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eile males ea ENGLISH eC Rete ee eyed oa Cc Pm tee mL) Contents ‘Thanks and acknowledgements iv Tothe student 1 Test1 Papert Reading 4 Paper2 Weiing 14 Paper 3 UsoofEngish 16 Paper 4 storing 24 Paper Speaking 29 Test2 Papert Reading 30 Paper® Weling 40 Paper Use of Engish 42 Paper4 Listening 50 Paper Speaking 55 Test3 Paper Reading 56 Paper2 Weng 66 Paper Use ofEnglsh 68 Paper Listening 76 Paper Speaking St Test4 Paper Reading 82 Paper2 Welling 92 Paper Use of English 94 Paper 4 Listening 102 Paper Speaking 107, Test Key anairansenpt 108 Test2 — Koyand transcript 120 Test Key andtranscript 132 Test4 Key andianseript 144 Visual mater Isfor Paper § colour section Sample answer sheets 156 Test 1 PAPER1 READING (1 hour 30 minutes) Part1 For questions 1-18, ead the thee texts below and decide which answer (A, B,C oD) best fs ach gap Mark your answers on the separate answer sheet. Einstel ‘Stop anyone in the street and ask them to name a scientist, and the chances are they'l think of Albert Einstein, His face is used to advertise products with intellectual (1)... , from computers to ‘encyctopaedias. Most people know lta of wiat Einstein did, except that he developed some mysterious theories Under the heading relativity’, which are,famaus for being incomprehensible, and for coming up with bizarre precictions that (2)... counter to everyday experience, Einstein was part of a gigantic (8)... forward in scientific thinking, an intellectual revolution that (4)... the birth of twentieth century science. Physicists and mathematicians were trying to create @ new, more rational description of the universe by studying relationships between matter and the forces of nature, Einstein (6) ...his profound and far-reaching contributions simply by looking again al the nature of the fundamentals: time, space, matter and energy. Previous descriptions had depended on Isaac Nowion’s view of a universe in which stars and planets moved in an absoluto framework of space ‘and time. Einstein (6) ... this notion, saying that time and space were not absolute but relative. 1A suppositions B connotations © assumptions D inferences 2 A drive B fall © flow Drun 3A flight B leap © dive D vault 4 A ushered B notified © heralded D dectared 5 A gave B laid © offered D made 6 A overthrew B overtook © ovenvineimed overran Papert Reading Young Readers Throughout our childhoods, Lycia and | distrusted any prize-winning book because we knew itwould bbe worthy; and for ‘worthy’, (7) ...boring’, we thought, While our mother had been inclined to abhor our philistinism in tones of despising innuendo, our father would cheerfully dish us out tenpences, chapter by chapter, as inducements to make us (8) ‘our eyes over the occasional improving volume. Or he would (9) .... the odd superior book in ‘amongst our Christmas and birthday presents, labelled in bold marker pon, ‘This Book is NOT Literature’. Though we (10) .... most of his offerings as ‘boys’ books’, he did, in this way, (14) ...us to some shorter works of decent fiction and, just once, to a well-known (12) ... of verse. 7 A interpret B read © consider D dotine 8 A chuck B throw © hurt D cast 9A link B weave C slip D fold 10 A dismissed B disqualified © discredited D disclaimed 11 A reveal B expose © unvoil D disclose 12 A album B periodical © manual D anthology Language “The origin of human language is truly secret and marvellous’ wrote Jacob Grimm in 1851, The ‘marvellous secret has long proved a launch pad for strange ideas. "Primitive man was likely to make sounds like “meu” when (13) ... danger; claimed Charles Caller in 1928, “Mou” has a plaintive sound. The human who wandered over @ hostile land inhabited by awesome beasts (14) desperate noises, and languages have preserved some echo of his lamentation such as malaria meaning ‘fever of the Latin mors meaning “death”: Faced with such weird speculations, many avoided the tapi regarding its @ playground for cranks, but recently, language origin and evolution have become Key research areas. Language probably developed in East Arica, around 100,000 years ago. (15) ..... speech was used for fendly interaction, and was an important tool in power (16)... nformation-swapping was probably not an important original (17)... ~ contrary to the views of philosopher John Locke, who spoke of language as a ‘great conduit for (18)... knowledge. 13 A feeling B sensing © suffering D fighting 14 A screeched B cried © called D uttered 15 A Inconclusion _B Asaconsequence © In the main D Despite this 16 A struggles B wars © strikes D contests 17 A argument B service © tole D thought 18 A dispatching B conveying © teaching D passing Test 1 Part 2 You are going to read four extracts which are all concerned in some way with animals, For questions 19-26, choose the answer (A, B, C or D) which you think fis best according tothe tex. Mark your answers on the seps te answer sheet. Vervet monkeys Cheney and Seyfarth describe how one day the dominane male in the group of vervet monkeys they were studying noticed a strange male hanging around in a neighbouring grove of trees. The strangers intentions were quite obvious: he was sizing up the group in order to join it. If he succeeded, ic was more than likely that the incumbent male would be ousted from his position of privilege. With the ‘vervet equivalent ofa stroke of genius, the male hit on the ideal ploy to keep the stranger away from his group. As soon as the strange male descended from the grove of trees to try to cross the open ground that separated his grove from the one in which the group was feeding, he gave an alarm call that vervets use to signal the sighting ofa leopard nearby. The stranger shot back into the safety of his trees. As the day wore on, this was repeated every time the stranger made a ‘move in the groups direction. All was going swimmingly uneilthe male made a tne 12 ‘crucial mistake: after successfully using the ploy several times, he gave the leopard alarm call while himself nonchalantly walking across open ground, 19 The writer describes the dominant male's tactic as ‘A. inspirational B- ambitious. © hazardous. D impudent. 20, What aspect ofthe situation is emphasised by the use of the word ‘swimmingly' (ine 12)? the tension the danger the humour the charm coo> : Paper 1 Reading What Cats Catch Ina recent survey, people in the 173-household English village of Felmersham collected their cats’ prey. Over one year their seventy cats produced over 1,000 prey items. A professor in America saw these figures and worked out that on this, basis the cat population of Britain must be Killing 100 million birds and small mammals each year! The mesmeric effect of big numbers seems to have stultified reason. It is not realistic just to multiply the number of catches of these rural cats by the entire cat population of Britain, Most cats are town cats with small ranges, and catch fewer items of prey than the cats in this survey. The key question should have been this: are the numbers sustainable? The answer would seem to be yes. In winter many householders feed birds, while garden trees and buildings provide resting sites, and in this way the bird population is kept at well above ‘natural” levels. The survey found that the cat is @ significant predator, but not that it is devastating Britain's bird population. 21 What is suggested about the American professor? A B ¢ D He did not use his common sense. He did not understand English village ie. He misunderstood the results of the survey He asked the wrong questions. 22. What point is made about cats in Britain? com> ‘They are no more dangerous than othor predators. ‘They have an effect on the numbers of birds, “They are not increasing in numbers. ‘They do less harm in rural areas. Test 1 A Buffalo's Day ‘The buffaloes are, as it were, the marshman’s lifeline, and they are cherished accordingly. At each dawn the buffaloes, who have been sleeping on the buffalo platform or quite frequently round the fire with their owners, leave, infinitely slowly and wearily, their wallowing progress continually punctuated with despairing groans, for the distant reed beds beyond the open water. For a long, time they stand on the edge of the platform, groaning to each other of the infinite fatigue of the coming day, until at last the leader takes a ponderous pace forward and subsides into the water. ‘Once in the water a deep lassitude once more descends upon the party, as if they had by now forgotten their intention and they may wallow there with low notes of complaint for many minutes. The movements that at length remove them from the immediate vieinity of the house are so gradual as to pass practically unnoticed, but finally they are swimming, so low in the water that their noses seem held above it by a last effort of ebbing strength, their rolling eyes proclaiming that this is the end at last and that they are drowning. So, patient and protesting and more or less submerged, they spend the day among the reeds and the bulrushes, grazing leisurely upon such green shoots as their antediluvian heads may find at eye level 23, Tho writer states that the marshmen ‘A worship the butfaloes. B look after the buffaloes carefully © treat the buttaloas better than they do people. D_ guard the butfaloes closely, 24 What sort of sounds do the buffaloes make? A. melancholy B drowsy © lazy D irate Paper Reading PICASSO, Pablo The soles 1940 Oil on canvas Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art Picasso tended to paint those things that surrounded him, and in the early spring of 11940, he painted several fish still lifes while he was staying in the fishing port of Royan. ‘The ostensible subject of the painting is a fishmonger’s slab with a crab, and a pair of scales containing two or three soles. In spite of their predicament these sea creatures look very much stil alive. It is not very easy to read the painting because Picasso has treated the composition in terms of a flat pattern of overlapping and interlocking transparent planes. This, the thin delicately brushed paint, and the cool, undemonstrative colours give the painting the appearance of an underwater world of slow-moving calm and harmony Rut this is disturbed by what seeme to be an impending battle between the fish, baring their teeth, and the crab, with its open laws. Those sharp, pointed forms are echoed by the scales. Even the chain going round one of the fish takes on a more sinister aspect. There is an undercurrent of menace and barely suppressed violence that gives the picture a symbolic edge. 25. The writer suggests that the idea behind this painting ‘A was not typical of Picasso's work. B is not immediately obvious. © is revealed by Picasso's painting technique, D__ was influenced by contemporary taste. 26 The writer says the creatures in the painting look as if ‘A. they have just been caught. B _Uwy have been trying to escape, © they are still swimming in the sea. D_ they are about to fight each other. Test 1 Part3 ‘You are going to read an extract from the autobiography of the lyricist Tim Rice. Seven paragraphs have been removed from the extract. Choose from the paragraphs A-H the one which fits each gap (27-38), There is one extra paragraph which you do not need to use. ‘Mark your answers on the separate answer sheet, TIM RICE | was ushered into the young man's drawing room, an ‘sis of cultured sanity surounded by what appeared tobe a quite snambotle cluster of rooms in which the less enlorprising members of tho Tamly operated Mouing rom he kitchen to is parlourwas an upgrade ‘om economy to business class ar His name was Androw Lloyd Webber. He had won a scholarship to Magdalen College, Oxlord, to read history, and he hadnine monthstokllbeore going up, ‘uring which time he intended to become Englands answer to the composer Richard Rodgers 28 Consequently, when Andrew suggested a ‘completely new insane ambition for me, ie, 19 become as famous aiycst as Oscar Hammersioin, Thad no qualms about giving ita go. This was partly because within ten minutes of our introduction, he ‘was atthe plano and had played me three tunes he had composed ~ I could tll that he was good. ery ‘004, ‘out on being a sidekick to a chap who was clearly ‘Qoing to lake the musical theats by storm. probabsy By next weak, im Se Beeman na sommes es mu at But in the meantime | fet | had nothing to lose by ‘seeing Andrew again would be fun to go and eae = ‘musical with him, 10 write woes hat apa rset Iytests rather than pop stars. And Andrew was fascinating individual who talked of Good Food Guides and Vietran architecture, besides eupportng Leyton Orient footal team. 1 aad litle to impress him with in return, other than Instant praise for his musie and a bona fide, actualy released, sevensinch single of a song | had writen (both words and music) with which an unknown pop ‘group hac deat the final bio thelr moribund career by recording three months previously, We parted, promising to meet again and to write something ‘ogether. I was stil mae interested in the charts than in the West End theatre, but told mysolf on the bus ‘back to my fat that | had just met somebody of rare ability anc determination, and | would be mad to miss 10 32 ‘The idea was the le ol Dr Thomas Barnard, the nineteenth. century philanthropist who Tounded the orphanages that bear his name. His story was a worthy one indeed, but not one that ‘rly fred my imagination. Tha hero was too squeaky-clean atleast in Andrew's version of his ie, and the enterprise was, unoriginal in both conception and execution, owing far too much to Lonel Bar's t show, Olver, Ez | eet to work with enormous enthusiasm, in particular foc those songs that wore intended fo be funny. ‘Andrew outined the pol, played me the tunes and in [A Andovenf the wo of us fale to challenge the top ‘musical composers sucessfully, then we could try t0 knock the Bealles and Rating Stones off ‘heir porches later, inthe summer. The Everly Brothers had just mado a comeback and would early be in need af some new material By then | would have sursly grown out of pop music as my father had confenty predicted | would by the time | was twenty-one. Tis was worying = ithe was night | only had a few more ‘menins of enjoying it © Ashoconfentycontind to bash out selections from some ofthe many shows he had writen and producedat school, was reminded many ofthe best show albums from my paren LP colton. He needed a new ireist fr the outside wor. 1D Burt seemed tome that plenty of olher blokes around my age (twenty) and not overburdened ‘vith talent Wore making and I wished to be of their number There were even guys fom my home town and fram pubic school in the pop ‘chats ~ surely | had the quaiications, Paper 1 Reading ‘many instances gave mo the tte as wall, most of lahich hed presumably boen thought up by hie ex \wordsmith sehool pal who had already had 2 go. | ‘Skipped a day athe soicors' office, faking ines, to vite my fist batch of theatrical yes. di nct know ‘that day but had cnanged careers | wasnt convinced by the idea for a musical that be had been werking on forthe past yaar, but in 1865 | was rarely convinced about erything, His falont was beyond question and he claimed to have all the contacts, | was soon back In his ‘drawing room. F My own ambitions were just as insane as his; ‘wanted to bea pop sta, or all the healthy reasons "women, money and tame. The dilerence between Androw and mysel was tat my dreams were naver ifs or desth tm though ifs easy $9 say that now. They might have bacome so had | falea G On the other hand, Andrew's comicton of his scores precocious blliance was infectious anc ‘ot totaly unjusifed. What dd | know about musicals? As David Land, later to be my agent or ‘vor a quarter of a century, memorably (and repeated) sald, if theres a demand for one hamburger bar onthe Bock, there i fom for wo. ‘We could be the second hamburger fin 1H Hore was the largest collection of records | had fever seen, the fist stereo record player and tuner | had come across and the astonishing evidence that a teenager existed who had spent menigy on Georgian wine glasses, pictures anc fumiur. ul Test 1 Part 4 You are going to read an extract from a novel. For questions 34-40, choose the answer (A.B, CorD) which you thnk fits best according tothe text. ‘Mark your answers on the separate answer sheet I chose this place to live, believing I woul fn anonymity among those who did ot eare i the Dlaster and glass and palntwork of rented houses Splintered and decayed, who were not reproached Dy gardens gone to see and rotting sofas. in that hope, as in moat things, was proved wrong. People In the shops, who are living thei eal lives, even i ‘you aren‘, soon start to recognise you. Next door’ fulkblown' roses pouring ‘over the fence are persistent reminders thatthe gardens were loved Usually, stay inside trying to forget that there is 1 summer going on out there, but tonight, | am ‘valching the switts ying inthe transparent space between the treetops and rools. Ihave cut back rosemary and lemon balm to make a space for & hair and my arms and hands are tingling vith Stings and scratches, Its a narrow London garden, ‘where plants must grow tall or sprawling survive ‘Been doing a spot of clearing, see. It's my upstairs neighbour, az, leaning out of the window, the author’ of several unpublished Januseripts Iam sometimes. called “upon to lissemble about in-my capacity as. an Engish teacher. Ihave a copy ofthe latest my possession “How's the work going, Jaz?™ “Yor goodness sake In no other profession is one called on to account for ones thoveand ter 3 fay by every Tom, Dick or Hary” Her voicetalls ot, then Falls "Tell you what, Ann, Te got something te drinkin the rg. bing it down, dont want Jaz in the garden, and see now, duly, that It Tooks mangled and bere The nly access (0 this garden is through my fat and Jaz s Banging 09 ‘ny door. "So, youre on holiday nowt you jammy 3o- anééso. She sprain shorts and vest, onthe chai ‘shile drop a cushion onto what had once been a litle lawn. ‘Cheers, she says in her delusion of Youth, T should've gone into teaching ~ a writer ‘oesn'thaveholidays. Sil, you know what they say, those who ean, do, those who ean" teach.” ‘And there are those who can neither write nor teach. So, what plans forthe hols? Al’ my’ postponed. dread’ of the schoot year's ending engulfs me. Empty days. Hot pavements 2 bobbed with melting chewing gum. The walk down to the shops and back. The fie park with Ts ountain, and loneliness siting beside me on the bench, “Aetually, Cm going down to Stonebridge the cats” My heat stars racing as | speak ‘Ok eourse wil Jaz says Tm around, knowing, ts di, that she would be.'So where wll you stay? Some bijou 8 and "No. TI be staying with my oldest fiend, Ruby, at the Rising Sun. We've known each other since we ‘were eight Ieian't true that | shall stay there, But then I spend my life dealing with fition of one sort oranather “Going backto your roots. So what do you think of nso ar? My opus” My'silence on the subject has forced Jaz to ‘enquire about her manuscript, The Cruelty of Red Vins which lies hal eartedlyBalfread on my desk. Trike the title and tell her so. I can see how eed vans could be erul, always bringing preseats and lnaltorder goodies to other houses and delivering turned manuscripts in_jily bags to hers Something prompts me to speak honesty for once, "Let me give you. litle ip dea, T begin “What? She i alfronted “ry writing about nice people fora change, prety poopie who atleast aypire to cing good 9 tach [ess slipsisin, abit more fiction. “Teachers! jaz i a mutinous schoolgel about 10 snatch back a poorly marke essa. “Tinyselt ep ajurnal, Ihave fr years, in whieh | write down something good, however small or tesla, about each day” My words sound as prissy fs my ola fashioned print dress “Keep ajourmall Nce people! Get ait, Ann.” Of, Pve gota ile, Tve got my work, and go out sometimes and fly home again, sitting on the tube ‘wth my nose ta a book ‘Wheat last we go Insde, my calm kitchen gives ‘amoment’s reassurance, then out ofthe blue comes the image of my school geography teacher Miss “Tarvantine, who most have been aboot the age Tm pow, closing an ancient vreptilan eyelid in a ‘monstrous Wink as she tells us, ‘Tve bad my moments’ We nearly died. 36 37 Paper 3 Use of English ‘The new cinema will be built as long as the council agrees to our plans for extra car parking space, subject Tho now cinema will be built to ‘our plans for extra car parking space. ‘My trainer's foreign accent makes it hard to follaw what ha says’ Sue sald, which ‘Sue explained to me that it... ithard to follow what he said, ‘There are very few opportunities for Tim to play the saxophone these days. get Very rarely . the saxophone these days. ‘The guide pointed out to us the magnificent carvings above the windows. drew The guide ..... vse the magnificent carvings above the windows, We ask passengers not to leave their soats until the aireraft doors have been opened. Passengers until the alreraft doors have been opened. 2 35 37 : Paper Reading “The place the narrator chose to live has not met her oxpactations because residents do not look after the area, she did not anticipate the difficulties of her itesiyte. sual patterns of interaction have not stopped. she has not found people who share her tastes. coo> What does Jaz’s response to the question about her work indicate? ‘A She resents being comparod to a man, B Sho resents being asked it continually. © She understands the narrator means no harm by i She knows what reply she is expected to give. From the narrators point of view, Jaz’s ability as a writer rmirors her own, demonstrates litle potential is likely to improve with help. reveals considerable talent. com> What advice does Ann give Jaz? ‘A Sho should be more inventive. B She should analyse her own situation, © She should read more literature. D_ She should describe people she knows. How does Jaz react to what she Is told? ‘She secretly recognises the value of the advice. ‘She is hostile to what she hears. Sho resents being treated like @ schoolgirl ‘She eriticises Ann's choica of profession. vom> How does Ann view her present life? A Sho appreciates its benefits B She enjoys the time available for reading. © She knows she should go out more often D_ She is aware of its true nature. Thinking of Miss Tarrantine makes Ann see an amusing side to herselt. realise how unattractive Miss Tarrantine was. appreciate how citferent her ite is from Miss Terrantine's. recognise how she appears to others. voo> 43 Test 1 PAPER 2 WRITING (2 hours) Part 1 ‘You must answer this question. Write your answer in 800-350 words in an appropriate style, 1 Your tutor has asked you to listen to the radio programme, Dilemmas, as part of your course on social issues and then to write an essay expressing your views on the points raised. Tho programme was described in a media magazine in the folowing way: ‘Tonight's programme is about money. In many parts of the world people have more money than they had thirty years ago, They may have more possessions but they are not always happier. The first guest believes that money can buy happiness, but in the studio audience we may have some people who believe that it is possible to be happy without much money. Write your essay. 4 Paper2 Writing Part 2 ‘Write an answer to one of the questions 2-S in this part. Write your answer in 300-360 words in an appropriate style. 2 The editor of 2 magazine called Leisure Today has asked for letlers from readers who collect things as a hobby. Readers are asked to explain what they collect, describe how they find new ‘objects for their collections and account forthe satisfaction they get from their hobby. You decide to write a letter to the magazine about your collection. ‘Write your letter. Do not write any postal addresses, 3 A publication called The 50 Best Holiday Destinations has invited readers to send in detailed reports of a recent holiday at any one destination, The report should include comments on accommodation, food, leisure facilities, places of interest and nightie. It should also state how strongly and for what reasons the destination is recommended, Write your report, 4 A popular magazine has invited readers to contribute articles to a series called A Day That (Changed My Life. You decide to submit an article. You shauld describe an experience that had {an important effect on you and say what the consequences were. Write your article. 