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WING CHUN

STRATEGY
AND TACTICS II

Strike, Control, Break

Jon Rister and Alfred Huang


Copyright © 2015 by Jon Rister and Alfred Huang.

Library of Congress Control Number: 2014922863


ISBN: Hardcover 978-1-5035-3143-7
Softcover 978-1-5035-3144-4
eBook 978-1-5035-3142-0

All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or
by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or by any
information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the copyright
owner.

Any people depicted in stock imagery provided by Thinkstock are models, and such images
are being used for illustrative purposes only.
Certain stock imagery © Thinkstock.

Rev. date: 01/28/2015

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Contents
Acknowledgments
Foreword
Preface
Chapter 1 Strike
Chapter 2 Control
Chapter 3 Break
Chapter 4 Who, Why, What, How, Where, and When?
Chapter 5 Biu Jee Form
Chapter 6 Understanding the Internal Art
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

Many thanks to the following instructors and students of Rister International


Martial Arts who were involved in photo illustrations (listed alphabetically):

Roger Carlson
Diego Hernandez
Risto Hietala
Alfred Huang
Matthew LaBombard
Tony Lett
Jon Rister
Israel Rodriguez
Dwight Wilson

This publication is also dedicated to the following associates, instructors, and


students of Rister International Martial Arts:

Dave Bernosky
James Fell
Risto Hietala
Tommy Jones
Ville Kaikkonen
Jani Kenttala
Timo Kivinen
Jarkko Lampsa
Victoria Lampsa
Virpi Muhonen
Jorge Santamaria
Kaj Tepponen
Joachim Viide
Many thanks to JKD Finland

Special thanks to Helen Huang for assisting with photography and to Alfred
Huang for editing, photography, and photo editing.
FOREWORD

When I was asked to write the foreword for (Sifu) Jon Rister’s second book
on wing chun, I felt honored and a bit confused. The confusion came about
because I had to ask myself, “Why me?” Sifu Jon has many more
knowledgeable, gifted, skilled, and talented students than myself. However, I
have been a student of his for over twenty years now. My primary martial arts
are in the Filipino martial arts (FMA). It has only been in the past two years
that I have become a serious wing chun student after Sifu Jon telling me for
years that wing chun will help your kali. He was right.

I am an old school martial artist. I enjoy the traditional and historical study of
martial arts. However what I learn must be practical, functional, and efficient.
I work in the private security industry as a uniformed armed security officer at
a federal facility. I also work doing private investigations, and personal
protection. My martial arts training needs to reflect my work reality.
Accomplishing my mission and going home safe is the name of the game.

Sifu Jon has trained in wing chun for decades. He has been a martial arts
instructor since the late 1980s. His experience, knowledge, research, and
ability to relate this to his students are a true gift. His understanding of wing
chun is years ahead of most wing chun instructors, even those with “Master”
and “Grandmaster” titles. In some regards, I do not even think they are studying
the same martial art.

Strike, Control, Break is the result. The information contained in this book will
improve your wing chun. It is based on Sifu Jon’s unique ability to question
and problem solve. I remember Sifu Jon telling me in one of my private
lessons, “Wing chun is problem solving.” When I pushed for more information,
he simply told me the information is in the forms. Strike, Control, Break (SCB)
will give the wing chun practitioner a simple, yet effective tool to remember
under stress to prevail in any conflict.

In this book, I hope it becomes clear that, contrary to what most students and
instructors of wing chun believe, wing chun is actually a “weapons-based” art.
Many think of wing chun as an empty hand art with three empty hand forms, a
wooden dummy form, drills, chi sao, and those other two weapons forms that
are not really relevant anymore. The pole form and the double sword form
were added as an afterthought, and besides NOBODY fights with a pole, or
double swords anyway, so why bother. WRONG, WRONG and WRONG! The
essence, the spirit of wing chun is hidden within the weapons. Without the
knowledge of the weapons, you have no wing chun. You just have to trust me.
Sifu Jon will change your wing chun and make you better. I promise.

Dwight Wilson
Security Professional (CSO, PPO, PI)
Martial Artist, Naturalist, and Tracker
Author – FOLLOWING TRACKS, A PERSONAL JOURNEY
LEARNING TO TRACK WILDLIFE AND MAN
PREFACE

The art of wing chun often brings to mind popular videos or films of various
practitioners displaying a flurry of dynamic techniques. Unfortunately, this is
often a cause of disillusionment when the learned techniques in a controlled
setting fail in actual application. Because of this, the art of wing chun is often
ridiculed and deemed unrealistic in the modern era. This publication is our
attempt to dispel certain myths and to give a little insight on how wing chun
can be most effective.

