Está en la página 1de 8

9/5/10

Sociology  of  Gender  


Sociology  219  
Gender  &  Women’s  Studies  216  
 
 “That  is  what  learning  is.  You  suddenly  understand  something  you've  understood  all  your  life,    
but  in  a  new  way.”  –  Doris  Lessing  
 
Professor  Wendy  Christensen  
Office:  402  Adams  Hall  
Contact:  wchriste@bowdoin.edu  or  725-­‐3268  
Office  hours:  Tuesdays  11-­‐12pm,  Thursdays  3-­‐5pm,  and  by  appointment  
 
Our  ideas  about  gender  –  about  women,  men,  masculinity,  femininity  –  organize  our  social  life  in  
important  ways  that  we  often  do  not  even  notice.  This  course  critically  examines  the  ways  gender  
informs  the  social  world  in  which  we  live  and  how  beliefs  about  gender  create  and  enforce  a  system  
of  gender  difference  and  inequality.  We  will  examine  how  gender  is  involved  in  and  related  to  
differences  and  inequalities  in  social  roles,  gender  identity,  sexual  orientation,  and  social  
constructions  of  knowledge.  Particular  attention  will  be  paid  to  exposing  the  gendered  workings  of  
institutions  such  as  the  family  and  the  workplace,  the  link  between  gender  and  sexuality,  and  how  
race  and  class  inform  our  ideas  about  gender.  
The  goals  for  this  course  are  to:  
• Reveal  the  “common-­‐sense”  world  of  gender  around  us;    
• Consider  how  we  learn  to  “do”  gender  as  girls  and  boys  (and  women  and  men);    
• Provide  information  about  the  current  situation  of  gender  relations  in  the  US;    
• Expose  the  workings  of  the  institutions  that  shape  our  gendered  lives;  and    
• Challenge  common  assumptions  about  women,  men  and  gender  relations.  
Prerequisite:  You  must  have  completed  SOC101  or  ANTH101  to  take  this  course.    
 
Course  Readings:  
The  following  books  are  available  for  purchase  at  the  Bowdoin  Bookstore:  
• Dworkin,  S.  L.  (2009).  Body  Panic:  Gender,  Health,  and  the  Selling  of  Fitness  New  York:  NYU  
Press.  
• Edin,  K.,  &  Kefalas,  M.  (2005).  Promises  I  Can  Keep:  Why  Poor  Women  Put  Motherhood  Before  
Marriage.  Berkeley:  University  of  California  Press.  
• Hochschild,  A.  R.,  &  Machung,  A.  (2003).  The  Second  Shift.  New  York:  Penguin  Books.  
• Pascoe,  C.  J.  (2007).  Dude,  You're  a  Fag:  Masculinity  and  Sexuality  in  High  School.  Berkeley:  
University  of  California  Press.  
• Salzinger,  L.  (2003).  Genders  in  Production:  Making  Workers  in  Mexico's  Global  Factories.  
Berkeley:  University  of  California  Press.  
Additional  required  readings  are  available  on  the  library  reserves  website.  
Readings  must  be  completed  before  class  on  the  day  that  they  are  due.  If  a  reading  is  listed  under  
Monday,  October  17  then  it  must  be  completed  before  class  on  October  17.  You  will  need  to  

Page 1 of 8  
9/5/10

complete  the  readings  the  day  before  class  in  order  to  prepare  discussion  questions  (see  the  
Assignments  section  for  more  information).    
I  reserve  the  right  to  add  (and  to  omit)  readings  during  the  course  of  the  semester.  I  will  always  let  
you  know  the  week  before  if  I  am  making  any  changes  to  the  readings.  
How  to  get  in  touch  with  me:  Email  is  a  great  way  to  reach  me  with  any  questions.  I  promise  to  
respond  to  your  email  within  24  hours.  You  are  encouraged  to  stop  by  office  hours  at  least  once  
during  the  semester,  or  make  an  appointment  to  see  me  at  another  time.  If  my  office  door  is  open  at  
any  other  time,  you’re  welcome  to  stop  by.  
 
