availability SAN
configuration, go to “Restoring the onboard port configuration
(active/active or high availability SAN configurations only)” on page 47.
If your system is in an active/active or high availability NAS or iSCSI
configuration, complete the following substeps:
a. Enter the following command:
boot_ontap
The message Waiting for Giveback is displayed during the boot
process.

46 IBM System Storage: N6000 Series Hardware and Service Guide


b. Complete the boot process by entering the following command from
the partner node console:
cf giveback
Results:
The target node reboots and functions normally. A successful giveback
ends with the following message on the partner node:
giveback completed

Note: If Waiting for Giveback is not displayed prior to giveback,


reboot the controller module. If this continues, contact technical
support.
c. Display the date and time on the partner node and set the target node
to the same date and time.
If your system is in a single-controller module configuration, go to 2 after
booting is complete.
2. Go to “Completing the replacement process” on page 48.

Restoring the onboard port configuration (active/active or high


availability SAN configurations only)
When you replace the controller module of a system in an active/active or
high availability configuration, the failed controller module is shut down and
the partner controller module takes over. If your configuration is FCP-licensed
and cabled to a Fibre Channel fabric, you must restore the configuration of
the onboard Fibre Channel ports before you perform the first giveback;
otherwise, you might experience a disruption in service.

The onboard Fibre Channel ports on a replacement controller module are not
preconfigured. If you do not configure the onboard Fibre Channel ports before
the first giveback, Data ONTAP restores the original onboard Fibre Channel
port configuration and then automatically reboots the controller module
during the giveback. SAN hosts that are failing back to the replaced controller
module might lose access to their LUNs during the reboot.

Note: See the na_fcadmin(1) man page for more information about Fibre
Channel port configuration.
1. Boot the controller module by entering the following command:
boot_ontap
2. Press Ctrl-C to interrupt the boot process.
3. From the boot menu, select Maintenance mode boot.
4. Program the onboard ports with the information you obtained in
“Shutting down the controller module” on page 39 by entering the
following commands:
v Set ports to Target mode: fcadmin config -t target adapter_name ...

Chapter 5. Replacing N6000 series system devices 47


v Set ports to Initiator mode: fcadmin config -t initiator
adapter_name ...
v Set ports to the unconfigured state: fcadmin config -t unconfig
adapter_name ...
adapter_name is the port number (for example, 0c). You can specify more
than one port.
5. Recable the target and initiator ports.
v Connect the target ports to the Fibre Channel fabric.
v Connect initiator ports to the local and partner disk shelves and/or the
TapeSAN fabric.
6. Exit Maintenance mode by entering the following command:
halt
7. Reboot the controller module by entering the following command:
boot_ontap
8. After the controller module reboots, perform the giveback by entering the
following command on the console of the takeover (partner) controller
module:
cf giveback
9. Display the date and time on the partner node and set the target node to
the same date and time.
10. Go to “Completing the replacement process.”
Completing the replacement process
Return the failed part to IBM. Contact IBM Service and Support at
1-800-IBM-SERV (1-800-426-7378) for more information on the return
procedure.

Replacing the fan module

Attention: A fan must be replaced within two minutes of removal or the


system shuts down. Have the replacement fan module ready for insertion.

This section describes the following tasks:


v “Removing a fan module”
v “Installing the replacement fan module” on page 50
v “Completing the replacement process” on page 51
Removing a fan module
1. While grounded, remove the bezel (if necessary) with two hands, by
grasping the openings on each side of the bezel, and then pulling it
toward you until the bezel releases from the four ball studs on the chassis
frame.

48 IBM System Storage: N6000 Series Hardware and Service Guide


2. Identify the fan module that you must replace by checking the console
error messages and looking at the Status LED on each fan module cam
handle.
A failed fan LED is solid amber, indicating that the fan has failed or no
power is reaching the fan module.
3. Press down the release latch on the fan module cam handle and pull the
cam handle downward.
The fan module moves a little bit away from the chassis.
4. Pull the fan module straight out from the chassis, making sure that you
support it with your free hand, so that it does not swing out of the
chassis.
Attention: The fan modules are short. Always support the bottom of the
module with your free hand so that it does not suddenly drop free from
the chassis and injure you.
Attention: You must replace the fan within two minutes of removing it
from the chassis. System airflow is disrupted and the controller module
shuts down after two minutes to avoid overheating. In active/active or
high availability configurations, a take-over occurs.
5. Set the fan module aside.

Chapter 5. Replacing N6000 series system devices 49


Fan module

Cam handle
release latch
Fan cam
handle Fan LED

n6hw003

Figure 11. Fan module

Installing the replacement fan module


1. While grounded, remove the bezel, if necessary.
2. Insert the replacement fan module into the chassis by aligning it with the
opening and sliding it into the chassis.
3. Push firmly on the fan module housing to ensure that it is seated all the
way into the chassis.
4. Push the cam handle up, to its closed position, making sure that the cam
handle release latch clicks into the locked position.
5. Reinstall the bezel by aligning it with the four ball studs on the chassis
frame, and then firmly pushing the bezel onto the ball studs.
6. Run diagnostics on the replacement fan module during the next scheduled
system downtime.

See the IBM System Storage N series Diagnostics Guide for more information.

50 IBM System Storage: N6000 Series Hardware and Service Guide


Completing the replacement process
Return the failed part to IBM. Contact IBM Service and Support at
1-800-IBM-SERV (1-800-426-7378) for more information on the return
procedure.

Replacing DIMMs
This section describes how to perform the following tasks:
v “Removing a DIMM”
v “Installing a DIMM” on page 54
v “Completing the replacement process” on page 55
Removing a DIMM
1. Shut down the target controller module (called a node in an active/active
or high availability configuration) by completing the applicable procedure:
v To shut down a node in an active/active or high availability
configuration
a. Check the status of the target node by entering the following
command at the system console of either node:
cf status
b. Take one of the following actions, depending on the result of the cf
status command:
– If clustering is enabled and neither node is in takeover mode, go
to substep 1c.
– If clustering is enabled and the partner node took over the target
node, go to step 2.
– If clustering is enabled and the target node took over the partner
node, correct the problem, run the cf giveback command from
the target node console, and go back to substep 1a.
c. Take over the target node by entering the following command from
the partner node’s console:
cf takeover
d. Go to step 2 when the takeover is complete.
v To shut down a controller module in a single-controller configuration
a. Enter the following command from the system console:
halt
b. Turn off the power supplies, unplug both power cords from the
power source, and then remove the power cords.
2. While grounded, remove the controller module, unplug the cables, and
then remove the cable management tray as described in “Opening the
system” on page 35.

Chapter 5. Replacing N6000 series system devices 51


3. Check whether the NVRAM LEDs on the controller module are flashing
red (see Figure 17 on page 64).
Flashing red LEDs means there is content in the NVRAM that has not
been saved to disk.
If your system is in an active/active or high availability configuration,
ignore the LEDs because content in the NVRAM was saved through the
takeover process.
If your system is in a single-controller module configuration, complete the
following substeps:
a. Reconnect the power supplies to the power source.
b. Reboot the controller module.
c. Repeat the substeps for "To shut down a controller module in a
single-controller configuration" on page 51, and then repeat step 2 on
page 51.

Note: If repeated attempts to cleanly shut down the controller module fail,
be aware that you might lose any data that was not saved to disk.
4. Open the DIMM cover in the controller module.
5. Locate the DIMM that you want to remove.

Note: Each system memory DIMM has an LED located on the board next
to each DIMM slot. The LED is illuminated if the DIMM needs to
be replaced.

Attention: You must replace the same number of DIMMs as you receive
in your replacement package.
If you are replacing DIMMs on an N6070 system, see Figure 12 on page 53.

52 IBM System Storage: N6000 Series Hardware and Service Guide


System memory DIMMs

NVRAM LED

n6hw008
NVRAM memory DIMM
NVRAM LED

Figure 12. Replacing DIMMs on an N6070 system

If you are replacing DIMMs on an N6040 system, see Figure 13.

System memory DIMMs


NVRAM LED
n6hw009

NVRAM memory DIMM


NVRAM LED

Figure 13. Replacing DIMMs on an N6040 system

6. Note the orientation of the DIMM in the socket so that you can insert the
replacement DIMM in the proper orientation.
7. Push apart the latches on either side of the DIMM to release the DIMM
from its slot, and then lift it out of the slot.

Chapter 5. Replacing N6000 series system devices 53


n50hw031

Voltage notch

Figure 14. Lifting the DIMM from the slot

8. Repeat step 5 on page 52 through step 7 on page 53 to remove additional


DIMMs as needed.
9. Go to “Installing a DIMM.”
Installing a DIMM
1. Locate the slot where you are installing the new DIMM.
2. While grounded, remove the replacement DIMM from the antistatic
shipping bag, hold the DIMM by the corners, and align it over the slot.
The voltage notch among the pins on the DIMM should line up with the
tab in the socket.
3. Insert the DIMM straight into the slot.
The DIMM fits tightly in the slot, but should go in easily. If not, realign
the DIMM with the slot and reinsert it.

Note: Visually inspect the DIMM to verify that it is evenly aligned and
fully inserted into the slot. The edge connector on the DIMM must
make complete contact with the slot.
4. Push carefully, but firmly, on the top edge of the DIMM until the latches
snap into place over the notches at the ends of the DIMM.
5. Repeat steps 1 through 4 to install additional DIMMs as needed.
6. Close the DIMM cover.
7. Reinstall the controller module by completing the following steps:
Attention: For active/active or high availability configurations, the
sequence in which you reinstall the controller module is important because
it attempts to reboot as soon as you completely seat it in the chassis.
a. Gently push the controller module halfway into the chassis.

54 IBM System Storage: N6000 Series Hardware and Service Guide


b. Recable the controller module and PCI cards that you removed at the
beginning of the procedure.
c. Attach the cable management tray.
d. Push the controller module all the way into the chassis.

Note: If you are recabling a gateway system, see the Gateway Installation
Requirements and Reference Guide.
8. Boot the system.
9. To run diagnostics on your DIMM, complete the following substeps. If you
do not want to run diagnostics, go to “Completing the replacement
process.”
a. Stop the boot process before LOADER completes loading, and enter
boot_diags at the boot loader prompt.
b. Enter the following command at the main diagnostics prompt to enter
the memory menu:
mem
c. Confirm that the total memory output is consistent with expectations.
d. Run the Comprehensive memory tests: option 1.
e. After you complete the tests, exit diagnostics.
f. Enter the following command at the prompt to boot the system:
boot_ontap
Attention: If your system is in an active/active or high availability
configuration, use the cf giveback command from the partner node’s
console to enable your active/active or high availability configuration.
g. Go to “Completing the replacement process.”
Completing the replacement process
Return the failed part to IBM. Contact IBM Service and Support at
1-800-IBM-SERV (1-800-426-7378) for more information on the return
procedure.

Replacing a PCIe card and riser


This section describes how to perform the following tasks:
v “Removing a PCIe card” on page 56
v “Installing a PCIe card” on page 57
v “Removing a riser” on page 59
v “Installing a riser” on page 59
v “Completing the replacement process” on page 60

Chapter 5. Replacing N6000 series system devices 55


Removing a PCIe card

Note: This procedure is written with the assumption that all other
components of the system are functioning properly. If your system does
not meet this criteria, contact technical support.
1. Shut down the target controller module (called a node in an active/active
or high availability configuration) by completing the applicable procedure:
v Shutting down a node in an active/active or high availability
configuration
a. Check the status of the target node by entering the following
command at the system console of either node:
cf status
b. Take one of the following actions, depending on the result of the cf
status command:
– If clustering is enabled and neither node is in takeover mode, go
to substep 1c.
– If clustering is enabled and the partner node took over the target
node, go to step 2.
– If clustering is enabled and the target node took over the partner
node, correct the problem, run the cf giveback command from
the target node console, and go back to substep 1a.
c. Take over the target node by entering the following command from
the partner node’s console:
cf takeover
d. Go to step 2 when the takeover is complete.
v Shutting down a controller module in a single-controller configuration
a. Enter the following command from the system console:
halt
b. Turn off the power supplies, unplug both power cords from the
power source, and then remove the power cords.
2. While grounded, remove the controller module, unplug the cables, and
then remove the cable management tray as described in “Opening the
system” on page 35.
3. Check whether the NVRAM LEDs on the controller module are flashing
red (see Figure 17 on page 64).
Flashing red LEDs means there is content in the NVRAM that has not
been saved to disk.
v If your system is in an active/active or high availability configuration,
ignore the LEDs because content in the NVRAM was saved through the
takeover process.

56 IBM System Storage: N6000 Series Hardware and Service Guide


v If your system is in a single-controller module configuration, complete
the following substeps:
a. Reconnect the power supplies to the power source.
b. Reboot the controller module.
c. Repeat substeps a and b from step 1 of "Shutting Down a Controller
Module in a Single-Controller Configuration," and then repeat step 2.

Note: If repeated attempts to cleanly shut down the controller module fail,
be aware that you might lose any data that was not saved to disk.
4. Remove the failing PCIe card by completing the following substeps, using
the PCIe card label on the controller DIMM cover for reference:
a. Loosen the thumbscrew on the controller module side panel.
b. Swing the side panel open until it comes off the controller module.
c. Remove the PCIe card from the controller module and set it aside.
d. Go to “Installing a PCIe card.”

Riser

PCIe card
n6hw002

Figure 15. Replacing a PCIe card and riser

Installing a PCIe card


1. While grounded, shut down the system, and remove the controller module
from the chassis, if necessary, as described in “Shutting down a controller
module” on page 34 and “Opening the system” on page 35.

Chapter 5. Replacing N6000 series system devices 57


2. Open the controller module side panel. If you are adding a new PCIe card,
remove the slot cover. Install the PCIe card.
Be sure that you properly align the card in the slot and exert even
pressure on the card when seating it in the socket.
3. Close the side panel and tighten the thumbscrew.
4. Reinstall the controller module by completing the following steps:
Attention: For active/active or high availability configurations, the
sequence in which you reinstall the controller module is important because
it attempts to reboot as soon as you completely seat it in the chassis.
a. Gently push the controller module halfway into the chassis.
b. Recable the controller module and PCI cards that you removed at the
beginning of the procedure.
c. Attach the cable management tray.
d. Push the controller module all the way into the chassis.

Note: If you are recabling a gateway system, see the Gateway


Installation Requirements and Reference Guide.
5. Cable the PCIe card as needed.
Attention: If your system is in an active/active or high availability
configuration, seat the controller module in the chassis, then go to step 6.
6. Boot the system by entering the following command:
boot_ontap
7. To run diagnostics on your PCI card, complete the following substeps. If
you do not want to run diagnostics, go to step 8 on page 59.
a. Stop the boot process before LOADER completes loading and enter
boot_diags at the boot loader prompt.
b. Enter the following command at the main diagnostics prompt:
config
c. Confirm that the output shows that all the installed adapters are
detected.
d. Enter the test menu for the adapter type that you replaced, and then
run the Comprehensive tests menu option.
e. Correct any errors, and then exit diagnostics.
f. Boot the system by entering the following command:
boot_ontap
Attention: If your system is an active/active or high availability
configuration, use the cf giveback command from the partner node’s
console to enable your active/active or high availability configuration.