5 Based on your reading of one of these books, write on one of the folowing: (2) John Wyndham: The Day of the Titias You belong to a reading group. Members ofthe group have been asked to write reviews of navels in which they discuss the opinion that ‘Science Fiction may be exciting and entertaining, although itis rarely believable: You decide to write about The Day ofthe Tifa, referring to characters and ‘events in the story. Write your reviow. (©) Graham Greene: Our Man in Havana ‘A popular magazine has asked its readers to submit articles for a series on women in fiction. You decide to contribute by writing about Beatrice, describing her character and discussing how well she deals with the unusual circumstances she becomes involved in Write yourartiee, (6) Anne Tyler: The Accidental Tourist ‘A popular literary magazine has recently featured readers’ opinions about minor characters in ‘Novels, You decide to write a letter to the magazine in which you discuss the part played by Julan Edge in The Accidental Tourist. You should describo his character and his rolationship with Rose and other members ofthe Leary family Write your leer. Do nol write any postal addresses. Test 1 PAPER 3 USE OF ENGLISH (1 hour 30 minutes) Part 1 For questions 1=18, road the text below and think ofthe word which best fits each space, Use only ‘one word in each space. There is an example al the beginning (0). ‘rite your answers in CAPITAL LETTERS on the separate answer sheet. Po C0 Example ‘The ways we have changed tis hard for almost everyone, but especialy the young, to imagine a world (0). Ait, television. We have (1). to expect that all the important news of the day, worldwide, will be there overs the touch of a button. In times (3) 1, only the fterate Knew what was going on Inthe world, and (4). only after 2 long delay. But now itis possible for any of us to watch world events as they occur. (5) has shortened the distance that divides our private tives, ©). the outside word to (7). n extent as television. ‘Tame and (8) television transports Us tothe habitats of rare animals, and we may identity, ©). ‘them. Cancem for damage to the environment extends far and (10)..eese We WOITY about the influence of technology not just in our cities but on us (11 we see (12), 28 part ofthe planet (13)... than in isolation «people. Increasingly, (14) ssc was once the prerogative of scholars ia now accesalble to countlcaa people through the medium of television. (15): this form of popular education can be regarded as superficial, it represents a broadening of knowledge, 16 . Paper 3 Use of English Part2 For questions 16-25, raadthe text below. Use the word given in capitals at the end of some of the lines to form a word that fits in the space in the same line. There isan example at the beginning (0) \ite your anewers in CAPITAL LETTERS on the separate answer sheet. eam: [9] [Ellul MON OOOIOOCO000 Ina.class of your own Like any form of (0).£4¥58420,, the sol-taught course has ts advantages as EDUCATE Wall si (16). DRAW (On the one hana, you are (17) 1 classroom, no timetable and sono AUTONOMY risk of gating a bad (18) record. Youare ableto study at yourownpace; ATTEND lathome, inthe car or wherever yout Walkman takes you, On the other hand, can Yyou realy trust yourselt to be (19). motivated without some form of SUFFICE extemal stimulus? | procrastinated (20)... before beginning my tst Spanish course. made DREAD coffee, did domestic chores that were anything but (21) nnn id@venwatched PRESS ‘daylime tolevision. But, once | got started, | found the course surprisingly ‘engaging, The multimecia formats, colourtul textbooks and (22).. teaching methods all drew me into the excitement of learning a new language, IMAGINE (Of cours, i your amis (23). inthe language, nothing can beat actualy EXPERT {going to the country concerned. Roune!.he-clock (24) nnn iscleatly always IMMERSE {ding to be more etfactive than the odd half hour with a set of tapes. But that odd half hour wl give you an (25). head start when you step out onto tha VALUE streets Test 1 Part 3 For questions 26-31, think of one word only which can be used appropriately in all hree sentences. Here is an example (0) Example: (© Some ofthe tourists are hoping to get compensation for the poor state ofthe hotel, and | think thoy have a very 088. fa 100 “Thoze's na point in trying to wade across the river, the current i It your'e asking me which of the candidates should get the job, I'm afraid | don't have any Views either way. EH ElleOO0O0CO00000d \Wreite only the missing word in CAPITAL LETTERS on the separate answer sheet, 26 When Janet got down to work, every complex problem was suitly toits ‘most important points Everything got worse and worse and eventually he was to begging, ‘The doctor noticed that the sweling had been considerably by the application ofthe new ointment. 27 Boris had a emall part inthe play but a8 a programme soller before the performance. Pippa her efforts as she was determined to succeed. ‘The investment was $0 good that | ‘my money in three months. 28 Winning the competition came as a surprise to Marianne. Robin is determined to keep on collecting football stickers until he has a sot Sir Ralph arrived at the fancy-dress party in full army uniform, eens With badges and medals. 18 29 30 a : Paper 3 Use of English “They heard the news oftheir wrecked holiday plans with. hears For anyone convicted of such a crime, there is a penalty. Simon is convinced he wil be able to carry that rucksack all the way. ‘The most expensive hotels are tiose which sooo tN 888, AAs an actor he had to _-v fel fom the press on a regular bass. Cristina found ithard to tho fact that her marrage was over. When buying a house, itis always a good idea to have some money in for unexpected expenses. ‘These fine textiles were WOVEN By «ss. eseo inindia. ‘The newscaster reported that the situation in the capital was getting out of 9 Tes 1 Part 4 For questions 82-89, complete the second sentence so that it has a similar meaning to the first ‘sontance, using tho word given. Do not change the word given, You must use botwoen three and ‘eight words, including the word given Here is an example (0) Example: © Do you mind if watch you while you paint? objection DO YOU sree fan 7 ‘you wnite you paint? ° have ary objection to my watching \Write only the missing words on the separate answer sheet ‘32 The manufacturing process was delayed by problems no one had foreseen. hela The manufacturing process... problems. 38 The only thing | could do was sit and wait. anything There. or sven it aM Walt 34 Eliza would never have got the job if er brother hadn't advised her when she completed the application form, without Eliza would neverhave got he job ‘completing the application form, 36 37 Paper 3 Use of English ‘The new cinema will be built as long as the council agrees to our plans for extra car parking space, subject Tho now cinema will be built to ‘our plans for extra car parking space. ‘My trainer's foreign accent makes it hard to follaw what ha says’ Sue sald, which ‘Sue explained to me that it... ithard to follow what he said, ‘There are very few opportunities for Tim to play the saxophone these days. get Very rarely . the saxophone these days. ‘The guide pointed out to us the magnificent carvings above the windows. drew The guide ..... vse the magnificent carvings above the windows, We ask passengers not to leave their soats until the aireraft doors have been opened. Passengers until the alreraft doors have been opened. 2 Tes 1 Part 5 For questions 40-44, read the following texts on good and bad smells, For questions 40-43, answer with @ word or short phrase. You do not need to write complete sentences. For question 44, write a ‘summary according tothe instructions given. ‘Write your answers to questions 40-44 on the separate answer sheet. Some yearsagp, abook was published called The Ramu Story of Seed. On the jacket its tha sine it was almost impossible to describe a fragrance in word, the readers had been given the scent theses Figen bl on heck flaps comesponded othe eighteen sents deseibed jut scratch and sniff Pesonally think the eaitont confit of odours is ily to be unbearable 1tsall very wel saying that this sort of thing lb ited to coker ooks, encyclopaedia of il foes ad the ie ut sooner or ate some clas wil coramisiona tony of hose hot dog strdsthat infest London, the stench fom whichis detectable unde mete "etewe that some theatrical an film produces in a misguided attempt to ak reals to the work ‘onoffer have tried pumping the apposite artifical smel's int the auditorium, ascalled for by the story, nly to find the plan going bad awry: In one case, they had fail to devise an mats of removing each smell fom the place befowe the next one was due, so that asthe heroine was ‘unrapping an exquisite Howes, the audience was sil being regaled with the fh that haben ‘consumed in the previousscene 40 Which three words in the second paragraph suggest thatthe writer isnot in favour of 'sratch and sniff books? (ine 4) 41. Explain in your own words what point the writer is making in paragraph @ with his example of ‘lower and ish. (ine 13) 2 : Paper 3 Use of English ‘Smell has the ability o bring alive memories and images more intensely than other senses, but nowadays most scents owe more to science and computers than to the mystique of the inast perfume houses. One new company sees itself as translating ideas and concepts Into smells, Many thousands of people have been interviewed to help the company get a5 close as possible to what is customers want. “The problem is that i dificult to tlk about smells in a way that will mean anything to the man or woman in the street because most people are unable to communicate their feelings about smalls yond whether they lke them or not. In an attempt to get round this inadequacy, the company has developed a computer program which makes visual the scent patterns of individual fragrances. ‘Asa result, the company can messure and recreate any smell inthe world. No smells are ruled out. Some smells like vanila, chocolate and toffee were once considered bizarre perfumes, but have now become mainstream. For most people, though, the latest perfumes emerging from the most fashionable designers may prove a challenge too far they include ‘mud! and ‘charcoal, lines How does the waiter suggest thatthe ‘mystique of the finest perfume houses’ (lines 2 and 3) has been lest? In your own words, explain what, according to the text, the key feature of the new computer program is In a paragraph of 50-70 wort, summarise In your own words as far as pos: le the possible consequences described in both texts of new developments in the creation and use of artificial smells. Write your summary on the separate answer sheet. 23 Test 1 PAPER 4 LISTENING (40 minutes approximately) Part ‘You mill hear four diferent extracts. For questions 1-8, choase the answer (A,B or C) which fs best ‘according to what you hear. There are two questions for each exact, Extract One ‘You heat an expert describing ow te helped to convict @ criminal 11 What is his area of expertise? A. analysis of res in textiles B chemical components of dyes © patterns of waar in cloth 2 How does he make a positive identiication? ‘A. matching individual characteristics BB roferring to computer records © conducting chemical tests Extract Two You hear a radio interview witha toacher who accompanies students on schoo trips. 3 What effect have school trips had on the teacher? ‘A. They have enriched her professionally. B She has become a mora understanding parent. © Thoy have increased her school responsibities, 4. She retains her teacher's role when on trig in oder to A. reassure students, B_ encourage learning © maintain decpline : Paper + Listening Extract Three You hear a playwright being interviewed on the radio about the arts in Britain. 5 What the playwright's view of the governments ole in the arts? ‘A. to support the traditional arts B to further its own aims 5 © toensure an even distribution of resources 6 According to the playwright, the success of big musicals in the 1980s led to ‘A. a serious dectine in the high arts. B the virlual collapse of the radical theatre, 6 © a dialogue between classical and popular music. Extract Four ‘You hear twin sisters from an Asian background discussing a British television programme about twins, 7 What did the fist twin distike about the programme? ‘A. It spent too much time on the scientific aspects. B_Itwas over-complex for tho average viewer. 7 © Itfocused on the negative aspects of boing a twin {8 The second twin believes that people in westem cultures: A. overvalue individuality B expect twins to look identical 8 © assume twins have similar traits. 25 Test 1 Part 2 Yu wi! hear a talk given by a naturalist who Is interested in a type of insect called the damsel, For questions 9-17, complete the sentences with a word or short phrase. ‘There is a lack of information about both the number and @ | of damseities across diferent locations in Britain. ‘The damselfly has boon badly affected by recent changes inthe countryside, for example, 40 | and the fiing-in of pond: ‘An observer can idently @ damselty by the postion of ts 44 | wile itis resting. Because of thei colours, some damsel are described as resembling types of 2 ‘The commonest species of damsel in the speaker's area is called the 13 ‘The most endangered species of damseliy in the speakers area is called the 4 ‘Tha best place to find dameeliles is near water which is. 48 |, and which supports plant ie. Damsolfos are easist to sae in the hours immediately folowing ( 6 ‘The Conservation Trust would ike to make a 77 | of places where damselfies can sil be found, - Paper 4 Listening Part 3 ‘Yu wil hear a radio interview with the artist, Madeline Knowles. For questions 18-22, choose the answer (A, B, C or D) which fits best according to what you hear. 18 What motivates Madeline in her choice of eubject? ‘A. a desire to produce beautiful paintings Ba rejection of the unpleasantness of life © an appreciation of essential qualities I D_ a search for her own inner peace 8 19 What, in Madeline's view, isthe relationship between artists and the world they live in? ‘A They want to reveal the patterns in life B_ They value the supernatural element in at. ‘© They have to provide what people want. l They have difficulty in communicating with people. 9 20. Why did Madeline frst take up painting? ‘A. Ithad been a secret ambition of hers to paint BA change of focus was required in her teaching © Horstudents requested help with their painting, D_ She saw tas a iulling way of expressing hersel 21 How was the rock star influenced by seeing Madeline's painting of « path? ‘A He was inspired to paint his frst picture, Ho commissioned hor to paint a picture of his house. © Ho wanted to introduce a similar foature into his garden, He became intersted in a naw styl of painting. 2 22 How does Madeline help the rock star with his painting? by providing him with technical ips by discussing his involvement with the subject by suggesting suitable subjects to paint lL by offering advice on painting the countryside > cog Test 1 Part 4 ‘You wil hear a discussion on the radio on the subject of rock festivals. For questions 23-28, decide whether the opinions are expressed by only one of the speakers, or whether the speakers agree. Write T forTim, 24 25 or 28 M for Maria, B_ for Both, where they agree. “Too many people travel to rock festivals by car Rock festivals in citias cause more problems than those in the countryside. The problem at the Tandem Festival could have been anticipated, ‘There are sometimes ugly structures left after festivals have taken place. [At Greanwnod, there is now a greater concern about removing waste. Festivals are held in order to make a profit for the organisers. ar Paper 5 Speaking PAPER5 SPEAKING (19 minutes) There are two examiners. One (the interlocutor) conducts the test, providing you withthe necessary ‘materials and explaining what you have to do. The other examiner {the Assessor) willbe introduced 10 you, but then takes no further part inthe interaction, Part 1 (3 minutes) The interlocutor frst asks you and your partner a few questions which focus on information about yourselves and personal opinions. Part 2 (4 minutes) In this part of the test you and your partner are asked to talk togethor. The Interlacultor places @ set of pictures on the table in front of you. This stimulus provides the basis for a discussion. The Interiocutor first asks an introductory question which focuses on one or two of the pictures. After about 2 minute, the interlocutor gives you both a decision-making task based on the same set of pictures. ‘The picture lor Part 2 is on page C3 of the colour section. Part 3 (12 minutes) You are each given the opportunity to talk for two minutes, to comment after your partner has ‘spoken and to take part in a more general discussion, “The Interlocutor gives you a card with a question written on it and asks you to talk about it for two minutes. After you have spoken, your partner Is first asked to comment and then the Interocutor asks you both another question related to the topic on the card, This procedure is repeated, so that your partner recelves a card and speaks for two minutes, you are given an ‘opportunity to comment and a follow-up question is askad, Finally, the Interlocutor asks some further questions, which leads to a discussion on a general theme related to the subjects already covered in Pant 3. “The cards for Part 3 are on pages C2 and C10 of the colour section. Test 2 PAPER 1 READING (1 hour 30 minutes) Part 1 For questions 1-18, each gap. read the three texts below and dacide which answer (A, B, € or D) best fs Mark your answers on the separate answer sheet Paul Simon Rock and rollin the 1950s was primary a youth cult, but its lasting importance (1)... the seiemic impact it had on the middle class and the middle-aged. It also (2)... the way for the next generation of rock idols, who listened to it awestruck and aware that this strange, unsettling sound would somehow, irrevocably, be (3)... with their destinies. For Paul Simon, as for other youngsters in the US, the chief (4) ... for hearing this new and invigorating type of music that was sweeping the country was courtesy of Alan Freec!s radio show, ‘Moondlog Flock 'n’ Roll Party. Freed’s show was (5)... Iistaning for a whole generation of fledgling Fock idols. Like the young John Lennon, 3,000 miles away in Liverpool, with his ear (6)... to Radio Luxembourg ~ the only European outlet for the new rock and roll ~ Paul Simon was fascinated by the sounds pouring rom Freed's show, and prepared himself forthe next big step for a rock and roll ‘obsessed teenager, the switch from listening to others’ music to making his ov. 1 A stood B stayed C heta Diy 2 A paved B fashioned © generated D grounded 3A fastened B joined © linkec D related 4 opportunity B chance © way D access 5 A nooded B obliged © demanded D required A engrossod B glued © sealed D enthralled 30 Paper 1 Reading ‘Snow No path was visible, but | thought that 1 would be all right if walked with due caution, The wind. hammered down from the heights, knocking me over as | slid and (7) .... on the slippery ic. ‘Suddenly the innocent-looking snow (8) ... way beneath me. | dropped, started, into a hole some four feet deep. The snow had formed a roof over the gap between two rocks, melting away to leave thing but a thin (9)... through which I had plunged. | (10) ... myself out, shaken and unnerved, ‘wondering what | would have done if the hole had been thirty feet deep. | sat back against the top of apine tree that protruded fromthe snow to take (11) ....of the situation. In an hour l had covered about half a mile. was perfectly clear that | would have to (12)... my plan. 7A slithered B swooped © skipped D swept 8 A sank B gave © opened D tell 9 A lining B fabric © crust D cloak 10 A hauled B handed © carted D trailed 11 A issue B thought © stock D gist 12 A abandon B neglect © desist D refute Qualitative Research ‘There are now numerous books which attempt to give guidance to researchers about qualitative research. While much has been written about the collection of data, the books are often (13) about the processes and procedures associated with data analysis. Indeed, much mystery ‘surrounds the way researchers analyse their data, (14) ..., we invited a range of social scientists ‘who have (16)... in qualitative projacts to discuss the (16)... that they used The idea was to share insight and understanding of the process of qualitative data analysis rather than to produce a ‘Guidebook forthe intending researcher. Such a task involves a process of demystieation, of (17) implicit procedures more explicit. While this may sound straightforward, we have found it far from simple. We have therefore given our contributors the opportunity to (18)... thelr workin a range of sty, which include autobiographical narratives and more impersonal forms. 19 A silent B dark blank © cum 14 A Honever B Accordingly © Even so D Inessence 15 A employed B engaged © exploited D entered 16 A accounts B manners © approaches D modes 47 A tuning B making © putting D getting 18 A propose B render © extend D present 31 Test 2 Part 2 You are going to read four extracts which are all concerned in some way with writing, For questions 19-26, choose the answer (A, B, C or D) which you think fits best according 0 the text. Mark your answors on the separate answer sheet. Self-help books Diane Reverend was a mere editor at Ranclorn House in New York when she. frst saw ci manuscript by an unknown pop psychologist, Br John Groy.‘l took ‘one jook Gl Ine thie anal knew iT would be a number one bestseller’ she says, ‘chucking, and she was right. The desperately understanding Dr Gray Is now a ‘multimillionaire and Diane Reverend has her own company, Dr Gray's slim volume on how fo bridge communication gaps belween the sexes is the unofficial mascot of « huge and expanding seifhelp incustry that may, as its insiders claim, answer some of Amoricans’ myriad yearnings for betterment. It {iso fee off those yearnings, creates hundreds mare and - not incidentally ~ Props up the entire world of New York publishing, As Bitain is learning, the gente can fil entire walls with tomes as quackish ‘and histrionic as their covers - but there are worse. For every selt-help title published, thousands are rejected as too derivative or specialised. Tis is no small mercy. As a new breed of heavyweight editor. cum-agent goes looking for the nex’ lightweight blockbuster prose style i the last tring on anyboay’s mind. Marketability is everything. ‘How promotable is the cuthor? What's the “hook"® [sit universal enough?’ Ms Reverend ratllas off the key questions, then ‘admits: if someone comes to me with a really catchy fille, that’s two thirds of the battle won, You know you can reach people.’ 19 Whatis the writar suggesting by his use of the phrase:not incidentally’ (ine 9)? ‘A. that the success of Dr Gray's book took other publishers by surprise that a major attraction of sel-nelp books to publishers is financial gain that sel-holp books do not really help readers to feel better 1D that publishers outside New York would not have started the sali-help industry 20 What, according to the wrlter, ino small mercy (ines 13-14)? the number of selt-nelp books that ara being published the decision whether to publish certain sel-help books the importance attached to sel-help books as @ genre the fact thet some solf-nelp books do not get published voa> tine 19 a Paper 1 Reading Autobiographies There has to be a tacit understanding, a pact, between an autobiographer and reader that the truth is being told. Such a pact is, Iwould guess, rarely observed to the full, There are many reasons why the writer should lapse, There may be actions ‘or thoughts which he feels itis simply too shamefal to make public. There may be things he decides against putting down on paper because (ashe rationalises) they are not important enough. There are also more complex and interesting reasons for surreptitiously breaking the pact. The autobiographer may decide that the ultimate ‘goal of the work, the truth about himself, can be served by inventing stories that encapsulate the truth more neatly, more pointedly, than strict adherence to the facts ever could. Or he may break the pact by deciding, from the beginning, never to adhere to it. He may call his book an autobiography simply in order to create a positive balance of credulity inthe reader’s mind that will be extremely convenient for him in his storytelling, and which, in the case of his more naive readers, may not be exhausted even by the time the story ends, so that these readers will go away thinking they have read a true history, when they have read nothing but fiction. ll of which can be done in no particular spirit of cynicism. “The writer states that some autobiographers who break the ‘pact’ with readers do so because ‘A. they have a very low regard for their readers, thoy feel this enables them to create a more accurate impression, © they fear they cannot describe real events entertainingly. D_ thay are simply unaware ofthe fact that they are doing so ‘What does ‘All of which (in the last sentence) reer to? ‘A. the types of pact between writer and reader B_ ways of deceiving the more naive readers, © ways of breaking the pact the reasons for disguising fition or truth 33 ‘Test 2 Dashiell Hammett’s detective stories Students of the detective story have explained the flourishing of this genre as an expression of the conflicts of late nineteenth and early twentieth century society. The detective story is essentially an allegory. ‘The crime is a symbolic enactment of some innate human impulse of lust or greed, and its solution, at least in che traditional story, represents the reintegration of the personality with society, its lawless impulses quelled so that society can again funccion smoothly. In Hammett’s peculiar version, society is returned to its former state, but that itself is shown to be cormupe and false ‘The hunter and the hunted in Hammett’s tales are two aspects of the same personality. The private eye and his prey understand each other and are, in a strange way, comfortable with each other, The private eye has a footin each camp, From the point of view of the criminal he is a bit too straight, and from that of ‘the law a bie too seedy. He is at once a crook and a competitor. The mission of the private eye is sometimes tempered by his sense of complicity, and sometimes his punitive zeal is intensified by his anxiety about this ambiguity. 23. The uniter describes Hammett's detective stories as peculiar because ‘A. they do not conform tothe theory that detective stories are allegories. they are not resolved in tne way that other detective stories are, they are based on a particularly negative view of human nature. 1B nay present an unconventional view as to why crimes are commited. 