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City of Greater Bendigo

Bendigo Industrial Land Strategy

Adopted

17 June 2002

Gutteridge Haskins & Davey Pty Ltd


In association with
Essential Economics Pty Ltd
GUTTERIDGE HASKINS & DAVEY PTY LTD
ABN 39 008 488 373
380 Lonsdale Street, Melbourne Vic 3000 Australia
Phone (03) 9278 2200 Fax (03) 9600 1300

Copyright © Gutteridge Haskins & Davey Pty Ltd 2001

This document is and shall remain the property of Gutteridge Haskins &
Davey Pty Ltd. The document may only be used for the purposes of
assessing our offer of services and being included in documentation for the
engagement of Gutteridge Haskins & Davey Pty Ltd. Unauthorised use of this
document in any form whatsoever is prohibited.

REF NO: 31/010414/00

DOCUMENT STATUS
Rev Author Reviewer Approved for Issue
No. Signature Signature Name Signature Date
Table of Contents Page
1. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY........................................................................................ 2

1.1 A VISION AND GUIDING PRINCIPLES .................................................................................... 2

1.2 SUMMARY AUDIT TABLE & PRECINCT RECOMMENDATIONS ........................................... 4

1.3 STRATEGY OUTCOMES.......................................................................................................... 6

2. PURPOSE OF THE STUDY .................................................................................. 8

2.1 STUDY OBJECTIVES & EXPECTED OUTCOMES.................................................................. 8

2.2 DRIVERS BEHIND THIS STUDY .............................................................................................. 8

2.3 METHODOLOGY....................................................................................................................... 9

2.4 ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS .......................................................................................................... 9

2.5 USING THE STRATEGY ........................................................................................................... 9

3. THE STRATEGY CONTEXT................................................................................ 12

3.1 BACKGROUND ....................................................................................................................... 12

3.2 BENDIGO AND ITS INDUSTRY BASE ................................................................................... 12

3.3 RECENT INDUSTRY TRENDS IN BENDIGO......................................................................... 13

3.3.1 Trends in Employment in Manufacturing, Transport/Storage, Wholesaling and Construction


Sectors..................................................................................................................................... 13

3.3.2 Industrial Property Sales.......................................................................................................... 14

3.3.3 Locations of Industrial Property Sales ..................................................................................... 16

3.3.4 Vacant Industrial Land ............................................................................................................. 16

3.3.5 Implications for the Strategy .................................................................................................... 17

3.3.6 Comparison of Bendigo with other regional centres ................................................................ 18

3.4 VIEWPOINTS ABOUT INDUSTRY IN BENDIGO.................................................................... 21

3.5 KEY ISSUES FOR STRATEGIC PLANNING .......................................................................... 23

3.5.1 Direction Needed ..................................................................................................................... 23

3.5.2 New Emphasis to Industry ....................................................................................................... 23

3.5.3 Community Attitudes................................................................................................................ 23

3.5.4 Fragmented Industrial Land ..................................................................................................... 24

3.5.5 New Industrial Areas Needed .................................................................................................. 24


3.5.6 Existing Industry Needs Encouragement................................................................................. 24

3.5.7 Need to Encourage Entrepreneurialism................................................................................... 24

3.5.8 East Bendigo Link Road .......................................................................................................... 24

3.5.9 An Industry Plan for Bendigo is warranted............................................................................... 25

3.5.10 Role for Council ....................................................................................................................... 25

3.5.11 Role for Local Firms................................................................................................................. 25

3.6 OUTLOOK FOR INDUSTRIAL LAND REQUIREMENTS ........................................................ 25

3.6.1 Background to the Forecast..................................................................................................... 25

3.6.2 Industrial Land Forecasts to 2021............................................................................................ 26

3.6.3 Market Opportunities and Incentives ....................................................................................... 27

3.6.4 Industrial Land Requirements by Type .................................................................................... 31

3.6.5 Best Practice............................................................................................................................ 31

3.7 STATUTORY PLANNING ISSUES AND EXISTING CONDITIONS........................................ 32

3.7.1 Statutory Planning Implications for the Strategy. ..................................................................... 32

3.7.2 Existing Local Planning Policy & Municipal Strategic Statement – Industrial land................... 34

3.7.3 Other Relevant Strategies........................................................................................................ 35

3.8 PRINCIPLES FOR THE CONSIDERATION OF INDUSTRIAL USES IN NON INDUSTRIAL


ZONES..................................................................................................................................... 36

4. AN INDUSTRIAL VISION FOR BENDIGO........................................................... 38


4.1 INDUSTRIAL VISION FOR THE CITY OF GREATER BENDIGO........................................... 38

4.2 GUIDING PRINCIPLES & KEY ACTIONS............................................................................... 38

4.2.1 Industrial Land Audit ................................................................................................................ 38

4.2.2 Promotion and marketing......................................................................................................... 39

