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ITIL 2011 edition

Ashley Hanna
David Cannon
Stuart Rance

©2011
©2011 Hewlett-Packard
Hewlett-Packard Development
Development Company,
Company, L.P.
L.P.
The
The information
information contained
contained herein
herein is
is subject
subject to
to change
change without
without notice
notice
Agenda
• The ITIL refresh project - Ashley Hanna
• Service Strategy - David Cannon
• Service Design - Stuart Rance
Service Transition
Service Operation
CSI
The ITIL Refresh Project

Ashley Hanna
The ITIL journey
• 1990: 44 books published

• 2000: 7 books published

• 2007: 5 books published

• 2011: 5 books revised and published


Where we are now
• ITIL is ITIL
• It is owned by the Cabinet Office (used to be the OGC)
• The revised core books were published on the 29th July 2011
• It‟s business as usual
Why improve ITIL ?
• In scope:
– Resolve:
• Errors and inconsistencies
– Improved ease of use:
• Make it easier to read
• Clearer, single common structure
• Clarify concepts and principles, more examples
– Consistent additional guidance
• Out of scope:
– New concepts
– Changes that would invalidate the current adoption of ITIL
ITIL 2011 - Authors and mentors
Assignment Authors Mentor
Service Strategy David Cannon David Wheeldon

Service Design Lou Hunnebeck Colin Rudd

Service Transition Stuart Rance Colin Rudd

Service Operation Randy Steinberg Colin Rudd

Continual Service Imp. Vernon Lloyd David Wheeldon

Official Introduction Anthony Orr Shirley Lacy

Project mentor Shirley Lacy


Technical continuity Ashley Hanna
& Glossary updates
ITIL 2011 – Project approach

Consistent
Simplify Re-use Signpost
structure

Standardise
Terms and definitions
Concepts
Diagrams (with text)
Interfaces
ITIL 2011 – Book structure
1. Introduction
2. Service management as a practice
3. Principles
4. Processes
5. Specific for each book
6. Organizing for <book title>
7. Technology considerations
8. Implementing <book title>
9. Challenges, risks, critical success factors
ITIL 2011 – Process section
1. Purpose and objectives
2. Scope
3. Value to business
4. Policies, principles and basic concepts
5. Process activities, methods and techniques
6. Triggers, inputs, outputs and interfaces
7. Information management
8. CSFs and KPIs
9. Challenges and risks
ITIL 2011 - Appendices

Specific Common
appendices for appendices
each book
Risk assessment
and management

Related guidance

Terms and
definitions
ITIL 2011 – What‟s in it for you ?

Service strategy, Roles, skills,


Consistent functions,
concepts and
processes with
language are organisation +
more examples
clearer examples
Service Strategy

David Cannon
Service Strategy
• Why is IT managed as a service?
• Why does IT have a credibility problem?
• Customers and Value
– Are all customers the same?
– Is all value the same?
– How should value be measured?
– Can a customer ever be wrong?
• How does Service Strategy help IT to answer these questions?
Why not Production Management?
• Fixed output
• Unvarying route through the factory
• Repeatable, predictable actions
• Raw materials converted to physical products
• Value is created and realized whenever the product changes hands
• Value is carried in the product
Why Service Management?
• Dynamic, real-time demand
• Variable output
• Changeable routing
• Dynamic components
• Output less important than outcome
• Value only exists when
used by the consumer
• Value is carried in the relationship
Strategy

Perspective

Plans Patterns

Position
Strategy

+
Plans = Patterns

-
Deferred
Plans
Customers
• Different types of customer:
– Internal
• Same business objectives
• IT is involved in their decision-making
• We work together to achieve common outcomes

– External
• Different business objectives
• IT is involved in understanding their requirements
• We enable their outcomes so that we keep their business
Value

Money Spent Value Realized

Value Added
What does this mean for IT?
• If IT wants to demonstrate value it has to link its services to where
value is realized, not where value is added