In learning wing chun, training must include at least three aspects: the forms,
the drills, and the application. While some may debate the utility of one aspect
over the other, it is our firm belief that all three are imperative and form a
cycle that continues to develop and improve one’s skill. The forms and drills
are necessary to learn the energy and structure of wing chun; there is yet
another level of learning that has always been deficient and misunderstood.
Too many instructors confuse drills for application. Our burden is to attempt to
touch on this road less traveled. This is not merely a book on techniques but on
tactics. In other words, making techniques effective does not always depend on
more skill or physical prowess. With sound tactics, one can overcome an
opponent’s skill or physical superiority.

As a physician, I have instructed medical students in medicine far longer than I


have helped instruct wing chun students in the art of wing chun. However, there
are remarkable similarities in instruction between the two. It is somewhat easy
to teach medical students diagnosis and treatment of various pathologies.
Although it takes some time to develop their knowledge base, it is relatively
easy to help them think of differential diagnoses, diagnostic tests, and
formulation of treatment plans. To a certain extent, it is even not too difficult to
learn all the pharmaceutics and procedures. All this is just objective
knowledge that eventually gets internalized in time. What is not so easy to
learn is how to apply this knowledge to patients in real life. No scenario in
medical school can accurately simulate that. Patients come with multiple
complicated problems. Even if a disease is presented in a similar way, no two
persons are the same in their personal value systems, religious beliefs, and
philosophical makeup. There may even be times when a medication is not what
is required to remedy a problem. Sometimes knowing how to address a
problem, or even multiple problems, does not require mere knowledge but
rather wisdom. Unfortunately, learning this takes experience and time, perhaps
a lifetime. In this regard, I myself am continually learning the “practice” of
medicine. I am always reminding myself to maintain a spirit of a learner with
humility.

In the same vein, it is somewhat easy to teach the structure and form of wing
chun. Even the drills are not too difficult to learn. Learning how to move your
body in such a way that you understand structure takes time to internalize.
However, it is extremely difficult to learn how actual conflict takes place
against an opponent or multiple opponents. An instructor may explain how
techniques work in various scenarios, and the student would rightly assume
that this is application. If they are honest with themselves, they would admit
that reality never plays out like predetermined scenarios. Unfortunately, many
people (myself included) have been lulled into thinking that whatever
techniques they have learned are enough to help them in a real altercation. This
kind of bravado will put you in very real danger. Therefore, it is important to
understand that our emphasis is not on showing better techniques. Moreover,
our attitude is not to promote arrogance or foolish aggression. It would be
absurd to think that we can illustrate every useful technique in one publication.
No book can be that all-inclusive. In fact, we will be limited to illustrating
only a few techniques. However, if you can look beyond the techniques and
realize what is trying to be conveyed tactically, you will hopefully gain a little
more insight on how to make wing chun or any close-quarter combat system
truly applicable.

In this volume, we will introduce aspects of wing chun that will enable the
practitioner to become more effective. As always, please seek direct
professional instruction. The material in this book is for information purposes
only, and it is not intended to replace actual instruction from a qualified
instructor.

Alfred C. Huang, MD
CHAPTER 1

Strike

The essence of close-quarter combat is urgency. In confined range, the crucial


need is to engage our opponent quickly and effectively using the various
“tools” at our disposal. The “tools” here refer to the various techniques used to
strike, control, or break (incapacitate) an opponent. These tools must be
employed efficiently and deliberately in order to cause physiological and
psychological disturbance. In addition, side-to-side movements and body
mechanics become even more important. In other words, you must understand
your tools and how to utilize them for close-quarter combat.