58 IBM System Storage: N6000 Series Hardware and Service Guide


8. Check the functioning of the new card by completing the following
substeps:
a. Look for the card in the system configuration tables on the controller
module.
b. Check that the card LEDs report traffic or network connections.
c. Make corrections as needed.
9. Go to “Completing the replacement process” on page 60.
Removing a riser
1. While grounded, remove the controller module, as described in “Opening
the system” on page 35.
2. Remove any applicable PCIe cards from the riser, as described in
“Removing a PCIe card” on page 56.
3. Using the PCIe card label on the controller DIMM cover for reference,
loosen the riser thumbscrew, and then pull the riser up and out of the
sockets.
4. Go to “Installing a riser.”
Installing a riser
1. While grounded, align the riser with the guide slots on the chassis, and
then firmly push down until the riser is in place.
2. Examine the riser to make sure that it is seated squarely and completely in
the sockets.
If it is not seated squarely, repeat step 1 to reinstall it.
3. Tighten the riser thumbscrew.
4. Open the controller side panel, if necessary, to reinstall the PCIe cards, and
then close the side panel and tighten the thumbscrew.
5. Reinstall the controller module by completing the following steps:
Attention: For active/active or high availability configurations, the
sequence in which you reinstall the controller module is important because
it attempts to reboot as soon as you completely seat it in the chassis.
a. Gently push the controller module halfway into the chassis.
b. Recable the controller module and PCI cards that you removed at the
beginning of the procedure.
c. Attach the cable management tray.
d. Push the controller module all the way into the chassis.

Note: If you are recabling a gateway system, see the Gateway


Installation Requirements and Reference Guide.
6. Boot the system by entering the following command:
boot_ontap

Chapter 5. Replacing N6000 series system devices 59


7. To run diagnostics on any of the reinstalled PCI cards, complete the
following substeps. If you do not want to run diagnostics, go to step 8.
a. Stop the boot process before LOADER completes loading and enter
boot_diags at the boot loader prompt.
b. Enter the following command at the main diagnostics prompt:
config
c. Confirm that the output shows that all the installed adapters are
detected.
d. Enter the test menu for the adapter type that you replaced, and then
run the Comprehensive tests menu option.
e. Correct any errors, and then exit diagnostics.
f. Boot the system by entering the following command:
boot_ontap
Attention: If your system is in an active/active or high availability
configuration, use the cf giveback command from the partner node’s
console to enable your active/active or high availability configuration.
8. Go to “Completing the replacement process.”
Completing the replacement process
Return the failed part to IBM. Contact IBM Service and Support at
1-800-IBM-SERV (1-800-426-7378) for more information on the return
procedure.

Replacing a power supply


This section describes the following tasks:
v “Removing a power supply”
v “Installing a power supply” on page 61
v “Completing the replacement process” on page 62

This procedure is written with the following assumptions:


v You are replacing only one power supply at a time. This prevents system
downtime.
v All other components in the system are functioning properly.

If your system does not meet these criteria, contact IBM technical support.
Removing a power supply
1. Make sure that you are properly grounded, then turn off the target power
supply.
2. Remove the power cord by completing the following substeps:

60 IBM System Storage: N6000 Series Hardware and Service Guide


a. Pinch the tab on the locking mechanism of the cable retainer clip, and
open the retainer clip.
b. Slide the retainer clip off the cable.
c. Unplug the power cords from the power source, and then remove the
power cords.
3. Press down the release latch on the power supply cam handle, lower the
cam handle to the fully open position, and then slide the power supply
out of the chassis.
Make sure that you support the power supply with your free hand.
Attention: You must replace the power supply within 60 minutes of
removing it from the chassis.

Power supply

Cam handle
release latch

LEDs

Cam
handle

Power cord
locking
n6hw001

mechanism

Figure 16. Replacing a power supply

Installing a power supply


1. Make sure the on/off switch of the new power supply is in the Off
position.

Chapter 5. Replacing N6000 series system devices 61


2. Align the edges of the new power supply with the opening in the system
chassis and gently push the power supply into the chassis until it is
almost flush with the back of the system.
3. Push on the edges of the power supply to seat it all the way into the
chassis, and then push the cam handle up to the closed position to seat the
power supply, making sure that the cam handle release latch clicks into its
locked position.
4. Reconnect the power cord and secure it to the power supply using the
cable retaining clip.
5. Reconnect the power supply to the power source, and then turn it on.
The power supply should run with no fault LEDs lit.
6. Go to “Completing the replacement process.”
Completing the replacement process
Return the failed part to IBM. Contact IBM Service and Support at
1-800-IBM-SERV (1-800-426-7378) for more information on the return
procedure.

Replacing an NVRAM battery


This section describes how to perform the following tasks:
v “Removing the NVRAM battery”
v “Installing the NVRAM battery” on page 65
v “Completing the replacement process” on page 67
Removing the NVRAM battery
1. Shut down the target controller module (called a node in an active/active
or high availability configuration) by completing the applicable procedure:
v To shut down a node in an active/active or high availability
configuration
a. Check the status of the target node by entering the following
command at the system console of either node:
cf status
b. Take one of the following actions, depending on the result of the cf
status command:
– If clustering is enabled and neither node is in takeover mode, go
to substep 1c on page 63.
– If clustering is enabled and the partner node took over the target
node, go to step 2 on page 63.
– If clustering is enabled and the target node took over the partner
node, correct the problem, run the cf giveback command from
the target node console, and go back to substep 1a.

62 IBM System Storage: N6000 Series Hardware and Service Guide


c. Take over the target node by entering the following command from
the partner node’s console:
cf takeover
d. Go to step 2 when the takeover is complete.
v To shut down a controller module in a single-controller configuration
a. Enter the following command from the system console:
halt
b. Turn off the power supplies, unplug both power cords from the
power source, and then remove the power cords.
2. While grounded, remove the controller module, unplug the cables, and
then remove the cable management tray as described in “Opening the
system” on page 35.
3. Check whether the NVRAM LEDs on the controller module are flashing
red (see Figure 17 on page 64).
Flashing red LEDs means there is content in the NVRAM that has not
been saved to disk.
v If your system is in an active/active or high availability configuration,
ignore the LEDs because content in the NVRAM was saved through the
takeover process.
v If your system is in a single-controller module configuration, complete
the following substeps:
a. Reconnect the power supplies to the power source.
b. Reboot the controller module.
c. Repeat substeps 1a on page 62 and 1b on page 62, and then repeat
step 2.

Note: If repeated attempts to cleanly shut down the controller module


fail, be aware that you might lose any data that was not saved to
disk.

Chapter 5. Replacing N6000 series system devices 63


System memory DIMMs

NVRAM LED

n6hw008

NVRAM memory DIMM


NVRAM LED

Figure 17. NVRAM locations

4. Remove the NVRAM battery by completing the following substeps and


using the label on the battery cover for reference:
a. Loosen the two thumbscrews on the battery cover.
You might need to push down on the cover with one hand to loosen
the thumbscrews.
b. Swing the cover up and away from the battery.
c. Lift the battery out of the floor of the housing, as shown in the
following figure.

64 IBM System Storage: N6000 Series Hardware and Service Guide


n6hw007

Figure 18. NVRAM battery removal

Installing the NVRAM battery


1. Align the battery socket with the edge connector in the floor of the
housing.
2. Seat the battery.
3. Close the battery cover and tighten the thumbscrews.
You might need to push down on the cover with one hand to tighten the
thumbscrews.
4. Reinstall the controller module by completing the following steps:
Attention: For active/active or high availability configurations, the
sequence in which you reinstall the controller module is important because
it attempts to reboot as soon as you completely seat it in the chassis.
a. Gently push the controller module halfway into the chassis.
b. Recable the controller module and PCI cards that you removed at the
beginning of the procedure.

Chapter 5. Replacing N6000 series system devices 65


c. Attach the cable management tray.
d. Push the controller module all the way into the chassis. Close the cam
handle and tighten the thumbscrew.
Attention: An active/active or high availability configuration
attempts to boot as soon as you completely seat it in the chassis. When
you receive the message Waiting for giveback, enter the cf giveback
command from the partner node’s console to enable your active/active
or high availability configuration.

Note: If you are recabling a gateway system, see the Gateway Installation
Requirements and Reference Guide.
5. An active/active or high availability configuration attempts to boot as
soon as you completely seat it in the chassis.
For a single-controller configuration, boot the system by entering the
following command:
boot_ontap

Note: Data ONTAP checks the battery charge during system boot. If the
battery is not charged enough to hold the NVRAM contents for a
sufficient period, the boot process is stopped until the battery is
properly recharged. The system also prints an error message and
gives an override command on the console screen.
6. Check the status of the NVRAM battery from the system command
prompt on the console by entering the following command:
environ chassis NVRAM7-battery-0 print
Result:
The output display shows the following information. The state is shown as
normal when the battery is good and fully charged.
Sensor name: NVRAM7-battery-0
type: voltage
owner: NVRAM7-0
phys_id: 1
state: normal
curr_reading: 3924mV
crit.low: 3499mV
warn.low: 3699mV
warn.high: 4250mV
crit.high: 4250mV

Note: The displayed field’s values can change without notice. All fields
will be present and have values.

66 IBM System Storage: N6000 Series Hardware and Service Guide


If the command fails or the state is not normal, reinstall the battery and
check the status again.
If you want to run diagnostics on the NVRAM battery, continue with the
next step.
7. To run diagnostics on the NVRAM battery, complete the following
substeps. If you do not want to run diagnostics, go to “Completing the
replacement process.”
a. Halt the controller to the LOADER prompt by entering the command:
halt. Enter boot_diags from the LOADER prompt.
b. Enter the following command at the main diagnostics prompt:
mb.
c. Select option 6, On-board NVRAM Test.
d. Select option 5, the NVRAM Environmental menu.
e. Select the third test, NVRAM Battery Test.
f. After you complete the tests, exit diagnostics by selecting 99 until the
prompt Enter Diag, Command or Option is displayed. Then enter the
exit command.
g. Enter the following command at the LOADER prompt to boot the
system:
boot_ontap
Attention: If your system is in an active/active or high availability
configuration, use the cf giveback command from the partner node’s
console to enable your active/active or high availability configuration.
h. Go to “Completing the replacement process.”
Completing the replacement process
Return the failed part to IBM. Contact IBM Service and Support at
1-800-IBM-SERV (1-800-426-7378) for more information on the return
procedure.

Battery disposal
Dispose of batteries according to local regulations regarding battery recycling
or disposal. For more information, see the IBM Environmental Notices and User
Guide, Z125-5823.

Replacing the Real-time Clock (RTC) battery


This section describes how to perform the following tasks:
v “Removing the RTC battery” on page 68
v “Installing the RTC battery” on page 69
v “Resetting the date and time on the controller module” on page 70
v “Completing the replacement process” on page 71

Chapter 5. Replacing N6000 series system devices 67


Removing the RTC battery
1. Shut down the target controller module (called a node in an active/active
or high availability configuration) by completing the applicable procedure:
v To shut down a node in an active/active or high availability
configuration:
a. Check the status of the target node by entering the following
command at the system console of either node:
cf status
b. Take one of the following actions, depending on the result of the cf
status command:
If clustering is enabled and neither node is in takeover mode, go to
substep c.
If clustering is enabled and the partner node took over the target
node, go to step 2.
If clustering is enabled and the target node took over the partner
node, correct the problem, run the cf giveback command from the
target node console, and go back to substep 1a.
c. Take over the target node by entering the following command from
the partner node’s console:
partner> cf takeover
d. Go to step 2 when the takeover is complete.
v To shut down a controller module in a single-controller configuration
a. Enter the following command from the system console:
halt
Turn off the power supplies, unplug the power cords from the
power source, and remove the power cords.
b. Check the NVRAM LEDs on the controller module (see Figure 17 on
page 64).
If the LED is not flashing, go to step 2.
If the LEDs are flashing red, there is content in the NVRAM that has
not been saved to disk. Reconnect the power supplies to the power
source, reboot the controller module, and repeat substeps 4a and 4b.
If repeated attempts to cleanly shut down the controller module fail,
be aware that you might lose any data that was not saved to disk,
and go to step 2.
2. While grounded, remove the controller module, as described in “Opening
the system” on page 35.
3. Locate the RTC battery at the right-rear of the controller module. See the
’RTC Battery’ illustration on the controller module DIMM cover.
It is the coin cell battery in the vertical holder near the CompactFlash card.

68 IBM System Storage: N6000 Series Hardware and Service Guide


4. Remove the RTC battery by completing the following substeps, using the
illustration for reference:

n6hw005

Figure 19. RTC battery removal

a. With your fingernail, gently pry the retaining clip away from the top
edge of the battery.
Attention: Do not pry the clip too much; the clip bends if you use too
much force.
b. Grasp the sides of the battery with your thumb and forefinger, lift the
battery out of the holder, and set it aside.
c. Go to “Installing the RTC battery.”
Installing the RTC battery
1. While grounded, remove the replacement battery from the antistatic
shipping bag.
2. Locate the empty battery holder on the controller module and insert the
battery into the holder.
3. Visually inspect the battery to make sure that it is completely installed into
the holder and that the polarity is correct.
See the RTC Battery illustration on the controller module DIMM cover for
battery polarity. There is also a large “+” on the controller module
indicating battery polarity.
4. Reinstall the controller module or node partially into the system chassis,
and then recable and close it as described in “Closing the system” on page
37.

Chapter 5. Replacing N6000 series system devices 69


Attention: The node attempts to boot in an active/active or high
availability configuration or when you apply power to a stand-alone
system. The system detects the incorrect date and time and halts the
system at the boot loader prompt.
5. Go to “Resetting the date and time on the controller module.”
Resetting the date and time on the controller module
You must reset the date and time on the controller module or node after
replacing the RTC battery and rebooting Data ONTAP.
1. If you want to run diagnostics, complete the following substeps:
a. Halt the controller to the LOADER prompt by entering the halt
command.
b. Enter boot_diags from the boot loader prompt.
c. Select and complete the appropriate tests.
See the IBM System Storage N series Diagnostics Guide for information
about specific diagnostics tests you can perform.
d. Exit diagnostics and then continue with the next step.
If you do not want to run diagnostics, continue with the next step.
2. Boot the controller module by entering the boot_ontap command at the
boot loader prompt:
Attention: For an active/active or high availability configuration, when
you receive the message Waiting for giveback, enter the cf giveback
command from the partner node’s console to enable your active/active or
high availability configuration.
3. Display the current date on the controller module or node by entering the
following command:
date
Attention: If your system is in an active/active or high availability
configuration, make sure that both nodes are set to the same date and time
by displaying the date and time on the partner node and setting the target
node to those values.
4. Set the date by entering the following command:
date [-u] [[[CC]yy]mmddhhmm>[.<ss>]]
-u sets the date and time to Greenwich Mean Time instead of the local
time.
CC is the first two digits of the current year.
yy is the second two digits of the current year.
mm is the current month. If you omit the month, the default is the current
month.
dd is the current day. If you omit the day, the default is the current day.
hh is the current hour, using a 24-hour clock.

70 IBM System Storage: N6000 Series Hardware and Service Guide


mm is the current minute.
ss is the current second. If you omit the seconds, the default is 0.
Example:
The following command sets the date and time to 22 May 2007 at 9:25 a.m.
date 200705220925
5. Boot the controller module by entering the following command at the boot
loader prompt: boot_ontap
If you want to run diagnostics, complete the following substeps:
a. Halt the controller to the LOADER prompt by entering the halt
command.
b. Enter boot_diags from the boot loader prompt.
c. Select and complete the appropriate tests.
See the IBM System Storage N series Diagnostics Guide for information
about specific diagnostics tests you can perform.
If you do not want to run diagnostics, continue with the next step.
Attention: Use the cf giveback command from the partner node’s
console to enable your active/active or high availability configuration.
d. Exit diagnostics and then continue with the next step.
6. Go to “Completing the replacement process.”
Completing the replacement process
Return the failed part to IBM. Contact IBM Service and Support at
1-800-IBM-SERV (1-800-426-7378) for more information on the return
procedure.