4.2.3 Governance ............................................................................................................................. 39

4.2.4 Facilitation................................................................................................................................ 39

5. INDUSTRIAL LAND AUDIT.................................................................................. 40

5.1 INTRODUCTION TO AUDIT.................................................................................................... 40

5.2 INDUSTRIAL LAND AREA IN THE CITY OF BENDIGO......................................................... 40

5.3 INFRASTRUCTURE ASSESSMENT ...................................................................................... 41

5.4 PRECINCT SUMMARIES AND SITE PLANS.......................................................................... 42


6. IMPLEMENTATION ............................................................................................. 82

6.1 STRATEGY OUTCOMES........................................................................................................ 82

6.2 IMPLEMENTATION SCHEDULE ............................................................................................ 83

APPENDICES

Appendix A: Interview Comments


Appendix B: Precinct Photos
Appendix C: Infrastructure Summary
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1. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
In late 2000 the City of Greater Bendigo appointed Gutteridge Haskins & Davey Pty Ltd in association
with Essential Economics to undertake an Industrial Land Strategy for the City of Greater Bendigo.
The key objectives of the project (as outlined in the Consultant’s brief) included;
i. Audit the existing industrial land in respect to services availability, accessibility and
limitations imposed by surrounding land uses and transport routes.
ii. Ascertain the present and anticipate future demand for industrial land.
iii. Establish the amount of industrial land currently available and suitable for noxious
industry, heavy industry, medium industry and light industry.
iv. Identify and nominate areas suitable for the levels of industrial uses identified in (iii)
above.
v. Identify land currently zoned industrial that may be more appropriately zoned.
vi. Nominate areas that may be suitable for future industrial zoning.
vii. Nominate areas where high priority for servicing may be appropriate and investment to
provide servicing in the form of industrial estates.
viii. Review Best Practice nationally in respect to the industrial land usage and incentives to
attract industry, to identify a method of implementation.

1.1 A VISION AND GUIDING PRINCIPLES


Having regard to the economic and market context for industrial development in Bendigo, a vision was
considered to be an essential element in setting a framework for the strategy development.
The vision for industrial land within the City of Greater Bendigo is as follows;
“By 2015, Bendigo is recognised as Victoria’s regional industrial centre of choice for new, emerging and expanding
industrial enterprises with distinctive competence in food manufacturing & processing, communications and value
adding IT and technology. Bendigo has retained and expanded existing industrial activities however consolidated
industrial land into identifiable clusters which are fully serviced, marketed and managed to best practice standards”

Based on the strategy investigations, discussions and interviews with existing and prospective
industrialists, real estate agents and development promoters, the Strategy is to be delivered utilising
the following four interrelated cluster actions and principles.
a) Industrial Land Audit
· There shall be no additional fragmentation of industrial estates and Council shall actively
promote the consolidation of existing industrial precincts into a number of core serviced centres
with high exposure and minimal expansion limitations.
· All future industrial land shall be capable of being fully serviced prior to occupation or release of
land;
· Identified existing isolated sites, unserviced or unmarketable sites will be subject to re-zoning to
better accord with surrounding land use, better utilization of land and/or in order to implement
the consolidation of total industrial locations throughout the City;
· The provision of an increased number of industrial lots sized between 1 000m2 and 3000m2 with
assist in meeting existing and future demands;
· All new and recurrent investment for funding for new servicing shall be undertaken in a
coordinated manner with appropriate private / public sector partnerships for delivery;

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· The sequencing of industrial land release shall be in an orderly manner having regard to
provision of services, existing supply of serviced land, uptake of land; and
· All development, design and improvements to industrial land shall utilise best available
technology and design standards and be undertaken in an ecologically sustainable manner.
b) Promotion and Marketing
· Promote as priority the expansion, reinvestment or internal re-location of existing firms within the
City or the region;
· All activities will celebrate, enhance and promote the attributes that make Bendigo a premier
regional centre for industrial investment and development;
· All actions shall consistently position Bendigo as a regional leader in research, value adding
manufacturing, innovation and education throughout Victoria and South Eastern Australia;
· To maintain and encourage positive local and state wide media exposure that position Bendigo
as a place of choice for industry, local employment and is reflective of a buoyant and thriving
community; and
· Council and Partners develop an affordable, sustainable and effective incentive programme for
the promotion and attraction of business to Bendigo. (Refer Section 3.6.3)
c) Governance
· To ensure that the City of Greater Bendigo is recognised as the governing body trusted in
partnership with industry and community to deliver sustainable industrial outcomes;
· That Council management of industrial development and investment in Bendigo is always
undertaken in an inclusive manner and fully engages with relevant stakeholders, industry and
investors;
· Decision-making is undertaken in transparent manner and decisions are consistent and
articulated and fully accountable; and
· Council investigate the value of increased marketing, promotion and communications
partnerships with industry to articulate and agree the core role and services that identifies where
Council can assist in improving the productivity and economic prosperity of industrial activities
and services within the City.
d) Facilitation
· The statutory planning process is refined and resourced to provide a proactive, problem solving
and outcome driven mechanism; and
· The City and Industrial Partners promote continual professional development of property, real
estate professional, development planning staff and Councillors to increase awareness of
industry sector needs.