Strike, control, and break refer to three basic modes of engagement. Depending
on the intention and situation, one might flow from one mode to another.
Striking is covered first. Without striking the opponent first, it is very difficult
to control an aggressive opponent. Even offering the threat of a strike can make
a difference. The opponent’s reaction to a perceived imminent strike may
possibly cause them to give up a limb or become distracted enough to allow
you to maneuver and further manipulate them. Striking can be with the
fingertips, the edge of the hand, the palm, the thumb, the fist, the elbow, the
knee, the foot, or even a head butt. When these tools are learned, then one can
learn what to apply from various positions, when to use them appropriately,
and how they can be easily utilized. The strike often occurs when we feel any
lull in combat. Even if not powerful, these strikes can be effective enough in
keeping the opponent off balance. Even if you intend to control or break,
tactically, they all must include strikes. However, striking by itself means that
we pretty much disregard any opportunity to grapple or affect the limbs. In this
case, the goal is to strike rapidly and to keep striking until the opponent is
incapacitated as in a blitz style of attack. This does not mean that we just
charge ahead blindly punching. You still must protect yourself while striking
effectively with power and efficiency. In other words, we do not try to seek the
locks and the control techniques. We simply attack and continue attacking with
the striking tools. We will illustrate the technical aspect of effective striking
and how to incapacitate an opponent efficiently.
The tools are as follows:

1. Biu gee (finger thrust)

2. Chum choy (vertical fist punch)


Although mostly used in training, it can be used in combat as follow-up.
3. Ding jarn and cup jarn (butting elbow and diagonal elbow)
4. Wong jern (sideways palm)
5. Sot sao (knife hand/throat-cutting hand)
6. Sut (knee strike)
7. Jing deem jern (vertical palm)
8. Lop sao (grab pull used on neck)
The basic principles are derived from the twelve gates training in wing chun.
Gates 1 and 2 are high outside gates. Gates 3 and 4 are low outside gates.
Gates 5 and 6 are low inside gates. Gates 7 and 8 are high inside. Gates 9 and
10 are angle-in punches at the heart level. Gates 11 and 12 are straight-in
punches at the heart level. These twelve gates cover relatively well all the
possible angles of being struck by an opponent who knows boxing, tae kwon
do, judo, or jujitsu. They also cover any attempt of the lapel or neck grab, a
body tackle, or thrust to the body. One must learn these basic gates before one
can learn the tactics and strategies that set up the technique to make the striking
effective. Eventually, the techniques by themselves become less relevant, as
they all should blend together. In the initial stages, however, this kind of
training will offer you the ability to develop flow.
Gates 1 and 2 – Biu da (thrusting hand and simultaneous punch)
Gates 3 and 4 – Gan da (slicing hand and simultaneous punch)
Gates 5 and 6 – Jut da (short snapping hand and simultaneous punch)
Gates 7 and 8 – Pak da (slapping hand and simultaneous punch)
Gates 9 and 10 – Bong lop sot (tying up/grabbing/pulling hand and knife hand
strike)
Gates 11 and 12 – Jop sot (closing gate hand and knife hand strike)
Striking is the primary survival skill. Striking means the base tools are
launched out to neutralize a threat. With a mind focused on striking, a solid
base of defensive motions must be maintained subconsciously. The hands must
be ready to protect in an instant if our opponent attacks or even while we are
executing our own attack. This is referred to as lin sil da (simultaneous attack
and defense) in wing chun. However, this does not happen because we intend
to do it. Instead, it happens reflexively, without a thought being given to the act.
When striking, we carry out an offensive that gives the opponent little or no
opportunity to respond. As a result, we take the initiative and maintain it
throughout combat.

Illustrations below convey the idea of this kind of attack. Using the tools
aforementioned, we will demonstrate a combination of strikes that can be most
effective with little wasted motion and still be effective. Strikes can be done
with a biu jee (finger strike), a sot sao (knife hand strike), or a da (punch).
Regardless of the strike, it must be a real threat that will affect the opponent. It
must threaten to the extent that the opponent will either be forced to defend,
disengage, or get hit. Once we hit, we stick to the opponent and strike on a soft
target like a nerve, throat, or eyes. We then continue to strike with the opposite
hand and repeat.
Gate 1:

Biu da

sot-da
sot-da
sot-da
Gate 2:

Biu da
sot-da
sot-da
sot-da
Gate 3:

Gan da
sot-da
sot-da
Gate 4:

Gan da
sot-da
sot-da
Gate 5:

Jut da
chum choy
sot-da

sot-da
Gate 6:

Jut da
chum choy
sot-da
sot-da
Gate 7:

Pak da
jut-da

sot-da
gnoy doy gock kuen
gnoy doy gock kuen
Gate 8:

Pak da
jut-da
sot-da
gnoy doy gock kuen
gnoy doy gock kuen
Gate 9:

Bong lop sot


da
gnoy doy gock kuen
gnoy doy gock kuen
Gate 10:

Bong lop sot


da
gnoy doy gock kuen
gnoy doy gock kuen
Gate 11:

Jop sot
da
gnoy doy gock kuen
gnoy doy gock kuen
Gate 12:

Jop sot
da
gnoy doy gock kuen
gnoy doy gock kuen
Follow-up strikes can be varied and practiced from the gates. As examples,
one can alternatively use the following:

Gate 1:

Biu da
sot-da
gnoy doy gock kuen
gnoy doy gock kuen
Gate 2:

Biu da
sot-da
gnoy doy gock kuen
gnoy doy gock kuen
Gate 3:

Gan da
ding jarn

ding jarn
cup jarn

Gate 4:

Gan da
ding jarn
ding jarn

cup jarn
Gate 5:

Jut da
chum choy

sot sao
ding jarn

cup jarn
Gate 6:

Jut da
chum choy
sot sao

ding jarn
cup jarn
Please note that under great stress, multiple strikes delivered on the same line
have a tendency to be more effective. This practice “motivates the muscle” to
perform through the stress loading. Instead of lin wah kuen (traditional chain
punching), try using multiple gnoy doy gock kuen strikes.

The techniques taught thus far are performed by what we call dry fire. In other
words, the opponent is executing only one punch and you are employing one
technique. Let me underscore this is only the learning phase. At this level, you
are only learning techniques and not actual application. After learning the
techniques, they must still be practiced over and over by yourself and with as
many different training partners as possible. Later, you will need to develop
them further by placing them in the context of various scenarios.

Doing this might involve having a person throw three or four punches and then
executing the technique when the timing and position is optimal for a
counterattack, follow-up, and finish. Later on, one will understand how one
mode can flow into another. In other words, the striking can flow into
controlling, which can then flow into breaking. What we are ultimately
achieving is to have the opponent unable to continue fighting. All three modes
(strike, control, and break) are trying to essentially achieve the same end
result.
CHAPTER 2

Control

Control means that we are controlling the opponent to keep him off balance
and to put them in a position that we may better finish the fight. Control does
not necessarily mean taking an opponent to the ground and putting them into
submission. Neither does it mean performing joint locks to cause the opponent
to submit. Even though joint locks can be used in order to throw, unbalance,
dislocate joints, or take down an opponent, we do not recommend going to the
ground. The control is an interim phase that puts the opponent into a position
where we can strike them into submission, to remove a weapon, or to prevent a
weapon from being used. While this does not mean that it cannot be used as a
submission tactic, the primary use is for survival, not fighting for sport. In
many cases, trying to grapple an opponent into submission also means placing
yourself in danger by exposing your back to surrounding people and other
potential opponents.
Gate 1:

Biu da

wong jern
cup jarn

mun sao
sut-sut-sut
mut sao
tie sao

Gate 2:

Biu da
wong jern
cup jarn

mun sao
sut-sut-sut
mut sao
tie sao
Gate 3: Gan da
ding jarn

sot sao
sut-sut-sut
jut gerk
chai gerk
Gate 4:

Gan da
ding jarn

sot sao
sut-sut-sut
jut gerk

chai gerk
Gate 5: Jut da
chum choy
ding jarn

sot sao - lau sao - jop sao


sut

gan gerk
jut gerk

chai gerk
Gate 6:

Jut da
chum choy

ding jarn
sot sao - lau sao - jop sao

sut
gan gerk

jut gerk
chai gerk

Gate 7:

Pak da
jut da
da-da
sup sao

dum ma
lop sao - seep ma

Gate 8:

Pak da
jut da
da-da
sup sao

dum ma
lop sao - seep ma

Gate 9:

Bong-lop-sot
jut sao

biu gee

jop sao (arm bar)


sut
gan gerk (over the head)
seep ma
Gate 10:

Bong-lop-sot
jut sao
biu gee

jop sao (arm bar)


sut

gan gerk (over the head)


seep ma

Gate 11:

Jop sot
jut biu
mun sao

lau sao
sut
gan gerk

seep ma
dum ma

biu gerk
Gate 12:

Jop sot
jut biu
mun sao
lau sao

sut
gan gerk

seep ma
dum ma

biu gerk
CHAPTER 3

Break

Break is utilized when we are in an extremely hazardous situation and are


most likely facing multiple armed attackers. Therefore, we execute or “break”
with extreme prejudice, which is the most efficient means to incapacitate an
opponent. Wing chun is especially well suited to this end. Many of the
movements, including the kicking movements, in the basic forms describe these
applications. What we are illustrating here are the most urgent of self-defense
techniques to eliminate a high-risk threat with the simplest established
pathway.
Gate 1:

Biu da

biu gee (maintain center line while lau sao passes the arm)
jip sao (on arm or shoulder)
oi jut sao

wong jern
huen (the head)

dum ma (arm over knee)


Gate 2:

Biu da
biu gee (maintain center line while lau sao passes the arm)

jip sao (on arm or shoulder)


oi jut sao

wong jern
huen (the head)

dum ma (arm over knee)


Gate 3:

Gan da
lau sao - ding jarn
sup sao

dum ma
Gate 4:

Gan da
lau sao - ding jarn

sup sao
dum ma

Gate 5:

Jut da
sot sao - chum choy
sot sau - lau sao

syeung (double) jop sao


Gate 6:

Jut da
sot sao - chum choy
sot sao - lau sao

syeung (double) jop sao


Gate 7:

Pak da
jut da
jip sao

pak sao - jong sao (like fig 4)


dum ma
Gate 8:

Pak da
jut da

jip sao
pak sao - jong sao (like fig 4)
dum ma
Gate 9:

Bong lop
chan jern

jip sao
(passing arm to other side of body) sao kuen

yup jern
dum ma

seep ma
Gate 10:

Bong lop
chan jern
jip sao

(passing arm to other side of body) sao kuen


yup jern

dum ma
seep ma

Gate 11:

Jop sot
jut biu (same hand)
sot – ding jarn – cup jarn

seep ma elbow
Gate 12:

Jop sot
jut biu (same hand)
sot – ding jarn – cup jarn

seep ma elbow
These are basic techniques that one should practice. Later on, they should not
be thought of as mere techniques, as they will simply become a part of who you
are and how you move. Movements will become interchangeable and will
depend on how the opponent responds to your initial actions. Therefore, we
say that “one technique becomes all techniques” when you have assimilated the
knowledge, along with the forms and other drills, into your subconscious. You
need to be able to flow from striking, into controlling, back to striking, or into
breaking at any time.

We structured this book by taking one variation of a technique and


superimposed it onto a particular gate or point of entry. The base technique for
each gate is determined by where your hands are positioned at the time and by
the most direct route to the action desired, whether striking, controlling, or
breaking. After these base techniques are perfected, they should be practiced
from an incoming jab instead of from a basic straight punch. Then they should
be practiced from a combination (like jab-cross-hook) to get into gate 1.
Following this, they should be practiced while moving around. Afterward, you
can practice this against a weapon. The following are a few examples of dry
fire training against a knife:
Gate 1 (up grip):

Biu da

lau sao-sot sao (too keep the centerline)


jip sao
jut sao, (disarm on body)

Gate 1 (down grip):

Biu da
sot sao-lau sao (disarming the weapon)
jip sao

oi jut sao
wong jern

huen sao (head)


Gate 5:

Jut sao-biu jee


jut sao

tie sao (low return)


Gate 9:

Bong-lop-sot (or qua choy)


jut sao

cup jarn (high return)


ding jarn
seep ma

Thus far, we have covered some basic concepts involving strike, control, and
break. However, in discussing strategy and tactics, there is another aspect of
close-quarter combat that must be covered. This involves the who, why, what,
how, where, and when.
CHAPTER 4

Who, Why, What, How, Where, and


When?

First, you must consider who you are fighting. This important question will
determine your tactics and sense of urgency in combat. Are you facing a person
determined to kill you? Is this person enraged about something you can identify
with? Is this person a violent predator and you are merely a random victim?
Are you in a planned attack, or are you facing a drunk who is out of his mind?
These are all the things you need to consider when determining the tactics to
employ. There are probably many more questions to ask about your attacker.
However, you will have to assess these things in a blink of an eye and under
possible duress.