Battery disposal
Dispose of batteries according to local regulations regarding battery recycling
or disposal. For more information, see the IBM Environmental Notices and User
Guide, Z125-5823.

Installing or replacing a Remote LAN Module


This section describes how to perform the following tasks:
v “Removing the RLM” on page 72
v “Installing an RLM” on page 73
v “Testing the RLM” on page 76
v “Testing and booting the system” on page 77
v “Completing the replacement process” on page 78
v “Information on using the RLM” on page 78

Chapter 5. Replacing N6000 series system devices 71


The N6000 series storage systems require an RLM card with firmware version
2.0 or later. This section includes the procedure for verifying the firmware
version on your new RLM card and directs you to instructions for
downloading updated firmware, if needed.
Removing the RLM

Note: This procedure assumes that all other components of the system are
functioning properly. If your system does not meet this criteria, contact
technical support.

Shutting down the controller module


1. Shut down the target controller module (called a node in an active/active
or high availability configuration) by completing the applicable procedure:
v To shut down a node in an active/active or high availability
configuration
a. Check the status of the target node by entering the following
command at the system console of either node:
cf status
b. Take one of the following actions, depending on the result of the cf
status command:
– If clustering is enabled and neither node is in takeover mode, go
to substep 1c.
– If clustering is enabled and the partner node took over the target
node, go to step 2.
– If clustering is enabled and the target node took over the partner
node, correct the problem, run the cf giveback command from
the target node console, and go back to substep 1a.
c. Take over the target node by entering the following command from
the partner node’s console:
cf takeover
d. Go to step 2 when the takeover is complete.
v To shut down a controller module in a single-controller configuration
a. Enter the following command from the system console:
halt
b. Turn off the power supplies, unplug both power cords from the
power source, and then remove the power cords.
2. While grounded, remove the controller module, unplug the cables, and
then remove the cable management tray as described in “Opening the
system” on page 35.
3. Check whether the NVRAM LEDs on the controller module are flashing
red (see Figure 17 on page 64).

72 IBM System Storage: N6000 Series Hardware and Service Guide


Flashing red LEDs indicate that there is content in the NVRAM that has
not been saved to disk.
v If your system is in an active/active or high availability configuration,
ignore the LEDs because content in the NVRAM was saved through the
takeover process.
v If your system is in a single-controller module configuration, complete
the following substeps:
a. Reconnect the power supplies to the power source.
b. Reboot the controller module.
c. Repeat substeps 1a on page 72 and 1b on page 72, and then repeat
step 2 on page 72.

Note: If repeated attempts to cleanly shut down the controller module fail,
be aware that you might lose any data that was not saved to disk.
4. Locate the RLM, in the center of the riser housing.
Refer to the controller module DIMM cover for the illustration showing
the location and removal of the RLM.
5. Pinch the retaining tabs on the RLM, and then lift the RLM straight out of
the socket and the housing.
6. Go to “Installing an RLM.”
Installing an RLM
1. Remove the RLM, as described in “Removing the RLM” on page 72, if
necessary.
2. Align the edges of the RLM with the guide slots on the edges of the riser
housing, lower the RLM into place in the housing, and then press the
RLM into the socket by using your thumbs in the top center of the RLM.
Make sure that you press down at the places indicated by the sticker on
the RLM housing. Make sure that the retaining tabs latch in place.
3. Reinstall the controller module by completing the following steps:
Attention: For active/active or high availability configurations, the
sequence in which you reinstall the controller module is important because
it attempts to reboot as soon as you completely seat it in the chassis.
a. Gently push the controller module halfway into the chassis.
b. Recable the controller module.
v If you are replacing an existing RLM, recable the controller module,
as needed.
v If you are installing an RLM for the first time, plug one end of the
RJ-45 cable into the RLM port, and then plug the other end into a
10/100 Ethernet network port.
c. Attach the cable management tray.

Chapter 5. Replacing N6000 series system devices 73


d. Push the controller module all the way into the chassis.

Note: If you are recabling a gateway system, see the Gateway


Installation Requirements and Reference Guide.
4. Check the link LED on the RLM port to ensure that it is green and that the
link is active.

Note: The network for the RLM should be a 10/100 Ethernet network, or
a network that can autonegotiate settings to a 10/100 Ethernet
network.
5. Verify that the RLM you installed has firmware version 2.0 or later.
a. Log into the RLM console from a remote host acting as a system
console by entering the following command from the administration
host prompt:
admin-host> ssh user_name@RLM_IP_address
Example:
admin-host> ssh admin@10.10.123.45
admin@172.22.136.85’s password:*********
RLM admin-host>

Note: Root login is not allowed for the RLM. If you need to log in
with root credentials, use naroot for root login.
b. Verify the version of RLM firmware by entering the following
command in administration mode:
version
v If the firmware version of the new RLM is 2.0 or later, continue with
the next step.
v If the firmware version of the RLM is earlier than 2.0, you must
update the firmware. For instructions on downloading firmware for
your RLM, see the IBM System Storage N series Data ONTAP Upgrade
Guide.
6. Enter the following command to boot the system:
boot_ontap
v If you are replacing an existing RLM, run diagnostics, as described in
“Testing and booting the system” on page 77.
v If you are installing an RLM for the first time, complete the following
substeps:
a. Enter the following command from the system console to begin the
RLM setup script:
mysystem-1> rlm setup
Example:

74 IBM System Storage: N6000 Series Hardware and Service Guide


mysystem-1> rlm setup
The Remote LAN Module (RLM) provides remote management
capabilities including console redirection, logging and power
control.
It also extends AutoSupport by sending additional system event
alerts. Your AutoSupport settings are used for sending these
alerts via email over the RLM LAN interface.
Would you like to configure the RLM [y]: y
Would you like to enable DHCP on the RLM LAN interface [y]: n
Please enter the IP address for the RLM []: 10.10.123.45
Please enter the netmask for the RLM []: 255.255.224.0
Please enter the IP address for the RLM gateway []:
10.10.123.1
mysystem-1>

Note: The RLM requires AutoSupport to be activated and


configured. If AutoSupport is not set up and configured, do so
at this time. See the IBM System Storage N series Data ONTAP
System Administration Guide for AutoSupport setup
information.
b. Enter the following command from the system console to check the
status and settings of the RLM:
mysystem-1> rlm status
Example:
mysystem-1> rlm status
Remote LAN Manager
Part Number: 110-00030
Revision: 32
Serial Number: 2P6256
Firmware Version: 1.0.10 Mon Jan 17 16:27:58 PST 2005
Mgmt MAC Address: 00:A0:98:01:9A:F8
Using DHCP no
IP Address: 172.22.136.61
Netmask: 255.255.224.0
Gateway: 172.22.128.1
c. Go to “Testing the RLM” on page 76 to ensure that you can access
the RLM from the administration console.

Chapter 5. Replacing N6000 series system devices 75


Testing the RLM
The RLM provides a command-line interface (CLI) to access its features. You
must log in to the RLM over its network interface by using a secure shell
client application, such as SSH, OpenSSH, or PuTTY. Insecure connection
protocol applications, such as telnet, are not available. See the IBM System
Storage N series Data ONTAP System Administration Guide for more information
about secure shell client applications.

To test the RLM, complete the following steps:


1. To test the RLM, complete the following steps, as appropriate for your
configuration:
v In an active/active or high availability configuration:
To run diagnostics on the RLM in an active/active or high availability
configuration, complete the following steps:
a. Press Ctrl-C to halt the system at the Waiting for giveback prompt.
b. Answer y to the prompt Do you wish to halt this node rather
than wait [y/n]?
c. Enter the boot_diags command at the boot loader prompt.
d. Continue with step 2.
v In a single-controller configuration:
To run diagnostics on the RLM in a single-controller configuration,
complete the following steps:
a. Log into the RLM console from a remote host acting as a system
console by entering the following command from the administration
host prompt:
admin-host> ssh user_name@RLM_IP_address
Example:
admin-host> ssh admin@10.10.123.45
admin@172.22.136.85’s password:*********
RLM admin-host>

Note: Root login is not allowed for the RLM. If you need to log in
with root credentials, use naroot for root login.
b. Check RLM status by entering the following command from the
RLM console:
RLM admin-host> rlm status
c. Continue with step 2.
2. Exit the RLM console by entering the following command:
RLM admin-host> exit

76 IBM System Storage: N6000 Series Hardware and Service Guide


3. Connect to the system console using the serial connection or through
telnet.
4. Test the RLM AutoSupport functions by sending a test e-mail to
AutoSupport with the following command from the system console:
mysystem-1> rlm test autosupport
5. Go to “Testing and booting the system.”
Testing and booting the system
After you recable your system and connect it to the power source, you should
run diagnostics on the RLM. If the system passes the diagnostic tests, you can
boot the system and bring it back online.
1. Run diagnostics on the RLM:
v In an active/active or high availability configuration:
To run diagnostics on the RLM in an active/active or high availability
configuration, complete the following steps:
a. Press Ctrl-C to halt the system at the Waiting for giveback prompt.
b. Answer y to the prompt: Do you wish to halt this node rather
than wait [y/n]?
c. Enter the boot_diags command at the boot loader prompt.
d. Continue with step 2.
v In a single-controller configuration:
To run diagnostics on the RLM in a single controller configuration,
complete the following steps:
a. Turn on the system or reboot it by entering the boot_ontap
command.
b. Stop the boot process before LOADER completes loading and enter
boot_diags at the boot loader prompt.
c. Continue with step 2.
2. Select the Agent and RLM Diagnostic option from the main menu, and
then run the Comprehensive Test.
3. Correct any errors, and then exit diagnostics.
4. Enter the following command at the prompt to boot the system:
boot_ontap
Attention: If your system is in an active/active or high availability
configuration, use the cf giveback command from the partner node’s
console to enable your active/active or high availability configuration.
5. Go to “Completing the replacement process” on page 78.

Chapter 5. Replacing N6000 series system devices 77


Completing the replacement process
Return the failed part to IBM. Contact IBM Service and Support at
1-800-IBM-SERV (1-800-426-7378) for more information on the return
procedure.
Information on using the RLM
The following table provides a list of manuals for configuring and using the
RLM.

Manual title Information needed


Installation and Setup Instructions for Describes the system and RLM cabling.
your platform
Diagnostics Guide Lists and describes the diagnostic tests for a
new or existing RLM.
Data ONTAP System Administration Describes RLM configuration and use.
Guide
Platform Monitoring Guide Lists RLM error messages and gives
corrective action for the error.

Replacing a CompactFlash card in N6000 series systems

Note: This section contains procedures for two different configurations. You
must use the correct procedure for your configuration:
v If you have a single-controller configuration, see “Replacing a
CompactFlash card in a single-controller system” on page 79.
v If you have an active/active or high availability configuration, see
“Replacing a CompactFlash card in an active/active or high
availability configuration” on page 84.

You might also need the following documentation to perform the identified
procedures:
v IBM System Storage N series Data ONTAP Upgrade Guide, as applicable
v IBM System Storage N series Data ONTAP Commands: Manual Page Reference,
if applicable
v IBM System Storage N series Data ONTAP System Administration Guide, if
applicable

These procedures are written with the assumption that you have access to at
least one of the following:
v A system on your network that you can use to netboot your system.
v A PC with a card reader/writer and with access to the IBM web site.

78 IBM System Storage: N6000 Series Hardware and Service Guide


If your system does not meet these criteria, contact IBM technical support.
Verifying system requirements
Software release information and downloads, including Data ONTAP
software, firmware, and diagnostics upgrades, are available at the following
site:

www.ibm.com/storage/support/nas/
Replacing a CompactFlash card in a single-controller system
This procedure describes how to replace a CompactFlash card in a
single-controller configuration.

If your system is in an active/active or high availability configuration, use the


procedure in “Replacing a CompactFlash card in an active/active or high
availability configuration” on page 84.

This section describes how to perform the following tasks:


v “Removing the CompactFlash card”
v “Installing the CompactFlash card” on page 81
v “Placing the system files on the CompactFlash card” on page 81
v “Updating the CompactFlash card” on page 83

Removing the CompactFlash card

Chapter 5. Replacing N6000 series system devices 79


CompactFlash Card

n6hw004

Front

Figure 20. CompactFlash card removal

1. Retrieve and save the system environment variables, if possible, by


completing the following substeps:
a. Bring the system down to the boot loader prompt.
v If the system is running, reboot it, press Ctrl-C when prompted by
the system, and then go to substep 1b.
v If the system is at the boot loader prompt, go to substep 1b.
b. Display the system environment variables by entering the following
command:
printenv
c. Copy the environment variable values.
You need these variable values for the replacement CompactFlash card.

Note: You do not need to retrieve the Fibre Channel port settings for a
stand-alone configuration. Fibre Channel port settings are stored
in the boot environment and also on disk in the system root
volume. When you reboot the system, Fibre Channel settings are
restored from the saved settings.
2. Turn off the power supplies, unplug both power cords from the power
source, and then remove the power cords.

80 IBM System Storage: N6000 Series Hardware and Service Guide


3. While grounded, remove the controller module from the chassis, as
described in “Opening the system” on page 35.
4. Check the NVRAM memory LEDs on the controller module board.
If the LEDs are flashing red, there is content in the NVRAM that has not
been saved to disk. Complete the following substeps:
a. Reinstall the controller module and reconnect the power supplies to the
power source.
b. Reboot the controller module.
c. Repeat Steps 1 and 2.
v If the NVRAM memory LEDs are no longer flashing red, go to step
5.
v If repeated attempts to cleanly shut down the controller module fail,
remove the controller module and proceed to step 5. However, be
aware that you might lose any data that was not saved to disk.
5. Turn the controller module so that the cables are facing away from you,
and then locate the CompactFlash card inside and on the left of the
controller module.
6. Grasp the CompactFlash card and lift it straight up and out of the socket.
7. Go to “Installing the CompactFlash card.”

Installing the CompactFlash card


Attention: If you are copying the system files to the CompactFlash card
using a PC or laptop with a card writer, you must copy the system files to the
CompactFlash card prior to installing it in the controller module. See
“Transferring the system files using a PC or laptop” on page 82 for
information.
1. While grounded, align the CompactFlash card with the edges of the
CompactFlash card socket. Seat the CompactFlash card by firmly pushing
it down into the CompactFlash socket.
The CompactFlash card should be squarely seated and should not move.
Reseat the CompactFlash card, if necessary.
2. Reinstall the controller module, as described in “Closing the system” on
page 37.
3. Go to “Placing the system files on the CompactFlash card.”

Placing the system files on the CompactFlash card


You can transfer system files to the new CompactFlash card using netboot or
a PC or laptop. The method you select depends on the following situations:
v Use netboot when you cannot copy the system files to the CompactFlash
card because you do not have access to a card reader/writer but can access
a network server.

Chapter 5. Replacing N6000 series system devices 81


v Use a PC or laptop when you can access a card reader/writer but you can
only take the CompactFlash card to the system; you cannot leave with
anything you take to the system. For example, you are entering a secured
location and must leave behind whatever you take into the location.

This section describes how to perform the following tasks:


v “Transferring the system files using netboot”
v “Transferring the system files using a PC or laptop”

Note: This procedure is written with the assumption that you have access
to a PC running Windows® XP or later and have a zip program.