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1.2 SUMMARY AUDIT TABLE & PRECINCT RECOMMENDATIONS
An essential element of the industrial land investigations, were individual precinct audits. The audits combined site visits to each of the industrial land holdings and a
desktop review of associated literature. Refer to Key Framework Plan for precinct locations and local context.
Precinct Location Land Size Level of Level of Servicing Current use Recommendations Target Markets*
No. Development
1 Epsom North/Huntly 76.3ha 1a: 75%> Suitable for development with substantial Combination of industrial, 1a-c: Retain existing zones. 1a-c: Warehouse, Store, Rural Industry
1b: 50%-75% upgrades to infrastructure. commercial, rural and residential 1d: Rezone to Rural Zone. 1d: Agriculture, Rural Industry
1c: 75%> uses.
1d: 50%-75%
2 Goornong 74ha <50% Not suitable for immediate development. Combination of industrial, rural and Retain existing Industrial Zone, Agriculture, Rural Industry
residential uses. and extend zoning to land west of
precinct
3 Maiden Gully 80ha <50% Suitable for development with major upgrades to Totally undeveloped, highly Retain existing zones. Industry including Rural Industry
infrastructure. vegetated site.
4 Heathcote 15.8ha 4a: <50% Suitable for development with substantial upgrade Combination of rural and industrial 4a: Retain existing zones. Service Industry
4b:<50% to infrastructure. uses. Significant area of
undeveloped land in sub-precinct
4a.
5 Epsom (South) 62.2ha <50% Suitable for development with substantial upgrade Largely undeveloped. Industrial Retain existing zones. Industry including Rural Industry,
to infrastructure. activity on Howard Street only. Research and Development Centre and
Materials recycling
6 Eaglehawk 112.4ha 6a: <50% Suitable for development with substantial upgrade Variety of industrial uses. Large Retain existing zones. Industry including Service Industry,
6b: 100% to infrastructure. area of undeveloped land in sub- materials Recycling, Outdoor research
6c:100% precinct 6a. facilities, Landscape supplies, market
and the like.
7 North Bendigo 45.3ha 7a: 75%> Suitable for immediate development or minor Two major industries currently Retain existing zones. Industry including office, research and
7b: 75%> upgrade to infrastructure. occupy site; Australian Defence Development, Service Industry.
Industries (ADI) and Pauls Victoria.
8 California Gully 13.8ha 8a: 75%> Suitable for immediate development or minor Combination of industrial and Retain existing zones. Industry including Research
8b:75%> upgrade to infrastructure. commercial uses. Development.
9 Long Gully 31.3ha 100% Suitable for immediate development or minor Combination of industrial and Consider rezoning to Industrial 3. Industry including Service Industry
upgrade to infrastructure. It should be noted that commercial uses.
this site is fully developed; therefore any future
development would be re-development only.
10 Bendigo East 115.3ha 10a: 50%-75% Suitable for development with substantial upgrade Combination or industrial and Retain existing zones and Industry including Research and
10b: 50%-75% to infrastructure. commercial uses. undertake LSP. Development, Materials recycling,
warehouse/store, restricted retail sales,
transport and terminal.

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Precinct Location Land Size Level of Level of Servicing Current use Recommendations Target Markets*
No. Development
11 Bendigo 111.2ha 11a: 100% Suitable for development with minor upgrade to Combination of industrial and Retain existing zones and Industry including Research and
East/Strathdale 11b: 100% infrastructure commercial uses. undertake LSP. Development, Materials recycling,
11c: 50%-75% warehouse/store, restricted retail sales,
11d: 75%> transport and terminal.

12 West Bendigo 20.3ha 12a: 75%> Suitable for immediate development or with minor Combination of residential and 12a: Consider rezoning to 12a: Business/Communal uses
12b: 100% upgrade to infrastructure. commercial uses. Business 1 Zone 12b: Communal, entertainment or
12c: 100% 12b: Consider rezoning to community uses.
12d: 100% Business 3 Zone 12c: Residential.
12c: Rezone to Residential 1 Zone 12d: Communal, entertainment or
12d: Rezone to Business 3 Zone. community uses.