COURSE  POLICIES  
Assignments:  
(1)  Weekly  Questions:  Beginning  on  week  2  of  the  semester,  each  student  is  expected  to  
submit  two  “reactive”  discussion  questions  derived  from  the  readings  assigned  for  each  day.  
These  questions  are  to  be  posted  to  Blackboard  no  later  than  9pm  the  night  before  class  
meets.  The  first  question  should  target  a  point(s)  that  you  believe  constitutes  a  real  strength  
of  the  material.  The  second  question  should  deal  with  a  criticism  of  the  material,  or  a  
question  you  have  about  the  material.  These  questions  are  designed  to  focus  your  thinking  
and  facilitate  class  discussion.  The  questions  should  be  original  and  not  the  result  of  a  group  
effort.  
(2)  Six  Scrapbook  Analysis  Papers:  (3  pages  each)  These  short  papers  on  different  topics  
are  designed  to  give  you  an  opportunity  to  apply  what  you  have  learned  in  the  course  
readings  and  in  class  to  observations  you  make  outside  of  class.  See  the  Scrapbook  
Assignment  for  all  details  and  due  dates.  Your  final  completed  scrapbook  is  due  with  your  
Final  Exam  on  12/16  by  2pm.  
(3)  Take  Home  Final  Exam:  Instead  of  an  in-­‐class  exam,  a  final  essay  exam  will  be  
distributed  on  the  last  day  of  class.  The  completed  exam  is  due  12/16  by  2:00pm  in  my  
department  mailbox.  This  is  an  open  book  exam  and  you  may  use  class  notes  and  material  
to  complete  it.  You  will  need  to  properly  cite  any  sources  you  use  while  answering  exam  
questions.  You  are  responsible  for  your  own  work  on  the  exam.  More  details  to  follow.  
Grading  Criteria:  
A   Shows  mastery  of  the  course  material  and  demonstrates  exceptional  critical  skills  
and  originality.  
B   Demonstrates  a  thorough  and  above  average  understanding  of  the  material.  
C   Demonstrates  a  thorough  and  satisfactory  understanding  of  the  material.  
D   Demonstrates  a  marginally  satisfactory  understanding  of  the  basic  material.  
F     Does  not  demonstrate  a  satisfactory  understanding  of  the  basic  material.  
Final  Grades:  
20%   Daily  Discussion  Questions  (1  point  per  class  meeting)  
20%     Attendance  and  Participation  (including  examples  brought  to  class)  
35%     Six  Scrapbook  Analysis  Papers  
25%     Final  Exam  
Written  work:    
• All  assignments  must  be  double-­‐spaced,  with  1  inch  margins,  and  12  point  font.    

Page 2 of 8  
9/5/10

• Acceptable  fonts  are  Times,  Times  New  Roman,  Arial,  Georgia,  or  Helvetica.    
• Pages  must  be  numbered.  
• On  the  first  page  include  your  full  name,  date,  and  the  name  of  the  assignment.  It  is  always  a  
good  idea  to  put  your  name  on  each  subsequent  page  someplace  in  case  a  page  is  separated  
from  the  others.    
• Double-­‐sided  printing  is  welcomed.  Don’t  bother  with  a  title  page  as  they  waste  paper.    
Late  and  missed  assignments:  Work  must  be  handed  in,  in  class,  on  the  day  it  is  due.  If  you  cannot  
make  class  that  day,  you  must  email  me  the  assignment  before  the  class  begins.  Late  assignments  
will  only  be  accepted  with  prior  consent  (given  on  a  case-­‐by-­‐case  basis),  and  will  lose  a  letter  grade  
for  each  day  they  are  late.  
Attendance:  Attendance  is  required.  You  may  miss  two  classes  without  penalty,  assuming  that  you  
turn  in  the  day’s  assignment  prior  to  class.  Each  absence  beyond  the  second  will  result  in  your  
grade  being  lowered.  If  you  must  miss  a  class,  it  is  your  responsibility  to  get  the  notes  and  
assignments  from  another  student.    
If  You  Need  Help:  Do  not  hesitate  to  contact  me  if  you  need  assistance.  The  key  to  success  is  to  
head  off  problems  before  they  turn  into  emergencies.  The  sooner  you  get  in  touch  with  me  about  an  
issue,  the  sooner  we  can  work  to  solve  it  together.  
Special  accommodations:  If  you  require  special  accommodations  to  participate  in,  or  to  complete  
the  work  in  this  course,  please  let  me  know  within  the  first  two  weeks  of  class  so  that  we  can  make  
the  necessary  arrangements.    
Academic  honesty:  I  fully  expect  you  to  follow  the  Bowdoin  College  Academic  Honor  Code.  
Anytime  you  are  required  to  turn  in  individual  work  I  expect  that  what  you  turn  in  will  be  written  
solely  by  you  and  will  be  unique  from  that  of  your  classmates.  Students  who  attempt  to  pass  off  the  
work  of  others  as  their  own  or  assist  others  in  doing  so  will  receive  zero  points  for  the  work  and  
will  be  subjected  to  disciplinary  action  as  determined  by  the  college.  Please  ask  if  you  have  any  
questions  about  what  is  and  is  not  acceptable.  CBB  has  put  together  a  guide  about  avoiding  
academic  misconduct  at  http://abacus.bates.edu/cbb/.  Additionally,  the  Bowdoin  Library  has  an  
online  guide  for  citing  sources  properly  at  http://library.bowdoin.edu/1st/sources.shtml.    
 