Transferring the system files using netboot:


1. Per the recommendations in the IBM System Storage N series Data ONTAP
Upgrade Guide , place the system files on the server you use for netbooting.
You can copy the system files from the system boot directory, at
/etc/boot/netapp-x86-64, or download the file <rlse>_netboot.q at
www.ibm.com/storage/support/nas/.
2. Turn on your system and press Ctrl-C to stop the boot process at the boot
loader prompt.
3. Configure your network connection, if needed.
v If you have DHCP running on your network, enter the following
command at the prompt:
ifconfig e0a -auto
v If you do not have DHCP running, configure the connection by entering
the following command at the prompt:
ifconfig e0a -addr=filer_addr -mask=netmask -gw=gateway
-dns=dns_addr -domain=dns_domain
filer_addr is the IP address of the system.
netmask is the network mask of the system.
gateway is the gateway for the system.
dns_addr is the IP address of a name server on your network.
dns_domain is the DNS domain name.
4. Enter the following command at the boot loader prompt:
netboot URL
URL is the location of the remote system files. It can be either an HTTP or a
TFTP network path.
5. Go to “Updating the CompactFlash card” on page 83.

Transferring the system files using a PC or laptop:


1. Download <rlse>_setup_q.exe to your PC.

82 IBM System Storage: N6000 Series Hardware and Service Guide


rlse is the Data ONTAP release you are using.
You can download the system files at www.ibm.com/storage/support/
nas/. You can also copy the system files from the system boot directory
of another system at /etc/boot/netapp-x86-64. Contact IBM technical
support if you cannot get the system files from these sources.
Attention: Make sure that you download the correct file, designated for
PC administration, and that it is the same version of Data ONTAP as
what is on your system.
2. Extract the contents of <rlse>_setup_q.exe to a temporary folder on your
PC.
3. Insert the CompactFlash card into the CompactFlash card reader.
Attention: The CompactFlash card is pre-formatted. Do not format the
CompactFlash card.
4. Create a folder called X86_64 in the root partition of the CompactFlash
card, and then create a subfolder called KERNEL in the X86_64 folder.
5. Copy netapp-x86-64 into the KERNEL folder in Windows Explorer.
6. Rename the netapp-x86-64 image to Primary.KRN.
7. Install the CompactFlash card with the kernel image into the system.
8. Reinstall the controller module, recable it, and turn on the power.
9. The controller will boot when power is turned on. If necessary, boot Data
ONTAP by entering the following command at the LOADER prompt:
boot_ontap
10. Go to “Updating the CompactFlash card.”

Updating the CompactFlash card


1. Download the system files to the CompactFlash card by entering the
following command:
download
Attention: If the download fails with the following error message, you
must run setup to reinstall the proper files on the system that enable you
to execute the download command on the CompactFlash card:

Failed to open download script file /etc/boot/x86-64/


kernel_1024.cmds: No such file download.requestDoneError:error]:
Operator requested download failed.
2. Check the version of the image by entering the following command:
version -b
Make sure that the kernel version on the CompactFlash card is the same
version was originally on the system.
3. Reboot the system by entering the following command:
reboot

Chapter 5. Replacing N6000 series system devices 83


4. Go to “Restoring environment variables.”

Restoring environment variables


1. Check the version of the image by entering the following command:
version -b
Make sure that the BIOS and Diagnostic images are the correct version. If
they are not, go to www.ibm.com/storage/support/nas/ and follow the
installation instructions to install the version you need.
2. Halt the controller by entering the following command:
halt
3. Display the default environment variables by entering the following
command:
printenv
4. Compare the default environment variables with the list you made in
“Removing the CompactFlash card” on page 79.
If the variable values are the same, go to step 5.
If the variable values are different or need modification, complete the
following steps:
a. Set the values of the individual variables by entering the following
command for each changed variable:
setenv variable_name variable_value
b. Verify the values of the variables by entering the following command
from the boot loader prompt:
printenv
5. Boot Data ONTAP after you modify all variables by entering the following
command:
boot_ontap
6. Go to “Completing the replacement process” on page 90.
Replacing a CompactFlash card in an active/active or high availability
configuration
This procedure describes how to nondisruptively replace the CompactFlash
card in an active/active or high availability configuration.

If your system is a single-controller system, use the procedure in “Replacing a


CompactFlash card in a single-controller system” on page 79.

Note: The following steps may be disruptive and are recommended to be


preformed only during a maintenance window.

This section describes how to perform the following tasks:


v “Preparing for the CompactFlash card replacement” on page 85

84 IBM System Storage: N6000 Series Hardware and Service Guide


v “Removing the CompactFlash card” on page 86
v “Installing the replacement CompactFlash card” on page 86
v “Updating the CompactFlash card” on page 88
v “Restoring environment variables and onboard Fibre Channel port
configurations” on page 89
v “Completing the replacement process” on page 90

Preparing for the CompactFlash card replacement


1. Check the status of the active/active or high availability configuration and
take over the target node.
v If you can connect to the target node through normal means, complete
the following substeps:
a. Check that the active/active or high availability configuration is
enabled by entering the following command:
cf status
If it is enabled, go to substep 1b.
If it is not enabled, enable it by entering the following command:
cf enable
b. Take over the target node by entering the following command from
the partner console:
cf takeover
c. Stop the target node from rebooting by pressing Ctrl-C when you see
the following message: Starting AUTOBOOT press Ctrl-C to abort
d. Go to step 2 on page 86.
v If you cannot connect to the target node through normal means and the
node is receiving power, complete the following substeps:
a. Connect a console directly to the target node through the marked
console port.
Follow the manufacturer’s installation instructions for configuration.
The boot loader prompt should be accessible after the console
connection is established. If it is not, contact technical support.
b. Boot the target node from the backup system files on the
CompactFlash card.
You might need to rename the backup system file so that it boots as
the primary file.
c. Return to the partner node and enable clustering by entering the
following command:
cf enable
d. Take over the target node by entering the following command from
the partner console:

Chapter 5. Replacing N6000 series system devices 85


cf takeover
e. Stop the target node from rebooting by pressing Ctrl-C when you
see the following message: Starting AUTOBOOT press Ctrl-C to
abort
f. Go to step 2.
2. At the boot loader prompt, display the environment variables for the
target node by entering the following command:
printenv
3. Copy the values for the variables and save them for later use when you
restore the environment variables on the replacement CompactFlash card.
4. Go to the partner console and enter the following command:
partner fcadmin config
5. Copy the values for the onboard Fibre Channel settings and save them for
later use when you restore the settings on the replacement CompactFlash
card.
6. Go to “Removing the CompactFlash card.”

Removing the CompactFlash card


1. While grounded, shut down the controller module and remove it from the
chassis, as described in “Shutting down a controller module” on page 34
and “Opening the system” on page 35.
2. Turn the controller module so that the cables are facing away from you
and then locate the CompactFlash card inside and on the left of the
controller module.
3. Grasp the CompactFlash card and lift it up and out of the socket.
4. Go to “Installing the replacement CompactFlash card.”

Installing the replacement CompactFlash card


You can transfer system files to the new CompactFlash card using netboot or
a PC or laptop. The method you select depends on the following situations:
v Use netboot when you cannot copy the system files to the CompactFlash
card because you do not have access to a card reader/writer but can access
a network server.
v Use a PC or laptop-when you can access a card reader/writer but you can
only take the CompactFlash card to the system; you cannot leave with
anything you take to the system. For example, you are entering a secured
location and must leave behind whatever you take into the location.

This section describes how to perform the following tasks:


v “Transferring the system files using netboot” on page 87
v “Transferring the system files using a PC or laptop” on page 88

86 IBM System Storage: N6000 Series Hardware and Service Guide


Transferring the system files using netboot:
1. Make sure that you are properly grounded.
2. Per the recommendations in the IBM System Storage N series Data ONTAP
Upgrade Guide, place the system files on the server you use for
netbooting.
You can copy the system files from the system boot directory, at
/etc/boot/netapp-x86-64, or download the file <rlse>_netboot.q at
www.ibm.com/storage/support/nas/.
3. Align the CompactFlash card with the edges of the CompactFlash card
slot. Seat the CompactFlash card by sliding it into the CompactFlash
reader.
The CompactFlash card should be squarely seated and should not move.
Reseat the CompactFlash card, if necessary.
4. Reinstall the controller module into the chassis and recable it, as
described in “Closing the system” on page 37.

Note: The node starts to reboot as soon as you insert it fully back into
the chassis.
5. Press Ctrl-C to stop the boot process and go to the boot loader prompt.
6. Configure your network connection, if needed.
If you have DHCP running on your network, enter the following
command at the prompt:
ifconfig e0a -auto
If you do not have DHCP running, configure the connection by entering
the following command at the prompt:
ifconfig e0a -addr=filer_addr -mask=netmask -gw=gateway
-dns=dns_addr -domain=dns_domain
filer_addr is the IP address of the system.
netmask is the network mask of the system.
gateway is the gateway for the system.
dns_addr is the IP address of a name server on your network.
dns_domain is the DNS domain name.
7. Enter the following command at the boot loader prompt:
netboot URL
URL is the location of the remote system files from step 2. It can be either
an HTTP or a TFTP network path.
8. On the failed node, at the Special Boot Menu, select Option 1 for normal
boot. Wait until you receive the prompt: Waiting for Giveback (press
Ctrl-C to abort wait).
9. On the partner node, enter the following command: cf giveback

Chapter 5. Replacing N6000 series system devices 87


10. After the target node completes booting, go to “Updating the
CompactFlash card.”

Transferring the system files using a PC or laptop:


1. Download <rlse>_setup_q.exe to your PC.
rlse is the Data ONTAP release you are using.
You can download the system files at www.ibm.com/storage/support/
nas/. You can also copy the system files from the system boot directory
of another storage system at /etc/boot/netapp-x86-64. Contact IBM
technical support if you cannot get the system files from these sources.
Attention: Make sure that you download the correct file, designated for
PC administration, and that it is the same version of Data ONTAP as
what is on your system.
2. Extract the contents of <rlse>_setup_q.exe to a temporary folder on your
PC.
3. Insert the CompactFlash card into the CompactFlash card reader.
Attention: The CompactFlash card is pre-formatted. Do not format the
CompactFlash card.
4. Create a folder called X86_64 in the root partition of the CompactFlash
card, and then create a subfolder called KERNEL in the X86_64 folder.
5. Copy netapp-x86-64 into the KERNEL folder in Windows Explorer.
6. Rename the netapp-X86-64 image to Primary.KRN.
7. While grounded, install the CompactFlash card into the controller
module.
8. Reinstall the controller module into the chassis and recable it, as
described in “Closing the system” on page 37.

Note: The node starts to reboot as soon as you insert it back into the
chassis.
Make sure that you give back the node when prompted to do so.
9. The controller will boot when power is turned on. If necessary, boot Data
ONTAP by entering the following command at the LOADER prompt:
boot_ontap
10. Go to “Updating the CompactFlash card.”

Updating the CompactFlash card


1. Download the system files to the CompactFlash card by entering the
following commands:
download

88 IBM System Storage: N6000 Series Hardware and Service Guide


Attention: If the download fails with the following error message, you
must run setup to reinstall the proper files on the system that enable you
to execute the download command on the CompactFlash card:

Failed to open download script file /etc/boot/x86-64/


kernel_1024.cmds: No such file [download.requestDoneError:error]:
Operator requested download failed.
2. Check the version of the image by entering the following command:
version -b
Make sure that the kernel version on the CompactFlash card is the same
version was originally on the system.
3. Reboot the system by entering the following command:
reboot
4. Press Ctrl-C to stop the system at the boot loader prompt, then go to
“Restoring environment variables and onboard Fibre Channel port
configurations””.

Restoring environment variables and onboard Fibre Channel port


configurations
1. Retrieve the environment variables you saved in “Preparing for the
CompactFlash card replacement” on page 85.
2. Enter the following command for each variable you must reset:
setenv variable “value”
variable is the variable name.
value is the setting you are assigning to the variable.
3. Boot Data ONTAP by entering the following command from the target
node’s console:
boot_ontap
4. When the following message is displayed on the target node’s console:
Waiting for giveback....Press Ctrl-C to abort wait enter the following
command from the partner node’s console:
cf giveback
5. After giveback completes, from the target node’s console, check the
configuration of the onboard Fibre Channel ports by entering the
following command:
fcadmin config
v If the displayed information is the same as what you captured for the
onboard Fibre Channel ports in step 5 on page 52 of “Preparing for the
CompactFlash card replacement” on page 85, then go to “Completing
the replacement process” on page 90.

Chapter 5. Replacing N6000 series system devices 89


v If the displayed information is different from what you captured for the
onboard Fibre Channel ports, complete the following substeps:
a. Reboot the node and press Ctrl-C when Press CTRL-C for special
boot menu appears.
b. Press Ctrl-C again when Press CTRL-C for Maintenance menu to
release disks appears.
c. Confirm disk release when prompted.
d. Reset the Fibre Channel ports in one of three ways:
– To reset the target ports, enter the following command for each
port:
fcadmin config -t target adapter_name
– To reset the initiator ports, enter the following command for each
port:
fcadmin config -t initiator adapter_name
– To reset the ports to unconfigured, enter the following command
for each port:
fcadmin config -t unconfig adapter_name
e. On the failed node, verify the values of the variables by entering the
following command from the boot loader prompt:
printenv
6. On the failed node, boot Data ONTAP by entering the following
command:
boot_ontap
7. Go to “Completing the replacement process.”
Completing the replacement process
Return the failed part to IBM. Contact IBM Service and Support at
1-800-IBM-SERV (1-800-426-7378) for more information on the return
procedure.

90 IBM System Storage: N6000 Series Hardware and Service Guide


Appendix A. Recommended power line sizes
This appendix discusses how to determine the power line lengths running
from your N series system to the power source.

Recommended AC power line sizes


Longer AC power feeds need to be properly designed to preserve voltage
levels to the equipment. The wiring from the breaker panel to the power strip,
which supplies power to your N6000 series system and storage expansion
units, can often exceed 50 feet.

Note: Total AC wire length = breaker to wall or ceiling outlet + extension


cable or ceiling drop.

The following table lists the recommended conductor size for 2% voltage drop
for a particular distance in feet (taken from the Radio Engineer’s Handbook).
Table 21. 110V, single phase recommended conductor sizes
110V, single-phase 20A circuit 30A circuit 40A circuit 50A circuit
25 feet 12 AWG 10 AWG 8 AWG 8 AWG
50 feet 8 AWG 6 AWG 6 AWG 4 AWG
75 feet 6 AWG 4 AWG 4 AWG 2 AWG

Table 22. 220V, single phase recommended conductor sizes


220V, single-phase 20A circuit 30A circuit 40A circuit 50A circuit
25 feet 14 AWG 12 AWG 12 AWG 10 AWG
50 feet 12 AWG 10 AWG 8 AWG 8 AWG
75 feet 10 AWG 8 AWG 6 AWG 6 AWG

The following table list the approximate equivalent wire gauge (American
Wire Gauge (AWG) to Harmonized Cordage).
Table 23. American Wire Gage to Harmonized Cordage equivalents
AWG 8 10 12
1
Harmonized, mm-mm 4.0 2.5 1.5

1
mm-mm = millimeter squared

© Copyright IBM Corp. 2008, 2009 91


92 IBM System Storage: N6000 Series Hardware and Service Guide
Appendix B. FRU/CRU and power cord list for N series
products
This appendix contains information about FRU/CRUs and power cords for N
series products.