13 Golden 50.54ha 13a: 50%-75% Suitable for immediate development or minor Combination of commercial and Consider rezoning entire precinct Integrated offices, manufacturing
Square/Quarry Hill 13b: 75%> upgrade to infrastructure. business related uses. to Business 3 Zone. industries and associated communal
13c: 100% industrial uses, restricted retail, office,
warehouses and industries

14 Golden Square 77.5ha 14a: 75%> Suitable for immediate development or with minor Combination of industrial, business Retain existing zones. Industry-Service Industry,
14b: 75%> upgrade to infrastructure. and commercial uses. transportation, terminal, restricted,
retail, research and development.
15 Kangaroo Flat East 11.7ha 100% Suitable for immediate development or with minor Combination of industrial, Retain existing zones. Industry-restricted retail,
upgrades to infrastructure. commercial and business uses. warehouse/store, office, service
Industry
16 Marong 3.5ha <50% Not suitable for immediate development. Undeveloped site. Retain existing zones. Industry-Rural industry, Transportation,
terminal, warehouse/store
17 Kangaroo Flat West 38.2ha 50%-75% Suitable for redevelopment with substantial Variety of industrial and Retain existing zones. Industry-mineral/sore extraction, service
upgrade to infrastructure. commercial uses. industry
18 Kangaroo Flat/Big 25.4ha <50% Suitable for development with major upgrade to Combination of residential and Rezone to Rural Living/Low Residential
Hill infrastructure. commercial uses. Density Residential Zone

19 Big Hill 3.4ha 50%>75% Suitable for immediate development or with minor Industrial uses Retain existing zone and identify Industry including office, research and
upgrade to infrastructure possible expansion to south in the Development, Service Industry.
future
*”Target markets” represent a selection of suitable uses for the precinct that are subject to usual planning scheme considerations.

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1.3 STRATEGY OUTCOMES
Currently in the City of Greater Bendigo there is a total of 971.2ha of land subject to either the
Industrial 1 Zone or the Industrial 3 Zone. The industrial land varies in development type, intensity and
servicing levels with some precincts being fully developed (eg. Long Gully) and some entirely
undeveloped (eg. Maiden Gully). Summary Table 1, below, describes the various levels of industrial
development found in the municipality and the quantities/percent of land subject to those levels of
development.
Summary Table 1
Level of Development Land Quantity Percentage
Under Developed <50% 260.9ha 27%
Partially Developed 50%-75% 230.1ha 23.8%
Mostly Developed 75%> 434.1ha 44.8%
Fully Developed 100% 43ha 4.4%
Total 968.1ha 100%

Summary Table 2 illustrates industrial land that as an outcome of this Strategy has been
recommended for rezoning to commercial, residential, business or rural uses. The land proposed for
rezoning totals 302ha, bringing the final industrial zoned land to 669.2ha.
Summary Table 2
Total Industrial Land 968.1ha

Proposed Rezoning from Industrial to Commercial/Residential/Business/Rural 219ha

Proposed Rezoning from another zone to Industrial 52.44ha

Final Industrial Zoned Land 801.5ha

At the current rates of development it is estimated that the municipality will experience between 50.0
ha and 65.0ha of new industrial development to 2021. The research undertaken has illustrated that
the City of Greater Bendigo has sufficient serviced industrial zoned land to serve its future industrial
land requirements for the strategy period.
Bendigo East is considered to hold the most opportunities for the City of Greater Bendigo’s future
industrial development due to the existing and proposed transport links, levels of servicing and
surrounding land uses. Results from the industrial land audit have indicated that future industrial land
requirements can be met in East Bendigo (Precincts 10 and 11), as available industrial land is
estimated to be between 81.2ha and 160ha (as illustrated in Summary Table 3).
Summary Table 3
Precinct Land Size Level of Development Estimated Available Estimated Available
Land (Lower) Land (Upper)

10a 119ha 50% - 75% 29.7ha 59.5ha


10b 98ha 50% - 75% 24.5ha 49ha
11a 6ha 100% 0ha 0ha
11b 7ha 100% (ex. Goninans) 7ha 7ha

11c 80ha 50%-75% 20ha 40ha


11d 18ha 75%> 0ha 4.5ha
Total 328ha NA 81.2ha 160ha
Note: Lower and Upper estimates are calculated on the basis of the existing levels of development or land within the precinct. For example, if the
level of development is between 50% - 75 %, the Upper estimate is 50% of the land developed (therefore 50% undeveloped) and the
Lower estimate is 75% of the land developed (therefore 25% undeveloped)

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2. PURPOSE OF THE STUDY

2.1 STUDY OBJECTIVES & EXPECTED OUTCOMES


The Prime Objectives and expected outcomes of the study are contained in the project brief dated
October 2000.
The objectives outlined were;
· Mobilise the project & Audit existing industrial land supply;
· Assess the land supply suitability to a range of industry types;
· Ascertain the present and future demand for industrial land;
· Review land currently zoned for industrial purposes and the suitability of the zone;
· Nominate areas for future industrial zoning;
· Nominate areas that are of a high priority for servicing; and
· Review Best Practice with regard to industrial development incentives and implementation; and
Report on project outcomes.