COURSE  SCHEDULE  
 
  WEEK  1:    
Monday  9/6  
  Welcome  and  Course  Introductions  
Wednesday  9/8  
  Read:    
• Gould,  L.  (1972).  X:  A  fabulous  child’s  story.  In  K.  Ackley  (Ed.),  Perspective  on  
contemporary  issues,  3rd  Ed.  (pp.  391-­‐399).  United  States  of  America:  Heinle.  
  WEEK  2:  The  System  of  Gender    
Monday  9/13  
Read:    
• Fausto-­‐Sterling,  A.  (2000).  “Dueling  Dualisms”  in  Sexing  the  Body:  Gender  Politics  
and  the  Construction  of  Sexuality.  New  York,  NY:  Basic  Books.  pp  1-­‐29.    

Page 3 of 8  
9/5/10

• Steinem,  G.  (2004)  “If  Men  Could  Menstruate”  in  Kimmel,  M.  S.,  &  Messner,  M.  A.  
(Eds).  Men's  Lives  (6th  ed.).  Boston:  Allyn  and  Bacon.  pp  347-­‐349.  
• Lorber,  J.  (1994).  “’Night  to  his  Day:’  The  Social  Construction  of  Gender”  in  
Paradoxes  of  Gender.  New  Haven:  Yale  University  Press.  pp  13-­‐36.  
Wednesday  9/15  
    Read:  
• West,  C.,  &  Zimmerman,  D.  H.  (1987).  Doing  Gender.  Gender  and  Society,  1(2).    
 
  WEEK  3:  Enacting  Gender  Identity  
Monday  9/20  
    Read:  
• Kimmel,  M.  S.  (2003)  “Masculinity  as  homophobia:  Fear,  Shame  and  Silence  in  
the  Construction  of  Gender  Identity”  Kimmel,  M.  S.,  &  Ferber,  A.  L.  (Eds).  
Privilege:  A  reader.  Boulder,  Colo.:  Westview  Press.  pp.  107-­‐132.  
• Dude  You’re  A  Fag:  Chapters  1-­‐4    
    Assignment:  Scrapbook  Entry  #1  Due  
Wednesday  9/22  
Read:  
• Dude  You’re  A  Fag:  Chapters  4,  5,  Conclusion  and  Appendix    
 
  WEEK  4:  Gender  in  U.S.  Media  
Monday  9/27  
  Read:  
• Strate,  L.  (2004)  “Beer  Commercials:  A  manual  for  masculinity”  in  Kimmel,  M.  S.,  
&  Messner  (Eds.),  M.  A.  Men's  Lives  (6th  ed.).  Boston:  Allyn  and  Bacon.  pp.  533-­‐
543.  
• Bordo,  S.  (1999).  “Never  Just  Pictures”  in  Twilight  Zones:  The  Hidden  Life  of  
Cultural  Images  from  Plato  to  O.J.  Berkeley,  CA:  University  of  California  Press.  
Wednesday  9/29  
  Read:  
• Katz,  J.  (2002)  8  Reasons  Why  Eminem’s  Popularity  is  a  Disaster  for  Women  
• Weitzer,  R.,  &  Kubrin,  C.  E.  (2009).  Misogyny  in  Rap  Music:  A  Content  Analysis  of  
Prevalence  and  Meanings.  Men  and  Masculinities,  12(1),  3-­‐29.  
Assignment:  Bring  song  lyric  example  to  class.  
 
  WEEK  5:  Gender  and  Bodies  
Monday  10/4  
Read:  
• Fausto-­‐Sterling,  A.  (2004).  “How  to  Build  a  Man”  in  Kimmel,  M.  S.,  &  Messner,  M.  
A.  (Eds.)  Men's  Lives  (6th  ed.).  Boston:  Allyn  and  Bacon.  pp.  342-­‐346.  
• Body  Panic:  Chapters  1-­‐3  

Page 4 of 8  
9/5/10

Assignment:  Bring  gendered  advertisement  to  class  


Wednesday  10/6  
  Read:  
• Martin,  K.  A.  (2003).  Giving  Birth  Like  A  Girl.  Gender  and  Society,  17(1).  
• Body  Panic:  Chapters  4-­‐6  
Assignment:  Scrapbook  Entry  #2  Due  
 