24 Wich ofthe following does the waiter consider to be ambiguous? the private eye's postion in society the criminats postion in society the attitude ofthe criminal towards the private eye the attitude of the law towards the prvate eye goo> 34 25 Paper 1 SCIENCE WRITING Today's greatest scientific essayist is Stephen Jay Gould. To discuss that art and hear his advice, I met him in an unfamiliar milieu: at the Grand Hotel (where he was staying while promoting his new book). Neither of us, it as to be said, felt much at home. As for writing a piece set in surroundings of such lifeless selfaggrandisement, Gould said: ‘I couldn't do it: Trollope might but he knew the culture. And knowing the culture is central to being a successful writer. Science, for example, is a civilisation of its own. AS a result, only scientists can make a good job of presenting it. If you don’t live in the community and don’t understand its rules, you are crippled from the start.’ (One of Gould’s axioms is: never write down to the reader: ‘Make no concessions,’ he says. ‘You can simplify the language but must never adulterate it. Above all, you cannot simplify the argument. Once readers notice that they are being patronised, your piece is dead.’ Which ofthe folowing do we learn about the Grand Hotel? ‘A. ILinspired Gould to talk about the role ofthe science writar in society. B_ Another writer had described the atmosphere there very well, © The wirter of tis article thought it an unappealing place. 1D It made Gould aware that the experience of many science writers is too narrow. Who is Gould talking about when he mentions ‘the community’ (line 147? scientists I ordinary people ‘science writers highly educated people soar Reading Test 2 Part 3 You are going 10 read an introduction to a book. Seven paragraphs have been removed trom the extract. Choose from the paragraphs A~H the one which fits each gap (27-33). There is one extra Paragraph which you do not need to use. ‘Mark your answers on the separate answer sheet, Advertising on trial It you work for an adverising agency, the early years of he 1890s may wall ave been the toughest of your Professional fe. Tho receasion in Gustine wes ald ‘enough. It was longer, deeper and more severe than anticipated by even the most pessimistic, iting industrialised nations as hard as anything else for thirty years, Every single business in the county was affected, some ~ the vehicle and bulling fades ~ finding thamseves 30 per cent down. A lot of people ~ lal ‘of companies ~ in a lot of counties suffered. Of ‘course, advertising people are scarcely unique in losing thei jos in such cific times, but ofall hose stiln employment, they often feel partcuary under Pressure a ay — ‘And ye, alongside these psychological an financial Imperatives lies an almost paradoxical rise in the Perceived importance of the markstiny process. The notion that companies should ba making sure they a Broxlucing services and goods that thei customers ‘want, as opposed 10 merely what i fs convenient for them to provido, isnot a new one, Sil its scarcely Unfair to say that thas beon only over the past en oF Iileen years that many companies seem lo have put the ‘ea Intentionally, rather than fartitousy, into practic. [2 All these things have pleasingly Increased the slatus ‘of marketing peopl, while simultansously adding to ‘ir burden. Marketing is increasingly regarded as ‘hat which itis not: a universal panacea. With approximately half of most marketing budgets being 36 penton advertising, her's some uth in saying hat the buck thon sop wth he acrpopl. is cert itde'that he" Boe vas tho decade’ in ch ‘verti never had itso good, te stro he ae sew the indy enduring te wera Gowrtum er 8 Generation. Tha was, of couse, pall a dea Consonuenoe ofthe eeenomiscimate a te ine. cons ee =» Ee I And, gonealy. inthe absenco of cone Cornining and quanta evidence to th conta they hed o conclude thatthe Benois of adveriing mighibe qUostonatie. Ata ime when onfusiagm sccount or every doar spent was nturaly hgh was simpy not clear enough to many ent companies exacty what by wero going fr ha lange sums of manoy they wor sponding. aay what rot they were seving on frit nvostment Advertising eer a inset excita the ueptens of the soap was, a8 a consequonce, more Pan ‘ver bot on tia a Now, while none of this shauld ele sympathy for a ‘thoroughly tough business, it does mean that many of those advertising people sil in work continue 10 face precisely the same problems as their clients how todo more with ess. this, in isl, suicienty ‘tying, «number of ether factors have made the production of effective advertising particularly cifcut 2) = — | ‘These _inclade, for example, the dramatic Jemographic changes facing much ofthe West the ‘burgeoning power of the rata: the changing needs ‘and desires of consumers; the rise of sponsorship: the Increasingly onerous legah resticons on adventising, And, of course, for some companies there is the new challango of advertsing abroad. “Together with the economic situation, itis those matters which have forced many of thase responsitia for atverising ta revs Lord LLeverhulme's commonplace that: ‘Only pall my ‘advertising works, Tho trouble is | don’ know wich hall? Because now more than ever before, the pressure is on to increase the proportion of advertising that works. = _ = [A Thus, client companies almost everywhere took the view of ane of thei leaders quoted in the British rade magazine Campaign: We want beter strategies, better targeting, better ereativly,bottor mada placement, better thinking. We aim to ‘ensure wa get advertising agencies best people fon our business and then ensure they are ‘motivated to work thelr fingers to the bone, producing outstanding work fr us The consequences have been that marketing ‘activities have at last begun to be given the fatention they deserve by management, that these people have acquired a litle Tearing about the subject, and that a few brands have actualy bbegun tobe genuinely marketed. © imately, the poverty ofthe current advertising ‘cana is due to the nature of the relationship between agencies and ther clients. he best way ot geting better acvertsing les parly in Imoroving this, and party iv adopting a more fempirical approach io the whole. advertising process, D_ Howaver, there was also evidence of more deep- ‘seated change which would nol simply be waved favay as, and when, economic prospects brightened. The fact was that whi this recession Naturally caused potential clients to. review, reconsider andioften cut their budigts atthe te, italso made them examine mace cosely than over belore the economies of advertising, Paper 1 Reading ‘Thismeans that hile conferences and seminars may provide some useful information, tha books currently ‘available on advertising, and how to dot, really dont ‘Those that are availabe tend o treat the process of producing advertising with too much respect. To give the impression that the work advertising agencies produce Is invariably of the highest qualty, deeply Considered and remarkable value for money, is nether true nor likely to help those employees of the ‘lent company wo are uttmately responsible. E ts not teribly surprising tht, at the moment, help for those who want or naed todo jst thats far trom feely avaiable. Gonoraly, companies ‘and the advertsing agencies they use have been far too busy simply coping with these CGreumstanges o wish talk oF write abut thom, ‘wile those that have suoceeded In Keeping thoit hheads above water are often underslandably ‘anwious to keep tho secrets of their success t0 themseives. F Seon, as they 270,10 spaarhead efforts to support ‘the bottom Ine, they suppose themselves 10 be Under close enough seruiny from their colleagues, et alone ther bosses, Moreover, hey are also faced wih the very considerable problem ‘of inreasingly being asked o do their aver more ficult jobe with emaller and smaller oudgets “They have been told that les must bo more. G Some of these are a droct consequence of the recession discussed earl: he controversy over production costs, and the disincination to take the Sort of sks that are Konically often the essence (of good advertising. Other events would have happened irespectve of local or global economic ‘conitons, HInBrtain, trmeant in 1991 alone that while gross domestic product (GDP) dectined, interest rates remained puntvely high, consumer spending on almost everything other than staples fel, more {han half a milion people lost their obs, and some 75,000 homes were repossessed, 7 Test 2 Part 4 You are going to read an extract from a novel. For questions 3440, choose the answer (A,B, Cor D) which you think fits best according tothe text. ‘Mark your answers on the separate answer sheet. Ralph unlocked the door to his flat and as he entered the dark, motionless hall experienced that ‘momentary qualm of ownership which even aftr three years stl lighily besieged him sometimes when he returned alone at the end ofthe day. When he had first bought the fat, he used to come home in an eager, questioning mood ~ often as early as he could ~ wondering what it had been doing during the hours he hhad been away. It had represented a form of welcome to him, a region in which his focus was undisputed sand reliable. He supposed that he should have worried about intruders or burst drains in that moment of reunion, but his flat had always been siting waiting for him with an expression of independence or of neglect depending on whether he'd efit tidy or not. Intheend he had begun toregardit merely asanother cloistered annexe of himself a space into which the stuly chambers of hisheart and head had gradually overspilled their contents. He had grown impatient with its inability to be transformed. There was, of course, the small, angular puddle of letters which sometimes gathered by the door and the red eye of the answering machine which could occasionally be found resuscitated and blinking withlife when he returned. And he was grateful that the glassy.cyes of his windows hadn't ben smashed nor the contents ravished with violence, mind you, he wondered what the fiat would look lke afterwards, From the dreary distance of his shabby third-loor office on the Holloway Road, Ralph often looked forward to his three or four solitary evenings at homeeach week. Once he had fled the fabricated world of the office and felt the memory of himself begin patchily to return on hs bus journey home, he no longer ‘needed to be on his own, ct which seemed continually to elude him in hs social calculations, Sitting exposed at his desk he would crave isolation, unlimited time alone amongst his possessions, but the relic of escape drained him and he would vainly wait for some sense of selfhood to return. Instead, there was ‘merely a resoundingemptiness, which made him suspect during his long hours of loneliness that the alien exercise of doing work which did not suit him had foreed him to change, moving him further and further from what he liked to think of as himself. He would often read or listen to music asthe night deepened ‘outside, familiar habits which now, however, he would find himself asking for whom or what he did them, Hispointsof reference had grown dim, his signposts muddied: sensations and ideas would arrive and then set lost, circulating around the junctions of his mind, unable to find a connection. ‘There had been a time, he supposed, when he had not felt this powerless, when, bad he but perceived his ‘own worth, he might have escaped; but he had been so eager to fix himself up with something that he had ‘been swept along by this great desire for something, and he had followed the first course which presented. itself asi it had been ordained that he should do so. He had tried, of course, after he left university, to formulate some plan for his own betterment, but it hhadn't really surprised him to find, whenhe searched himself for ambition, merely thedesire unobirusively| to survive. He had applied for the types of jobs which had become familiar to him through the talk of his peers, had latched himself wearily on to their futures and jogged behind as they rushed towards them, tunable to imagine that he might be put to some use which would manufacture as its by-product his own hhappiness. He had attended his only interview gratefully, and in the fever of examination did not think to test the position ~ an inexplict editorial role on a free local newspaper — for its own merits. Relieved at having. pulled off twenty minutes of pleasant conversation with Neil his boss, he had not considered the future of lengthy encounters by which he was now daily assaulted, Neil had offered him the job there and then, telling nim he was the only graduate who had applied; a revelation which atthe time Ralph had obscutely taken as a compliment. 38 34 36 a7 29 40 Paper 1 Reading ‘What do we learn inthe first paragraph about Ralphs current attude towards his flat? He resents the responsibilties ownership oft involves. He ragrois that he cannot put more effort into ts upkeep. He is aware tha he has imposed his personality ont. He sees it as an area over which he has supreme authority, voor \What do we lear from Ralph's thoughts about his answering machine? A. He takes some comfort rom its presence. B He dishkes its intrusive nature © Winoreases his feelings of isolation. 1D contributes to his sense of security. ‘According o the author, Ralpi's desire tobe alone is A saltindulgent B conceited. © salt-cestructve. D_ misguided. Ralph suspects that his work A. has restricted his other intrest. should be a more sociable experience, © is too complex for his limited abies. has had a negative effect on his personaly Falpts intial concern after university had been to [A improve his future prospects B _koop sight of his long-term goals. © avoid any early mistakes. D_ ‘follow his own intorest. ‘What approach did Ralph take in looking fora job? ‘A. He trie to apply faster than other applicants. B_ He unthinkingly adopted the ideas of others, © He rehearsed for interviews with his friends. 1D. He focused on areas in which he had some experience, What do we learn about Ralphs interview with Neit? > Nal took pains to make Ralph feel relaxed. Brag failed to find out about the job concerned. ‘© Itwas much shorter than Ralph had expected. The two men shared similar educational backgrounds. 39 Test 2 PAPER 2 WRITING (2 hours) Part 1 You must answer this question. Write your answer in 300-350 words in an appropriate style. 1. The extract below is from a letter which appeared in a national newspaper. You decide to write a reply. In your letter, respond to the issues raised and express your own opinions, | hr Dear Editor, ‘These days many parents give their children the freedom to make their own decisions from a very early age. They argue that this freedom helps children to learn from their mistakes and gives them the maturity and confidence to deal with the responsibilities of adult life. I don’t agree. It is totally irresponsible to let young people make their own choices about friendship, leisure activities and, later on, vital decisions about their future lives. Write your letter. Do not write any postal addresses, 40 Paper 2 Writing Part2 Write an answer to one of the questions 2-5 in this part, Write your answer in 300-350 words in an appropriate siyl. 2 Your course tutor has asked you to write @ review of a popular soap opera which you know well, and to explain the popularly of such programmes in general Write your review. 3 Write an article for your college magazine, briefly describing a museum or exhibition that you have visited recently. Choose one exhibit which particularly impressed you, and give reasons for your choice. Write your article. 4 You work for a local environmental organisation which is concemed about the effect that mass tourism is having on your region. Your manager has asked you to write a proposal in which you suggest ways of encouraging tourists to continue visiting your area without threatening the local environment, Write your proposal 5 Based on your reading of one of these books, write on one of the following: {@) John Wyndham: The Day of the Tifids ‘local radio station has asked listeners to send in reports on books which they consider suitable {or reading aloud on the radio. You decide to write about The Day of the Tiffds. In your report you should consider and discuss the following two areas: episodes which contribute to the excitement of the story and relationships which add interest tothe story line. Write your report. (b) Graham Greene: Our Man in Havana A literary magazine is planning a series of articies on the development of relationships in English novels. You decide to submit an article on Qur Man in Havana in which you describe the circumstances which lead to the meeting between Wormold and Beatrice Severn, and examine the different aspects of their characters which attract them to each other. Write your article. (©) Anne Tyler: The Accidental Tourist “ttoccurred to him that the world was sharply divided down the middie. Some lived careful lives, ‘and some lived careless lives, Write an essay for your tutor discussing how far you think this view ‘applies to Macon and Muriel, and whether you think ther attitudes to life change during the course of the story. Write your essay. a Test 2 PAPER 3 USE OF ENGLISH (1 hour 30 minutes) Part1 For questions 1~15, read the text below and think ofthe word which best fits each space, Use only ‘one word in each space. There is an example at the beginning (0). ‘Write your answers in CAPITAL LETTERS on the separate answer sheet. seme [9] [oF IOOO000000ooo Louis Pasteur (1822-1895) ‘twentieth century scientists, only a handful won worldwide recognition. 1ave won the greatest prize of all, the Nobel Prize, and rarer stil are those who hhave won two, So (2).. + only three people have succeeded in achieving this, but there is one scientist whose achievements would have merited four at the (3). least. (4) a few years (6). ‘s00n to receive the first Nobel Prize, Louis Pasteur is arguably the most colobrated of any scientist, (6). name appearing (7). shops and supermarkets (8) this day countless products in homes, Pioneer scientist, conqueror of disease and saviour of industries, Pasteur combined soaring intellectual powers (9). (19). . intents and purposes, to dispose of centuries of pseudo-science. In the year 1822 whon ho wae born, the lfe acionces were based on (14] ‘down-to-earth pragmatism, a combination which allowed him, to more than medieval fay tales, The underlying causes of many diseases were quite unknown. What explanations (12) exist were utterly bizarre. For instance, malaria was said to have (13). origins in 'miasmas’ emanating from swamps, whereas influenza was linked to the ‘infdence’ of celestial events, 9), a8 the passage of comets, Pastour exploded (18). and many other myths. a Paper 3 Use of English Part 2 For questions 16-25, read the text below. Use the word given in capitals atthe end of some of the lines to form a word that fits in the space in tho same ine, There Is an example at the beginning (0), \Wrte your answers in CAPITAL LETTERS on the separate answer sheet. canoe: [9] [oMPFlA RAMEE Rain making ‘when trains, itdoesn't always pour. During atypical storm, (0).£2t2asetNey. COMPARE ‘small amount of the locked up moisture in each cloud reaches the ground as rain. So the des that human (1 . ~arain dance, perhaps—mightencourage INTERVENE ‘the sky to give up ait (17)... water has been around since prehistoric ADD times. More recently, would-be rain makers have used a more direct (18) that of throwing various chemicals out of aeroplanes in an effort PROCEED to.wring mace rain from the clouds, a practice known as cloud seeding’. Yet such techniques, which were fst developed in the 18406, are (18)...nue- NOTORIETY lificut to evaluate. is hard to (20). for example, how much rain would CERTAIN have fallen anyway. So, despite much anecdotal evidence of the advantages of cloud seeding, which has led to is adoption in more than 40 countries around the word, as far as scientists are concerned, results are sil (21). ‘That CONCLUSIVE could be about to change. For the past three years (22). have been RESEARCH ‘carrying out the most extensive and (23). evaluation to dato of a RIGOUR revolutionary new technique which will substantially boost the volume of (24) RAIN ‘The protiminary (28). Of their experiments indicate that solid evidence FIND. ofthe technique's effectiveness is naw within the sclantists' grasp, B Test 2 Part 3 For questions 26-31, think of one word only which can be used appropriately in all three sentences. Horo is an example (0). Example: 0 Some of the tourists are hoping to got compensation for the poor state ofthe hotel, and | think they have a very case. There's no point in trying to wade across the river, the current is far too If youre asking me which of the candidates should get the job, I'm afraid | don't have any Views either way, SIGE OOO0000000000 Write only the missing word in CAPITAL LETTERS on the separate answer sheet. 26 tis often said that children learn best by ‘The new sofa looked quite expensive, but infact it was made OF ose leather, Alison could do an almost pertect oftheir teacher, and she always made feveryone laugh 27 The instructions say you should... the glue to a slightly damp surface. Jane will need 10 nen herself more toher murk, i shu is lo yet a good degree, le read the warning but I don’t know who it ea so. 0. 28 When | was at university, | lived for one . in @ t00m which overlooked the When the “British Sign Language’ is used, it can only refer to the signs used in the British system, ‘The wrongdoer was fined and sentenced to a of imprisonment, which many considered excessive. “4 30 a Paper 3 Use of English sa Inatine, surely, to save others, especialy a chi. His ambition from adolescence was to become a rights lawyer. “The writers which interest me most are these whose novels explore the strangihe and weaknesses of ature, Following the accident, the company has agreed to carry out thorough ofits safety procedures: ‘The whole policy of allowing members to borrow the club's equipment is now under ‘Sally was thrilled to see a positive other first novein the local newspaper. ‘After utile, the ain became so heavy that we were forced to shelter. Mr wiliams moved to London 10 his fortune. To climb this mountain, you must fist permission from the appropriate government department. 45 Test 2 Part 4 For questions 32-39, complete the second sentence so that it has a similar meaning to the fist sentence, using the word given. Do not change the word given. You must use between three and tight words, including the word given Here is an example (0). © Do you mind it! watch you while you paint? ‘objection Do you a you while you paint? 0 have any objection te my watching ] ‘Write only the missing words on the separate answor sheot. 32 Chess is @ much more skiful game than backgammon, deal Playing choss requires playing ‘backgammon. 33 John's comments on the new film were not well received 90 ‘John's comments on the new film well 84 _Itwas never explained why Grogor decided to leave. given No. ‘of Gregors decision to leave, 46 35 36 ar Paper 3. Use of English Nobody expected Lucy to fesign Lucys everyone. | was just about to leave the house when | heard the phone ring verge : Iwas .. the house when I heard the phone ring Stetano decided to stay on at the hotel for two more weeks. extend Stefano decided Wo weeks. ''m sory, | didn't mean to interrupt the meeting intention tim sorry, | : the meating. | wonder what's happened to Hans; he's normally on time for an important meeting, untike | wonder what's happened to Hans; i's most for an important meeting, Test 2 Part 5 For questions 40-44, read the following texts on fairy tales. For questions 40-43, answer with a word or short phrase. You do not need to write complete sentences. For question 44, write a summary according tothe instructions given. Write your answers to questions 40-44 on the separate answer sheet, A characteristic of many traditional tales is that they are unbelievable. For example, European faiy tales are selciom tales about faites, although they do contain 2 supernatural element that is clearly imaginary. The hero or heroine is almost invariably ‘8 young person who is suffering in some way. They, and all the other characters, are stock figures, They are either altogether good or altogether bad. The stories describe events that took place when a different range of possibilities ‘operated at an unidentified time, long, long ago, and this is part of their attraction ‘The stories would, paradoxically, not be believable if the period in which they took place wes specified, or the place where they occurred was named, Wonders may take place without remark but a sharp eye is kept on practical details. It will be noticed that tracitional stories are selciom soft or sentimental. The virtues which get rewarded are presence of mind, kinaliness, willingness to take advice, and courage. ‘The rewards sought after are the familiar ones: wealth, comfortable living, and an ideal partner. Indeed, some details that appear to us romantic today may merely reflect the social conditions when the tales were formulated, When lives were shot, girls of distinction ‘married early; Sleeping Beauty, who marries her prince when sixteen (ifthe huncired ‘years she has been asleep are not counted), was simply Conforming to the prectice ofthe time, 40 Which phrase in the frst paragraph means ‘stereotypes’? 41. Explain in your own words the paradox referred to in line 8. 