The desired outcomes for the project included;


· Fully documented report (including photographic record) detailing rationalisation of existing
industrial zones and the establishment of new industrial zones;
· Clear business and community group understanding and acceptance of proposal;
· Clear mapping of existing and future industrial areas and their preferred uses, having regard to
particular precinct areas within zones;
· Service installation areas prioritised;
· List of incentives to encourage industrial development, including the provision of industrial parks,
prepared and adapted for different areas; and
· Documentation required by Council to amend the Greater Bendigo Planning Scheme so as to
incorporate the industrial zones as ultimately identified. This may include such tools as zone
overlays and related schedules and/or modifications to the MSS and Local Planning Policies.

2.2 DRIVERS BEHIND THIS STUDY


The strategy has been, in part, driven by a number of significant elements including:
· The need for Council and private sector to better understand and manage the interface between
industrial and residential land uses in Bendigo. This is particularly important given the increasing
level of constraints on existing industrial operations that are imposed by residential growth in
areas adjoining existing industrial land;
· The need to counter the threat of loss of economic value from declining industrial activities within
Bendigo resulting from increasing competition from regional centres (Ballarat, Shepparton) etc,
and that of general macro economic decline in Victorian regional centres;

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· The need to provide a long term integrated strategy for investment in industrial infrastructure to
service new industrial land in order to assist in the statutory planning process and development
contribution consideration; and
· The need for Council to maximise economic and physical service investment in the City that is
undertaken in a sustainable manner.

2.3 METHODOLOGY
The study methodology included the following broad activities as were agreed by the project steering
committee:
· Strategic overview of each industrial site in the City of Greater Bendigo - For the purpose of the
overview the 62 identified industrial areas were consolidated into 18 key industrial precincts. The
overview incorporated a desktop review (planning scheme provisions), combined with individual
site audits.
· Interviews with individuals with varying interest industrial development – A series of interviews
with key stakeholders were conducted to determine the views and attitudes of various members
of the community. The stakeholders included representatives from a selection of firms, real
estate agents and Council officers.
· Infrastructure audit of each industrial precinct - Each of the service providers were contacted
regarding servicing for the 18 precincts. The information obtained included site plans and
general comments. This information was used to make an overall assessment of each site.

2.4 ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
The project was guided and advised by a Steering Committee, who met on numerous occasions for
the purpose of providing local knowledge, views on market related and technical matters and review of
the strategy process. Membership of the Steering Committee include:

· Cr Barry Ackerman (Chair) · Marg Allan (Manager Strategic Planning)


· Jodi Kennedy (Strategic Planner) · Justin Hanney (Director Community Services)
· David Krumins (Manager Planning and Development) · David Beard (Director Infrastructure Services)
· Andrew Cahill (Dungey Carter Ketterer) · Phil Hanna (Regional Manager DOI)
· Ian Holmes (VicRoads) · Brian Gould (Manager Economic Development)
· David Johnston (Senior Planner, DOI) · Ken McMahon (DNRE)
Many thanks are extended to the Committee Members for their input into the study.

2.5 USING THE STRATEGY


The preparation of an Industrial Strategy for Bendigo was undertaken by adopting the following basic
development procedures for land use and marketing strategies:
· Need recognition: We must identify the problem, threats or series of issues that give rise to the
need for a “strategy” (see Key Drivers pg 6);
· Existing condition: We must then audit the current condition and context to establish the base
case (see existing context and site audit pp 38-58);

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· Vision establishment: We must therefore develop a vision for the desired future state to provide
the Strategy a goal (Strategy Vision pg 35); and then
· Implementation: We must prepare a staged, orderly and transparent implementation programme
(see pg. 59)
· These broad tasks form the basis of the following Bendigo Industrial Strategy documentation. In
addition, the Strategy documentation has been designed as a means to assist and guide in the
following circumstances:
– Capital works expenditure development and prioritisation;
– Planning permit applications for industrial and neighbouring land;
– The development of local planning policies relating to industrial land in the City of Greater
Bendigo;
– The consideration of re-zoning requests for industrial and neighbouring land; and
– The development of Council internal organisation reviews and economic facilitation
programs.

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3. THE STRATEGY CONTEXT

3.1 BACKGROUND
The underlying task for this project is to identify the demand for industrial land, to review the
appropriateness of existing industrially zoned land, to identify potential future industrial land, to identify
preferred uses for this land, and to document service needs.
In order to achieve these outcomes, this section of the report provides necessary background
information on Bendigo's profile in terms of its industrial activities and industrial land provision.
The following aspects relating to Bendigo's industrial composition are covered:
· The industrial development context;
· Recent industrial property trends;
· A comparison of Bendigo's performance with other regional centres;
· Viewpoints about industrial activity and industrial land in Bendigo;
· Identification of issues associated with industrial development and industrial land;
· An overview of existing industrial areas from a market perspective;
· The outlook for industrial and demand and supply; and
· Strategic planning considerations to guide the overall project.
In this chapter there is no specific definition of 'industry', except to emphasise that the focus is placed
on activities which locate in industrial land, and which include activities such as manufacturing,
transport & storage, construction, and wholesaling.