  WEEK  6:  Learning  Gender  
Wednesday  10/13  
Read:  
• Thorne,  B.  (1999).  “Boys  and  Girls  Together  But  Mostly  Apart”  and  “Crossing  the  
Gender  Divide”  Gender  Play:  Girls  and  Boys  in  School  (6th  ed.).  New  Brunswick:  
Rutgers  University  Press.  
• Williams,  S.  L.  (2002).  Trying  on  Gender,  Gender  Regimes,  and  the  Process  of  
Becoming  Women.  Gender  and  Society,  16(1):  29-­‐52.  
• Lucal,  B.  (1999).  What  it  Means  to  Be  Gendered  Me:  Life  on  the  Boundaries  of  a  
Dichotomous  Gender  System.  Gender  &  Society,  13(6),  781-­‐797.  
 
  WEEK  7:  Intersectionality:    
Monday  10/18  
  Read:  
• West,  C.,  &  Fenstermaker,  S.  (1995).  Doing  Difference.  Gender  &  Society,  9(1)  
• Promises  I  Can  Keep:  Introduction  and  Chapters  1-­‐3  
Assignment:  Scrapbook  Entry  #3  Due  
Wednesday  10/20  
Read:  
• Promises  I  Can  Keep:  Chapters  4-­‐6  and  Conclusion  (Appendices  are  optional)  
 
  WEEK  8:  Gender  &  Sexuality  
Monday  10/25  
    Read:  
• Rich,  A.  (1980).  Compulsory  Heterosexuality  and  Lesbian  Existence.  Signs,  5(4),  
631-­‐660.  
• Myers,  K.  A.  (2010).  Elementary  School  Girls  and  Heteronormativity:  The  Girl  
Project.  Gender  &  Society,  24(2),  167-­‐188.  
• Rochlin,  M.  (2003).  “The  Heterosexual  Questionnaire”  in  Kimmel,  M.  S.,  &  Ferber,  
A.  L.  (Eds.)  Privilege:  A  reader.  Boulder,  Colo.:  Westview  Press.  pp.  73-­‐74.  
Wednesday  10/27  
    Read:  

Page 5 of 8  
9/5/10

• Taylor,  V.  and  Rupp,  L.  (2008)  “Learning  from  Drag  Queens”  In  J.  Goodwin  &  J.  M.  
Jasper  (Eds.),  The  Contexts  Reader  (2008)  New  York:  W.W.  Norton.  pp.  247-­‐253.  
• Heath,  M.  (2008).  State  of  our  Unions:  Marriage  Promotion  and  the  Contested  
Power  of  Heterosexuality.  Gender  &  Society,  23(1),  27-­‐48.  
Assignment:  Scrapbook  Entry  #4  Due  
 
  WEEK  9:  Families  and  Household  Labor  
  Monday  11/1  
    Read:  
• Coontz,  S.  (1995).  The  American  family  and  the  nostalgia  trap.  Phi  Delta  Kappan,  
76(7).  
• Cherlin,  A.  J.  (2011).  “American  Marriage  in  the  Early  Twenty-­‐First  Century”  in  
Kimmel,  M.  S.  (Ed.).  The  Gendered  Society  Reader  (4th  ed.).  New  York,  NY:  Oxford  
University  Press.  pp.  239-­‐256  
• The  Second  Shift:  Introduction  and  Chapters  1-­‐5  
Assignment:  Bring  an  image  of  a  family  to  class.    
Wednesday  11/3  
Read:  
• The  Second  Shift:  Chapters  6-­‐17  
 
  WEEK  10:  Gender  and  Work    
Monday  11/8  
Read:    
• Williams,  C.  L.  (1992).  The  Glass  Escalator:  Hidden  Advantages  for  Men  in  the  
"Female"  Professions.  Social  Problems,  39(3),  253-­‐267.  
• Erickson,  K.,  &  Pierce,  J.  L.  (2005).  Farewell  to  the  Organization  Man:  The  
feminization  of  loyalty  in  high-­‐end  and  low-­‐end  service  jobs.  Ethnography,  6(3),  
283-­‐313.  
Assignment:  Scrapbook  Entry  #5  Due  
 
Wednesday  11/10  
    Read:  
• Connell,  C.  (2010).  Doing,  Undoing,  or  Redoing  Gender?:  Learning  from  the  
Workplace  Experiences  of  Transpeople.  Gender  &  Society,  24(1),  31-­‐55.  
• Jacobs,  J.  (2008).  Detours  on  the  Road  to  Equality:  Women,  Work,  and  Higher  
Education.  In  J.  Goodwin  &  J.  M.  Jasper  (Eds.),  The  Contexts  Reader.  New  York:  
W.W.  Norton.  pp.  239-­‐246  
 