48 4a 43 Paper 3 Use of English ‘There is a widespread refissal to let children know that the source of much that {goes wrong in life is due to our very own natures ~ the propensity of all hurnan beings for acting aggressively and selfishly. Instead we want our children to believe that, inherently, all people are good, But children know that. they themselves are not always good; and often even when they are, they would prefer not to be. This contradicts what they are told by their parents and therefore makes the child @ monster in his or her own eyes. ‘The dominant culture wishes to pretend, particularly where children are concerned, that the dark side of human beings does not exist. Psychoanalysis is viewed as having the purpose of making life easy ~ but this is not what Froud, its founder, intended. Psychoanalysis was created to enable people to accept the problematic nature of life without being defeated by it. Freud's prescription is that only by struggling courageously against what seem like overwhelming ‘ods can people succeed in wringing meaning out of their existence, ‘This is exactly the message that fairy tales got across to the child in manifold forms: that a struggle against severe difficulties in life is unavoidable, is an intrinsic part of human existence ~ but that if one does not shy away, but steadfastly meets unexpected and often unjust hardships, one can master all obstacles and emerge victorious. tine? fines Explain in your own words why the writer states that a child may appear be a'monsterin his lr her own eyes" (ine 7) In your own words, explain what the phrase The dominant culture’ (ine 8) refers to in the text. Ina paragraph of 50-70 words, summarise In your own words as far as possible how both texts suggest that fairy tales contain elements of raal if, Write your summary on the separate answer sheet. 49 Test 2 PAPER 4 LISTENING (40 minutes approximately) Part 1 You will hear four diferent extracts, For questions 1-8, choose the answer (A, B or C) which fits best according to what you hear. There are two questions for each extract, Extract One You hear a woman talking about the English language. 1 In which field does the speaker have direct experience? A radio journalism B_ newspaper editing 1 © television production 2 What is her attitude towards those who complain about falling standards of English? ‘A. She is dismissive oftheir concems. B She is annoyed by their ignorance. 2 © She respects thoir porsistence. Extract Two You hear part of an interview with a former ice skater who now dances in musical shows. 3 According tothe former ice skater, the thrill of theatre work comes from A the association with big-name shows. B the rapport with the audience. 3 © the size of he stage, ‘4 When the former ice skater started dancing, Bho missed the exhilaration of speed. Che leat new ways to control his movements. ‘A ha benefited from the support ofthe cast ea 4 30 Paper# Listening You hear a cil reviewing a new flm based on a novel 5 In the critic's opinion, the film fails because the source material was A. dated, B tooliterary. © rather intolioctual. ~ 6 The cite feels the two main roles ‘A have become uninspiring. B_ have boon made into comic figures. © should have been played by other actors ‘You hear part of an interview about routines with Dr Brown, a psychologist. 7 According to Dr Brown, particular routines can be beneficial because they can help people to ‘A work at their own pace. B_ save time and energy. © cope bottor with changes. 8 According to Dr Brown, what helps when introducing changes in the workplace? ‘A. decisive management B financial incentives © prior consultation Cz st Test 2 Part 2 You will hear part of a radio programme about creatures which live in the sea, This part of the programme is about sponges. For questions 9-17, completa the sentences with a word or short phrase. GENERAL CHARACTERISTICS OF SPONGES The speaker says that people offen fal to raalise the range of 9 | ‘ound amongst sponges. “The epoaker mentions that one ofthe largest sponges has the appearance of a 10 ‘The ability of sponges to regenerate tissue means that 11 | is possivie, ‘SPONGES ON DISPLAY INTHE NATURAL HISTORY MUSEUM \Wmhat distinguishes the sponges in boxes in the museum basement is that they are all 2 ‘The speaker says that ‘glass’ sponges are similar to a ‘The shrimps found insira nartain sponges are sometimes seen se eymbolicing both 4 ‘To emphasise how unusual the so-called ‘demonstration sponge’ the speaker describes it as being 15 RESEARCH BEING CARRIED OUT ON SPONGES. Researchers are investigating what thoy call 46 | interaction, Research into sponges may help people because 17 | may be produced as a result. 32 Part 3 Paper 4 Listening ‘You will hear part of @ radio programme in which guidebooks are discussed. For questions 18-22, ‘choose the answer (A, B,C or D) which fits best according to what you hear. 418 What recent development connected with ravelis discussed intially? {A_ anincreasein th types of adventurous holidays on offer destinations that have become cheaper _improverensin wha is fed in certain places D arse inthe numberof guidebooks 19 John feels that the most important factor in choosing a guidebook is A. the reputation ofthe publisher. B the attention to detail © the quality of the illustrations, D_ the author's experience. 20. What does John say he has discovered from comparing guidebooks? ‘A Some leave out interesting places altogether. B Some use a strango style to describe places. © Some fail to provide useful information. 1D Some are not very enjoyable to read. 21, What does the presenter say about tha information in Blueprint Guides? A. tis sometimes hard io find what you need. Some of itis ncomprehensibe, © Too much is in the form of ordinary narrative. D_ The amount of detail can be excessive. 22. John thinks thatthe style of writing in guidebooks should be A. both informal and authoritative. lively at all times. © both objective and impersonal D__undemanding of the reader. | 48 2h 22 53 Test 2 Part 4 You will hear two friends, Tim and Vera, discussing a concert which was held in the dark. For questions 23-28, decide whether the opinions are expressed by only one of the speakers, of whether the speakers agroe. Wite T forTim, V forVera, or Bor Both, where they agree. 23. The lack of visual distractions allowed me to experience the music ina new way. 2 24 think | might sten to music ina diferent way from now on, L |] 25. The intimacy of tho situation was unnerving 2 25 The performers must fel more relaxed knowing tha they are not being observed % 27 This experimentis not easly transferable to ther media, { [a] 28. ‘Dinnors in the Dark’ promises to bea less serious afar 28 sa Paper 5 Speaking PAPER5 SPEAKING (19 minutes) ‘Thre are two examinors. One (the Interlocutor) conducts the test, providing you withthe necossary materials and explaining what you have to do. The other examiner (the Assessor wil be introduced ‘0 you, but then takes no further part inthe interaction Part 1 (3 minutes) ‘The interlocutor frst asks you and your partner a few questions which focus on information about yourselves and personal opinions. Part 2 (4 minutes) In this part of the test you and your partner aré asked to tak together. The Interlocutor places a set of pictures on the table in front of you. This stimulus provides the basis for a discussion. The Intortocutor first asks an introductory question which focuses on one or two of the pictures. After ‘about a minute, the Interlocutor gives you both a decision-making task based on the same set of pictures. ‘The pictures for Part 2 are on pages C4-CS of the colour section. Part 3 (12 minutes) You are each given the opportunity 10 talk for two minutes, to comment after your partner has spoken and to take part in a more general discussion. ‘The laterlocuter gives you a card with a question written on it and asks you to talk about it for two minutos. After you have spoken, your partner is frst asked to comment and then the Interlocutor asks you both another question related to the topic on the card. This procedure is repeated, so that your partner receives a card and speaks for two minutes, you are given an ‘opportunity to comment and a follow-up question is asked. Finally the Interlocutor asks some further questions, which leads to @ discussion on a general theme related to the subjects already covered in Part 3. The cards for Part 3 are on pages C2 and C10 of the colour section. 55 Test 3 PAPER 1 READING (1 hour 30 minutes) Part1 For questions 1-18, read the three texts below and decide which answer (A, B, C or D) best fits ‘each gap. ‘Mark your answers on the separate answer sheet, ArtonTV Why is it that television so consistently fails when it (1)... to programmes about the visual arts? Painting and sculpture should be (2) .... subjects for the camera, which has the abilly to show a Whole work of art, then move in close to examine the details. Yet I can think of few series on television that have managed to (3) .. both the pleasure and complexity of looking at them. ‘A good example of what goes wrong can be seen in Robert Hughes's eight part survey of American art, American Visions. Hughes is a critic you can trust, he has a personally that commands attention ‘and he has been given nearly eight hours in which to (4) .... British audiences to a school of art that British galleries have totally ignored. | had expected the series to (6) ....on great works of art. What | got instead was one about the way American history and culture are (6)... in its art and architecture. 1A applios B takes © addresses D comes 2 A natural B due © right D apparent 3 A convey B inflict © cast Demi 4 acquaint B disclose © reveal D introduce 5 A target B focus © aim D cover 6 A bome B conforred © reflected D hinted Dealing in Metals For 20 years | worked as an intemational metals dealer and gained something of a reputation as a ‘speculator. Metals are (7) .. far less than other markets, With a bit of luck, a (8)... 1 take a risk {and a good understanding of how the market works, i's possible to make a lot of money, Risk-taking 56 Paper Reading Is part and (8)... ofthe indistry. The buceancering culture (10) ...nioely witha free-market global ‘economy, But naw the free-trade economists wh claimed the marke itself would maintain the price ‘of soarea metals have found the opposite is happening, More minerals are being (11)... and the cost of aw materials is decreasing, aking inflation ino account, the prices of mast metals are about half of what they were 20 years ago. Recently, | was askod to look into (12)... made against one ‘ofthe mulinational conglomerates that benef from these cheap raw materials. 7 Anied B regulated © govemed D legislated 8 A talent eoit © willingness D propensity 9A portion B package © present D parce! 10 A plays B joins ¢ fits D suits 11 A expelled B extracted © exhumed D expanded 12 A propositions —B allegations © suggestions ——_D insinuations. Extract from a Holiday Brochure ‘Abaco and its off-shore cays are part of the 700 islands ofthe Bahamas that stretch rom Florida, ‘past the Tople of Cancer, to Cuba. Each one has is own (13)... each ane has something to offer. ‘The key to gatting anywhere inthe islands and cays of Abaco isa boat. Ifyou don't get one (14) in withthe room don't worry. Be happy. There are ferries (15) .... And water-taxis. Or, thore are plenty of boats to rent if you prefer to go under your awn (16) But sailing isthe most popular (17)... of tansport here. Abaco is nicknamed ‘The Sailing Capital of the World for ood reason. Those calm, naturally protected waters aro also a paradise for fishing, diving, snorkeling and ‘swimming. Tha cays and thelr beaches stretch for 200 miles ikea (18) ..of peas. 's not only at sea that gems can be found. At night it's the lights ofthe restaurants and cafés of Hope Town and Greon Tutle Cay that sparkle 19 A teat B personality © ype D distinction 14 A pushed B given © thrown D bought 15 A sundiy B galore © legion D replete 16 A propulsion B means, © momentum D steam 17 & mode B pattem © way D manner 18 A thread B lament © line D string 7 Test 3 ‘You are going to read four extracts which are all concemed in some wey with people's attitudes, For Part 2 {questions 19-26, choose the answer (A, B, C or D) which you think fis best accoraing tothe text. ‘Maric your answers on the separate answer sheet. 19 20 58 Food ‘There is something very elemental and satisfying about our relationship with food, I know T may be preaching to the converted, because presumably people keen on ooking buy cookery books like this one, hut so offen we immagine that, unless its some special oecasion or an especially elaborate dish, itis hardly worth attempting, Noto. Just by throwing a fewe ‘oughly chopped carrots, a lek, some celery and a few herbs into water you will get the most delicious soup, This is much mote satisfying than buying a packet or opening a tin, Instead of buying an over-sweet chocolate mousse fill of preservatives, emulsifiers and additives, in five minutes you can turn out the most delicious confection that both grown-ups and children will ove Cooking is also an offering, and it isa gesture of care and love to bring one’s own ervation, however humble or simple, to the table. Sharing aod is sa ich in synabotism, of our deepest hhuman neods,thatit is hardly surprisingall our festivities and celebrations take place around tables, be they birthdays, anniversaries, engagements ar whatever! No one would have a takeaway for a wedding or anniversary party! Nor would many people wish to have a ‘business deal discussed over tinned soup, What does the writer acknowledge about his readership? ‘A They may already agree with him, B They may have varied attitudes to food, © They may have a preference for certain kinds of food, They may be most interested in complicated meals, ‘The writer mentions tinned soup as an example of food which may A. salisty a number of people, B create the wrong impression. © be easy to prepare. D be economical to use. a Paper 1 Reading In the Elevator This morning, Alistair had made a stab at straightening up his office, but correspondence stil littered every surface. Quarterly tax forms, state and federal, bulged out of desk drawers and cardboard boxes, all waiting on a day when he was in the filing mode. And then there was all the added paperwork that went along with owning an apartment building. The hundred-odd books and a few years’ worth of journals were only in proximity to the new bookshelves. As the elevator bore him closer to his floor, he knew that Mallory would be on time for their appointment. She would be knocking on the door of his empty office on the hour, not a second before or after. She was as compulsive about time as she was about neatness, How would she react to the mess? She might assume he'd been vandalised. He could walk in behind her and feign shock, Mrs Wilson, his cleaning woman, had arrived while he was scrambling around on the floor, trying desperately to clear a few square feet of the carpet. Putting his head out of the office door as she was turning her key in the lock of his apartment, he had smiled at her, his eyes filled with hope. Her own eyes had turned hard. Fat chance I'm going in there, said the back of her head as she had disappeared into his residence, which was her territory and all that she might be held accountable for. He knew Mrs Wilson believed him to be a visitor from somewhere else, perhaps some point straight up, miles out, but nowhere on the surface of her own earth, which was square and shaped by the streets of Brooklyn. (One thing that occurred to Alistair about his office was that A. he had forgotten to put away some important documonts there. 'B_he would have todo a lot of paperwork when he got back there, © he had nowhere to put the books and journals 1D _he could pretend to bo surprisod at its concition, \What had happened between Alistair and Mrs Wilson that morning? > ‘She had made it clear that she did not feel responsible for his offic. She had told him that sho was not wiling to help him, © She had not been as friendly to him as she usually was. D__ Sho had decided that he was nat lke other people she knew. 59 Test 3 23 2a 60. KAREN It was a simple desire ~ not to be like her mother - thot led Karen to create her own story, her own mythology, 0 mythology of difference and strength. In the tole that she constructed for herself, there were significant moments in her progress: such as the day she was twelve years old and her brother q swung © golf club behind him and hit her full in the eye. At the first moment of impact, she wos convinced of immediate blindness. But the bone had protected her, as the doctor from the high-walled house later assured her. The golf club had clean missed the eye ond she was left with only a few stitches that healed to a pale drawing of past suffering. When she opened her eyes in the doctors white-walled consulting room, overlooking the tennis courts, and saw her mother clear before het, muttering predictably and paradoxically about both miracles ond small mercies, she knew that she was saved for some purpose. What was characteristic of Karen's ‘mythology’? the portrayal of herself as a victim the models she chose for herself the importance attached to particular events, the carelessness of the people around her com> In the doctor's consulting room, Karen's mother’s behaviour ‘was an embarrassment to Karen ‘came as no surprise to Karen. took Karen's mind off her situation. was @ logical reaction to Karen's accident. coo> Visual materials for Paper 5 TEST 1 _—Promptcardta What makes people laugh? ‘+ cultural background + visual or verbal + changing attitudes TEST 2 == romtorata How easy is it to remember new information? + topic + circumstances '* quantity TEST3 ——-Prompteard3a ‘What itis that makes people powerful? * personal circumstances + knowledge * personality TEST4 Why should dangerous sports be allowed? * personal choice * safety + money a Visual materials for Paper 5 TEST 1 PAPER 5 ‘Teenage magazine - People and animals 3 TEST 2 PAPER 5 ct 2A Government leaflet - Saving natural resources Visual materials for Paper 3 2A TEST 3 PAPER 5 Jewellery company - Precious things 3B SE oF 3D Visual materials for Paper 5 TEST 4 PAPER 5 4a ac cs Government leaflet - Learning and Teaching Visual materials for Paper 5 TEST1 How important is it to have a sense of humour? + health + time and place + relationships TEST 2 || What makes a place particularly memorable? * personal experiences, * people + atmosphere TEST3 How much do people respect authority nowadays? * different societies * changing times * influences TEST4 What helps people to deal with difficult situations? + personality, = support + age c10 TEST 4 In what ways has life become more or less dangerous? + technology + health + social values Visual materials for Paper S cu Paper 1 Reading Miss Fogerty Miss Fogerty, returning briskly to her duties across the wet grass of the village gfeen, was both excited and saddened by the scene she had just witnessed. itis, always exhilarating to be the first to know something of nate, particularly in a small ‘community, and Miss Fogerty’s quiet life held little excitement. On the other hand, her grief for Dr Bailey's condition was overwhelming. He had attended her for many years and she remembered with gratitude his concern for her annual bouts of laryngitis which were, fortunately, about the only troubles for which she had to ‘consult him. His most valuable quality, Miss Fogerty considered, was his making one feel that there was always plenty of time, and that he truly wished to hear about his patients’ fears and perplexties. It was this quality, above all others, which had so endeared the good doctor to the village and its environs. He had always been prepared to give ~ of his time, of his knowledge, and of his humour. His reward had been outstanding loyalty and affection. 25 As Miss Fogerty crossed the grass, her predominant feeling was one of contusion, sorrow, excitement relict. coa> 26 Miss Fogerty felt that Dr Bailey was particulary kod for his, ‘A. loyalty to his patients. B ability 10 say the right things. independence of thought D__ generosity of spir. a Test 3 Part3 ‘You are going to road an extract from a novel. Seven paragraphs have been removed from the ‘extract, Choose from the paragrapiis A-H the one which fits each gap (27-33). There is one extra paragraph which you do not need to use Mark your answers on the separate answer sheet. THe WELL | had read somewhere tat trom a suificienty deep hole, one could see the stars. ifthe dav were clear. | hhad poreuadad you to help ma wath my scheme; you \alched, eyes wid, sto mouth, 8 | winched up ne well bucket, steadied it onthe wall and then cimbos “na NOO YoUNO WAM Bon, 18d He MnaUETAND sow {or the buckets much inoroased weight, your lack of ‘Stenath or ncinaton to just sland back and et what ‘would happen, happen. You held the hand, taking ome ofthe stain as | pushed the bucket ofthe side of the wells stone surround. Froed of tho walls suppor, | plunged immediataly You gave a title shiek and made one attompt to brake the handle, then you lot I go. Yell nto the wel | racked my ead, [AL the time | was at fst ust dazed, then tightened, then raicved, then finally both angry a yu fr leting ‘ne fall and afraid of what Mother would say Youcales down, asking i wae all ight. opened my mouth tO Shout and ‘hen you ealled again, & note of ring panic'in your voice, and with those words stopped ‘ine in my throat. ays, eyelids cracked enough to watch you through the foliage of lashes, You disappeared, caling out fr help. | waited a momar, ‘han quickly hauled and pushed my way to the top, then pulled myselt over the edge and landed on the courtyard cobbles. | >| Mother and Father both appeared alongwith you and ‘ld Arthur; Mother shrigked, flapping her hands Feather shouted and told Arthur to haul onthe winch hand. You stood back, looking pale and shocked, watching. I was bowed inthe shadows, A fre of fee lation filled me. Then I saw the ine of ops Tet, from the wellto wire | now stood. looked in hoor a atte spots, dark coins of ity wel water fallon fom ‘nv soaking clothes on to the dy. gry cobbles. At my feet, inthe darkness, the water had formed a ile i at a __) Degen es cette paieaionel ee mtoste Seeleeeceieds mumraece Sea eens al onder vein eg Tinie = ia —_ Siting up, comforted, my head in my weeping ‘nother’ bosom went Phew ar saa‘On dar and ld bravely and cared at ad found a sure {nna fom th Solon ofthe ol fo the moa and {rane ands slong tut go ed cabo tho bisge and fotered, exhates, tough he passagenay. gg T) ‘Thinking I was plugging @ 99p, infact only aang anothor fog fo my pyre, | said that the seoret passage had fallan in afer mo; there wouldnt be any Paitin, sa, sanding somebody down to look for It In fact the whole well was dangerous. Pd barely escaped with my fe, | loked into my fathers eyes and it was ko looking into a dark tunnel wath no Sars at the end, Zz My words dd in my thrpat.‘Don't be rslculous, boy! he ssi, investing more contemst in those few words than Ta have thought a whole language capable of conveying. He rose smoothly to his fet and walked away. a) ‘A. looked back into the courtyard, to where Father ‘was now shining a flashlight down into the well {and peering iio the gloom. The crops | had left shone in the sunlight. | could not believe that robody had seen them, Mother was screaming ryterealy now; a sharp, ating noise that | had ‘never heard before Itshook my soul, sufused my conscience. What was | to do? | had had my revenge on you, but where dl | go trom here? To this day | tink was almost getting away with ‘tot Fatisr appeared squatting in front of me, Hehad me repeat my story. dso, hesitating. His eyes narrowed. © Itdid not occur to ma then tha | had succeeded, Jn a sence, in my plan. What | sav wore lights, strange, inchoate and bizare. twas only later that | connected the visual symptoms ofthat fll and impact with the stylised stars and planets I was used to seeing drawn ina cartoon panol ‘whenever a comic characler suffered a similar whadk, D Itwas as though he was seeing me for the frst time, and as though l was looking down a secret passage through ime, to an adult perspective, to the way the world and cocky, lying children's ‘stores would look to me when Iwas his age. Paper 1 Reading In that pity was a rebuke as sovore and wounding as tat my father had administered, and in as much that ‘Woontemad that tis was the mature judgamant of my ‘actions and my fate’, not some aberration | might be able o discount orignore affected me even more profouncly, E That was what racked me, spread upon the castle's stones; that wes what gripped me lke a Col fist nsido and squeszed those cold and biter tears of gif from me and could nat be comforted by Mothor's soothing stokes and gentle pats and soft cooings. F Tho plan came to ma ka a liebalt to a drowning man. | gathered all my courage and lett my higing place, coming staggering out and binking. | cried ut faintly, one hard to my brow, then yelled outa Iie louder when my fst ery Want unheodd, stumbled ona litle further, then collapsed ‘ramatically on the cobbies. GI could hear rased, alarmed voices coming trom the castle's main door. | ran the opposite way, ‘down to the passage leading to the moat bridge, And hid inthe shadows ther, Hi Athurlooked down at ma, his expression regretful {and troubled, shaking his aad or looking tke he wanted to, not because I had had a temying Adventure and thon boon unjustly disbotioved by my own father, but because he too could see through my foriorn and haplssile, and worried for the sou, the characte, the future maral standing of any child so shamoless ~ and so incompaten~ In ts too easily rasortec-o yng. 63 Part 4 14 are going to read an extract from a book on art. For questions 34~40, choose the answer 4B, Cor D) which you think fits best according to the text. ark your answers on the separate answer sheet. 