FRU/CRU list for N series products


For the most current FRU/CRU list for your N series product, see the
following web site:

www.ibm.com/storage/support/nas/

Power cord list for N series products


The following list details the power cord feature codes (FCs) for N series
products.
FC 9000 (All countries)
Power cord, Rack PDU
v 27 inches
v Rated 250 V/15 A
v Product end uses C14; PDU end uses C13.
FC 9001 Europe and others
Provides power cords for Austria, Belgium, Bolivia, Bulgaria, Chile,
Croatia, Czech Republic, Egypt, Estonia, European Union, Finland,
France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Indonesia, Latvia,
Lebanon, Lithuania, Luxemburg, Morocco, Netherlands, Norway,
Peru, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Russia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain,
Suriname, Sweden, Turkey
v 2.5 m (9 feet), unshielded, rated 250 V/10 A.
v Attached plug EL 211 (CEE 7-VII) designed for 200-240 V ac input.
FC 9002 United Kingdom and others
Provides power cords for United Kingdom, Costa Rica, Cyprus,
Guyana, Hong Kong, Ireland, Kuwait, Malta, Oman, Singapore, Sri
Lanka
v 2.5 m (9 feet), unshielded, rated 250 V/10 A.
v Attached plug EL 210 (13A fuse) designed for 200-240 V ac input.
FC 9003 Japan
Provides power cords for Japan

© Copyright IBM Corp. 2008, 2009 93


v 1.83 m (6 feet), unshielded, rated 125 V/15 A.
v Attached plug EL 302 (JIS C3306) designed for 100-110 V ac input.
FC 9004 U.S., Six Feet (2 m)
Provides power cords for U.S., Canada, Mexico, Belize, Columbia,
Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Korea, Nicaragua,
Panama, Philippines, Puerto Rico, Saudi Arabia, Thailand, Venezuela
v 1.83 m (6 feet), unshielded, rated 125 V/15 A.
v Attached plug EL 302 (Nema 5-15P) designed for 100-120 V ac
input.
FC 9005 Australia, New Zealand
Provides power cords for Australia, New Zealand, Uruguay
v 2.5 m (9 feet), unshielded, rated 250 V/10 A.
v Attached plug EL 206 (AS 3112) designed for 200-240 V ac input.
FC 9006 Switzerland, Liechtenstein
Provides power cords for Switzerland, Liechtenstein
v 2.5 m (9 feet), unshielded, rated 250 V/10 A.
v Attached plug EL 203 (SEV 1011) designed for 200-240 V ac input.
FC 9007 Argentina
Provides power cords for Argentina
v 2.5 m (9 feet), unshielded, rated 250 V/10 A.
v Attached plug EL 219 (IRAM 2073) designed for 200-240 V ac input.
FC 9008 China
Provides power cords for China
v 2.5 m (9 feet), unshielded, rated 250 V/10 A.
v Attached plug EL 602 (GB 2099/GB 1002) designed for 200-240 V ac
input.
FC 9009 Denmark
Provides power cords for Denmark
v 2.5 m (9 feet), unshielded, rated 250 V/10 A.
v Attached plug EL 213 (DHCR 107-2-D1) designed for 200-240 V ac
input.
FC 9010 India, Pakistan, South Africa
Provides power cords for India, Macau, Pakistan, South Africa
v 2.5 m (9 feet), unshielded, rated 250 V/10 A.
v Attached plug EL 208 (BS 164-1, BS 546) designed for 200-240 V ac
input.
FC 9011 Israel
Provides power cords for Israel

94 IBM System Storage: N6000 Series Hardware and Service Guide


v 2.5 m (9 feet), unshielded, rated 250 V/10 A.
v Attached plug EL 212 (SI 32) designed for 200-240 V ac input.
FC 9012 Italy
Provides power cords for Italy
v 2.5 m (9 feet), unshielded, rated 250 V/10 A.
v Attached plug EL 502 (CEI 23-16) designed for 200-240 V ac input.
FC 9013 North America (250 V)
Provides power cords for U.S.
v 1.83 m (6 feet), unshielded, rated 250 V/15 A.
v Attached plug EL 309 (NEMA 6-15P) designed for 200-240 V ac
input.
FC 9014 Brazil
Provides power cords for Brazil
v 2.5 m (9 feet), unshielded, rated 250 V/10 A.
v Attached plug EL 211 (NBR 6147/2000) designed for 200-240 V ac
input
FC 9015 Taiwan
Provides 125 V power cords for Taiwan
v 2.5 m (9 feet), unshielded, rated 125 V/15 A.
v Attached plug EL 302 (CNS 10917-3) designed for 100-120 V ac
input.
FC 9016 Taiwan (250 V)
Provides 250 V power cords for Taiwan
v 1.83 m (6 feet), unshielded, rated 250 V/10 A.
v Attached plug EL 610 (CNS 10917, CNS 690) designed for 250 V ac
input.

Appendix B. FRU/CRU and power cord list for N series products 95


96 IBM System Storage: N6000 Series Hardware and Service Guide
Appendix C. Optional adapter cards
IBM supports the following optional PCIe adapter cards in N6000 series
systems.
Table 24. Optional adapter cards supported by N6000 series systems
Feature
Code Feature Code Description Supported systems
1012 Dual-port Gigabit Ethernet adapter (optical) N6040, N6060, N6070
1013 Dual-port 10/100/1000 Ethernet adapter N6040, N6060, N6070
(copper)
1014 Dual-port 4-Gbps Fibre Channel HBA for disk N6040, N6060, N6070
attachment
1015 Dual-port 4-Gbps Fibre Channel HBA for tape N6040, N6060, N6070
attachment
1017 Dual-port 4-Gbps Fibre Channel target HBA N6040, N6060, N6070
1021 Dual-port GbE iSCSI adapter (optical) N6040, N6060, N6070
1022 Quad-port GbE Ethernet TOE adapter (copper) N6040, N6060, N6070
1023 Quad-port GbE Ethernet adapter (copper) N6040, N6060, N6070
1024 Dual-port Ultra320 SCSI HBA for tape N6040, N6060, N6070
attachment
1026 Dual-port GbE iSCSI target adapter (copper) N6040, N6060, N6070
1029 Quad-port 4-Gbps Fibre Channel HBA for disk N6040, N6060, N6070
and tape attachment
1030 Quad-port 4-Gbps Fibre Channel target HBA N6040, N6060, N6070
1031 Dual-port 10 GbE Ethernet adapter N6040, N6060, N6070
1032 Dual-port MetroCluster VI HBA N6040, N6060, N6070
(A20/A21/A22 models only)
1033 SnapMirror over Fibre Channel HBA N6040, N6060, N6070
1035 Quad-port 4-Gbps Fibre Channel HBA for tape N6040, N6060, N6070
and disk attachment
1036 Dual-port 8-Gbps Fibre Channel target HBA N6040, N6060, N6070
1056 16-GB Performance Acceleration Module (PAM N6040, N6060, N6070
I)
1057 512-GB Performance Acceleration Module N6070
(PAM II)

© Copyright IBM Corp. 2008, 2009 97


Table 24. Optional adapter cards supported by N6000 series systems (continued)
Feature
Code Feature Code Description Supported systems
1058 256-GB Performance Acceleration Module N6040, N6060
(PAM II)
1061 Quad-port 3-Gbps SAS adapter N6040, N6060, N6070
1063 Dual-port Fibre Channel over Ethernet (FCoE) N6040, N6060, N6070
Target Adapter (optical)
1064 Dual-port Fibre Channel over Ethernet (FCoE) N6040, N6060, N6070
Target Adapter (copper)
1065 Dual-port 10-Gbps NIC N6040, N6060, N6070

The following is the priority order for installing optional adapter cards into
the N6000 series system:
1. Storage adapters for attaching disk storage expansion units (FC 1014, 1029,
1035, 1061)
2. Storage adapters for mirroring or MetroCluster configurations (FC 1032,
1033)
3. Performance Acceleration Modules I and II (PAMs) (FC 1056, 1057, 1058)
4. Adapters for host block access (FC 1017, 1021, 1026, 1030, 1036, 1063, 1064,
1065)
5. Network Interface cards (FC 1012, 1013, 1022, 1023, 1031)
6. Storage adapters for tape attachment (FC 1015, 1024, 1029)

For the single-node models, the total number of PCIe adapters cannot exceed
four. For the dual-node (active/active or high availability) models, the total
number of PCIe adapters cannot exceed eight.

For information about monitoring the LEDs for your optional adapter cards,
refer to the IBM System Storage N series Platform Monitoring Guide.

Dual-port Gigabit Ethernet (GbE) adapter (optical) (FC 1012)


Feature code 1012 is a dual-port Gigabit Ethernet (1000BASE-SX) adapter. This
adapter has two LC duplex connectors and supports a maximum distance of
275 meters using 62.5-micron MMF media and 550m using 50-micron MMF
media.

For a single-node model, the maximum number of this adapter is four. For a
dual-node model, the maximum number of this adapter is eight.

The slot priority order for this adapter is 4, 3, 2, 1.

98 IBM System Storage: N6000 Series Hardware and Service Guide


Dual-port 10/100/1000 Ethernet adapter (copper) (FC 1013)
Feature code 1013 is a dual-port 10/100/1000 Ethernet adapter. This adapter
supports 10BASE-T, 100BASE-TX and 1000BASE-T Ethernet standards. This
adapter has two RJ-45 connectors and supports a maximum distance of 100
meters using Category 5 or better unshielded twisted pair (UTP) four-pair
media.

For a single-node model, the maximum number of this adapter is four. For a
dual-node model, the maximum number of this adapter is eight.

The slot priority order for this adapter is 4, 3, 2, 1.

Dual-port 4-Gbps Fibre Channel HBA for disk attachment (FC 1014)
Feature code 1014 is a dual-port 4-Gbps Fibre Channel HBA. This adapter
auto-negotiates to 4, 2 and 1 Gbps. This adapter may only be used for
attaching supported N series disk storage expansion units (EXN1000,
EXN2000, and EXN4000). The Fibre Channel ports on this adapter may not be
used as FCP target ports.

This adapter has two small form factor (SFF) multi-mode optics with LC-style
connectors. This adapter supports the following maximum cable lengths.
Table 25. Dual-port 4-Gbps Fibre Channel HBA for disk (FC 1014) - maximum cable
lengths
50 micron multi-mode 62.5 micron multi-mode
Link operating speed fiber fiber
1 Gbps 500 meters 300 meters
2 Gbps 300 meters 150 meters
4 Gbps 150 meters 70 meters

For a single-node model, the maximum number of this adapter is four. For a
dual-node model, the maximum number of this adapter is eight.

The slot priority order for this adapter is 4, 3, 2, 1.

Dual-port 4-Gbps Fibre Channel HBA for tape attachment (FC 1015)
Feature code 1015 is a dual-port 4-Gbps Fibre Channel HBA for tape
attachment. This adapter auto-negotiates to 4, 2 and 1 Gbps.

This adapter has two SFF multi-mode optics with LC-style connectors. This
adapter supports the following maximum cable lengths.

Appendix C. Optional adapter cards 99


Table 26. Dual-port 4-Gbps Fibre Channel HBA for tape (FC 1015) - maximum cable
lengths
50 micron multi-mode 62.5 micron multi-mode
Link operating speed fiber fiber
1 Gbps 500 meters 300 meters
2 Gbps 300 meters 150 meters
4 Gbps 150 meters 70 meters

For a single-node model, the maximum number of this adapter is four. For a
dual-node model, the maximum number of this adapter is eight.

The slot priority order for this adapter is 4, 3, 2, 1.

This feature code includes a 50-micron optical loopback cable with LC


connectors.

Dual-port 4-Gbps Fibre Channel target HBA (FC 1017)


Feature code 1017 is a dual-port 4-Gbps Fibre Channel HBA for FCP target
ports. This adapter auto-negotiates to 4, 2 and 1 Gbps. This adapter is used
for providing two additional 4-Gbps FCP target ports. It is not used for
attaching N series storage expansion units.

This adapter has two SFF multi-mode optics with LC-style connectors. This
adapter supports the following maximum cable lengths.
Table 27. Dual-port 4-Gbps Fibre Channel target HBA (FC 1017) - maximum cable
lengths
50 micron multi-mode 62.5 micron multi-mode
Link operating speed fiber fiber
1 Gbps 500 meters 300 meters
2 Gbps 300 meters 150 meters
4 Gbps 150 meters 70 meters

For a single-node model, the maximum number of this adapter is two. For a
dual-node model, the maximum number of this adapter is four.

The slot priority order for this adapter is 4, 3, 2, 1.

Dual-port GbE iSCSI adapter (optical) (FC 1021)


Feature code 1021 is a dual-port Ethernet iSCSI adapter.

100 IBM System Storage: N6000 Series Hardware and Service Guide
For a single-node model, the maximum number of this adapter is four. For a
dual-node model, the maximum number of this adapter is eight.

The slot priority order for this adapter is 4, 3, 2, 1.

Quad-port GbE Ethernet TOE adapter (copper) (FC 1022)


Feature code 1022 is a quad-port 10/100/1000 Ethernet TOE adapter.

For a single-node model, the maximum number of this adapter is four. For a
dual-node model, the maximum number of this adapter is eight.

The slot priority order for this adapter is 4, 3, 2, 1.

Quad-port GbE Ethernet adapter (copper) (FC 1023)


Feature code 1023 is a quad-port 10/100/1000 Ethernet adapter. This adapter
supports 10BASE-T, 100BASE-TX and 1000BASE-T Ethernet standard. It has
four RJ-45 connectors and supports a maximum distance of 100 meters using
Category 5 or better unshielded twisted pair (UTP) four-pair media.

For a single-node model, the maximum number of this adapter is four. For a
dual-node model, the maximum number of this adapter is eight.

The slot priority order for this adapter is 4, 3, 2, 1.

Dual-port Ultra320 SCSI HBA for tape attachment (FC 1024)


Feature code 1024 is a dual-port Ultra320 SCSI host bus adapter (HBA) for
tape attachment.

For a single-node model, the maximum number of this adapter is four. For a
dual-node model, the maximum number of this adapter is eight.

The slot priority order for this adapter is 4, 3, 2, 1.

Dual-port GbE iSCSI target adapter (copper) (FC 1026)


Feature code 1026 is a dual-port Ethernet iSCSI adapter.

For a single-node model, the maximum number of this adapter is four. For a
dual-node model, the maximum number of this adapter is eight.

The slot priority order for this adapter is 4, 3, 2, 1.

Appendix C. Optional adapter cards 101


Quad-port 4-Gbps Fibre Channel HBA for disk and tape attachment (FC 1029)
Feature code 1029 is a PCIe quad-port 4-Gbps HBA for attaching supported N
series disk storage expansion units (EXN1000, EXN2000, and EXN4000) and
tape devices to N series storage controllers. This adapter auto-negotiates
connections of 1-Gbps, 2-Gbps, or 4-Gbps. Four small form factor (SFF)
multimode optical ports with LC connectors support the following cable
lengths:
Table 28. Quad-port 4-Gbps Fibre Channel HBA for disk and tape attachment (FC
1029) - maximum cable lengths
50 micron multi-mode 62.5 micron multi-mode
Link operating speed fiber fiber
1 Gbps 500 meters 300 meters
2 Gbps 300 meters 150 meters
4 Gbps 150 meters 70 meters

The ports of this adapter may not be used as FCP target ports.

For a single-node model, the maximum number of this adapter is four. For a
dual-node model, the maximum number of this adapter is eight.

The slot priority order for this adapter is 1, 2, 3, 4.