Sometimes you may even need to keep it simple. There is a saying, “When in
doubt, whip it out!” In other words, you would usually open with a strike of
some kind to upset and off balance the attacker. This may not necessarily be a
heavy blow but still one that would be effective. Keep your attacks as simple
and direct as possible. You may even strike while moving away (see Luk Dim
Boon Kwun). Always take into consideration that the person may be armed and
dangerous. In fact, we always teach that you should presume the opponent is
armed. You can also presume that their intent is to harm you, but this will be
covered in the next section on why.

Second, why are you fighting? This is a reiteration of who first and why
second. While seemingly obvious, you can presume an attacker is motivated to
cause you harm; otherwise, they would not be engaging you. If they are not
intent on causing you harm, then you need to ask yourself why you are engaging
them. Get out of the situation and go home. Do not engage in combat unless it is
absolutely necessary. When you can keep a clear understanding and attitude,
you are morally justified when needing to take all and necessary action to
escape alive and unscathed. What I mean is do not get into a fight that you will
regret later if someone were to get injured or even killed. Keep your
conscience clear. If your goal in clear sight is to take them out, realize that the
aftermath may be far worse than the call to arms.

As previously stated, you must consider, is it worth it? If what is at stake is not
for your own protection, a family member, or loved one, then do not fight. Even
if you are defending a third party, why fight if you can get them help by other
means? Think clearly about this: If you are fighting for the sake of ego, then do
not. If you are fighting to protect property, then weigh the risk versus reward
very carefully. Are the contents of your purse or wallet worth your life? If you
kill someone over your wallet, will you be able to live with that for the rest of
your life? You must measure your capacity to survive these things now. This
way, you will not be hindered or you will not hesitate at the time you have to
act. As discussed in our previous book, Close Combat Strategy and Tactics:
Prevent, Confront, Prevail, do not put yourself into a position where violence
is the only answer. We say this emphatically. However, you need to be very
clear that when you have no choice but to act, you can do so absolutely and
without hesitation.

Third, what are you fighting with or against? This simply means what weapons
are available to you, what weapons do your adversary have, and are you even
aware that weapons might be involved in the fight. Even if you are not sure,
you must already assume there are weapons on the enemy. Always assume your
opponent may have a firearm. Since we live in a conceal carry state, we
reasonably assume this is always true.

Fourth, related to the why and what is how you apply the tactics in any given
situation. In understanding why you are engaged in a fight, you can determine
what is your intended outcome or goal. Will you try to escape? Will you try to
put your opponent in submission? Will you just go all out (anything goes)?
Overall, our first goal should be to get out of a situation immediately. Most of
the time, we should look to escape if possible and only resort to an attack
when escape becomes impossible. There are many times when we should look
to defuse or de-escalate the conflict. Especially when the threat level is high,
de-escalation may need to take place very quickly.

When de-escalation fails or does not resolve the situation, you will need to
move aggressively to create angle and space. You may need to preempt an
attack, especially when you suspect a weapon is involved. All of these
assessments happen in a split second. Timing is everything.

Fifth, you need to consider where you are. Pay attention to your location and
surroundings. Are you fighting in a public area? How many witnesses are
there? Whose side will they be on? Even if you are in the right, you might have
a hard time proving it. Can you just leave the area? Always consider escape to
be the first option. Be careful to try to get as many witnesses on your side after
an incident. What is the terrain like? Whether you are on wet grass or
pavement can make a difference on how you fight.

Are you being recorded on camera? Just about every public area is now under
some kind of video surveillance. So how will this affect the way you defend
yourself? Answer: It should not if you follow certain principles of self-
defense. First, do not fight unless you must. Second, make sure to end it
quickly. Third, do not continue if your opponent is out of commission. If
children are present, make sure you do not endanger them.

Sixth consideration is when you are fighting. This is very similar to


considerations in your environment. Is it nighttime? If it is after dark, you may
use it to your advantage by shining a bright flashlight or a flash from your
camera/phone. If there is some kind of event or gathering nearby, you will need
to assess whether that will be an advantage or disadvantage. Perhaps it will be
more difficult to find an escape. Perhaps it will be a factor to find help. If your
confrontation occurs after a vehicle accident, your ability to flee or escape
becomes more difficult, as you may not be able to leave the scene of the
accident. In cases involving road rage, if possible, do not stop. It is much
better to proceed to an area where you can get help.
CHAPTER 5