64 ‘AESTHETICS 3By one ofthe onic perverse that offen attend the cous of fairs, the existence of the works ofa upon which formation of aesbece theory depends hs become an obstruction to theory about then. For one seston: these works ate products tht exist exesally an physically. tn common conception the work oft ts often teed seh the bung, book, ann, ‘or atuein its existence apart fom human experience Since the actual work of artis what the product does ‘with and inexperience, he result snot fsouable co understanding. In addition, the very perfection of Some of these products, the prestige they parses Deease of Jong history of unquestioned dion, creates contentions hat getin the way of es insight. ‘When an art product once stains classe atu, it Somehow becomes isolated from the himan conditions under which ws brought ato being and from the homan consequences st engenders in atl, life experience ‘When artistic objects aie separated ffom both conditions of origin and operation in experience, a there follows a conchason which és at Grst sight suprising In erder to understand the mesning of arise prot, have 0 forget then fra times to turn aside fom them and have recourse to the conlinry forces and eondlidons of experience that we dlonot urlly regard a aeshec. We mustarriveat the theory of art by means of & detour for theory ‘concerned with understzsding and insight 115, of cour, quite possible to enjoy lowers in heir fnlomed form and delicate fragance without owing anything about plants theoreti Burifone sets out to unctind the Hlowecing of pls, one Is ‘commuted 10 finding out something aboue the Iterations of sol. ait, water and sunlight dat condition the growth of pts moder to ited the asthe ints late and approved forms, ne mat begin with ein the 3; 30 the evens and Scenes chat hold the attentive eye and ear arousng one’ iterest nd affording enjoyinent fone looks and listens Yer so extensive and subely Dperesive are dhe ideas har seta elf upon emote ~okislnulacuomhiraetacchem.tenorsorgege. ~ooiitenianqpowibinernipitor eer ‘het general significance, with which seth theory aa Aris remit to parte eam, here isu of from that association wih the materials and sims fevery ote form of man etfore and ahlevenent, A primary tsk is thus imposed upon one who underaes to write pom the pilosa ofthe fine ‘mts. This tsk isto restore continuity erween the refine and intensified forms of experience tht are works of art and the everyday evens, doings, and sufferings that are universally ecogaited to constate experience. Mountain peaks do noi Ros unsupported hey do net even just rest upon the ext. They a the fab in one of is manifest opeitions. Te ie che business of those who are concerned with the theory ofthe eat, geographers and geologists to make this fit evident i ts various implications The theo ‘who would deal philosophically with fine at has ke ‘ask o accompli, ones willing vo grant this postion, even iFonly by say of temporary expetinen, one will ce that than pleased iF tld that they enjoyed ther ex recreations in pata les, because of cei neste ‘quality The ats which ody have most vit fr the 2nerage person are things be or she dos noe tke tobe ans: for instance, the moves, jazz, comic stp and, ‘ox frequent urd newspaper accounts ofthe week's ‘rents Fo, whe what they know a at selegated 0 ‘he museum and gallery, dhe uneonquersbe ple towards experiences enjoyable in themseives finds suc oud a de daily environment provides, Many people who protest grins the museum coneepion axe sll share the fallacy from which tha conception sprigs Tor the popular notion comes fim 3 sepuraton of art from the objects and scenes of ondinaryexpenence that many theorists ad eis pre themselves upon holding and even elaborang The times when select and disinguished objects are ‘losely connected withthe products af wal vocations ae the times when apprecation of the former is mest ‘fe and mos keen. a4 37 Paper 1 Reading What ironic perversityis referred to inline 17, ‘The formation of aesthetic theory depends on the existence of works of art. ‘The very existence of works of at interferes with thinking about them, “Too wide a range of objects are considered to be works of art Works of art have a tendency to generate misunderstandings. voa> According tothe writer, what happens when an art product altains classic status? ‘A. The aificuitos involved in its creation are underestimated, B The prestige it enjoys begins to attract criticism. © _Itloses its connection with common experiance. It ceases to have a provocative effect on observers. What isthe ‘primary task’ referred to in line 277 making sure that art does not surrender its role in society ‘encouraging ordinary people to realise the significance of art ‘shedding light on the aesthetic aims of artists ‘explaining the link between art and ordinary ite a> c D “The writer mentions mountain peaks to demonstrate that ‘A works of art do not exist in isolation. B_ writers on art face a difficult challenge, © _arthas much in common with other disciplines. D theorists have a responsibilty to be accurate. Why isthe conclusion about understanding artistic products in paragraph 3 described as surprising? ignores certain types of art products. involves the use of unexpected criteria, ltundervalues the emotional response to art. It conflicts with the opinions of theorists on fine at. com> What does the writer intend us to learn from the reference to flowers? {Ar can be enjoyed without being explained, ‘Only commited individuals can learn to appreciate art ‘True works of art are only created in suitable conditions. Fallure to enjoy art makes a theoretical understanding dificut. coa> ‘According tothe writer, setting art on a remote pedestal has meant that > people enjoy works of art lass than they would otherwise do. B casual recreations are preferred to the study of art. © acsthetic qualities in other areas of fe go unnoticed. D_ people are happy to consign art to museums and galleries. 65 Test 3 PAPER 2 WRITING (2 hours) Part 1 You must answer this question. Write your answer in 300-350 words in an appropriate styl. 1 Youhave read the extract below as part of a newspaper article on education. Readers have been asked fo send in their opinions. You decide to write a letter responding to the points raised and ‘expressing your own views. Some people consider that much of our school education is a waste of time. These people argue that we are only motivated to learn what is relevant and useful to us based on our experience. Therefore, as most of our education happens at such an early age, it is surely necessary to rethink what people really need to learn at school. White your letter, Do not write any postal addresses, 66 Paper 2 Writing Part 2 Write an answer to one ofthe questions 2-5 inthis part. Write your answer in 300-350 words in an appropriate style, 2 Inorder to celebrate the history and culture of your city, the council has decided to commemorate the achievements of a person, well known locally, who was born, or worked in the area. It has invited the public to send in proposals stating who they think should be chosen and in what ways his or her lfe should be celebrated, Write your proposal 3 You have recently visited a museum or exhitition, either in your country or abroad. Write a review for an English language magazine, describing the contents of the museum or exhibition. You should say whether itis worth visiting and explain why museums or exhibtions are an important part of national culture. rite your review. 4A popular magazine is asking people to submit articles on their favourite leisure activities. You decide to send an article on your favourite leisure pursuit, which you hope will interest and entertain other readers, as wall as encourage them to take up the acivity themselves, Write your article, 5. Based on your reading of one of these books, write on one ofthe folowing: (@) Anne Tyler: The Accidental Tourist {As part of your studies your tutor has asked you to write an essay on the way Alexander is being brought up by Muriel and to come to some conclusions about what has particularly influenced the development of his personality write your essay. (0) LP Hartley: The Go-Between You belong to a reading group whose members have decided to study novels which portray English society in different historical periods. You decide to suggest The Go-Between as a suitable text and to write a report for the group in wiich you describe how social atitudes and Conventions atthe time of Leo's childhood areilustrated in the novel Write your report (6) Brian Moore: The Colour of Blood ‘An aris magazine is planning a series of articles on great heroes in modern literature, You feet that Cardinal Bom displays qualities that make him a hero and decide to write an article in support ‘of your view. rite your article, 0 Test 3 PAPER 3 USE OF ENGLISH (1 hour 30 minutes) Part 1 For questions 1-15, read the text below and think of the word which best fits each space. Use only ‘one ward in each space, There is an example atthe beginning (0). \wrte your answers in CAPITAL LETTERS on the separate answer sheet same [Als] OOOO Communication “Throughout our lives, eight from the moment when (0)..22... Infants wo ery fo express hunger, wwe are engaging in social interaction of one form or (1). Each and (2). encounter fellow human beings, some kind of social interaction will take place, (8). ‘getting on a bus and paying the fare for the journey, or socialising with fiends. It goes without ®, | therefore, that we need the ability to communicate. Without some method of transiting intentions, we would be (6)... complete loss when it) socially, ‘Communication involves the exchange of information, which can be (7). a friend signaling baredom to the presentation ofa university thesis which may (8). bee read by a handtul of athers, oF it could be something in (2) the two. ‘Our highly developed languages set us (10)..-..n+ from animals. (11).. languages, we could not communicate sophisticated or abstract ideas. (12) ‘or write about people or objects (19).. immediately present, (14)... discussing objects already prosent, we would be (16) lo make abstract generalisations ‘about the world for these snes COUKE We tll we restricted to 68 Paper’3. Use of English Part 2 For questions 16-25, read the text below. Use the word given in capitals atthe end of some of the lines to form a word that fis in the space inthe same line. There is an example atthe beginning (0). \write your answers in CAPITAL LETTERS on the separate answer sheet CloiMFakA WME ‘Science and technology Until (0)..,22MPAP=IEY.. recent times science and technology performed diferent and separate functions, the progress of one so often completely (16) sss 10 tho progress ofthe other. (17.. hhave established that, since the earliest times, tho improvements in our way of life have resulted from an empirical approach, that is @ process of trial and ercor, by which equipment and tools are made to satisfy important needs. listo this approach that we owe the evolution of technology. Ourmodern concept of science, both (18).. ‘and pragmatic in approach, stems from the seventeenth century, when extensive investigations into the natural laws ‘governing the behaviour of matter were (19) Iwas this (20). style of thought which iad to a science-based technology. ‘Scientific knowledge was notinitse'seenasa(21)., forthe eariersystom of trial and error, but it did help the technical (22) to.s0e which path of experimentation might be more (23) With the industrialisation of the nineteenth century, the bond between science and technology (24), In our ovm time, the mutual (25) Increased stl further . of one discipline upon the other has Ooo COMPARE RELATE HISTORY PHILOSOPHY TAKE REVOLUTION PLACE INNOVATE, FRUIT STRONG RELY 69 Test 3 Part 3 For questions 26-31, think of one word only which can be used appropriately in all three sentences. Here is an example (0) Exampl © Some ofthe tourists are hoping to get compensation for the poor state ofthe hotel, and I think they have a very case, ‘There's no point in trying to wade across the rvar, the currents far too IY youre asking me which of the candidates shoul get the job, I'm afraid | don't have any PEER eOOROo0ooooooo \Wrte only the missing word in CAPITAL LETTERS on the separat inswer sheet, 26 You can always. sree 01 family members to help you out Itis always important to... your change before you leave the shop. 1 you as one of my closest tiands. 27 The actress forgot hor ‘on the opening night of the play ‘This anti-ageing cream wil reduce sess OM YOUT F368, Don't ever ross ralWAy .....nnrenes- at this point i's far too dangerous. 28 When David heard the news, he was in a terible tocalm him down, Lnti his wife managed Each prospective member ......nee-e- HAS tO Accept certain obligations in order to join the confederation, ‘The plans for the renovation of the house relly depend on the ence OF he foundations, 70 31 Paper 3 Use of English rave the that some members ofthe group are lass than happy with the planned excursion. \Vactav did his best to leave the conference audience with a positive ot the work of his organisation (On one of the Roman tiles you can see the cof @ dog's paw, made before the clay had dried over two thousand years ago. Whether the book in 's tho one published in he USA is something you'l hhave to find out from the librarian, There's no ‘of Thea’ loyalty to the company; she has been with them for the past 15 years, ater al It took the minister some time to finally address the ‘of underfunding in education Liam won't be playing forthe team this Week —he ons muscle inlast weeks match. Christ was angry because she her dress on the door handle when she was geting into the car. Paco ‘ut ofthe house this morning — he must have got up late again 7m Test 3 Part 3 For questions 26-31, think of one word only which can be used appropriately nal three sentences. Here is an example (0). Example: (© Some ofthe tourists are hoping to get compensation forthe poor state ofthe hotel, and | think they have a very case. There's no point in trying to wad across the river, the current is far too If yourre asking me which of the candidates should get the job, I'm afraid | don't have any viows either way. Pl sIelolwle OOO00O000oo0o0 ‘Write only the missing word in CAPITAL LETTERS on the separate answer sheet. 26 Youcan aways (on family members to help you out Itis always important to. your change belore you leave the shop. Vanes {you as one of my closest friends, 27 The actress forgot he on the opening night af the play ‘This anizageing croam wll reduce... (on your face. Don't ever cross raiway ‘al this point: its far too dangerous, 28 When David heard the news, he was in a terble soca unt his wile managed tocalm him down, Each prospective member has to accept certain obligations in order to join the confederation, ‘The plans forthe renovation of the house really depend on the ww... of the foundations. 20 a Paper} Use of English Vrave the that some members ofthe group are less than happy with the planned excursion. \Vaciav did his best to leave the conference aucience with a posite of the work of his organisation. ‘On one of the Roman tiles you can see the (of a dog's paw, made betore the clay had dried over two thousand years ago. Whether the B00K In... Is the one published in the USA is something you'l have to find out from the librarian. Theres M0 on (of Thea's loyalty to the company; she has been with them for the past 18 years, after al, It took the minister some time to finally address the of underfunding in ‘education. am won'tbe playing forthe team this week he ‘muscle in|ast week's match. (Christ was angry because sho her dress on the door handle when she was geting nto the car. Paco ‘out ofthe house this morning he must have got up late again a Test 3 Part4 For questions 32-89, complete the second sentence so that It has a similar meaning to the first sentence, using the word given. Do not change the word given. You must use between three and ‘elght words, including the word given, Here is an example (0). Example: 9 Do you mind if watch you white you paint? objection Do you : you while you paint? 0 have ary abjaction ta my watching ‘Write only the missing words on the separate answer sheet. 32 Nobody wants to buy second-hand computor equipment these days. call There Is... : snes S@eonG-hand computer ‘equipment these days, 38 This letter cleay says that you are entilled to attend the meeting, Fight This loter makes . altend the meeting, 34 Martina was very annoyed that her son had borrowed her new bike great a borrowed hor new bike, R 37 38 39 Paper 3. Use of English You should never leave this door unlocked under any circumstances. Under .- left unlocked. “There is every certainty that Joe! will have finished the report by Monday. bound Joe! by Monday. (One day she's going to become a famous film star. matter Its only 1 famous film star Because of the appalling weather conditions, some trains will be delayed. subject ‘Some trains . because of the ‘appalling weather conaitions. | don't mind which make of car you choose. consequence te make of car you choose 2B Test 3 Part 5 For questions 40-44, read the following texts on television. For questions 40-43, answer with a ord ‘or short phrase. You do net need to write complete sentences. For question 44, write a summary according tothe instructions given. ‘rite your answers to questions 40-44 on the separate answer sheet, Supporters of television have always promoted it as a tool of public edification, an inexpensive provider of the best in drama, music and, of course, the news. In reality, however, it falls somewhat short of such ‘ideals. Flipping through my cight channels late one sleepless night, 1 didn't find the best of anything, quite the opposite in fact. tine 5 There is good television out there, though. Much of what we see is pleasant and relaxing - or at least harmless. And there is even a little bit of great television, which can make us rethink important social and political issues, or make us laugh until we forget about them. And even Ifthe majority of what's on television is mundane, what it says about the viewing public is not. When television condones or censors, it is ‘measuring the opinion of at least part of the population; when audiences boycott certain shows, they are demonstrating the other side of television's interactivity. And when the entire nation gets caught up in mne14 the life of a soap character who isn't even a real person, it’s more than a meaningless fad; we care about our TV because we identify so closely with it, We should recognise but understand its failures, as we do our own, 40 In your own words, explain what the write is refering to when he says quite the opposite in fact’ (ine 5) . 41. In your own words, explain what the writer means by television's interactivity’. (ine 14) 4 Paper 3 Use of English If we can‘t be celebrities ourselves, we at least like to think we know ‘one. ‘He's a really nice person, we say, with great authority, divulging some little detail to confirm our familiarity. Such information is what the TV programme Through the Keyhole provides. Whispering in confidential insinuations, the presenter takes us through a celebrity's house in their absence, casting spotlights on their lifestyle and personality that reveal their taste, or lack of it. His manner alternates between admiration and sneering superiority. The person is then unveiled to’a studio audience and joins in the discussion. All of this is intended to let the viewers feel they are on intimate terms with the celebrity and privy to all kinds of personal details. First you see their music collection, bookshelves and curtains, and then hear convivial conversation. This, of course, is not the first show in which we've been invited to fraternise with the famous in their own habitats. Indeed, the proliferation of such series would tend to confirm that TV has found a way of yet further extending that central role it has come to play in our social relations. Having created the celebrities in the first place, it now allows us to spend time in their company; these surrogate acquaintances taking the place of the real people we might just meet if we had the courage to hit the switch and venture forth into society. Sometimes we marvel at the opulence of their existence, more often we are reassured to find they are just ordinary people, much like us in fact. But most of all, we are able to say, ‘They are really nice people.’ In your own words, explain why the presenter of Through the Keyhole might sometimes feel ‘superiority (line 8) towards the celebrities featured in the programme. Which two phrases in the second paragraph reinforce the idea of Yamiliaity' (line 3) with the celebrities? Ina paragraph of 50-70 words, summarise in your own words as far as possible the ways in which, according to both texis, television plays a role in contemporary society, beyond that (of entertaining people. Write your summary on the separate answer sheet. Test 3 PAPER 4 LISTENING (40 minutes approximately) Part 1 ‘You will hear four different extracts. For questions 1-8, choose the answer (A, Bor C) which fis best according o what you hear. There are two questions for each extract Extract One ‘You hoar part of a talk about employment opportunites for actors 1 The speaker says that mast aciors who take temporary jobs do so because they 4 te 0st rancal node © owt obessn ter ase CE & beter sa Comma sing 2 He says the most satisfactory temporary jobs B help raise actors’ profiles © exploit actors’ existing skills A are found by actors’ agents, O Extract Two ‘You hear someone being interviewed about what's called 'muzak’, the type of recorded background ‘music often heard in public places. 3 According fo Richard well, how does ew art muzak’ compare to ordinary muzek? A tis ess intrusive, B_ tis equally accessible. 3 © tis more caratully chosen, 4 What do the to speakers disagree about? A. the role of muzak in shops a B the importance of silence in restaurants 4 © the need to improve people's working environment 76 Paper 4 Listening Extract Three ‘You hear part ofa talk about improving concentration, 5 The speaker's advice focuses on A a sequence of tasks, Ba method of relaxing © achange ofroutine. 6 According to the speaker, concentration is particularly affected by A. visual stimul B_ omotion. 6 © silence, ‘You hear part ofa radio programme about the theatre. 7 Who is being interviewed? A anactor — Ba playwright 7 © adirector LE |B Whats the man doing when he speaks? A accepting a criticism B denying an accusation 8 © defending a point of vow 7 Test 3 Part 2 You will hear part of a radio programme about a wildlife conservation project located in a disusod Industrial por. For questions 8-17, complete the sentences with a word or short phrase. Provious industries in Harford included the processing of both oil nd “Tony says that the port complex closed largely because 48] wore gotting ema. “The Marine Wildlife Trust was set up to raise awareness of the [ of the sea. At first, the port owners worried about the 42 | implications of accommodating the seals, “The Marine Widlife Trust persuaded the port owners that accepting the seals would be veer | a ‘The viruses affecting the seals are often spread by 44) which nave fallen into the sea, “Tony says thatthe seals recover because they are provided with 2 45 | and good food, Tony fees thatthe requirements for his job are a suitable background, a lot of 46 | and a knowledge of toxins Tony describes the seals in the complex as less 17 | than people expect 78 Paper4 Listening Part 3 ‘You will near part of an interview in which a professor of sociology is talking about the subject of leisure in Britain. For cuestions 18-22, choose the answer (A, B, C or D) which fs best according to what you hear. 18 19 a According to Professor Marshall, lisure is increasingly being seen as @ way of convincing people they have freedom of choice. helping people to understand themselves bettr. encouraging peopie to perform better at work. issuading people from challenging authority. com> According to US sociologists, ‘serious Ieisure"is an activity which i detrimental to someone's work becomes a financial burden, © becomes the central facus of someone's if D_ helps a person to achieve a higher income, a> Professor Marshall baieves that as people become more Invalved in their hoson leisure activites, thoy are less atraid of the dangers. they place a greater value on routine they worry less about the rues. they want more scope for personal development com> ‘According to Professor Marshall, television provides a useful basis for socal interaction ‘can disrupt other leisure activites. Js no more than a vary passive activiy destroys meaningful conversation. coa> Professor Marshall says that having to wear special clothes fo take part in a leisure activity 3 ‘A. improve the participants! respect for each other. B redefine the participants’ social roles. © increase the participants’ selmesteem D_ reflect the prions ofthe participants work environment. 8 79 Test 3 Part4 You will hear part ofa radio programme in which two writers discuss the appeal ofthe short story For questions 23-28, decide whether the opinions are expressed by only one of the speakers, or ‘whether the speakers agree, Write © forCialre, A. for Alan, of © B for Both, where they agree 23 | enjoy shor stories because I Ike varioty and qual 23 24 Critios have often been inaccurate in their description of my style of writing et 25 The appeal of wing short stories is being able to explore the world from ferent standpoints 28 Shot story witing and poetry wsting share some common features. 