3.2 BENDIGO AND ITS INDUSTRY BASE


The City of Greater Bendigo, with a resident population of approximately 87,000 people, is a long-
established regional centre in central Victoria. From its early beginnings as a gold mining settlement
in the 1850s, Bendigo today serves an extensive region of some 150,000 people in central Victoria,
with its sphere of influence extending north to the Murray River and into southern NSW.
While Bendigo's regional role now focuses on services (retailing, for example, is the largest
employment sector), its role as an industrial centre remains strong.
For example, manufacturing provides employment for around 4,300 people, while the construction
sector employs around 2,000 people, transport & storage employs almost 900 people, and
wholesaling employs around 1,400 people (refer 1996 Population Census). These sectors are the
principal occupiers of industrial land in the municipality, and together they account for 28% of all
employed persons in Bendigo.
While the industrial sector is important to Bendigo's economic base, it is also true that there has been
considerable restructuring of the industry base in the past 20 - 25 years or so, with much of this
restructuring associated with reduction in tariff protection and other national policy initiatives. In 1981,
for example, approximately 18% of employed persons in Bendigo were in manufacturing, but by 1996
this share had declined significantly to 14%. While manufacturing activity has been slowly declining in
employment terms in Bendigo and universally (but remains important for its value-adding and
multiplier effects), it is also evident that other activities which tend to locate in industrial areas have

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been expanding in numbers, and this includes wholesaling, transport & storage, construction and
other activities. Thus, overall demand for industrial land has been increasing.
Another consideration is that continuing population growth is forecast for Bendigo over the next 20
years, with an approximate population increase of 11,000 persons by 2021, giving a total population
number in the order of 98,400 people (refer Council population statistics). This means an increasing
labour force, especially as participation rates are increasing, and hence the need to generate more
employment opportunities in Bendigo.
By 2021, another 2,000-plus jobs will be required to meet the growth in Bendigo's labour force
numbers. The need to create more jobs is already evident, considering that currently some 3,100
residents or 7.9% of the labour force are unemployed, and this compares with the non-metropolitan
figure of 6.7% (refer DEWRSB, Labour Small Area Labour Markets, Dec Qtr 2000).
This is the overall context within which the City of Greater Bendigo has commissioned this
assessment of industrial land requirements and the outlook for the next decade or so as a guide to
planning for future industrial development and infrastructure provision. The need for such an
assessment is also reinforced by the fact that, prior to recent Council amalgamations (1995), planning
for industry in Bendigo was constrained by having five separate municipalities (exclusive of
Heathcote), each vying for a share of industrial development, and with consequence that Bendigo
today has a multitude of industrial areas.

3.3 RECENT INDUSTRY TRENDS IN BENDIGO


Trends in industrial development in Bendigo can be observed through reference to a number of data
sources, including employment data in the ABS Population Census, property sales data provided by
the Valuer-General's Office, and Council's permit information. Interviews with industry representatives
and property agents also assist in obtaining a good appreciation of trends in industrial activity and in
related property development in Bendigo.
Again, we note that the reference to 'industry' includes manufacturing, transport & storage,
wholesaling, and construction, as these are typical of activities locating in industrial areas.

3.3.1 Trends in Employment in Manufacturing, Transport/Storage, Wholesaling and Construction


Sectors
Significant changes have taken place in the Bendigo economy in the ten years 1986 to 1996 (with
reference to ABS Census data), and since that time these trends have tended to be reinforced. In
respect to changes, we note that the period overlaps with the economic recession that commenced
around 1990 and lasted until the early 1990s, with economic recovery underway by 1995.
For the full 10-year period to 1996, total employment in the sectors comprising Manufacturing,
Transport/Storage, Wholesaling and Construction – which are typical of activities locating in industrial
areas in Bendigo – increased by only 4%, while in contrast, employment in all other sectors in Bendigo
increased by 18%. Thus, although there was some growth over the period in employment in activities
usually locating in industrial areas, this growth was slow when compared with growth in other sectors
(and which principally comprise services such as retailing, health, education, community services,
etc).
As Table 1 shows, the period 1986 to 1991 witnessed a severe decline in employment in
manufacturing, transport & storage, and construction, in line with the effects of the economic
recession. However, the growth trend returned in the period 1991 to 1996, with growth recorded in all
sectors (with the exception of transport & storage). Indeed, the growth in manufacturing in the period