Biu Jee Form

Biu jee is the third open-hand form that is composed of short-range and long-
range techniques, along with low kicks and sweeps. This form shows urgent
combat tactics and techniques used for counterattacking when the structure and
centerline discipline is broken or not maintained as can occur if one becomes
seriously injured. As developed in chum kiu, the pivoting and stepping
movements enhance a range of motion that involves more of the upper body to
develop power at close range. There are also stretching movements that
provide greater reach for longer-range strikes. Hence, the movements include
very close range elbow strikes and finger thrusts to the throat. Serious wing
chun students view this form as imparting deadly, lethal blows or maiming
techniques that should never be used if at all possible. Thus, biu jee is referred
to as urgent combat. A common wing chun saying is “Biu jee does not go out
the door.” It may also be stated that biu jee is an “indoor form” only. Some
people interpret the biu jee form should be kept secret. Others may interpret
that it should never be used. In fact, many wing chun instructors may not teach
this form, and neither will they teach the staff or the swords. Perhaps they think
that keeping it a secret helps the art as a whole. Our view is that by not
teaching the biu jee form, the staff, and the swords, the true nature of wing chun
remains obscure and hidden, which will only damage the art’s reputation. In
the 1980s, wing chun was viewed as an aggressive fighting art. These days, it
is not regarded as such, perhaps even ridiculed. Biu jee and chum kiu share
many of the same routines to the extent that some may say that the biu jee form
is not needed to learn to fight with wing chun, to think this is grossly erroneous
and will cause one to miss out on crucial aspects of combat. Biu jee form, as
well as the staff and the sword forms, is necessary to transform a mere boxer
or puncher into a skilled survival fighter. To defeat a more powerful opponent,
one cannot neglect learning these three forms.
Opening

*Remember to relax and breathe deeply.


** Keep the center of focus on the low diaphragm.

Lop jing

Jun bay
Huen bo (lau gerk)
Sup sao down

Jong sao
*Left side first.
Yut gee kuen
Biu jee sahm (vertical three times)
Biu jee sahm (horizontal three times)
Huen
Sao kuen
*Repeat on right side (not shown)
Section I-A

Cup jarn turning right (diagonal down elbow)


Cup jarn turning left
Cup jarn turning right
Right biu jee
Left biu jee (stepping up and stomping)
Huen sao
Sao kuen
Left pak gerk then gan gerk
Right pak gerk then gan gerk
Left pak gerk then gan gerk
*Repeat on opposite side (not shown)
Section I-B

Cup jarn turning right


Cup jarn turning left
Cup jarn turning right
Right biu jee
Left chang jern (upward palm strike)
Sot sao turning left
Jop sao
Jong sao

Biu jee
Huen sao
Sao kuen
*Repeat on opposite side (not shown)
Section I-C

Cup jarn turning right


Cup jarn turning left
Cup jarn turning right
Right biu jee
Left wong jern
Left taw sao
Biu jee
Huen sao
Sao kuen
*Repeat on opposite side (not shown)
Section II

*Left side first


Mun sao three times (whispering hand)
Jop sao

Left die sao three times (guiding hand)


Jong sao
Biu sao

Huen sao
Sao kuen
*Repeat on opposite side (not shown)

*Left side first


Gong sao (three times)
Jop sao
Biu jee
Huen sao
Sao kuen
*Repeat on opposite side (not shown)
Section III

*Left side first


Biu jee three times (left-right-left)
Chan jern (shoveling upward strike)
Sot sao

Jop sao
Jong sao

Biu jee
Huen sao
Sao kuen
*Repeat on opposite side (not shown)

*Left side first


Double lop sao
Jor nao choy (left hooking punch)
Chum jarn

Yup jern
Huen sao
Sao kuen
*Repeat on right side (not shown)

Squatting scoop three times


Sau ma (closing stance)
CHAPTER 6

Understanding the Internal Art

Often, wing chun is merely perceived as an aggressive close-range combat


system. While wing chun is very effective at close range, it is much more than
that. There is an internal aspect that takes some time to understand and
develop. To further illustrate, let us consider the first wing chun form, sil nim
tao (a little imagination). The first section should be practiced slowly and
frequently to develop breathing and focus from the dan tien (the lower
diaphragm). The eyes should concentrate on a single point straight ahead. The
chin should be slightly down, with the shoulders and chest relaxed. The upper
thigh muscles should support the weight, which is also isometric training.
Attention should be placed on elbow position and the centerline. Every major
movement starts at the elbow and occupies the centerline. The stance yee gee
keem yueng ma (pigeon-toed stance or restraining-the-goat stance) aligns the
entire skeletal structure so that the tendons and bones support most of the
weight, allowing the student to learn to relax.