26 27 The skill involved in writing a navel isto dovalop the story lines. a 28 The short story holds a particular appeal for some readers. ~ 28 80 Paper 5 Speaking PAPERS SPEAKING (19 minutes) There are two examiners, One (the Interlocutor) conducts the test, providing you withthe necessary ‘materials and explaining what you have to do. The other examiner (the Assessor) willbe intraduced to you, but then fakes no further part in the interaction, Part 1 (3 minutes) Tho Intorlocuto fst asks you and your partner a few questions which focus on information about yourselves and personal opinions Part 2 (4 minutes) In this part of the test you and your pariner are asked to talk together. The Intarlocutor places a set of pictures on the table in front of you. This stimulus provides the basis for a discussion. The Interlocutor fist asks an introductory question which focuses on one or two of the pictues. After about a minute, the Interfocutor gives you both a decision-making task based on the same set of pictures. ‘The pictures for Part 2 are on pages C6-C7 of the colour section, Part 3 (12 minutes) You are each given the opportunity to talk for two minutes, to comment after your partner has spoken and to take part in a more general discussion, The Interiocutor gives you @ card with a question written on it and asks you to talk about it for two minutos. After you have spoken, your pariner is frst asked to comment and then the Interlocutor asks you both another question related to the topic on the card. This procedure is repeated, so that your partner receives @ card and speaks for two minutes, you are given an ‘opportunity to comment and a follow-up question is asked. Finally, the Interocutor asks some further questions, which loads to a discussion on a general theme related to the subjects already covered in Part 3. ‘The cards for Part 3 are on pagos C2 and C10 of the colour section. st Test 4 PAPER 1 READING (1 hour 30 minutes) Part 1 For questions 1~18, read the three texts below and decide which answer (A, B, © or D) best fits each gap. ‘Mark your answers on the separate answer sheet. Goat Racing [was about to witness goat racing, Easter Monday in Buccoo Village. | was fighting my way through ice-cream vans, (1)... of people, food stalls and hot music singeing my eardrums. Even though the ‘general movement was towards the racecourse, | (2)... my way through the crowds in an effort to get a good pitch. An area had been (3) ..1o make a course for competitors. Not quite on a (4) with established racecourses, but on the similar assumption that spectators were to line either side ‘of (6) ...of ground along which the participants would travel. An attempt was being made to keep ‘a handful of select goats in order. No mean feat when dealing with an animal fabled to eat almost anything it can get (6)... of 1A flocks B shoals © hordes D herds 2 A handed thumbed © fingered D elbowed 2A cordonedaft ——_—B chut away © penned ia closed down 48 standard B rule © par D nom 5A spread B stretch © space _D span 6 A ofp B hols © hang D grasp Canoe Trip AAs the day (7)... to a close, | started to think about the night ahead, and | (8)... with fear. The canoe was too wet o sleep in, there was nowhere to stop, and we hadn't seen ary vilages or huts since early morning. inthe dim moonlight, and withthe (9)... of our torch we could just make out the line ofthe cliffs; the torch batteries were (10) ..., 60 wa put in new ‘nes, but they cide’ work. Cbviousty we weren't going to be able io spot a camping place, A couple of ils lator, Lasley called 82 Paper 1 Reading ‘ut that she had seen a distant flickering light and our hopas (11) ..: the light ted out to be ‘mooniightglnting on waves; soon we could hear the roaring noiso of fact-rushing water, though we Couldnt see what was happening. Time (12)... sil, and we moved on, TA ted B pulled © drew D headed 8 A thurnpod B beat © thyobbed D shuddered 9A support B means © backing D aid 10 A dimming B failing © sinking D ainting 11 A soared B expanded © reared D ascended 12 A kept B waited © stood D remained How to be Presentation Perfect - we answer your questions _/| am not natural at making presentations, yt in my role as managing director | am increasingly required to present internally 10 my colleagues, (13) ... externally fo the major shareholders. How a0 | improve my presentational techniques and my contidence? You are not the only one. Making a presentation involves completely different skis from those you ‘ged to run @ company, yet more and more senior executives are (14)... tobe accomplished at I HY you are trying to convince your audience of something, you have to be convinced yoursel. Demonstrate your conviction in the passion and enthusiasm you (15)... othe presentation. That ‘means you must do your homework. Test your proposition careluly in advance. Ask colleagues 10 Identify the ‘hard questions’ your auclence might (16)... 10 you. You also need to build a positive climate from the (17)... Begin with an area of (18)... ground that people can identiy with and build gradually towards the conclusion you want to reach, 13 A letalone B nottomention © bosides D alongside 14 A demanded B called © expected D cesired 15 A bring B bear © convey D deliver 16 A make B request © propose D put 17 A outset B outcome © outlook D output 18 A mutual B common © shared D similar 83 Test 4 PAPER 1 READING (1 hour 30 minutes) Part 1 For questions 1-18, read the three texts below and decide which answer (A, B, © or D) best fits each gap. Mark your answers on the separate answer sheet. Goat Racing | was about to witness goat racing. Easter Monday in Buccoo Village. | was fighting my way through ice-cream vans, (1)... of people, food stalls and hot music singeing my eardrums, Even though the {goneral movement was towards the racecourse, | (2)... my way through the crowds in an effort to {get a good pitch. An area had been (3) ...o make a course for competitors. Not quite on a (4) With established racecourses, but on the similar assumption that spectators wore to line either side of a (6) ...of ground along which the participants would travel. An attempt was being made to keep ' handful of select goats in order. No mean feat when dealing with an animal fabled to eat almost anything it ean got (6) ... of 1A Tocks B shoals © hordes D herds 2 A handed B thumbed © fingered D catbowed 3A cordoned of ——_—B shut away © penned in D closed down 4 stangara Bue © par D norm 5 A spread B strtch © space _D span 6 A orp B hold © hang D grasp Canoe Trip [As the day (7) .. to a clase, I started to think about the night ahead, and | (8)... with fear. The canoe was 100 wel to sleepin, there was nowhere to stop, and we hadn't seen any vilagas or huts sinco early morning, In the dim moonlight, and with the (9)... of our torch we could just make out the line ofthe cfs; the torch batteries were (10) ..., $0 we pul in new ines, but they didn't work (Obviously we weren't going to be able to spot a camping place. A couple of mllos later, Lesley called 82 Paper 1 Reading fut that she had seen a distant fickering ight and our hopes (11) ..: the light turned out to be ‘moonlight ginting on waves; soon we could hear the roaring noise of fast-rushing water, though we ‘couldn't see what was happening. Time (12)... sil, and we moved on. T Aled B pulled © drow D headed 8 A thumped B beat © throbbed D shuddered 9 A support B moans © backing D aid 40 A dimming B tailing © sinking D fainting 11 A soared B expanded © reared D ascended 12 A kept B walted © stoos D remained How to be Presentation Perfect - we answer your questions. am not a natural at making presentations, yet in my role as managing dlrector | am increasingly required to present internally 10 my colleagues, (18) .. exornally to the major shareholders. How ‘ean | improve my presentational techniques and my confidence? ‘You are not the only one, Making a presentation involves completely diferent skls from those you need fo run @ company, yet more and more senior excoutivas are (14)... 0 be accomplished att I¥ you are trying to convince your audience of something, you have to be convinced yourset Demonstrate your conviction inthe passion and enthusiasm you (18)... the presentation. That ‘means you must do your homework. Test your proposition carefully in advance. Ask colleagues to ‘entity the ‘hard questions’ your audience might (16) ...o you. You also need to build a positive Climate from the (17)... Begin with an area of (18) ... ground that people can identify with and build gradually towards the conclusion you want to roach. 13 A lot alone B notio mention © besides, D alongside 14. A demanded B called © expected D desires 18 A bring B bear © comey D deliver 16 A mako B request © propose D put 17 A outset B outcome © outlook D output 18 A mutual B common © shared D similar Test 4 ‘Partz You are going to read four extracts which are all concerned in some way with the cinema, For ‘questions 19-26, choose the answer (A, B, C or D) which you think fits best according to the text. ‘Mack your answers on the separate answer sheet. Every Picture Tells a Story Adapting novels for film almost always involves a process of reduction, condensation and delet This can he veny frustrating forthe writer, but ale illuminating. Working na ssp, Twas struck by how much ofthe dialogue and narrative description in a glven scene in the novel I could dispense with, while still getting across the same point. This does not necessarily mean that the dialogue and description ofthe original were superfluous. It is matter of the type of attention demanded of he audience by narrative in each medium, anda matter ofthe type of redundancy each employs. I do not mean ‘redundancy’ in the usta colloquial sense ‘of material which is unnecessary, but ina technical sense. Ina novel, such redundancy would include the repeated allusion to cen tats by which characters are identified, as wel as speech tags such as ‘he said’ Strictly speaking a character trait needs to be described only once, But it assists comprehension If we are constantly -minded of it. And usually we ean infer who is speaking in a scene of dialogue from the content and layout on the page, but speech tags make reading Stage drama, which consists mostly of speech, imitates and reproduces the redundancy of real speech with various degrees of stylisation. In some modern dramas, this is taken to an extreme, so that the dialogue seems to consist almost entirely of redundant language, whose function is purely phatic (merely establishing contact between the two speakers), leaving us inthe dark as to what is being communicated. 19 The writer's experience of adaptation has shown him ‘A. how tiresome changing mediums can be for a write. 'B how an audience can influence decisions about redundancy © that as a writer he depends too greatly on dialogue. that the nature of redundancy varies with the medium, 20. What approach do some playwrights take towards conversational redundancy’? ‘They ignore it ‘They exploit it ‘They use it inconsistently. ‘They soe it as a necossary too. come 84 21 22 Paper 1 Reading Watching Movies Watching movies, one can be carried away to the degree that one feels part of the world of the moving picture. itis an experience that lifts one out of oneself into a world where one is not beholden to ordinary reality, at least for the length of the film. So it seems that what one feels and does while at the movies does not really count. But as soon as the lights are turned on, the spell is abruptly broken, one is again in the ordinary world. One does not feel responsible for the time spent under the spell of the film and, further, this unreality prevents ‘one from devoting much serious attention to what was considered in my boyhood not an art, but ‘mere entertainment’. This was how some people of our parents’ generation, and most of our teachers, disparaged the movies. Like most people, they liked to be entertained, but they did not consider the movies to be an art. ‘The writer suggests that for the duration ofa film ‘a unique set of circumstances prevails. ‘people fee! able to behave irresponsibly, people feel bettor abie to cape with reality. ‘everyday events take on @ new meaning com> ‘What does the writer suggest about the porcoption of watching movies as mere entertainment rather than art? It was a short-sighted view without foundation, Itstemmed from the nature ofthe activity twas expressed by those who did not ike the movies. reflected the quality of movies being shown. coa> 8s Test 4 The film studies ‘The site ofthe Leiper Film Company studios was a huddle of many disparate buildings, The topography of the place was irational and obscure. It possessed, certainly, a few permanent landmarks such as the Script Department, but forthe rest it appeared to be made up of numerous small rooms, identically furnished, which were employed for Official and unofficial confebuiations and could be distinguished! one from anather only by @ surrealist system of digits and letters of the alphabet, and to locate any articular one of these unaided was a considerable enterprise. More than anything else, perhaps, the studio lacked a focus. A decisive single main entrance might have provided this, but in fact there were three main entrances, severely egalitarian in their ‘amerities and with nothing to choose between them except that one of them gave. ‘access to the place where you wanted to arrive and the other two did not, and in none. of them was there anywhere where enquiries could be made and some species of orientation established. To the mere stranger it was all vastly confusing, Mere strangers, however, were few and far between, for obvious reasons, the ‘organisation did not encourage their presence. And it was to be presumed that People who worked there could find their way about all right. And oy these employees’ united labours, romance and adventure would travel the country. Hendin hand, head against shoulder, Jane and George, Sally and Dick would, for three hours at least, snatch immunity, by the studio's contriving, from domestic contention and, public strife, from tedium and malice and routine, and the struggle to keep alive. 23. Finding one’s way around the studios ‘was extremely ctficlt for visitors. confused even the staf. involved understanding the symbols on a plan, ‘was regarded as a kind of game, ‘ com> 24 The writer charactorises the productions of the film studio as artistic creations exploiting the dissatisfaction of audiences. ‘escapist fiction. reflecting the lives of ordinary people. gom> Paper 1 Reading Film-makers Almost everybody, it seems, wants to make a movie. Bookshops fill shelves with ‘how-to’ books about scriptwriting and film production. Fashionable universities offer courses ‘There are competitions offering the kind of hand-held camer that Robert Rodrigue used to make the film El Mariachi, which cost $7,000 to make and shot him from nowhere into the front line of American independent directors If ever dreams came true, they did for Rodrigues ~ and ahead of schedule. Recalling his 23rd birthday in his book about his Mariachi adventures, ie writes: ‘Orson Welles made Citizen Kane when he was 25. Spielberg made Jaws at 26. So I've only got two or three years to make my breakthrough, film. This was not alwaysso. When the studios ruled, film-makers were expected to take time to mature. They worked behind che scenes, as editors, writers or cinematographers. They learnt the job directing low-budget westerns or supporting short films. John Huston was 35 when he made his first film, The Maltese Falcon, Fred Zinnemann, the director of High Noon, only got into his stride in his forties. But nowadays, without the support system of, stuadios or television, aspiring film-makers are forced to be mavericks. 25 Why is Rodriguez used as an example in the first paragraph? A. Ho made a fim on a deliberately restricted budget. B_ His film has been compared to accepted masterpieces. © He learnt effectively from what he had read, D_ He showed how successful novice film-makers can be. 26 Under the studio system, film-makers Could work from the start on individual projects. developed a range of professional skills. adopted a narrow technical approach. \were always under pressure to succeed. gom> 87 Test 4 Part 3 You are going to read an extract from a novel. Seven paragraphs have been removed from the extract. Choose from the paragraphs A-H the one which fits each gap (27-33). There Is one extra paragraph which you do not need to use. ‘Mark your answers on the separate answer sheet, The Wrong Country Uncle chose for them a package holiday at a very reasonable price: tight rom Gatwick Airport, elie ght im Venice, tne Tarylang ety, in the Pensions Concordia. When Kelth and Dawe went together to the travel agency to make the beoking, the counter clerk explained that the other members of that paticular package were a school group tom the ‘euth coast, all of them learning lain. ut something want wrong, Ea LEE] ~—_ [At Gatwick they had handed thie tickets 10 a git in the yellowand-ed Yourkind-ot-Holisay uniform, ‘Sheld addressed them by name, had checked the elas on thor tickets and said that that was lovely ‘An four later it had surprised tham to hear eldery people on the plane talking in North of England ‘ccanis. Keith ‘said there must have been a ‘cancelation, or poss the lalian class was oo a second plan. ‘But the next morning, when it became apparent that they were being offered them forthe duration oftheir holiday they became alarmed. ‘We have the lake, and the water birds’ the receptionist smilingly explained ‘And we may take the steamer to Ineriaken. ‘An aror haa been made; Keith informed the man, keeping the register of Ns voice. even, for twas essential to be calm. He was aware of his wie’ agitated breathing close beside him, "Your group is booked twelve rights in the Edelweiss Hotel To make an alteration now, Si, If you have ‘changed your minds 88 "We haven" changed aur minds. There's been a mistake" “The recoptonist shook his head. He did not know about a mistake. ‘The man who made the booking’ Dawne interupted, was bald, wih glasses and a ‘mausiache’ She gave the name ofthe travel agency In London, 30 | ee ‘Again she gave the name of the travel agency and ‘described the bald-headed cauntor clerk, mentioning his spectacles and his moustache. Kethinteruptes het. it seems we got into the wong group. We reported tothe YourKind-a-Holiay git and lft tal toner "We should have known when they weren't fom Dover! Davie contributed. We heard them taking about Dartington: Keith made an impationt sound. He wished she'd leave te talking o him. a "Now, what | am endeavouring to say 10 you good people i tat all tekels and labels are naturally Sil, the yellow with the two rec bands: Mrs Franks suddenly laughed. So If you simply flowed othr people with the yolow-andved label you might Imagine you could end up in a wilde park! But of course; she adcad coating, that couldn happen in million years? = Mo ‘She saems quite kind? Dawne whispered, ‘that woman! Keith wasn stenng, He bed fo go over in his mind every single thing hal had eccurred: handing the gi the tickets, siting down to wat, and then the Gil loading tho way to the plane, and then the pilots ‘ice welcoming them aboard, and the air hostess vin the smooth black hair going round fo see that everyone's seat belt was fastened, — Keith walked out ofthe reception area and Dawne ‘ollowee him, On the forecourt ofthe hotel they cit Paper 1 Reading say to one another that there was an ity in the Calastophe that had occured. On thal rst holiday since their honeymoon they landed themselves ina Package four of edery people when the whole point the holiday was to escape the needs and demands of the elder. In his bossy way Uncle had said 50 himset! when they tied 10 persuade him to ‘accompany them, A "We noticed you at Gatwick? Keith said, We new you ware in charge of tings “And | notood you. | couniod you, tough | csaresay you cid see me doing tat, Naw, lt me ‘plan to you. Thore are mary places Your-Kind- CotHolday sends iis cents to, many diferent holidays at diferent prices. There are, for instance, vila holidays forthe adventurous unde ‘hiry-hoo.Thare are trakst Turkey, andl teks for ‘ingloa tothe Himalayas’ We were meant to be in Venice, In the Pensions Concordia? "1 donot know the name, ‘Switzeriana’ "A coach isto take us on. Aa ofl said so on the plane, She was here lastnight, that woman” sic This is © _'Nice to have some young people along? an elderly man's voice interrupted Keit's though "Nottage tho name is'Tho old mans wit was wth him, both of them looking asi hey were in thelr ‘ightos. They slept Ike logs, ho said, bost night sleep tney had for years, whic ofcourse ‘would be dio tothe lake ae. “That's ico: Dawne sai D The last ofthe elderly people slowly mado their ‘way ftom the dining room, saying good night as they went. A day would coma, Dawno thought. when they would go to Venice. on their oun inatve, with poopla tka the class from Dover ‘She imagined them in the Pansione Concordia, not one of ham a day older than themsoives. EE Ethorin th travel agoncy ora the checkin dosk, or insome anonymous computer, a smallcalamty was conceived. Davin and Ketth ended up in & hotel called me Edevelss, in Room 212, ‘Somewhere in Switzerian. F ‘Wee not meant to be in Switzerland! Keith doggedly prsistec. ‘Well, les just so0, shat wo? UUnexpoctecy, Mrs Franks tumed and went away, leaving them standing. The receptionist was no longer bohind the reception desk. The sound of ‘typing could be heard G ‘Some problem, have we?’ a woman sai, beaming at Keith. She was the stout woman he had referred to as an official, They'd seen her taking to the yellow-and-fed gl at Gatwick. On the plane shed walked Up and down the aise, smiling st people. ‘My namo is Franks sho was saying now.‘Tm martied tothe man withthe ba leg ‘aro_you In charge, Mrs Franks?” Oawne lenguied."Only were in he wrong note” H_ They ordered two arinks, and ten two more."The coactil lake us on’ a stout woman vith spectacles announced when they touched dow, ‘Koop all togather now There boon no mention cf an overnight stop inthe brechure, but whan the tach draw inate destination, Keith explained thal that was clearly what this was. Ae thoy slapped out of the coach was case on midnight fatigued and tavel-saned, they did not fool Ike questioning their right to the beds they were fered 89 Test 4 Part4 You are going to read an extract from a newspaper article. For questions 34-40, choose the answer (A,B, Cor D) which you think fits best according tothe text ‘Mark your answers on the separate answer sh HE WAS A PEOPLE PERSON American executives are adopting the polar explorer Ernest Shackleton as & made of you management Blane Price reports Most people in Bian know who Sir Erne Shacketon was anctbaves rough des of whathe dd Atria, howe as ‘rly jst discovered hin ~ although the Wal Ser urls ‘descption of Sbcketon caer tis year a ‘an Antnce ‘explorer whose feats went all burunnotird Formos fhe 2othcemtry staking thngstoo fe Beno eames axe maling up for lose ume with powerful enthstas, Biographies and accountsaf Use voyage of he ete proton andre expected to spring off the sees a ist ‘stheyaresticod he American MiseumofNaural sory mounting + grand exhision; aed Colembia Tsar Preparing im based onshacketon sli. Some American managers have so sloped Shackleton asiconand exemplar Hsslr appointed spentestecountte falls ofhis dees with ve; they extract lesson in eet Ship and communicasons a parle for spin doce; nd Ise efer wo eachother sspeskng Shack The cermined, esourcefl Shackleton, with is edees Sleeping bg (ur ede) and ble sow hs baa ‘model formicdern management consents, Tim MacGregor, the managing parter of Abernathy MacGregor Rank in New Yor, took Shaclton for 3 role _model years ago. His frm species i comanmicarion Aspect of mergers and equtslons and orporte cies Sudha? Such asthe oe plan Rew hale en Fences tog Wile nos forgetting tht hacen served ‘amen publ relations for a Glasgow sel wor, maybe 2 tele dealt to spot naam the eeleance of ling out ‘elas iofalbstrostinaub-zero temperatures to puting Splnan derivatives trading disse forte Internet "ren ifscompany manages crise beau can sulleilototharmby communicating badly aboot what doing says MaeCregoe Shackleton a mode for manage ‘ment because ois qulitessa leader and communist ed his ales in order He was ais best when he and ‘ose dependent on him hada great deal to low sch ak thet lies In some ways the most Gscnating decison ShacKeton made was totum bck wes onl 97 miles fom ‘hou ole That ipexpained bse forthe next ‘one: the ves of his men were parsmount’ The refers to ShacKleon’sexpediuon to reach te South Poe in (308 ‘when, 97 malls shoe of ther objeie, ith unforeseen “eh draining tetsupplesandimtedimeto getbackto 90 ht ship Shacston made the courageous ad df ‘econ tte bach ‘nacr naacregor people wanton someone \sincharge Whereas no the tendency fr anaes dhuckand squirm, Shalom wa pepe san and accept rponsiiy Hin 1914 exon was the one at ieametiewaefegend leche Ean defor "in monte nthe pele sd wis aly ered ye foes When talent dow, Shetek sen, “weshonldllevently chaired you cone tue todo your utmost and eo st me eo al he ‘cco ss the mea hp ts lee hee wos heer sina the Hoe wast hae Sclcon thought everything tugh, planed freer een, Apt it men conn non ad sug see opi tenn ngs MacGregor He we sda ling to lego ‘when seeing ws ot and wat sec Wee Pl ‘sive eof pips here hat Sacto tse {Centre ele oe sory wats ecg they Bony ey Sackston belived th an explorer ness opinion, ysl endrance snd psteceOn oft bares things {odoin despre sense ntingesecaliyin Ameo kurt nal opp tang eso ing SauveyentusGegorl uty bondesl gies rong ‘heintcretater Jou hg deranderentaly youl gt Yyourmoneybacio fei and sell op ould nen ge Tove Equal dn’ be alisidto ange your pansy ‘otworkngIanew prod ster don hep eng Shacleton ety example On the voyage ick be alae be oie Hrey oe exped ok pong oes He ced bis ow on Hu sng dd Putten one wouldthow them oreoad Someone elt ‘emembered undoing thane ting witha acl when theywerenearauving oie 0Sexpedton esd hd Ievettintesnow halons pounds coud avout thr bc As Craliae lear suo of Efe human accoon of htexpedion ays "The pc appetite for eric ender ren Seaton expense fecha there sot here ging on ow Ere ing ‘Se ils and er sundig be gstae eo ‘neat ofthe ht were so wil for noma 7 39 Paper 1 Reading “The writer says in the first paragraph that American enthusiasm for Shackleton reveals ‘A a cortain amount of ignorance concerning his existing reputation, Ba tendency to exaggerate his achievements, © the extent to which all explorers capture the public imagination. their strong dosire to learn from the past. In te second paragraph, the writer implies that some American managers ‘A have based their view of Shackleton on inaccurate information. B regard Shackleton as-@ man who was ahead of his time © _are mocked for their enthusiasm for Shackleton, D_ misunderstand what Shackleton actually di ‘What does the writer say in the third paragraph about using Shackleton as a role model? A. tis wise to take Shackleton’s experiences outside the field of exploration into ‘consideration, Itis more appropriate in some business circumstances than in others, Connecting Shackleton’s experiences with those of managers requires some imagination. People who do so often find it hard to explain why he is relevant, coo According to Jim MacGregor, Shackleton's decision to end the 1908 expedition ilustrates ‘A his ability to foresee the effect his actions would have on his reputation. his wilingness to accept responsibilty for mistakas that were not his fault © his ability to put the interests of others above his personal ations. his willingness to make decisions that others might criticise him for. MacGregor uses Shackleton's behaviour during the 1914 expedition > to toach managers the need to make decisions and then stick to them. B_ to educate managers without implying thal they themselves have shortcomings. © to inspire managers by showing them how highly others think of them. D_ to point out to managers the importance of leting others make decisions. ‘According to MacGregor, the culture in America is such that failing to take action when its necessary is commonplace. ‘managers frequent lack confidence in the decisions they make, ‘managers impulsively change decisions they have made. ‘aking action when iis inadvisable to do so fs commanplace. o> c D {nthe final paragraph, we are told that Shackleton's actions were ofa kind that ‘many people wish were more prevalent today. ‘many people consider pleasantly eccentric these days. ‘many people regard as no longer worthwhile these days. ‘many people ty to emulate these days. a> v0 on Teed PAPER 2 WRITING (2 hours) Part 1 ‘You must answer this question. Write your answer in 800-960 words in an appropriate style. 