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1991 to 1996 was significant, with an extra 850 people employed over the period (representing a 24%
increase), compared with a loss of 440 employed persons in the previous period 1986 to 1991.
Overall, those employment sectors which typically locate in industrial areas experienced an average
annual growth of +2.6% in the period 1991 to 1996, compared with an average annual growth rate of
just 1.1% for all employment. This growth implies an increased demand for industrial land in Bendigo
in the second half of the 1990s. These trends are identified in the following Section 3.2.
The 2001 Population Census will confirm the economic activity and employment trends that have
continued since the period leading up to the mid-1990s and since that time to the late 1990s.
Table 1: Employment Trends in Selected Industry Sectors in Bendigo, 1986 to 1996

Sector 1986 1991 1996 Change Change


1986 to 1991 1991 to 1996
Manufacturing 3,930 3,490 4,340 -440 +850
(-11.2%) (+24.4%)
Transport & Storage 1,310 960 870 -350 -90
(-26.7%) (-9.4%)
Wholesaling 1,100 1,300 1,420 +200 +120
(+18.2%) (+9.2%)
Construction 1,850 1,760 1,930 -90 +170
(-4.9%) (+9.7%)
TOTAL 8,190 7,510 8,560 -680 +1,050
(-8.3%) (+14.0%)
% of total employment 30% 26% 28% - -
ALL OTHER 18,920 21,630 22,280 +2,710 +650
EMPLOYMENT
(+14.3%) (+3.0%)

TOTAL, ALL 27,110 29,140 30,820 +2,030 +1,680


EMPLOYMENT
(+7.5%) (+5.8%)

Source: ABS, Population and Housing Census, 1986 to 1996


Note: Figures rounded. Figures refer to ‘resident labour force’

3.3.2 Industrial Property Sales


In the ten years 1990 to 1999, the City of Greater Bendigo (and including the five separate
municipalities which existed prior to 1995) recorded a total of 169 industrial property sales, according
to data provided by the Valuer-General’s Office. The emergence of the municipality from recession of
the early 1990s is reflected in these figures, with growth in new sales commencing in 1994, and this
has continued through to the end of the 1990s. These trends are shown in Table 2.

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Table 2: Total Industrial Property Sales, City of Greater Bendigo, 1990 to 1999
Year Total No.
Industrial Property Sales
1990 23 (6 vacant sites)
1991 10 (1 vacant)
1992 8 (1 vacant)
1993 12 (3 vacant)
1994 23 (6 vacant)
1995 16 (6 vacant)
1996 13 (3 vacant)
1997 18 (10 vacant)
1998 26 (9 vacant)
1999 20 (10 vacant)
TOTAL 169 (55 vacant)
Source: Valuer-General’s Office
Note: 1990-1994: data refers to the five former municipalities
1995-1999: data refers to the (amalgamated) City of Greater Bendigo
Table excludes Heathcote where there have been only 5 or so sales of vacant industrial land during the 1990s (V-G’s Office and local
comment)

The increase in activities associated with industrial land is evident with the growth in vacant land
sales. Thus, during the recession years of the early 1990s there was, on average, 2 or 3 sales of
vacant land each year. In the subsequent period 1994 to 1999, vacant land sales have averaged 7 to
8 sales pa, increasing to around 10 sales pa for the past three years.
These industrial property sales tend to reflect the emerging growth in economic activity in Bendigo in
the mid-1990s which was also becoming evident at the time of the 1996 ABS Population Census (and
as earlier reported in Table 1).
In the past five years, 1995 to 1999, Bendigo has recorded a total of 93 industrial property sales and
these include –
· vacant industrial land (38 sales or 41% of total sales)
· factory buildings (27 sales or 29%)
· other industrial property (28 sales or 30%)
Median block size for vacant industrial land sales has typically been in the order of 1,000 to 3,000 m2,
with median price generally averaging up to $45,000 per sale expressed in 2000 prices. Details of
industrial sales by property type between 1995 and 1999 are provided in Table 3.

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Table 3: Industrial Property Sales, City of Greater Bendigo, 1995 - 1999 (and Median Price per
Vacant Block)

Year Vacant Factory Warehouse Other Total


1995 6 4 - 6 16
($48,000)
1996 3 7 - 3 13
($42,500)
1997 10 4 1 3 18
($40,000)
1998 9 9 2 6 26
($45,000)
1999 10 3 1 6 20
($37,500)
TOTAL 38 27 4 24 93

Source: Valuer-General, Victoria A Guide to Property Values (annual)

3.3.3 Locations of Industrial Property Sales


Industrial property sales information showing locations of sales in urban Bendigo has been provided
from real estate records.
In the period 1990 to 2000 (incomplete data for 2000), there was a total of 112 industrial property
sales in urban Bendigo. Of these sales, 73 (or 65%) were located in the area defined as suburban
Bendigo, while the next highest number of sales was in Eaglehawk (21 sales), followed by Epsom (10
sales), Kangaroo Flat (7 sales) and Marong (1 sale).
The figures are summarised in Table 4, which also shows the trends for 1990-1994 and for 1995 -
2000. The dominance of urban Bendigo is evident as a preferred location for industrial activities.