The second section of sil nim tao should be more flowing and graceful,
emphasizing relaxed, fluid muscles instead of tense, straining muscles.
Combined with the first section, this training will allow one to understand how
to receive and project energy in an everyday mind-set. This is much like a
relaxed “walk in the park” frame of mind instead of a panicky, stressed-out
mindset. As a result, there is no excess adrenaline being dumped to the muscles
to cause early fatigue.

Section 3 of sil nim tao should be done with snap in the motion. There is still
the emphasis on the elbow position and control, but the movements involve
more vigor and aggressive energy. Without moving the hips or torso, keep the
hands inside the box. The box (also called four corners) is the invisible
boundaries where the hands stay within. This box is roughly between the right
and left shoulders horizontally and between the level of the shoulders and level
of the hips vertically.

To stay in the box means that the hands do not chase anything outside these set
boundaries, thereby keeping the body and limbs under control at all times. In
other words, do not reach out to stop a strike. This only gives away the
initiative and breaks centerline discipline.
Individual hand techniques should not be applied directly out of this form, as
every movement has many meanings and can be used for multiple purposes.
Although the following may be difficult to explain, take for example the
sequence pac sao oi jut sao wong jern (slapping hand outside snapping
wrist sideways palm). These could be applied as one movement together or
used sequentially. Pac sao (slapping hand) can be used offensively or
defensively. Sometimes people can over-interpret the meaning behind the
movements. For example, the double sot sao (throat-cutting hand) is not
necessarily intended for you to strike two flanking opponents simultaneously
(although I suppose it could be done if one could actually get two opponents to
line up precisely for you).
Rather, this movement is to teach the correct alignment of the arms and hips in
order to execute a powerful strike.
Sil nim tao is to teach you how to use and control your arms while keeping
your body aligned. Hand techniques are far more effective when the rest of the
body is properly aligned.

Seemingly, movements merely involve the physical aspect. However,


repetition eventually brings about a closer connection between both brain
hemispheres. This is why both sides are performed in the same way. When one
can develop oneness of the body and mind, one will eventually realize a
deeper spiritual understanding of the art (imagination). Hence, essential
concepts and principles will become clearer.
One should not seek to fight with wing chun. In other words, one does not seek
to use this or that stance but rather engaging from where you are at any moment.
Simply allow the tools learned to apply themselves. The premise that a wing
chun practitioner should attempt to fight from the classical stance or pose is not
realistic and is a gross misinterpretation. One must understand that stances are
merely snap shots of a continuous mobile process. As one circles his opponent,
he will phase in and out of each stance or posture not using any one stance but
all.

Static training teaches the student sectoring, angling, leveraging, and drawing
out certain responses from an opponent. However, students should not confine
themselves to a particular position and try to defend it. Learning to “root
oneself,” for instance, is to learn how to generate power from the ground, not
to defend a particular piece of territory. One only needs to look at history
(Masala, Maginot Line, Festoon Europa, Siegfried Line, etc.) to know that any
fortification, regardless how secure, can be overcome by a powerful, patient
opponent. Even though stances are an integral part of the overall learning
process, the application should be practiced more realistically from a mobile
base. This is precisely why jun fan gung fu was developed by its founder,
Bruce Lee, a wing chun practitioner and student of Yip Man. He wanted to
bring mobility to the art and nonrestrictive positioning to the practitioner. It is
unfortunate that current generations of practitioners are now degrading into
doing the same freeze-framing thing instead of what was once a mobile and
flowing art.

Wing chun should be practiced on three levels (or phases): forms (the
structure), drills (the fluid motion), and application (the strategy and tactics).
Most of the application that is taught today is usually at the technique level
only. In other words, an instructor can take the idea of tan sao from the form
and show a so-called application by adding a stance and a punch. They can
even show how it counters a punch using tan da, but this is still learning a
concept and technique. This is not real-time application. The only way to make
wing chun effective is to make it part of you, not separate from you.
“One does not do wing chun. Nothing is or is not wing chun.”