• If IT can not do this it will always be viewed as „money spent‟ not


„value added‟
Customers and Services
External External External External External
Customer Customer Customer Customer Customer

“THE BUSINESS”

Business Unit Business Unit

IT Unit IT Unit IT Unit IT Unit


Services and Value
External External External External External
Customer Customer Customer Customer Customer

“THE BUSINESS” Value


Business Unit Business Unit Realized

Value Added?
Money Spent
IT Unit IT Unit IT Unit IT Unit
Measuring ROI

Outcome
Service

External
Service Customer Outcome
Provider
Revenue
Outcome

Service Provider
Value Customer Value
Measuring ROI

Service Service

Internal
Business
Service Customer
Unit
Provider
Funding Revenue

Business Value
Business Investment
Strategy Management for IT Services

Business Enterprise
Strategy

BU Strategy IT Manufacturing

Strategic Service Technology Product


Plans Strategy Strategy Strategy
Strategic Assessment

External

Market
Spaces

Objectives
Strategic
Industry
Factors

Internal
Strategy Generation

Perspective

Positions
Service
Strategy
Plans • Service Portfolio
• Financial Management
• Demand Management
• Service Design requirements
• Service Transition requirements
Patterns • Service Operation requirements
Strategy Execution

Service
Management

Align Service and Continual Service


Customer Assets Improvement

Critical Success
Factors Strategy
Measurement
Prioritize and Evaluation
Investments
Service Portfolio Management
• The “Gatekeeper” of IT
• New services or changes to existing services
• Decides what services will be used to achieve the business outcomes
• Assesses and proposes services based on high-level models
• Charters the design and build of services
SPM Process

Define

Analyze

Approve

Charter
Service Portfolio Management

Service Portfolio
Service Service Retired
Pipeline Catalogue Services

Supplier &
Contract CMS
Management

Customer
Customer
Customer Application Project
Agreement
Agreement
Portfolio Portfolio Portfolio
Portfolio
Portfolio
Define

Define Service,
Define Service,
New Customers, Business
Model
Outcomes

Service
Portfolios Model

Define Impact on Define Impact on


Existing
Service Portfolio Service Model
Analyze

Analyze Investment, Articulate Value Business Case


Value and Priorities Proposition

Service
Portfolio
Review
Approve

Change Change
Proposal Management
Y

Service
Feasible?

N Notify Stakeholders,
Update Portfolio
Charter

Project
Portfolio

Service
Charter Track Progress,
Design and
Update Portfolio
Transition

Notify Stakeholders
Other Processes
• Demand Management
– Understanding the customers‟ demand for services
– Ensuring Service Provider‟s ability to supply services that meet the demand
• Business Relationship Management
– A process in line with ISO/IEC 20000
– Supports the BRM role
Some New Sections
• Governance
• Enterprise architecture
• Application development
• ITSM implementation strategies
• A logical organization structure for ITSM
• An appendix on cloud and service strategy
Service design

Lou Hunnebeck
Service design
• Added the “design coordination” process
• Clarification of:
– The five aspects of design
– The service lifecycle within the service portfolio
– Revised service catalogue language:
(customer facing service and supporting service)
– Integration with functions such as project management and application
development
Design coordination

The purpose of the design coordination process is to


ensure the goals and objectives of the service design
stage are met by providing and maintaining a single point
of coordination and control for all activities and processes
within this stage of the service lifecycle.

It includes attention to:


• Activities relating to the
overall service design stage

• Activities relating to each


individual service design
Clarity of types of services
• Customer-facing service:
– IT services that are seen by the customer. These are typically services that
support business units/ business processes, directly facilitating outcome(s)
desired by the customer
• Supporting service:
– IT services that support or „underpin‟ the customer-facing services. These are
typically invisible to the customer, but essential to the delivery of customer-
facing services
Service catalogue
Service catalogue