Quad-port 4-Gbps Fibre Channel Target adapter (FC 1030)


Feature code 1030 is a PCIe quad-port 4-Gbps HBA for FCP target ports. This
adapter may only be used to provide additional target ports; it may not be
used to attach storage expansion units. This adapter auto-negotiates
connections of 1-Gbps, 2-Gbps, or 4-Gbps. Two SFP multimode optical ports
with LC connectors support the following cable lengths:
Table 29. Quad-port 4-Gbps Fibre Channel Target adapter (PCIe) (FC 1030) -
maximum cable lengths
50 micron multi-mode 62.5 micron multi-mode
Link operating speed fiber fiber
1 Gbps 500 meters 300 meters
2 Gbps 300 meters 150 meters
4 Gbps 150 meters 70 meters

For the single-node model the maximum number of this adapter is four. For
the dual-node model the maximum number of this adapter is eight.

102 IBM System Storage: N6000 Series Hardware and Service Guide
This adapter is a PCIe adapter. For a single-node configuration, the slot
priority order is 3, 4, 2. For a dual-node configuration, the slot priority order
is 1, 2, 4.

Note: Feature code 1030 requires Data ONTAP 7.3 or higher.

Dual-port 10 GbE Ethernet adapter (FC 1031)


Feature code 1031 is a 10-Gb Ethernet PCIe TOE adapter feature that provides
dual LC duplex connectors. It supports a maximum distance of 300 meters
using 850-nanometer (nm) multimode fiber (MMF) media.

For a single-node model, the maximum number of this adapter is four. For a
dual-node model, the maximum number of this adapter is eight.

The slot priority order for this adapter is 1, 2, 3, 4.

Dual-port MetroCluster VI HBA (Models A20/A21/A22 only) (FC 1032)


Feature code 1032 is used for fabric MetroCluster installations only. It is
required by MetroCluster. In a fabric MetroCluster configuration, the
MetroCluster Remote advanced function authorization and IBM 2005-16B
Fibre Channel switches are required. In a fabric MetroCluster configuration,
the cluster interconnect traffic is carried across the Fibre Channel SAN via this
adapter instead of across the normal Infiniband (IB) cluster interconnect
cables.

In a fabric MetroCluster configuration, two of these adapter cards must be


ordered (one for each node of a dual-node cluster).

This adapter must be installed in slot 1.

SnapMirror over Fibre Channel HBA (FC 1033)


Feature code 1033 is a 4-Gbps PCIe card used to support SnapMirror over
Fibre Channel.

For a single-node model, the maximum number of this adapter is one. For a
dual-node model, the maximum number of this adapter is two.

The slot priority order for this adapter is 3, 4.

Appendix C. Optional adapter cards 103


Quad-port 4-Gbps Fibre Channel HBA for tape and disk attachment (FC 1035)
Feature code 1035 is a PCIe quad-port 4-Gbps HBA for attaching tape and
supported N series disk storage expansion units (EXN1000, EXN2000, and
EXN4000) to N series storage controllers. This adapter auto-negotiates
connections of 1-Gbps, 2-Gbps, or 4-Gbps. Four small form factor (SFF)
multimode optical ports with LC connectors support the following cable
lengths:
Table 30. Quad-port 4-Gbps Fibre Channel HBA for tape and disk attachment (FC
1035) - maximum cable lengths
50 micron multi-mode 62.5 micron multi-mode
Link operating speed fiber fiber
1 Gbps 500 meters 300 meters
2 Gbps 300 meters 150 meters
4 Gbps 150 meters 70 meters

The ports of this adapter may not be used as FCP target ports.

Note: This adapter is not supported for N6000 series MetroCluster


configurations or filers with gateway features.

For a single-node model, the maximum number of this adapter is four. For a
dual-node model, the maximum number of this adapter is eight.

The slot priority order for this adapter is 1, 2, 3, 4.

Dual-port 8-Gbps Fibre Channel target HBA (FC 1036)


Feature code 1036 is a dual-port 8-Gbps Fibre Channel HBA for FCP target
ports.

This adapter may only be used to provide additional target ports. It is not
used for attaching N series storage expansion units. It auto-negotiates
connections of 1-Gbps, 2-Gbps, or 4-Gbps.

This adapter has two SFP multimode optical ports with LC connectors. This
adapter supports the following cable lengths:
Table 31. Dual-port 8-Gbps Fibre Channel target HBA (FC 1036) - maximum cable
lengths
50 micron multi-mode 62.5 micron multi-mode
Link operating speed fiber fiber
1 Gbps 500 meters 300 meters

104 IBM System Storage: N6000 Series Hardware and Service Guide
Table 31. Dual-port 8-Gbps Fibre Channel target HBA (FC 1036) - maximum cable
lengths (continued)
50 micron multi-mode 62.5 micron multi-mode
Link operating speed fiber fiber
2 Gbps 300 meters 150 meters
4 Gbps 150 meters 70 meters

For a single-node model, the maximum number of this adapter is four. For a
dual-node model, the maximum number of this adapter is eight.

The slot priority order for this adapter is 4, 3, 2, 1.

16 GB Performance Acceleration Module (FC 1056)


Feature code 1056 is a PCIe adapter with 16 GB of onboard cache memory
that works as a performance acceleration module. It is designed to augment
the system’s memory and improve performance with some applications when
a configuration has a limited number of disks. This design allows the N series
disk configuration to be sized based on capacity, rather than performance
requirements. For more information about PAM cards, see Appendix D,
“Installing or replacing a Performance Acceleration Module,” on page 109.

Use of the 16 GB Performance Acceleration Module I (FC 1056) requires the


FlexScale software feature.

For the single-node model, the maximum number of this adapter is four for
the N6070 and two for the N6040 or N6060. For the dual-node model, the
maximum number of this adapter is four.

This adapter is a PCIe adapter. For both single-node and dual-node


configurations, the slot priority order is 1, 2. 3. 4.

Note: Feature code 1056 requires Data ONTAP 7.3 or higher.

512 GB Performance Acceleration Module II (FC 1057)


Feature code 1057 is a PCIe adapter with 512 GB of onboard cache memory
that works as a Performance Acceleration Module (PAM) II. The Performance
Acceleration Module (PAM) II is the second generation of PCIe PAM adapters
for N series systems. It is designed to augment the system’s onboard memory,
improving performance with some configurations. The design allows the N
series system to be sized based on required capacity instead of performance,
reducing the need for excess spindles in some environments and helping to

Appendix C. Optional adapter cards 105


improve capacity utilization. For more information about PAM cards, see
Appendix D, “Installing or replacing a Performance Acceleration Module,” on
page 109.

Use of the 512 GB Performance Acceleration Module II (FC 1057) requires the
Performance Acceleration Module II software feature.

For the single-node N6070, the maximum number of this adapter is two. For
the dual-node N6070, the maximum number of this adapter is four.

This adapter is a PCIe adapter. For both single-node and dual-node


configurations, the slot priority order is 1, 2, 3, 4.

Note: Feature code 1057 requires Data ONTAP 7.3.2 or higher.

256 GB Performance Acceleration Module II (FC 1058)


Feature code 1058 is a PCIe adapter with 256 GB of onboard cache memory
that works as a Performance Acceleration Module (PAM) II. The Performance
Acceleration Module (PAM) II is the second generation of PCIe PAM adapters
for N series systems. It is designed to augment the system’s onboard memory,
improving performance with some configurations. The design allows the N
series system to be sized based on required capacity instead of performance,
reducing the need for excess spindles in some environments and helping to
improve capacity utilization. For more information about PAM cards, see
Appendix D, “Installing or replacing a Performance Acceleration Module,” on
page 109.

Use of the 256 GB Performance Acceleration Module II (FC 1058) requires the
Performance Acceleration Module II software feature.

For the single-node N6040, the maximum number of this adapter is one. For
the dual-node N6040, the maximum number of this adapter is two.

For the single-node N6060, the maximum number of this adapter is two. For
the dual-node N6060, the maximum number of this adapter is four.

The slot priority order for this adapter is 1, 2, 3, 4.

Note: Feature code 1058 requires Data ONTAP 7.3.2 or higher.

Quad-port 3-Gbps SAS Adapter (FC 1061)


Feature code 1061 is a PCIe adapter with four SAS ports for connecting N
series SAS-based storage (EXN3000) behind the N series controller. The SAS
adapter operates at 3 Gbps.

106 IBM System Storage: N6000 Series Hardware and Service Guide
For a single-node model, the maximum number of this adapter is four. For a
dual-node model, the maximum number of this adapter is eight.

The slot priority order for this adapter is 1, 2, 3, 4.

Note: Feature code 1061 requires Data ONTAP 7.3.2 or higher.

Dual-port Fibre Channel over Ethernet (FCoE) Target Adapter (optical) (FC 1063)
Feature code 1063 is a PCIe adapter with two Fibre Channel over Ethernet
(FCoE) ports for connecting the N series controller to FCoE environments.
This adapter utilizes optical connections to the FCoE networks.

For a single-node model, the maximum number of this adapter is four. For a
dual-node model, the maximum number of this adapter is eight.

The slot priority order for this adapter is 4, 3, 2, 1.

Note: Feature code 1063 requires Data ONTAP 7.3.2 or higher.

Dual-port Fibre Channel over Ethernet (FCoE) Target Adapter (copper) (FC 1064)
Feature code 1064 is a PCIe adapter with two Fibre Channel over Ethernet
(FCoE) ports for connecting the N series controller to FCoE environments.
This adapter utilizes copper connections to the FCoE networks.

For a single-node model, the maximum number of this adapter is four. For a
dual-node model, the maximum number of this adapter is eight.

The slot priority order for this adapter is 4, 3, 2, 1.

Note: Feature code 1064 requires Data ONTAP 7.3.2 or higher.

Dual-port 10-Gbps NIC (FC 1065)


Feature code 1065 is a 10-Gb Ethernet PCIe NIC adapter feature provides dual
LC duplex connectors. It supports a maximum distance of 300 meters using
850-nanometer (nm) multimode fiber (MMF) media.

Cable features 5m 50-micron MMF Cable (FC 1045), 30m 50-micron MMF
Cable (FC 1046), 10-GbE Fi cable 30m LC/SC (FC 1047), or 10-GbE Fi cable
5m LC/SC (FC 1048) can optionally be ordered with this feature. FC 1045 and
FC 1046 are LC/LC cables; FC 1047 and FC 1048 are LC/SC cables.

For a single-node model, the maximum number of this adapter is four. For a
dual-node model, the maximum number of this adapter is eight.

Appendix C. Optional adapter cards 107


The slot priority order for this adapter is 1, 2, 3, 4.

Note: Feature code 1065 requires Data ONTAP 7.3.2 or higher.

108 IBM System Storage: N6000 Series Hardware and Service Guide
Appendix D. Installing or replacing a Performance
Acceleration Module
This section contains information and processes for the following:
v “System requirements”
v “Before you begin”
v “Installing or replacing a Performance Acceleration Module” on page 110
v “Enabling the WAFL extended cache software license and functionality” on
page 111
v “Enabling the WAFL extended cache configuration options” on page 112
v “Completing the replacement process” on page 113
For information about the Performance Acceleration Module (PAM) LEDs,
refer to the IBM System Storage N series Platform Monitoring Guide or to the
flyer that shipped with your PAM.

System requirements
Your system must be running the minimum version of Data ONTAP required
for your module type. For the most up-to-date information about supported
Data ONTAP versions for your module, see the IBM System Storage N series
Introduction and Planning Guide or the Hardware and Service Guide for your N
series system, located at:

www.ibm.com/storage/support/nas

Before you begin


Depending on whether you are installing a Performance Acceleration Module
for the first time, replacing an existing module, or installing an additional
module, your system must meet the criteria specified for your applicable
installation type below.
First time installations:
v Your system must be running the minimum version of Data ONTAP
required for the module type you are installing.
v The platform on which you are installing the module must be supported.
The following platforms are supported; however, for the most up-to-date
list of supported platforms, see the IBM System Storage N series Introduction
and Planning Guide or the Hardware and Service Guide for your N series
system, located at:

© Copyright IBM Corp. 2008, 2009 109


www.ibm.com/storage/support/nas
v Your system must have an available PCI-e slot (one slot for each module),
and you must have checked the IBM System Storage N series Introduction and
Planning Guide or the Hardware and Service Guide for your N series system.
v You must have the software license key and download instructions that
came with your order.
v If you are installing the module in an active/active or high availability
configuration, you must install an equal number of modules in each system.
v All other components in the system must be functioning properly.
Replacement or additional module installations
v Your system must be running the minimum version of Data ONTAP
required for the module type you are installing.
v If you are installing additional modules in an active/active or high
availability configuration, you must install an equal number of modules in
each system.
v If you are installing additional modules, your system must have an
available PCI-e slot (one slot for each module), and you must have checked
the IBM System Storage N series Introduction and Planning Guide or the
Hardware and Service Guide for your N series system for the assigned
module slots for your system.
v If you are installing additional modules, they must be the same type
module as you currently have installed.
You cannot mix 16-GB, 256-GB, and 512-GB modules in the same system.
v If you are upgrading the 16-GB modules in your system with 256-GB or
512-GB modules, you must have the correct software license for your
replacement module type.
There are two different WAFL® extended cache software licenses. One is
used with the 16-GB module and one is used with the 256-GB and 512-GB
modules.
v All other components in the system must be functioning properly.

Installing or replacing a Performance Acceleration Module


Attention: This procedure is disruptive for single-controller configurations,
and is recommended to be performed on single-controller configurations only
during a maintenance window. For active/active or high availability
configurations, this is a nondisruptive procedure.

To install or replace a module, complete the following steps:


1. Shut down the controller module.
See the Hardware and Service Guide for your applicable platform.
2. Open your system.

110 IBM System Storage: N6000 Series Hardware and Service Guide
See the Hardware and Service Guide for your applicable platform.
3. Remove an existing module (if necessary).
See the Hardware and Service Guide for your applicable platform. For
detailed information, see the section “Replacing PCI Cards and Risers” or
“Replacing PCI adapters”.
4. Install the module.
See the Hardware and Service Guide for your applicable platform. For
detailed information, see the section “Replacing PCI Cards and Risers” or
“Replacing PCI adapters”.

Note: For active/active or high availability configurations, if you are


installing a module for the first time or adding an additional
module, you must install an equal number of modules in each
node.
5. Close and boot your system.
See the Hardware and Service Guide for your applicable platform.
6. Run diagnostics on the new module (for first time installations only).
See the IBM System Storage N series Diagnostics Guide for information
about specific diagnostics tests you can perform for PCI cards, located at:
www.ibm.com/storage/support/nas
7. Complete the installation process:
v If you are installing an additional module in a system with preexisting
modules, you have completed the installation process.
v If you are replacing a failed module, go to step 10.
v If you are installing a module for the first time in a system or
upgrading the 16-GB modules in your system with 256-GB or 512-GB
modules, complete steps 8 and 9.
8. Enable the WAFL extended cache software.
See “Enabling the WAFL extended cache software license and
functionality.”
9. Set the software configuration options.
See “Enabling the WAFL extended cache configuration options” on page
112.
10. Complete the replacement process.
See “Completing the replacement process” on page 113.

Enabling the WAFL extended cache software license and functionality


For first-time installations of a module or upgrading the 16-GB modules in
your system with 256-GB or 512-GB modules, complete the following steps:

Appendix D. Installing or replacing a Performance Acceleration Module 111


Note: There are two different WAFL extended cache software licenses. One is
used with the 16-GB module and one is used with the 256-GB and
512-GB modules. You must have the correct software license for your
module type.