  WEEK  11:  International  Perspectives:    
Monday  11/15  
  Read:  

Page 6 of 8  
9/5/10

• Brennan,  D.  (2004).  “’Selling  Sex  for  Visas:’  Sex  Tourism  as  a  Stepping-­‐Stone  to  
International  Migration  in  Global  Women”  in  Ehrenreich,  B.,  &  Hochschild,  A.  R.  
(Eds.).  Global  Woman:  Nannies,  Maids,  and  Sex  Workers  in  the  New  Economy.  New  
York,  NY:  Holt.  pp.  154-­‐168.  
• Gamburd,  M.  (2004).  “Breadwinner  No  More”  in  Ehrenreich,  B.,  &  Hochschild,  A.  
R.  (Eds.).  Global  Woman:  Nannies,  Maids,  and  Sex  Workers  in  the  New  Economy.  
New  York,  NY:  Holt.  pp.  190-­‐206.  
• Genders  in  Production:  Chapters  1-­‐3  
 
Wednesday  11/17  
    Read:    
• Genders  in  Production:  Chapters  4-­‐8  
Assignment:  Scrapbook  Entry  #6  Due  
 
  WEEK  12:  International  Perspectives  continued.    
Monday  11/22  
Read:  
• Kristof,  N.  D.,  &  Wudunn,  S.  (2009).  The  Women’s  Crusade.  New  York  Times  
Magazine,  August  17.  
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/08/23/magazine/23Women-­‐t.html?_r=2  
• Ferree,  Myra  Marx.  (2006).  “Globalization  and  Feminism:  Opportunities  and  
Obstacles  for  Activism  in  the  Global  Arena.”  in  Ferree,  M.  M.,  &  Tripp,  A.  M.  
(Eds.).  Global  Feminism:  Transnational  women’s  activism,  organizing,  and  human  
rights.  New  York:  New  York  University  Press.  
 
  WEEK  13:  Gender  and  Violence  
Monday  11/29    
Read:    
• Yancey  Martin,  P.  (1989).  Fraternities  and  Rape  on  Campus.  Gender  and  Society,  
3(4).  
• Blee,  K.  (2004).  “Women  and  Organized  Racism”  in  Ferber,  A.  L.  (Ed.).  Home-­
grown  Hate:  Gender  and  Organized  Racism.  New  York:  Routledge.  pp.  46-­‐71.  
Wednesday  12/1  
  Read:  
• Cohn,  C.  (1993).  Wars,  Wimps,  and  Women:  Talking  Gender  and  Thinking  War.  
In  M.  Cooke  &  A.  Woollacott  (Eds.),  Gendering  War  Talk.  Princeton,  NJ:  Princeton  
University  Press.  pp.  227-­‐246.  
• Kimmel,  M.S.  (2002)  “Gender,  Class  and  Terrorism,”  Chronicle  of  Higher  
Education:  The  Chronicle  Review,  February  9.  
http://chronicle.com/article/Gender-­‐ClassTerrorism/6096  
Assignment:  Scrapbook  Entry  #7  Due  
 

Page 7 of 8  
9/5/10

  WEEK  14:  Transforming  Gender?    


Monday  12/6    
  Read:  
• Lorber,  J.  (2004).  “A  World  Without  Gender”  and  “Epilogue.”  in  Breaking  the  
Bowls:  Degendering  and  feminist  change.  New  York:  W.W.  Norton.  pp.  151-­‐176  
• Risman,  B.  (2009).  From  Doing  To  Undoing:  Gender  as  We  Know  It  by  Barbara  J.  
Risman  Gender  &  Society  23:  pp.  81-­‐84  
Wednesday  12/8  
  Read:  
• Collins,  P.  H.  (2003).  “Toward  a  New  Vision:  Race,  Class,  and  Gender  as  
Categories  of  Analysis  and  Connection.”  In  Kimmel,  M.  S.,  &  Ferber,  A.  L.  (Eds.).  
Privilege:  A  reader.  Boulder,  Colo.:  Westview  Press.  pp.  233-­‐250    
• Ferber,  A.  (2003).  “Dismantling  Privilege  and  Becoming  an  Activist”  In  Kimmel,  
M.  S.,  &  Ferber,  A.  L.  (Eds.).  Privilege:  A  reader.  Boulder,  Colo.:  Westview  Press.  
pp.  251-­‐256.  
Final  Exam  handed  out  in  class.    
 
  December  16  at  2pm:  Final  Exam  Due  with  Final  Scrapbook.  

Page 8 of 8