Business Business Business Business / customer


process 1 process 2 process 3 service catalogue view

Service A Service B Service C Service D

Service 1 Service 2 Service 3 Service 4 Service 5

Technical / supporting
Links to related service catalogue view
information

Service assets / configuration records


Five aspects of design - consistency
• Service solutions for new or changed services
• Management information systems and tools
• Technology architecture and management architecture
• The processes required
• Measurement methods and metrics
Service Transition

Stuart Rance

46
Service Transition
• Content and relationships of SKMS and CMS
• How and when to use a change proposal
• Content about asset management added to SACM
• New high level process flow for release and deployment
• Improved integration between process flowcharts and text
• Evaluation renamed to change evaluation
• Most risk management content moved to appendix
SKMS and CMS

SKMS
The CMS is
part of the
Some CIs (such as
SKMS
SLAs or release
CMS plans) are in the
SKMS
Configuration Each configuration
records are record points to and
stored in describes a CI
CMDBs in Other CIs (such as
the CMS users and servers)
are outside the
SKMS
Change Proposals
• Used for major change
– Usually created by service portfolio management
– Provides description of change and business case
– Submitted before new/changed service is chartered
– Change management checks for resource conflicts or other issues before
authorizing
– Allows change management to add long term plans
• RFCs raised in the normal way for specific changes
– RFCs linked to the change proposal
Release and deployment

change management
Auth Auth Auth Auth
Auth Auth
Auth

authorize authorize authorize authorize post


release build and test check in deployment/ implementation
planning to DML transfer/retirement review

release and
release deployment review and
deployment
build and test close
planning

deployment

transfer

Auth change management


authorization
retirement
SACM
• Asset management content moved together to a single sub-heading
– Fixed assets and fixed asset management
– Software asset management
– Secure libraries and secure stores
– Definitive spares
– Definitive media library
– Decommissioning assets
Service operation

Randy Steinberg
Service operation
• Key areas of improvement:
– Enhanced process flows
– Enhanced functional and organizational guidance
– Proactive problem management and root cause analysis
techniques
– Incident matching
– Enhanced guidance - physical facilities and data centers
– Application management v application development
Service operation
• Further clarification:
– Incident v problem v request
– Requests v standard changes v change proposals
– Request models
– When incidents trigger the problem mgt. process
– How application management differs from application development
– How event mgmt. triggers incident mgmt.
– Events v alarms, alerts, thresholds, and warnings
Service requests

Available IT
services

Service Request
request fulfilment
process

Request
model

Fulfilled service request

Request for
change (RFCs)
Continual Service Improvement (CSI)

Vernon Lloyd
CSI
• Seven-step improvement process
– Now has 7 steps
– Documented as every other ITIL
process
– Relationship with Plan-Do-Check-Act more explicit
• CSI model renamed CSI approach
• CSI register introduced
• Improved interfaces between CSI and other lifecycle stages
• Lots of small improvements
Seven-step improvement

Wisdom 1. Identify strategy for improvement 2. Define what you will


Data
• Vision measure
• Business need
• Strategy
• Tactical goals
• Operational goals
3. Gather the data
PLAN
• Who? How? When?
• Criteria to evaluate
7. Implement improvement integrity of data
• Operational goals
• Service measurement
ACT DO
6. Present and use the
information
• Assessment summary?
• Action plans?
• Etc.
CHECK
5. Analyse the information 4. Process the data
and data • Frequency?
• Trends? • Format?
• Targets? • Tools and systems?
Knowledge • Improvements required? • Accuracy? Information
CSI approach
Business vision, mission,
What is the vision?
goals and objectives

Where are we now? Baseline assessments

How do we keep the Where do we want to


Measurable targets
momentum going? be?

Service and process


How do we get there?
improvement

Measurements and
Did we get there?
metrics
CSI Register
• Used to record all improvement opportunities
• Categorised into
• large / medium / small, quick / medium term / long term
• Documents the potential benefits
• Used to prioritize opportunities
• Tool for managing and reporting all improvement activity
• Provides visibility of improvements
• There is an example CSI register in CSI appendix B
THANK YOU