Note: See the software license key and download instructions that came with
your order.
1. From the console, enable the WAFL extended cache software license by
entering the following command:
license add license key
Result: WAFL extended cache functionality should be enabled
automatically.
2. Verify that WAFL extended cache functionality is enabled by entering the
following command:
options flexscale.enable
Result: Should be on.
3. Enable the WAFL extended cache configuration options.
v If your system is in a single-controller module configuration, go to
“Enabling the WAFL extended cache configuration options.”
v If your system is in an active/active or high availability configuration,
repeat Steps 1 and 2 of this procedure for each node, and then go to
“Enabling the WAFL extended cache configuration options.”

Enabling the WAFL extended cache configuration options


WAFL extended cache configuration options enable you to optimize
performance for your particular workload. Depending on your workload, the
following options can apply:
v Caching normal user data blocks
v Caching low-priority user data blocks
v Caching only system metadata
v Integrating FlexShare™ buffer cache policies with WAFL extended cache
options

Note: You can set the WAFL extended cache configuration options during
module installation or later. However, it is recommended that you set
options at the time of installation to ensure optimal performance for
your workload.

To enable WAFL extended cache configuration options, complete the following


steps:

112 IBM System Storage: N6000 Series Hardware and Service Guide
1. Read about the WAFL extended cache configuration options in the Data
ONTAP System Administration Guide.
You can access this document at:
www.ibm.com/storage/support/nas

Note: Knowing your application and volume configuration helps you


decide what configuration options to choose.
2. Follow the applicable option enabling procedures in the Data ONTAP
System Administration Guide.

Note: For active/active or high availability configurations, you must


configure options on each node.

Completing the replacement process


If you have replaced a failed module, return the failed part to IBM. Contact
IBM Service and Support at 1-800-IBM-SERV (1-800-426-7378) for more
information on the return procedure.

Appendix D. Installing or replacing a Performance Acceleration Module 113


114 IBM System Storage: N6000 Series Hardware and Service Guide
Appendix E. IBM System Storage N series documentation
The following lists present an overview of the IBM System Storage N series
hardware and Data ONTAP product libraries, as well as other related
documents.

You can access the documents listed in these tables at the following web site:

www.ibm.com/storage/support/nas/

N7000 series systems library


v IBM System Storage N7000 Series Hardware and Service Guide, GC26-7953
v IBM System Storage N7000 Series Filer Installation and Setup Instructions,
GC26-7954
v IBM System Storage N7000 Series Gateway Installation and Setup Instructions,
GC26-7956

N6000 series systems library


v IBM System Storage N6000 Series Hardware and Service Guide, GC53-1142-00
v IBM System Storage N6000 Series Filer Installation and Setup Instructions,
GC53-1143-00
v IBM System Storage N6000 Series Gateway Installation and Setup Instructions,
GC53-1144-00

N5000 series systems library


v IBM System Storage N5000 Series Hardware and Service Guide, GC26-7785
v IBM System Storage N5000 Series Filer Installation and Setup Instructions,
GC26-7784
v IBM System Storage N5000 Series Gateway Installation and Setup Instructions,
GC26-7838

N3300 and N3600 storage systems library


v IBM System Storage N3300 and N3600 Hardware and Service Guide, GC27-2087
v IBM System Storage N3300 Installation and Setup Instructions, GC27-2086
v IBM System Storage N3600 Installation and Setup Instructions, GC27-2089

© Copyright IBM Corp. 2008, 2009 115


N3700 storage system library
v IBM System Storage N3700 Hardware and Service Guide, GA32-0515
v IBM System Storage N3700 Installation and Setup Instructions, GA32-0517

EXN1000, EXN2000, EXN3000and EXN4000 storage expansion units library


v IBM System Storage EXN1000 Storage Expansion Unit Hardware and Service
Guide, GC26-7802
v IBM System Storage EXN1000 Installation and Setup Instructions, GC26-7786
v IBM System Storage EXN2000 Storage Expansion Unit Hardware and Service
Guide, GA32-0516
v IBM System Storage EXN2000 Installation and Setup Instructions, GC27-2064
v IBM System Storage EXN3000 Storage Expansion Unit Hardware and Service
Guide, GC52-1346
v IBM System Storage EXN3000 Installation and Setup Instructions, GC52-1345
v IBM System Storage EXN4000 Storage Expansion Unit Hardware and Service
Guide, GC27-2080
v IBM System Storage EXN4000 Installation and Setup Instructions, GC27-2079

Data ONTAP 7.3 filer library


v IBM System Storage N series Data ONTAP 7.3.x Release Notes®, GC53-1175

Note: Beginning with Data ONTAP 7.3.1, a single Data ONTAP 7.3.x
Release Notes covers both filers and gateways.
v IBM System Storage N series Data ONTAP 7.3.Release Notes, GC27-2201
v IBM System Storage N series Data ONTAP 7.3 Active/Active Configuration
Guide, GC27-2208
v IBM System Storage N series Data ONTAP 7.3 File Access and Protocols
Management Guide, GC27-2207
v IBM System Storage N series Data ONTAP 7.3 Storage Management Guide,
GC52-1277
v IBM System Storage N series Data ONTAP 7.3 Data Protection Online Backup
and Recovery Guide, GC27-2204
v IBM System Storage N series Data ONTAP 7.3 Data Protection Tape Backup and
Recovery Guide, GC27-2205
v IBM System Storage N series Data ONTAP 7.3 MultiStore Management Guide,
GC52-1281
v IBM System Storage N series Data ONTAP 7.3 Network Management Guide,
GC52-1280

116 IBM System Storage: N6000 Series Hardware and Service Guide
v IBM System Storage N series Data ONTAP 7.3 Commands: Manual Page
Reference, Volume 1, GC27-2202
v IBM System Storage N series Data ONTAP 7.3 Commands: Manual Page
Reference, Volume 2, GC27-2203
v IBM System Storage N series Data ONTAP 7.3 Upgrade Guide, GC27-2200
v IBM System Storage N series Data ONTAP 7.3 Block Access Management Guide
for iSCSI and FCP, GC52-1282
v IBM System Storage N series Data ONTAP 7.3 System Administration Guide,
GC52-1279
v IBM System Storage N series Data ONTAP 7.3 Software Setup Guide,
GC27-2206
v IBM System Storage N series Data ONTAP 7.3 Core Commands Quick Reference,
GC52-1278
v IBM System Storage N series Data ONTAP 7.3 Archive and Compliance
Management Guide, GC53-1168

Data ONTAP 7.2 filer library


v IBM System Storage N series Data ONTAP 7.2.x Release Notes, GC26-7963
v IBM System Storage N series Data ONTAP 7.2 Active/Active Configuration
Guide, GC26-7964
v IBM System Storage N series Data ONTAP 7.2 File Access and Protocols
Management Guide, GC26-7965
v IBM System Storage N series Data ONTAP 7.2 Storage Management Guide,
GC26-7966
v IBM System Storage N series Data ONTAP 7.2 Data Protection Online Backup
and Recovery Guide, GC26-7967
v IBM System Storage N series Data ONTAP 7.2 Data Protection Tape Backup and
Recovery Guide, GC26-7968
v IBM System Storage N series Data ONTAP 7.2 MultiStore Management Guide,
GC26-7969
v IBM System Storage N series Data ONTAP 7.2 Network Management Guide,
GC26-7970
v IBM System Storage N series Data ONTAP 7.2 Commands: Manual Page
Reference, Volume 1, GC26-7971
v IBM System Storage N series Data ONTAP 7.2 Commands: Manual Page
Reference, Volume 2, GC26-7972
v IBM System Storage N series Data ONTAP 7.2 Upgrade Guide, GC26-7976
v IBM System Storage N series Data ONTAP 7.2 Block Access Management Guide
for iSCSI & FCP, GC26-7973

Appendix E. IBM System Storage N series documentation 117


v IBM System Storage N series Data ONTAP 7.2 System Administration Guide,
GC26-7974
v IBM System Storage N series Data ONTAP 7.2 Software Setup Guide,
GC26-7975
v IBM System Storage N series Data ONTAP 7.2 Core Commands Quick Reference,
GC26-7977

Data ONTAP 7.1 filer library


v IBM System Storage N series Data ONTAP 7.1.x Release Notes, GC26-7862
v IBM System Storage N series Data ONTAP 7.1 Cluster Installation and
Management Guide, GC26-7790
v IBM System Storage N series Data ONTAP 7.1 File Access and Protocols
Management Guide, GA32-0520
v IBM System Storage N series Data ONTAP 7.1 Storage Management Guide,
GA32-0521
v IBM System Storage N series Data ONTAP 7.1 Data Protection Online Backup
and Recovery Guide, GA32-0522
v IBM System Storage N series Data ONTAP 7.1 Data Protection Tape Backup and
Recovery Guide, GA32-0523
v IBM System Storage N series Data ONTAP 7.1 MultiStore Management Guide,
GA32-0524
v IBM System Storage N series Data ONTAP 7.1 Network Management Guide,
GA32-0525
v IBM System Storage N series Data ONTAP 7.1 Commands: Manual Page
Reference, Volume 1, GA32-0526
v IBM System Storage N series Data ONTAP 7.1 Commands: Manual Page
Reference, Volume 2, GA32-0527
v IBM System Storage N series Data ONTAP 7.1 Upgrade Guide, GC26-7791
v IBM System Storage N series Data ONTAP 7.1 Block Access Management Guide
for iSCSI and FCP, GA32-0528
v IBM System Storage N series Data ONTAP 7.1 System Administration Guide,
GA32-0529
v IBM System Storage N series Data ONTAP 7.1 Software Setup Guide,
GA32-0530
v IBM System Storage N series Data ONTAP 7.1 Core Commands Quick Reference,
GA32-0531

Data ONTAP 7.2 and 7.3 gateway systems library


v IBM System Storage N series Data ONTAP 7.2.x Gateway Release Notes,
GC26-7955

118 IBM System Storage: N6000 Series Hardware and Service Guide
v IBM System Storage N series Data ONTAP 7.3 Gateway Release Notes,
GC27-2189
v IBM System Storage N series Data ONTAP 7.3.x Release Notes, GC53-1175

Note: Beginning with Data ONTAP 7.3.1, a single Data ONTAP 7.3.x
Release Notes will cover both filers and gateways.
v IBM System Storage N series Gateway Planning Guide, GC53-1150
v IBM System Storage N series Gateway Upgrade Guide, GC26-1166
v IBM System Storage N series Gateway Software Setup, Installation, and
Management Guide, GC53-1147
v IBM System Storage N series Gateway Installation Requirements and Reference
Guide, GC53-1148
v IBM System Storage N series Gateway Metrocluster Guide, GC53-1149
v IBM System Storage N series Gateway Implementation Guide for Native Disk
Shelves, GC27-2188 (for Data ONTAP 7.3 gateways only)
v IBM System Storage N series Gateway Implementation Guide for EMC Symmetrix
Storage, GC27-2190
v IBM System Storage N series Gateway Implementation Guide for HP EVA
Storage, GC27-2192
v IBM System Storage N series Gateway Implementation Guide for HP XP Storage,
GC27-2193
v IBM System Storage N series Gateway Implementation Guide for 3PAR InServ
Storage, GC27-2195
v IBM System Storage N series Gateway Implementation Guide for EMC
CLARiiON Storage, GC27-2191
v IBM System Storage N series Gateway Implementation Guide for IBM Storage,
GC27-2194
v IBM System Storage N series Gateway Implementation Guide for IBM SAN
Volume Controller Storage, GC53-1151
v IBM System Storage N series Gateway Implementation Guide for Hitachi Storage,
GC53-1164
v IBM System Storage N series Gateway Implementation Guide for Fujitsu
ETERNUS Storage, GC53-1165
v IBM System Storage N series Gateway Implementation Guide for RamSan Storage,
GC52-1342

Data ONTAP 7.1 gateway systems library


v IBM System Storage N series Gateway Planning Guide, GC26-7839
v IBM System Storage N series Gateway Integration Guide for IBM Storage,
GC26-7840

Appendix E. IBM System Storage N series documentation 119


v IBM System Storage N series Gateway Integration Guide for Hitachi Storage,
GC26-7841
v IBM System Storage N series Gateway Integration Guide for HP Storage,
GC26-7858
v IBM System Storage N series Gateway Software Upgrade Guide, GC26-7859
v IBM System Storage N series Gateway Software Setup, Installation, and
Management Guide, GC26-7886
v IBM System Storage N series Gateway 7.1.x Release Notes, GC26-7837

Other N series and N series-related documents


v IBM System Storage N Series Platform Monitoring Guide, GC27-2088
(previously called the IBM System Storage N series Error Messages and
Troubleshooting Guide, GC26-7984)
v IBM System Storage N series Diagnostics Guide, GC26-7789
v IBM System Storage N series Introduction and Planning Guide, GA32-0543
v IBM System Storage N series AutoSupport Overview, GC26-7854
v IBM System Storage N series: Changing the cluster cfmode Setting in Fibre
Channel SAN Configurations, GC26-7876
v IBM System Storage N series iSCSI and Fibre Channel Configuration Guide,
GC53-1300
v IBM System Storage N series Brocade 200E and Brocade 5000 Switch
Configuration Guide, GC52-1284
v IBM System Storage N series Brocade 3000 Series Switch Configuration Guide,
GC52-1285
v IBM System Storage N series Brocade 300 and Brocade 5100 Switch Configuration
Guide, GC53-1167
v IBM System Storage N series MetroCluster Redbook, REDP-4243-00
v IBM System Storage Systems Safety Notices, G229-9054
v IBM Environmental Notices and User Guide Z125-5823
v IBM Storage Solution Rack 2101 Rack Installation and Service Guide: Models 200
and N00, GC26-7993
v IBM Storage Solution Rack 2101 Rack Installation and Service Guide: Model N42,
GC53-1174

120 IBM System Storage: N6000 Series Hardware and Service Guide
Notices
This information was developed for products and services offered in the
U.S.A.

IBM may not offer the products, services, or features discussed in this
document in other countries. Consult your local IBM representative for
information on the products and services currently available in your area. Any
reference to an IBM product, program, or service is not intended to state or
imply that only that IBM product, program, or service may be used. Any
functionally equivalent product, program, or service that does not infringe on
any IBM intellectual property right may be used instead. However, it is the
user’s responsibility to evaluate and verify the operation of any non-IBM
product, program, or service.

IBM may have patents or pending patent applications covering subject matter
described in this document. The furnishing of this document does not give
you any license to these patents. You can send license inquiries, in writing to:

IBM Director of Licensing


IBM Corporation
North Castle Drive
Armonk, N.Y. 10504-1785
U.S.A.

For additional information, visit the web at:


http://www.ibm.com/ibm/licensing/contact/

The following paragraph does not apply to the United Kingdom or any
other country where such provisions are inconsistent with local law:
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MACHINES CORPORATION PROVIDES THIS
PUBLICATION “AS IS” WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EITHER
EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE
IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF NON-INFRINGEMENT, MERCHANTABILITY
OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. Some states do not allow
disclaimer of express or implied warranties in certain transactions, therefore,
this statement may not apply to you.

This information could include technical inaccuracies or typographical errors.


Changes are periodically made to the information herein; these changes will
be incorporated in new editions of the publication. IBM may make
improvements and/or changes in the product(s) and/or the program(s)
described in this publication at any time without notice.

© Copyright IBM Corp. 2008, 2009 121


Any references in this information to non-IBM web sites are provided for
convenience only and do not in any manner serve as an endorsement of those
web sites. The materials at those web sites are not part of the materials for
this IBM product and use of those web sites is at your own risk.