1 Lifestyles magazine is intending to produce a special edition on consumer choice and how we decide what to buy. Readers are asked to submit articles expressing their own opinions in response to the comments below. You decide to write an article. —— When we go shopping we are all influenced by the { media. They havea huge | We buy things because we effect on dictating the latest ran thm and pot tensa sos Recast we eal ned the 7 a a cs write your article. 2 Paper 2 Writing Part2 Write an answer to one of the questions 2-5 in this part. Write your answer in 300-350 words in an appropriate styl, 2 Aweekly magazine, The Good Times, has been publishing a series of readers’ letters withthe ile A cay that changed my ite forthe better, The Editor has asked people to send in letters to share their positive experiences with others. You decide to contribute. Write your letter. Do not wilte any postal addresses. 3 An international magazine is conducting a survey amongst its readers into television viewing habits around the world. It has invited readers lo send in reports on television in their own ‘countries covering the following areas: the variety of programmes aveilable, the popularity of particular kinds of programmes and the role television plays in people's lives, ‘Write your report. 4 A publishers planning a book about festivals and customs from around the world. The publisher has asked people to submit proposals about what should be included on the festivals and ‘customs which are unique to their own countries and which also maintain important traditions. ‘You decide to submit a proposal to the publisher about your country Write your proposal 8 Based on your reading of one of those books, write on one of the following: (a) Brian Moore: The Colour of Blood "in order to avoid another decade of violence in his country, Cardinal Bem has to rely on the help cof people who would normally be his opponents: Write an essay for your tulor describing how the Prime Minister (General Francis Urban) and the union organiser (Jop) help him and their reasons for doing so. ‘Write your essay, (b) Anne Tyler: The Accidental Tourist Your tulor has asked members of the class to review modem English or American novels which feature family Ife. Write a review of The Accidental Touristin which you focus on the Leary family, ‘showing how Macon Leary is influenced by and escapes from his family background, Write your review. (©) LP Harlley: The Go-Between Alitorary magazine is running a series on the treatment of childhood in Iterature and has asked readers to send in articles on the topic. You decide to send in an article about the loss of childhood innocence in The Go-Between, describing how Leo's vist to Brancham Hall marked a significant turning point in is ie ‘Write your article 93 Test 4 PAPER 3. USE OF ENGLISH (1 hour 30 minutes) Part 1 For questions 1-18, road the text below and think of the word which best fils each space. Use only ‘one word in each space. There is an example at the beginning (0), \Write your answers in CAPITAL LETTERS on the separate answer sheet EW OOOOOO0Oo00o0 Example Letter from a Genius In 1912, the world’s top mathematicians began to receive letters which were (O)...fUl... of increcbly complex formulae. They came from Madras, in India, (1 ‘lork named Srinivasa Ramanujan had seemingly (2)... Up with hundreds of new solutions {© known mathematical problems (3). 1a 28.year-old accounts any form of assistance or taining. For the most (4), the professional mathematicians’ response was the usual one ©). faced with eccentric letters: they consigned them straight (6)... the bin. But in 1913, some reached G. H. Hardy a leading authoriy in number theory at Cambridge University. He, 100, initially dismissed the letters (7). the work of an eccentric, but unable to (8). them out of his head, he eventually subjected them to closer scrutiny. After afew hours, Herdy arrived (8). the conclusion that what he had (10). him was the work of a mathematical ganius, a view annfiemacl hy cellaaguas with (14). he sharod hie diccovery Before very (12) . Ramanujan had recelved an invitation to Cambridge and, once there, he ‘s00n proved (13).. forth. fruitful collaboration with Hardy (14)... in the opening up ‘of vast areas of mathematical research, sill being worked on 10 (18) vrnnon 34 Paper 3 Use of English Part 2 For questions 16-25, read the text below. Use the word given in capitals atthe ond of some of the lines to form a word that isn the space inthe same line. There is an example at the beginning (0). ‘Write your answers in CAPITAL LETTERS on the separate answer sheet Examph SWEl@E MW eNO 0A000040 Lack of pastures new Human activity made is mark on land use and (0)..1%A¢%A2t. in coastal ragions of southern Europe long botore the first (16)..eee holidays arrived, By classical times, these areas had already seen extensive (17)ennnnne BY natural and human activity, and the process continues today, ‘The hospitable ciate of the area, long appreciated in iterature as well as holiday brochures, produces seasonal variations in levels of sol (18). ‘and consequently in plant growth, In an area where (19) frequently there was a distinctive sol type at one time, with plants which had ‘adapted to i. Nowadays though, this sol cover Is no longer in (20) anywhere in the region, The early yoars of the 1980s were (21). dry and this exacerbated problems brought about by the (22) ‘growth of Industry In rural areas nd the intensification of agricuiture. Pollution and insufficient water supplies hhave bacome problems to which the landscape is increasingly (23). ‘The more recenty this type of land has falon out of use, the longer I takes for plant cover to reestabish sel The European Union has set up a programme of (24)... gradation in southem Europe, involving forty-our universes in the (25)... of data which can be used to inform the policy decisions needed to-deal with te issue. into lana VEGETATE PACK ERODE Moist exist EXCEPT ‘SUBSTANCE SENSE SEARCH GATHER, 95 Test 4 Part 3 For questions 26-31, think of one word only which can be used appropriately in all three sentences. Here isan example (0). Example: © Some ofthe tourists are hoping to get compensation for the poor stato ofthe hotel, and | thnk thoy have a very case. There's no point in trying to wade across the river, the currents far too IW you're asking me which of the candidates should get the job, I'm afraid | don't have any views either way. leilsittligliolvig TIOOOO0000005 Write only the missing word in CAPITAL LETTERS on the separate answer sheet. 28 There are several courses of action to the government The job is sit ityouie interested The two boxers looked at each other with host. 27 From what the police spokesman said, we that hold been arrested. The car reply speed as it went down the hil. ‘The crowela in the squars to catch a glimpse uf Ue sta 28 The sports club is dependent on the lacal council for financial ‘Some famous celebrities have agreed to lend their to the campaign, Most tall buildings have. steel frames in order to provide the necessary level of structural 96 Paper3 Use of English 29 When he gods to an Indian restaurant, Henry will always the hottest curry ‘on the menu, “The ship's captain Is going 10 wsesstnesse the crew to cast off at dawn, Writers should always their thoughts before putting pen to paper. 30 InAgatha Christie's crime stories, the detective always solves the nnn snes OFWHO the murderer is, ‘Angela invariably dresses in black and has an air of... sees DOU HAT. a bidder paid six million doliars for the Impressionist painting at yesterday's auction in New York. 31 Lean being with Julio when he's in a bad mood, ‘The fans said they would ‘outside the stage door until the band appeared. Do you think Sam willbe able to .. the suspense of waiting for his present? Test 4 Part 4 For questions 32-89, complete the second sentence so that it has a similar meaning to the fist ‘sentence, using the word given. Do not change the word given. You must use belween three and feght words, including the word given. Here is an example (0). Example: © Do you mind if watch you while you paint? objection 10 you you while you paine? ° have any objection to my watering \rite only the missing words on the separate answer sheet 32 There are fewer goose on the nature reserve than there were ten years ago. declined ‘Tho number of geese on the nature reserve ten years. 38 | asked Sally to write us a shor letter to lat us know that she's arived safely. arop | asked aly... to lotus know that she's arived safely 34 Alan felt that it was unforgivable that Jane hadn't replied to his invitation. fallure Alan fel that oo : was unforgivable, 98 7 39 Paper 3 Use of English "Marisa thought it woild be possible for somacne to turn the old vase into a plant po. made ‘Marisa thought that 7 ? scans & Plant ol Jeremy usually plays football on Saturdeys, habit Jeremy is, football on Saturdays. When he was at his most successtul, the president had enormous influence. height at » the president had enormous intuence. ‘Shula is one of the few students to use the library extensively. majority nike ‘extensive use of the library. For me, his skill as a negotiator wes most impressive, how Iwas most negotiator he was. 99 Test 4 Part 5 For questions 40-84, read the following texts on aiferent branches of science. For questions 40-43, answer with a word or short phrase, You do nat need to write complete sentences. For question 44, \wite a summary according to the instructions given. \rite your answers to questions 40-44 on the separate answer sheet. Science is concerned with the observation of the world around us and with devising plausible explanations for the events that are observed. ‘There is nothing very mysterious about it, but its explanations have to be real explanations, and really convincing, and they are rarely final because each explanation raises new questions. It is not until people working in a particular branch of science have accumulated large numbers of observations and have devised satisfactory explanations for them that they can start to make predictions. This takes time. Ecologists are still accumulating tines observations and devising explanations. Their science is growing rapidly, but it does not yet allow them to make many precise, relidble predictions. It is not their fault, or that of their science, but only that their discipline is very young. This explains some of the worry and confusion that surrounds environmental issues. We are aware that problems exist, but uncertain about how serious they are or how to solve them without creating still ‘more problems with our solutions. We need more information, and when scientists respond to environmental controversies by demanding ‘more research they are not usuelly trying to evade the issue, or enhance tne 19 their own careers. They really do need to know more. What ecologists have learned so far can be summed up very simply: the world is a great 40 a 100 deal more complicated than anyone thought. ‘To what does This refer in ine 9? Why does the wirter say that scientists ‘are not usually trying to evade the issue"? (ine 19) Paper 3 Use of English In recent times, systematic study of the Earth and its atmosphere is an activity that has accelerated and now there is a wide range of specialisms focusing on different aspects such as meteorology and geology that together can be called by the relatively new name of ‘geoscience’. ‘Throughout the centuries, there has been a growth in scientific knowledge and understanding of the air we breathe and the land that supports us. However, the 21st century will see science that is more structured and organised than formerly, Scientists observe, explain, predict and construct hypotheses to formalise this activity. Scientific advances occur when observations, measurements or other data cannot, be explained by current theory. The advances usually involve increasing the complexity of the ideas, and the accompanying equations, to incorporate these ‘exceptional’ events. The physicist Richard Feynman likened this process to trying to work out the rules of chess from a small number of snapshots of the game. Despite this complexity, advances have been made, through thousands of individuals and teams observing, attempting to explain patterns, hypothesis-construeting, predicting, experimenting, data collecting and publishing in the areas of science where their natural curiosity and training have led them. In the future, it is likely that large teams with experts in different fields will collaborate to understand the complex nteractions of the Earth’s systems. linea Which phrase inthe first text is similar in meaning to the relatively new name’ in the second text? (ine 4) ‘What point is the writer making when he mentions what Richard Feynman said about analysing data? Ina paragraph of 50-70 words, summarise in your own words as far as possible what both texts say about why scientilic knowledge constantly develops. Write your summary on the ‘separate answer sheet. 101 Test 4 PAPER 4 LISTENING (40 minutes approximately) Part 1 You will hear four diferent extracts. For questions 1-8, choose the anewer (A, B or C) which fits bost according to what you hear. There are two questions for each extract. [se You hear part of a radio programme about fame 1 In the speaker's opinion, Hollywood stars of the past wore ‘A remote from the public. B famous fora varlety of reasons. © protected trom scandal 2 What does the speaker think celebrities nowadays shuld do? A accept the temporary nature of fame B exploit the potential oftheir situation © avoid comparisons with younger rivals ay You hear part of radio programme about developments in instruments used in dance orchestras, 3 The first speaker explains that improvements to drumkits in the early twentieth century ‘A. ‘eflected the pace of musical change. B__ were introduced by practising musicians. © came about quite by accidont 4 According to Ralph Burton, hs brethor Vie was the first person to ‘A introduce a popular style of dance musi. B invent a new form of drumming equipment. © change a particular instruments use. 102 Paper 4 Extract Three ‘You hear part ofan interview with the fl crc lan King, who is discussing a now fl, 5 Ian thought that, in general, the special effects in the film A wore aimed at a wide age range. B_ helped to speed up the narrative, © were generally very-creatve, {6 What did an distke about the fn? A. the development ofthe plot B the way itwas shot © the quality ofthe acting Extract Four You hear part of a football commentary on the radio 7. The speaker says that Wynaham United won the match ‘A. although they didn't deserve to. B_ bocause of an early goal © because they were the fer team, ‘8 Whal does the speaker say about the players’ behaviour during the match? A He disapproves of the way it was handled He thinks it got out of hand faltly soon after half-sime. © He thinks the referee intervened too hasty Listening 103 Test 4 Part 2 You will hear an interview with Potor Simon, a farmer from Scotland who keeps llamas, animals ‘which are native to South America. For questions 9-17, complae the sentences with a ward or short phrase Betore they became farmers, Peter and Ann worked Ina family-run 8 | frm in London, son ste tan etme tis [ = The nature ofits coat ensures that the llama doesn't lose 4" ‘The persistent cain in Scotland caused 12 | disorders inthe lamas, Peter got round the problem caused by the ain by puting up 48] tortnottamas. ‘An unexpected result of having the lamas is that 14] is now replacing other sorts of vegetation. To supplement their income, the Simons have renovated a farm building for use as a 8 For Peter, the most unexpected thing about the Iimas is theit 16 Peter uses the word ———— a 417 | to describe the sound made by the lamas. Paper 4 Listening Part 3 ‘You will hear a radio interview with Maureen Kemp, a ballet dancer. For questions 18-22, choose the answer (A, B, C or D) which fits best according to what you heer. 18 Maureen got expert ballet training through ‘Aa special teacher at her normal school. B_partime classes ai a famous school. © going away to a special boarding school D> extra classes at her frst dancing school 8 19 Hor frst experionce of work with a choreographer ‘A was surprisingly unthreatening. B_accurred before she fet ready. © increased her desire for success. 1D was dificult because of the personal retationship, 49 20. Maureen finds working on a new piece ‘A. physically demanding. B_ emotionally exhausting © anorve-racking experience, Dan unrewarding task. 21 Maureen does not want fo croate dances herself because A. she is too proud to accept cxtcism. B she proters other kinds of creative activity. © she cannot find appropriate inspiration D__ she has difcully developing her ideas fully a 22 Thinking about hersotf as a performer, Maureen ‘A. loves the opportunity o show off B values the importance of technique, (© likes the chance to intaract with the audience. draws inspiration from the roles she plays, 105 Test 4 Part 4 ‘You will hear part of a discussion in which two friends, Gordon and Martha, are discussing current issues in education, For questions 23-28, decide whether the opinions are expressed by only one of the speakers, or whether the speakers agree. Write @ for Gordon, M. for Martha or B for Both, where they agree. 23. Ithink educating chien athome is avery postive move. 2 24 Socialsing wih other chin is important a 25 I belev hat chieron have to lean to deal with diticutes. 2% 26 Ainatod toonagers can cause @lat of problems inthe communi. | 27 Itwould be much easier to orgarise diferent acts forjust afew citron. [| a] 2 Nos nw here in eceaton jt ad tan ncteasd burn franco, 2 106 Paper S Speaking PAPER 5 SPEAKING (19 minutes) There are two examiners. One (the interlocutor) conducts the test, providing you withthe necessary ‘materials and explaining wat you have to do. The other examiner (the Assessor) willbe introduced 1o you, but then takes no futher par in the interaction. Part 4 (3 minutes) “The interlocutor frst asks you and your partner a few questions which focus on information about yourselves and personal opinions. Part 2 (4 minutes) ln this part of the test you and your partner are asked to talk together. The Interlocutor places a set of pictures on the table in front of you. This stimulus provides the basis for a discussion. The Interlocutor first asks an intraductory question which focuses on one or two of the pictures After ‘about a minute, the Intelacutor gives you both a decision-making task based on the same set of pictures, The pictures for Part 2 are on pages C8-C8 ofthe colour section. Part 3 (12 minutes) You are each given the opportunity to talk for two minutes, to comment after your partner has spoken and to lake part in a more general discussion. The Interiocutor gives you a card with @ question written on it and asks you to talk about it for two minutes. After you have spoken, your partner is first asked to comment and then the interlocutor asks you both another question related to the topic on the card. This procedure is repeated, 60 that your partner receives a card and speaks for two minutes, you are given an ‘opportunity to comment and a follow-up question is asked. Final the interlocutor asks eome further questions, which leads to a discussion on a general ‘theme related ta the subjects already covered in Part 3 “The cards far Part 3 are on pages C2, C10 and C11 of the colour section, 107 Test 1 Key Paper 1 Reading (1 hour 30 minutes) Part 1 (one mark for each correct answer) ie 2De38 46 sp 6A 78 (OA e1EB. 2D 138 1D asic 18 B Part 2 (two marks for each correct answer) A MC 2A BB 2B WA Part 3 (two marks for each correct answer) 27H 2%F 29C 30A SB 328 Part 4 (two marks for each correct answer) 34C 35B 36B 387A 38 B 39D Paper 2. Writing (2 hous) Task-specific mark schemes Question 1: Dilemmas Content Money and its relationship with happiness. ‘Major points for discussion: ‘* many people in the world are now richer than they were © you don’t need money to he happy Further relevant point: © most people inthe world are not richer than they were Range Language for expressing and supporting opinions. Appropriacy of register and format Register appropriate to an essay. Organisation and cohesion 8D, .9C 16A. 17°C 25B 26D 33. G 40D Adequate use of paragraphing, Clear organisation of content with suitable introduction and conclusion, Target reader Tutor would be able to follow the discussion and understand the writer's point of 108 Test 1 Key Question 2: Leisure Today Content Letter should explain what they collect, give details about how they collect and account for satisiaction derived from hobby. Range Language of description, narration and explanation, Appropriacy of register and format Consistently appropriate for leter to magazine. Organisation and cohesion - Adequately organised in paragraphs. Clear introduction and conclusion. Target reader ‘Would be interested in and informed about the hobby/collection described. Question 3: The 50 Best Holiday Destinations Content Report should cover the following areas, where appropriate: accommodation, ood, leisure facilities, places of interest and nightlife (some of these poines may be combined). Should conclude with recommendation. Range Language of description and recommendation, Appropriacy of register and format Register appropriate to a report ~ may or may not include headings/sub-headings, Organisation and cobesion Clearly organised and paragraphed, Target reader ‘Would be clearly informed about the destination. Question 4: A Day That Changed My Life Content Article should describe an experience which had an important effect on candidate and say what the consequences were, Range Language of description and narration, Appropriacy of register and format Register appropriate for a magazine. Organisation and cobesion Clearly organised and paragraphed. ‘Target reader ‘Would be interested in the writer's experience. 109 Test 1 Key Question S(a)s The Day of the Tifids Content Exciting and entertaining: the dramatic beginning throughout, the frightening encounters with Trffids the threat ofthe Trifds’ increased powers (apparent hearing and learning) Bill's search for Josella the exciting escape at the end people's behaviour — how fear, etc leads to cruelty and violence satellites ~ how the tragedy was of human making the threat of biological weapons the danger of genetic engineering (Underlined points must be included ~ bulleted points are suggested relevant information.) Range Language of description, narration and evaluation. Appropriacy of register and format Consistently neutral/informal register suitable for fellow readers Organisation and cohesion ‘Well organised and paragraphed with an appropriate introduction and conclusion. Target reader ‘Would have a clear idea of the book's plot and content and of the writer’ view of the story. Question 5(b): Our Man in Havana Content Information about Beattie’ character and capabilities from: * information from HQ in London * behaviour at Milly's parry and assessment of herself asa “erazy type * enthusiastic way she goes about organising the office but says ‘what happens alter work is real + after Raul’s death, works hard at warning other agents, despite the bizarre circumstances «alte: Hasselbacher’s death, shows no surprise when Wormold confesses 4 Iaughs about the drawings ‘her final statement at HQ in London and ideas about the value and definition of ‘loyalty’ (Underlined point must be included ~ bulleted points are suggested relevant information.) Range Language of description, narration and evaluation. Appropriacy of register and format Register consistent and appropriate for a general interest magazine, no - Test 1 Key Organisation and cohesion Well organised and paragraphed. ‘Target reader ‘Would have some insight into Beatrice’s character, the situations that faced her and how she deale with them. Question 5(c}: The Accidental Tourist Content Information about Jolian’s character from: ‘his background ~ boats, blazers, sunburnt nose ‘© hiis amusement at Macon ‘his kindness over the turkey and Rose's distress «his understanding of Macon’s relationship with Muriel Information about Julian's relationships from: * his relationship with Rose ~ impressed by her qualities (care for the brothers, good organiser) ~ has great respect for her * his relationship with Macon —he is amused by him, but understands him well — he accepts Macon’s advice © his relationship with the whole Leary family ~he is intrigued by their ‘unconventional ways and eager to join them as a family member (Underlined points must be included ~ bulleted points are suggested relevant information.) Range Language of narration, description and evaluation. Appropriacy of register and format Consistent register, appropriate for letter to magazine. Organisation and cobesion Snitable introduction and conclusion, well organised and paragraphed. Target reader ‘Would have a clear idea of the character and the part he plays inthe novel. Paper 3 Use of English (1 hour 30 minuces) Part 1 (one mark for each correct answer) 1 come/ learnt learned 2 at 3 gone 4 then 5 nothing 6 from 7 such 8 again 9 with 10 wide 11 as 12 ourselves 13 rather 14 what 15 although / though / while / whilse Part 2 (one mark for each correct answer) 16 drawbacks 17 autonomous 18 attendance 19 sufficiently 20 dreadfully 24. pressing 22 imaginative 23. expertise 24 immersion 25 invaluable Test 1 Key Part 3 {ewo marks for each correet answer} 26 reduced 27 doubled 28 complete 29 heavy 30 face 31 hand Part 4 (one mark for each correct section} 32. was held up (1) + by / because of / due to / owing to / on account of fas result of unforeseen (1) 33. wasn’t / was not anything (else) (that) I could do (1) + except / other than / but / apart from (1) (NB: maximum of eight words) 34 ‘without her brother / brother’ (1} + having advised / advising her when / while (she was) (1) OR without the advice (1) + of her brother when / while on (1) 35. subject t0 (1) + the council / councils agreeing / rhe council's agreement (1) OR the agreement of the couneil (1) 36 was her trainer's foreign accent (1) + which made / was making (1) 37 does Tim get (1) + the / any / an f opportunity to play (1) OR (any) ‘opportunities to play (1) OR a/ the / any chance to play / of playing (1) 38 drew our (1) + attention 10 (1) 39) are asked to / requested to (1) + remain seated /in their seats (1) Part $ (questions 40-43 two marks for each correct answer} 40 clown / infest / stench AL inappropriace smells atthe wrong time / smells getting mixed up paraphrase of ‘plan going awry’, eg. things going wrong 42. because perfume houses / they rely (more / heavily) on science / technology / computers (to create a perfume] 43. paraphrase of ‘makes visual the scent patterns’, eg. you can see smells 44 ‘The parageaph should include the following points i confusion / mixing of smells ii smells that are difficult ro get rid of (when you want to) iii. some smells are unpleasant iv_nowadays, perfume companies can produce any kind of smell ‘many new perfimes are very strange OR strange-smelling perfumes are Paper 4 Listening (40 minutes approximately) Part 1 (one mark for each corsect answer) fe 20 8A 4s See 6 7c | ae Part 2 (one mark for each correct answer) 9 distribution 10 drainage (ofthe land) 11. wings 12 jewel(s)/ gems) 13 blue-tailed 14 largered 15 still 16 dawn/ sunrise 17 survey Part 3 (one mark for each correct answer) i6C WA Gon 2c 2 4 412 S Test 1 Key Part 4 (one matk for each correct answer) 231 24M Transcript PART 1 Extract 1 2B 6B 27M 8B Gontifcate of Proficiency in English Listening Test Tet 1 Tm going to give you the instructions for tis test introduce each part ofthe test and give you time to look at the questions, At the start of each piece you'll bear this sounds tone You'll bear each piece neice Remember, while you're listening, write your ansiwers on the question paper You'll have five minutes atthe end of the test to copy’ your anstwers onto the separate answer sheet. ‘There will now be a pause. Please ask any questions mow, because you must riot speak during the tes. [pause] Now open your question paper and fook at Part One. Ipausel You'll bear four different extracts For questions 110 8, choose the answer (Ay B or C) which fits est according to what you bear. There are two questions for cach extract. [pause ‘Tho robbery was captured on the bank’s high-quality video cameras and they ‘managed 10 get quite a few good shots ofthe robbers. Later, same people were arrested and | was sant some oftheir clothes andthe bank film and asked, ‘Can you see any ofthe clethig items on the fm?’ And | went through te flm and found a number of good shots showing this one particular maskod bank robber ‘and hs bi jeans, Now people keep ther jeans fora long period and wit time they get these ‘marks on them; spots where the blue dye gets rubbed away. Along the seams, ‘this arrangement of bright spots and dark places where the dye hasst been rubbed away looks lke a computerised bar code, And for me i's ikea fingerprint, because every one is slighty diferent ‘And in the ral, tha defence actually brought me in as an expert witness and, ‘though the guy ovned thirty-four pairs of jeans, we found the one from the film ‘and that was enough to convict him. [pause] [The recording is repeated] [pause] 43 ‘Test 1 Key Extract 2 Interviewer: Teacher: Interviewer: Extract 3 4 Intorviowor: Playwright: {pause} ‘This far we've discussed the effect and the experience of the students. Now what, sort of effect have schoo rps had on you? What sort of responsibities, for instance, have you nad? Wel, obviously i's broadened my mind as wel, but it certainty broadened my ‘educational experience. Its certainly been the case that realised in my particular rale on these school rps, Im not just the schoolteacher. I's very important that | stil am considered tobe tne teacher and consider the educational values on this trp, as we have been talking about. But its also the case that | suppose Ive become a substitute parent as well I's a very specic responsibilty; you're with sludenis twenty-four hours a day pretty much and obviously its quite demanding fad you now thie Wo be tek sen, al ines lu et oo @ paren Bul Jo i the teacher rola is dominant otharwise the educational role ofthe trip perhaps might not be as reinforced as it shouldbe. ‘Wel thank you very much for sharing your experiences with us today. [pause] tone [The recording is repeated.] Ipausel Ipause] ‘Some erties tak about the explosion of musicals as what they loosely call ‘dumbing down, but your argument, Davi. is thatthe effects have been much more subto. ‘Wol,| thnk the musical was the means by which, asin so many other aspects of Briish culture, poles and public policy, the eighties saw economics beng {expiotea to gain potical ends. n he arts there nad been a ‘conversation’ for ‘wonty yoars botwoon tho traditional high arts’, the National Theatre, the BBC, the great orchestras and opera companies, and the provocative ars including the plays that eubbled up inthe sitias which vere politically and artistically radical Not, in the eighties, thaco was a direct attack onthe high arts through the ‘marketplace, through a moblisation ofthe popular inthe ats as a business, as arts pursuing a mass audience ~ the big musicals in fact. And the result ofthat ironically, it seams to me, was more or las the elimination ofthe prevocative arts. Thal was ihe greal sea change which had come about by the end ofthe eighties. pause] {he recordings repeated] {pause Exeract 4 PART 2 ‘Amina: Fatma: ‘Arving: Fatma: 7 Test 1 Key [pause] {have mixed feelings about the programme, actualy, thnk from a non-tin Perspective it was reasonably informative fom a scentiic point of view. to see how things happon and why you get ferent types of twins. Bul orn a twin Perspective here wore a few tings that wasabi disgrurtled about, f you like, ‘certain swooping statements that I found cifcut to understand, For example, ‘when the programme showed us newborn twin girs and Prolessor Graham implying that what they roally would have to cape with in the future was growing up as identical twins, ‘Hmm. thnk the underying assumption is this idea of incvidualty, which abways, ‘seems to be emphasisad when you see ary programmes ta do with twins. and ‘tho view that there's somathing wrong if yau'e not trying to be so-called inividua™.| think this is quile a wastern conceat and, certainly for us, coming fromm an indian background, it was quite alien. Which is not to ay, of course, that ‘we don't in fact possess quite distinct personaly tals, hich complement each athor in so many ways. Tus, [pause] [The recording is repeated.) That's the end of Part One, Now tur to Part Two, [pause] You will bear a talk given by a naturalist who is interested ia type of insect «called the damselfly. For questions 910 17, complete the sentences with a word or short phrase You now have forty-five seconds in which to read Part Tio. (pause] Good evening. Now you may think that looking inta the murky depths of a muddy pond doesn't sound much lite fun. But Ihave mary happy childhood memories of ling ust that, as | wont hunting forthe insects that have always fascinated me. For itis in surrouncings lke these that you can fing ane of the fastest and oldest ‘species of insect in ne word, the cragonty, and its elusive but beautiful smaller cousin, the dams, “The speed ofthese insocs is estimated to vary rom 25 to 60 miles per hour, {end fossilised remains show them to have been in existence 300 millon years ‘ag0. But apart from tha, relatively lite is known about these creatures, particularly the damselfly. the abundance and distibuton of which in Bain can only bo guessed at us Test 1 Key 16 \wmat is knowin is that changes to the rural landscape have been affecting the population of these charming creatures over recent decades. Developments such '3s land drainage and the filing-n of ponds have certainly taken their tl, but fexacly how much is dificult to assess, And this is where you come in, because ‘conservation organisations desperately need your help in locating the remaining damselly habiais, ‘So, how do you go about this? Wel frst ofall, wheri you make what you think isa sighting of a damsel itis necessary to make a postive identification. The insects similar tots lose relation the cragontly, but differs in several respect. Firstly, the dragonfly has a api, strong fight, while its damsel cousin is delicate ‘with fail wings and is therefore relatively weak in fight. Seconcly, you should try to cbserve the insect when itis at rest. When the dragonfly is not fying, its wings ‘are held out at right angles to its body. Tis isin direct contrast tothe damselfly which holds it wings over ito body 00 that they are touching each other, rather like a buttery. | would like fo emphasise that this isa stronger cistinguishing feature than, sa, the eyes or body, 'As regards colouring, damselflies can be blue, ed or green, but these are not ‘ordinary colours, there's nothing muted about them. They are vivid and they spark in the sunlight like jewels as the insects dart about from place to place. ‘And some of them have names that reflec this; the Emerald damselly and tho ‘Azure damsel, both of which may be spotted locally tis, however, the more prosalally named Blue-‘alled damselfly that is actually the most frequently ‘sighted in the region, Whilst others you might see include the Common Blue ‘damsel, which isnot as common as is nama suggests, and the Large Red ‘damselfly which is thought almost to have died out locally, and so if you should ‘64 sighting ofthat one we'd certainly be interested in hearing about i ‘Non, where and when to look fr them? Well, not surprisingly the summer ‘months are best, om Nay onwards, but not much after August. It's a relatively ‘Short season. And you need tobe looking in areas where there is water. though you may find tham in gardens, especialy near slow-moving streams, damsetfies Teally thrive in the vegetation thats found in and around stl water. is here that they fin the smaller fying insects which are ther prey and itis also here that they lay their ogge bolow the eurlaco ofthe watar In terms of the hast imo of day. ‘avoid the aternaon and evenings because these insects are definitely ealy~ risers. The ideal time to catch up wih them is soon after dawn "And 50 please, i you see dameolies, and i you find them as captivating as | do, thon please don't just walk away and forget them, The Conservation Trusts keen to produce a survey of the remaining sites that provide a habitat and so put [pressure on the authorities to preserve them for future generations, so do let them know what you see and whore you see it [pause] Now you'l bear Part Teo again, tone [The recording is repeated. | [pause] ‘Thats the end of Part Tico. 2 PART 3 Presenter: Madeline: Present Madeline: Presenter: Madeline: Presenter: Madeline: Presenter: Madeline: = ‘Test 1 Key Now ture t0 Part Three. Frause] You will beara radio interview with the artist Madeline Knowles. For questions 18 to 22, choose the answer (A, B, C or D) which fis best according to what you bear You now bave one minute in which to look at Part Three. pause] Her paintings reflect the peaceful nature of county Ito, a vase of pansies or roses, a few buttercups or some bluebells. A new book, The Ar of Madeline ‘Knowles, has been published this week to coincide with her 76th birthday, and she currently has exhibitions in London and Cardiff Madeline, why do you usually paint vary peaceful subjects rather than the harsher realities of ito? ‘Wel, | thnk the thing about plants, actully, is that they'e quite wonderful: thoy'ra absolutely adapted lo survival and | thnk that what we see as grace and beauty is actualy strength, When I'm painting flowers, fm looking for their inner strength ‘and wanting to show it It isnt, for me, done in order to be peacel, i's done in ‘order to discover that something inside which keeps them going. Buti art, then, ust to please the eye and calm the nerves, because that's how we respond toi ist? think mankind has alvays needed ar: for magic, for celebration, for ‘embellishment, and artists meanuile have been trying to produce some sort ot ‘sense out ofthis funny old word in which we exist. And | think artists today, we're sill ying to find that order and show ito people when we paint. So, you don't approve of what's called the modem movement? [think my kind of painting is part ofthe modern movernent, but is @ description that gets overused and often in a misleading fashion. For example, those artists atthe so-called ‘cuting edge’ are only one very small part oft which gets alot of attention in the media and elsewhere. "Now, you began as a designer of textes rather than a painter. Why did you change, was I very important to you to paint? ‘Wel, jumped int it really. hadn't sought the change at all. was teaching drawing atthe time, as well as doing my own design work. And Iwas suddenly ‘asked for some reason, sll shortages or something, to do the painting classes \with the students as well So, itmade me sh, | had to gota box of paints and go ‘out and paint mysel, in order to feel prepared. And, of course, | found it such a. | don't know, almost, sort of, an enormous rei, that! haven’ looked back since, And these days you teach just the one rather famous person, I believe, What was it in your work that appealed particulary to Andy Benson, the rock star? ‘Wol, | think he saw a ite painting of mina in an exhibition, it had pathway running up toa village, | think, but twas the image that caught his attention because whan I goto his house, | was early, and so | was waiting in the siting oom for a quarta af an hour or £0, and |ooked out othe window and saw that hhe was outside creating a path with stones, and it struck me that it must have 'been that image which had appealed to him. | understand that on seeing my picture, hed said, ‘Oh Vd lke my garcon painted lke that! 47 Test 1 Key Presenter: Madeline: Presenter: Madeline: Prosentor Madeline: Presenter: Madeline: PART 4 us Preset: Ter: Mavia: Tin: {And nally that's what you were invited to do, of course Thats right. But then lier he did ask me for adviee about his own paintings, Which you gave? ‘Oh yes, we had a go through them because he was working for an exhiton the following year. ‘And your advice was? (Oh, it was the usual at school advice about big shapes and ite shapes. Quite a formal discussion, It wasn't about how he felt about the landscapes that he was sing, tha’ for him. I reat him just ike an art school student realy Madeline Knowles, thank you very much for joining me today. Thank you. pause] [Now you'll hear Part Three again. [he recording is repeated. [pause] ‘That's the end of Part Thre. Now turn to Part Foun [pause] You will hear a discussion on the radio on the subject of rack festivals. For questions 23 to 28, decide whether the opinions are expressed by only one of the speakers, or whether the speakers agree. Write for Tim, M for Maria or B for both, sohere they agree. You now have thirty seconds in which 19 look at Part Four [pause] arlor today, Tin Bewwn, our environment correspondent, spoke to Matta Taylor ‘of Environment Now. ‘The open season on rock festivals is about to start unleashing joy and anguish side by side all ver the country. youre heading off towards the three-day packed programme at Green\vood ths weekend, then you probably love them. {you lve within he area, you're probably battening down the hatches in tear and {tepidation of some ofthe chaos tats about to descend on your neighbourhood But rock festivals may nat only bombard your ears, they can also affect the environment, as thousands of enthusiastic revellers converge on one venue. ‘Well, Tim, | think we have fo be careful not to flint the trap of assuming that all, festivals cause exacly the same probloms. | think a rural festival ~ such as Greenwood ~tha’s almost bound to generate trafic ams and clog up the winding lanes ofthe countryside, but at lest its not near toa major centre of population, soto tha extent the impacts ited Bul the traffic goneration associated with these festivals is & cause for concern. Caruso is far too great and often can't be accommadated wihin the rural road network around many ofthese sites, Marla Tim Maria: Mavia Ti: Maia Tim: Mari: Tie Mari . ‘Test 1 Key ‘Wel, compar it, say, withthe two Peter Storm concerts in July, one's at The GP Contre, and the others atthe Sampson Bow. Now both sites are much more ‘acoessible by pub transport, but they aa also much claser to urban centres ‘and the impact is far greater. Now, the noise and other disturbance associated with festivals can sometimes be unacceptable for not ust local residents but people living inthe wider vient, can't it? And then you get the sort of thing that happened al the Tandem Festival at Lockey ast year, Yes, heard about that. It was a shambles, wasn't i? "Mmm, there was oridiock outside; it looks asi 70,000 tickets were issued fora sita which was only iconsed for haf that number. Concert-goers there ended up waiting in jams for upto 16 hours betore gating in, bul anyone could have seen that coming [No shocks there, because as I recall there was only one entrance and exitto the sile. But | gather thal accoss is being improved therefor his year’s event. ‘Apparently. But there are stl issues tobe resolved there. The temporary and not 50 temporary things that are erected onthe festival sits, which can have an Intrusive impact on the landscape in the longer teen andi they'e not taken down afte the event, theyre unsightly, arent they? Now theres other polution as wel, not to put too fine a pont oni, rubbish, that has an cect, fst there? Hmm, the organisers at Greenwood have become increasingly aware oftheir cevrormental obligations. They weren't always that bothered but now i's Certainly alot beter in that way than the other bg festivals But atthe same time i's a massive commercial event, ike they all aro, It not aiming to make a loss, any more than the others do, les pu it that way ‘But the changes that the organisers have introduced are helping and they'e Certainly being able to recycle more othe waste each year and that’s the direction theyre moving in [pause] Now you'll hear Part Four again tone [the recording is repeated] [pause] ‘That's the end of Part Four ‘There will now be a pause of five minutes for you to copy your answers onto the separate answer sheet. Be sure to follow the numbering ofall the questions. Note: Teacher, stop the recording here and time five minutes. Remind students, ‘when theee is one minute remaining, [pause] ‘That's the end ofthe test. Please stop now. Your supervisor will now collet all the question papers and answer sheets. 119 Test 2 Key Paper 1 Reading (1 hour 30 minutes) Part 1 (one mark for each correct answer) 1D 28 3C 4A SD 6B 7 WA 41¢C 2A 49k 148 ~ i5bemaic 18 D Part 2 (two marks for each correct answer) oR 20D 2th mc 330 2 aAMEsiG Part 3 (two marks for each corsect answer) 27H WF 9B 3D BA 32G 33E Part 4 (two marks for each correct answer) MC 395A 36D 37D 38A 398 © <40rRt Paper 2 Writing (2 hovrs) Task-specific mark schemes Question 1: Children’s freedom Content Degree of freedom given to children, ‘Major points for discussion: ‘children gain from being given freedom ‘© ais urresponsibie to give young people treedom Further relevant points ‘¢ many children get freedom from an easly age Range Language for expressing and supporting opinions. Appropriacy of register and format Consistently appropriate for letter ro newspaper. Organisation and cohesion Adequately organised in paragraphs. Clear introduction and conclusion. Introductory and concluding conventions. Target reader ‘Would understand writer's opinions. 120 so 26 Test 2 Key Question 2: Soap operas Content Review of popular soap opera. Explanation of popularity of soap operas in general. Range Language of description and explanation, Appropriaey of resister and format Register appropriate for piece of writing for euro Organisation and eobesion Clearly organised and paragraphed. Clea linkage between specif review and general discussion of soap operas Target reader ‘Would be informed about specific soap opera and writers views on the popularity of soap oper Question 3: A Museum or Exhibition Content Brief description of museum or exhibition. Focus on one exhibit and reasons for choice ofthat exhibit Range Language of description, explanation and evalvation. Appropriacy of register and format Register appropriate for article in college magazine. Organisation and cobesion ‘Clearly organised and paragraphed. Clear linkage berween two parts of question. Target reader ‘Would be informed about museum or exhibition. Would be interested in exhibit described. Question 4s Tourisme and the Local Environment Content Proposal on ways of encouraging tourists to continue visiting the writer's area, Awareness of threat to the environment. Range Language of description and making recommendations Appropriacy of register and format Proposal format ~ probably with section headings/sub-headings. Register appropriate co a formal working relationship, Organisation and cobesion ‘Well structured proposal with clear sections. Presentation of ideas in coherent rose. Appropriate use of linking and paragraphing Target reader Would understand the issues and what writer is proposing. 121 ‘Test 2 Key Question 5a): The Day of the Triffds Content * dramatic beginning to novel rious occasions when Tiffds attack lescriptions of violence and anarchy as society breaks down * continuing suspense of Bill’s search for Josella * final dramatic escape from Shirning Interest in relationships: Bill and Josclla ~Bill’s search defines the plot in the early stages Bill and Coker Bill and Susan Various brief but relevant encounters, et. the unnamed blind gie Relationshipicontflice between the differene groups with differen ideas of how to reorganise society (Underlined points must be included ~ bulleted points are suggested relevant information.) Range Language of description and narration, analysis and evaluation. Appropriacy of register and format Register and format appropriate to a report, possibly with headings oF suub-headings. Consistent register, Organisation and cobesion Appropriate introduction, reason for writing and conclusion, Well-organised report with clear presentation of ideas, Adequate use of paragraphing and linking. “Target reader ‘Would be well informed about the book and its suitability for radio, ‘Question 5(b}: Our Man in Havana Content characters of Wormold and Beatrice: © ‘brief outline of each character’ role © description of Milly's birthday party ~ where first meeting takes place * information about Wormold’s characer ~ as salesman, as Milly’ fathes, as Hasselbacher’ friend; his attitude to spying * information about Beatrice ~ gained from frst episode in London, behaviour at the birthday pact, attitude to her husband, way she adapes to the job as| ‘Wormold’s secretary ‘as the story develops ~ their attitudes to the business of spying and their ideas and beliefs about loyalty are developed and defined (Underlined points must be included — bulleted points are suggested relevant information.) Range Language of description, narration and evaluation. 122 2 Test 2 Key Appropriacy of register and format Consistent register for article suitable for inclusion in magazine. Organisation and cobesion Suitable introduction ~ reason for writing, Well organised, moving from