IBM may use or distribute any of the information you supply in any way it
believes appropriate without incurring any obligation to you.

Any performance data contained herein was determined in a controlled


environment. Therefore, the results obtained in other operating environments
may vary significantly. Some measurements may have been made on
development-level systems and there is no guarantee that these measurements
will be the same on generally available systems. Furthermore, some
measurement may have been estimated through extrapolation. Actual results
may vary. Users of this document should verify the applicable data for their
specific environment.

Information concerning non-IBM products was obtained from the suppliers of


those products, their published announcements or other publicly available
sources. IBM has not tested those products and cannot confirm the accuracy
of performance, compatibility or any other claims related to non-IBM
products. Questions on the capabilities of non-IBM products should be
addressed to the suppliers of those products.

If you are viewing this information in softcopy, the photographs and color
illustrations may not appear.

Trademarks
IBM, the IBM logo, and ibm.com® are trademarks or registered trademarks of
International Business Machines Corporation in the United States, other
countries, or both. A complete and current list of other IBM trademarks is
available on the web at http://www.ibm.com/legal/copytrade.shtml

NetApp, the Network Appliance logo, the bolt design, NetApp–the Network
Appliance Company, Data ONTAP, DataFabric, FAServer, FilerView,
MultiStore, NearStore, NetCache, SecureShare, SnapManager, SnapMirror,
SnapMover, SnapRestore, SnapVault, SyncMirror, and WAFL are registered
trademarks of Network Appliance, Inc. in the United States, and/or other
countries. gFiler, Network Appliance, SnapCopy, Snapshot, and The Evolution
of Storage are trademarks of Network Appliance, Inc. in the United States
and/or other countries and registered trademarks in some other countries.
ApplianceWatch, BareMetal, Camera-to-Viewer, ComplianceClock,
ComplianceJournal, ContentDirector, ContentFabric, EdgeFiler, FlexClone,
FlexVol, FPolicy, HyperSAN, InfoFabric, LockVault, Manage ONTAP, NOW,
NetApp on the web, ONTAPI, RAID-DP, RoboCache, RoboFiler, SecureAdmin,

122 IBM System Storage: N6000 Series Hardware and Service Guide
Serving Data by Design, SharedStorage, Simulate ONTAP, Smart SAN,
SnapCache, SnapDirector, SnapDrive, SnapFilter, SnapLock, SnapMigrator,
SnapSuite, SnapValidator, SohoFiler, vFiler, VFM, Virtual File Manager,
VPolicy, and Web Filer are trademarks of Network Appliance, Inc. in the
United States and other countries. NetApp Availability Assurance and
NetApp ProTech Expert are service marks of Network Appliance, Inc. in the
United States. Spinnaker Networks, the Spinnaker Networks logo, SpinAccess,
SpinCluster, SpinFS, SpinHA, SpinMove, and SpinServer are registered
trademarks of Spinnaker Networks, LLC in the United States and/or other
countries. SpinAV, SpinManager, SpinMirror, SpinRestore, SpinShot, and
SpinStor are trademarks of Spinnaker Networks, LLC in the United States
and/or other countries.

Network Appliance is a licensee of the CompactFlash and CF Logo


trademarks.

Network Appliance NetCache is certified RealSystem compatible.

Microsoft®, Windows, and Windows NT® are trademarks of Microsoft


Corporation in the United States, other countries, or both.

UNIX is a registered trademark of The Open Group in the United States and
other countries.

Other company, product, or service names may be trademarks or service


marks of others.

Important notes
Processor speeds indicate the internal clock speed of the microprocessor; other
factors also affect application performance.

CD-ROM drive speeds list the variable read rate. Actual speeds vary and are
often less than the maximum possible.

When referring to processor storage, real and virtual storage, or channel


volume, KB stands for approximately 1000 bytes, MB stands for
approximately 1 000 000 bytes, and GB stands for approximately 1 000 000 000
bytes.

When referring to hard disk drive capacity or communications volume, MB


stands for 1 000 000 bytes, and GB stands for 1 000 000 000 bytes. Total
user-accessible capacity may vary depending on operating environments.

Notices 123
Maximum internal hard disk drive capacities assume the replacement of any
standard hard disk drives and population of all hard disk drive bays with the
largest currently supported drives available from IBM.

Maximum memory may require replacement of the standard memory with an


optional memory module.

IBM makes no representation or warranties regarding non-IBM products and


services that are ServerProven®, including but not limited to the implied
warranties of merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose. These
products are offered and warranted solely by third parties.

IBM makes no representations or warranties with respect to non-IBM


products. Support (if any) for the non-IBM products is provided by the third
party, not IBM.

Some software may differ from its retail version (if available), and may not
include user manuals or all program functionality.

Attention: In compliance with the GNU General Public License (GPL),


Version 2, June 1991, a complete machine-readable copy of the source code for
the relevant source code portions of the Remote LAN Module (RLM)
Firmware that are covered by the GPL, is available from http://
now.netapp.com.

Electronic emission notices


The following statements apply to this product. The statements for other
products intended for use with this product will appear in their
accompanying manuals.
Federal Communications Commission (FCC) Class A Statement
Note: This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for
a Class A digital device, pursuant to Part 15 of the FCC Rules. These limits
are designed to provide reasonable protection against harmful interference
when the equipment is operated in a commercial environment. This
equipment generates, uses, and can radiate radio frequency energy and, if not
installed and used in accordance with the instruction manual, may cause
harmful interference to radio communications. Operation of this equipment in
a residential area is likely to cause harmful interference, in which case the
user will be required to correct the interference at his own expense.

Properly shielded and grounded cables and connectors must be used in order
to meet FCC emission limits. IBM is not responsible for any radio or television
interference caused by using other than recommended cables and connectors

124 IBM System Storage: N6000 Series Hardware and Service Guide
or by unauthorized changes or modifications to this equipment. Unauthorized
changes or modifications could void the user’s authority to operate the
equipment.

This device complies with Part 15 of the FCC Rules. Operation is subject to
the following two conditions: (1) this device may not cause harmful
interference, and (2) this device must accept any interference received,
including interference that may cause undesired operation.
Industry Canada Class A Emission Compliance Statement
This Class A digital apparatus complies with Canadian ICES-003.
Avis de conformité à la réglementation d’Industrie Canada
Cet appareil numérique de la classe A est conform à la norme NMB-003 du
Canada.
European Union (EU) Electromagnetic Compatibility Directive
This product is in conformity with the protection requirements of EU Council
Directive 2004/108/EC on the approximation of the laws of the Member
States relating to electromagnetic compatibility. IBM cannot accept
responsibility for any failure to satisfy the protection requirements resulting
from a non-recommended modification of the product, including the fitting of
non-IBM option cards.

This product has been tested and found to comply with the limits for Class A
Information Technology Equipment according to European Standard EN
55022. The limits for Class A equipment were derived for commercial and
industrial environments to provide reasonable protection against interference
with licensed communication equipment.

Attention: This is a Class A product. In a domestic environment this product


may cause radio interference in which case the user may be required to take
adequate measures.

European Community contact:


IBM Technical Regulations
Pascalstr. 100, Stuttgart, Germany 70569
Tele: 0049 (0)711 785 1176
Fax: 0049 (0)711 785 1283
e-mail: tjahn@de.ibm.com
Germany Electromagnetic Compatibility Directive
Deutschsprachiger EU Hinweis:

Hinweis für Geräte der Klasse A EU-Richtlinie zur Elektromagnetischen


Verträglichkeit

Notices 125
Dieses Produkt entspricht den Schutzanforderungen der EU-Richtlinie
2004/108/EG zur Angleichung der Rechtsvorschriften über die
elektromagnetische Verträglichkeit in den EU-Mitgliedsstaaten und hält die
Grenzwerte der EN 55022 Klasse A ein.

Um dieses sicherzustellen, sind die Geräte wie in den Handbüchern


beschrieben zu installieren und zu betreiben. Des Weiteren dürfen auch nur
von der IBM empfohlene Kabel angeschlossen werden. IBM übernimmt keine
Verantwortung für die Einhaltung der Schutzanforderungen, wenn das
Produkt ohne Zustimmung der IBM verändert bzw. wenn
Erweiterungskomponenten von Fremdherstellern ohne Empfehlung der IBM
gesteckt/eingebaut werden.

EN 55022 Klasse A Geräte müssen mit folgendem Warnhinweis versehen


werden:
“Warnung: Dieses ist eine Einrichtung der Klasse A. Diese Einrichtung kann
im Wohnbereich Funk-Störungen verursachen; in diesem Fall kann vom
Betreiber verlangt werden, angemessene Maßnahmen zu ergreifen und dafür
aufzukommen.“

Deutschland: Einhaltung des Gesetzes über die elektromagnetische


Verträglichkeit von Geräten

Dieses Produkt entspricht dem “Gesetz über die elektromagnetische


Verträglichkeit von Geräten (EMVG)“. Dies ist die Umsetzung der
EU-Richtlinie 2004/108/EG in der Bundesrepublik Deutschland.

Zulassungsbescheinigung laut dem Deutschen Gesetz über die


elektromagnetische Verträglichkeit von Geräten (EMVG) (bzw. der EMC EG
Richtlinie 2004/108/EG) für Geräte der Klasse A

Dieses Gerät ist berechtigt, in Übereinstimmung mit dem Deutschen EMVG


das EG-Konformitätszeichen - CE - zu führen. Verantwortlich für die
Konformitätserklärung des EMVG ist die IBM Deutschland GmbH, 70548
Stuttgart.

Generelle Informationen:

Das Gerät erfüllt die Schutzanforderungen nach EN 55024 und EN 55022


Klasse A.

126 IBM System Storage: N6000 Series Hardware and Service Guide
People’s Republic of China Class A Electronic Emission Statement

Japan VCCI Class A ITE Electronic Emission Statement

Taiwan Class A warning statement

Korea Class A Electronic Emission Statement

Power cords
For your safety, IBM provides a power cord with a grounded attachment plug
to use with this IBM product. To avoid electrical shock, always use the power
cord and plug with a properly grounded outlet.

Notices 127
IBM power cords used in the United States and Canada are listed by
Underwriter’s Laboratories (UL) and certified by the Canadian Standards
Association (CSA).

For units intended to be operated at 115 volts: Use a UL-listed and


CSA-certified cord set consisting of a minimum 18 AWG, Type SVT or SJT,
three-conductor cord, a maximum of 15 feet in length and a parallel blade,
grounding-type attachment plug rated 15 amperes, 125 volts.

For units intended to be operated at 230 volts (U.S. use): Use a UL-listed and
CSA-certified cord set consisting of a minimum 18 AWG, Type SVT or SJT,
three-conductor cord, a maximum of 15 feet in length and a tandem blade,
grounding-type attachment plug rated 15 amperes, 250 volts.

For units intended to be operated at 230 volts (outside the U.S.): Use a cord
set with a grounding-type attachment plug. The cord set should have the
appropriate safety approvals for the country in which the equipment will be
installed.

IBM power cords for a specific country or region are usually available only in
that country or region.

128 IBM System Storage: N6000 Series Hardware and Service Guide
Index
conventions
A command xxvii
about this document xxiii
formatting xxvii
how to send your comments xxix
keyboard xxviii
AC power line sizes 91
AC power supplies, connecting N6000 series system
to 15
D
danger notices iii
active/active or high availability configuration definition iii
tasks 25 example iii
adapter, DB-9 to RJ-45 console 22 Data ONTAP 7.1 filer
adapters documentation 118
cabling 16 Data ONTAP 7.1 gateway systems library 119
optional cards Data ONTAP 7.2 and 7.3 gateway systems library 118
N6000 series system 97 Data ONTAP 7.2 filer
ASCII terminal console connection 21, 22 documentation 117
attention notice Data ONTAP 7.3 filer
definition vii documentation 116
example vii DB-9 to RJ-45
console adapter 22
B pin connections 22
booting your system 25
device carrier xxvii
C DIMMs
replacing 51
caution notices vi
definition vi documentation
clearance dimensions 3 Data ONTAP 7.1 filer 118
clustered configuration tasks 25 Data ONTAP 7.1 gateway 119
comments Data ONTAP 7.2 and 7.3 gateway 118
sending xxix Data ONTAP 7.2 filer 117
CompactFlash card Data ONTAP 7.3 filer 116
replacing 78 EXN1000, EXN2000, EXN3000 and EXN4000 storage
configuring for an active/active or high availability expansion units 116
configuration 25 IBM System Storage N series 113
configuring the Fibre Channel port 27 improvement xxix
connections N series-related documents 120
ASCII terminal console 21, 22 N3300 and N3600 storage system 115
console 22 N3700 storage system 116
filer to storage expansion unit 16 N5000 series systems 115
gateway to external storage 20 N6000 series systems 115
N6000 series system 13 N7000 series systems 115
storage 15 dual-path Fibre Channel cabling 16
third-party devices 21
to a power source 15
E
e0M interface 14
to an IP network 13
electrical requirements
using a Fibre Channel expansion adapter 16
N6040 4, 5
using an optional adapter card 16
N6040 with PAM cards 5, 6
controller module
N6060 6
replacing 38
N6060 with PAM cards 7
shutting down 34
N6070 8
N6070 with PAM cards 9

© Copyright IBM Corp. 2008, 2009 129


Electronic emission notices N series system
Taiwanese Class A warning statement 127 setup worksheet 25
environmental requirements 3 N3300 and N3600 storage system library 115
EXN1000, EXN2000, EXN3000 and EXN4000 storage N3700 storage system library 116
expansion units library 116 N5000 series systems library 115
N6000 series systems library 115
F N7000 series systems library 115
fan module notes, important 123
replacing 48 notices
fiber-optic cable attention vii
handling 13 caution vi
Fibre Channel expansion adapters danger iii
cabling 16 safety iii
Fibre Channel port configuring 27 types iii
filer, defined xxvi NVRAM battery
fire suppression xi replacing 62
FRU/CRU list
feature codes 93 O
optical port terminators vii
G optional adapter cards
gateway cabling 16
connecting to external storage 20 descriptions
gateway, defined xxvi N6000 series system 97

H P
handling static-sensitive devices 2 patents 121
hardware service and support xxv PCIe card and riser
hardware specifications 3 replacing 55
high availability configuration tasks 25 physical characteristics 3
how to send your comments xxix power
separate circuit breakers for 15
I power cords 127
IBM safety information 120 feature codes 93
initiator mode 28 power line sizes 91
installation power supplies 15
preparation for 1 power supply
procedures for 11 replacing 60
rack viii
rules 10 R
tools 1 rack installation viii
intellectual property 121 safety viii
IP network 13 rack relocation
safety x
L rack safety viii
labels, safety vi reader feedback
laser safety vii sending xxix
license, patents 121 real-time Clock (RTC) battery
licensing replacing 67
address 121 Remote LAN Module
Web address 121 replacing 71
replacement
N N6000 series system devices 33
N series restrictions, usage vii
related documents 120 RLM
N series documentation 113 configuring and using 29

130 IBM System Storage: N6000 Series Hardware and Service Guide
S
safety
labels iii
laser vii
notices iii
rack viii
rack installation viii
rack relocation x
safety labels vi
shipment package contents 9
static-sensitive devices, handling 2
system
closing 37
opening 35
system setup worksheet 25

T
tasks by document title 113
terminators
optical ports vii
terminology xxvi
third-party devices
rules for connecting 21
trademarks 122

U
usage restrictions vii

W
web sites, related xxv
worksheets
system setup 25

Index 131
132 IBM System Storage: N6000 Series Hardware and Service Guide


Printed in USA

GC53-1142-03