Table 4: Industrial Property Sales, Urban Bendigo, 1990 - 2000

Location No. Sales No. Sales No. Sales


‘suburb’ 1990 - 1994 1995 - 2000 Total
Bendigo 19 54 73
Eaglehawk 11 10 21
Epsom 4 6 10
Kangaroo Flat 3 4 7
Marong - 1 1
TOTAL 37 75 112
Source: Derived from information provided by Dungey Carter Ketterer, Bendigo Real Estate Agents
Note: Information not complete for Year 2000. Data excludes Heathcote where there have only been approximately 5 industrial
land sales during the 1990s

3.3.4 Vacant Industrial Land


A register of vacant industrial land is maintained in Bendigo, and is complete to the year 1998. While
there would have been some changes in the supply of vacant land since 1998, the general pattern
prevailing at that time is of interest.

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Of 149 vacant industrial allotments, only 20 allotments or 14% were under 1,500 m2 in size. Most of
the allotments (70%) are 3,000 m2 and larger, including 40% of lots over 10,000 m2. The median size
of all vacant allotments is 6,000 m2.
These figures highlight that most vacant industrial land in Bendigo (70%) is over 3,000 m2 in area, yet
most of the demand for industrial land is for lots of between 1,000 to 3,000 m2, according to real
estate agents.
Taking an average allotment area for the size ranges shown in the register (and summarised below in
Table 5), the total amount of vacant industrial land in Bendigo could be at least 250 ha. While this is a
considerable amount of land, this figure includes land that may not be acceptable for the marketplace
in view of poor location, unsuitable topography, no services, and so on. Moreover, just because land
is vacant does not mean it is therefore available to the market; in some cases land owners will
continue to hold vacant land in order to meet their own potential needs in the longer term, or to hold
the land as an asset or investment for realisation at some future date. Thus, the amount of vacant
land that is available for sale is probably considerably less than the total figure would otherwise
indicate.
Table 5 summarises the vacant land figures from the register.
Table 5: Register of Vacant Land, Bendigo, 1998
Size Range No. Vacant Lots %
0-500 m2 5 3.6
501-1,000 m2 8 5.8
1,001-1,500 m2 7 5.1
1,501-2,000 m2 12 8.7
2,001-3,000 m2 9 6.5
3,001-5,000 m2 24 17.4
5,001-10,000 m2 19 13.8
10,001-100,000 m2 45 32.6
100,001+ m2 9 6.5
NOT AVAILABLE 11 -
TOTAL 149 100.0
Source: Bendigo Register of Vacant Land, 1998

3.3.5 Implications for the Strategy


This overview of industry trends in Bendigo highlights the following:
· There is evidence in Bendigo of new growth during the 1990’s in activities that typically locate in
industrial areas, including manufacturing, transport & storage, wholesale and construction
activities. These four sub-sectors increased by a net 1,050 employed persons between 1991
and 1996, compared with a net increase of 650 employed persons in all other employment
sectors. With the national and regional economies emerging from economic recession around
1994 - 1995, there is every reason to expect that continuing growth has been occurring in these
industry sectors since the last Population Census was undertaken in 1996.
· Property sales information confirms that the number of industrial property sales in Bendigo has
been increasing during the latter part of the 1990s, with an average of 7 to 8 sales pa in the
period 1994 to 1999 compared with just 2 to 3 sales pa between 1991 and 1994.

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· There is a considerable stock of vacant industrial land (almost 150 lots in 1998), but most of
these require subdivision, and many do not meet market needs. Popular allotment sizes are in
the range of 1,000 to 3,000 m2. However, a total of 70% of all vacant lots are over 3,000 m2 in
area, and the median size of all existing vacant lots is 6,000 m2. Other market needs are for
industrial land which is serviced or serviceable, relatively close to town centre facilities, enjoys
main road access and exposure (if possible), and is affordable.
· In the past decade, areas in ‘suburban’ Bendigo are most popular for industrial property
purchases, followed by Eaglehawk and Epsom. However, these patterns are likely to change in
favour of places like north-east Bendigo and Epsom as land availability changes.

3.3.6 Comparison of Bendigo with other regional centres


Bendigo is one of the major regional centres in Victoria, and it is worthwhile comparing this centre with
others so as to have some form of benchmark regarding underlying economic indicators and
consequent industrial performance.
The following points are highlighted:
· Bendigo (87,150 persons) has a larger population than nearby Ballarat (81,600), but is not as
large as Geelong (192,000). Bendigo is also significantly larger than a number of other regional
centres. Refer to Table 6.
· Bendigo has been experiencing faster population growth in the decade to 2001 (+0.7% pa)
compared with other regional centres (Ballarat +0.3% pa; Geelong +0.56% pa), and has been
growing faster than the country Victoria average (+0.4% pa). Refer to Table 6.
· For the period 2001 to 2021, Bendigo’s population is forecast to grow at a faster rate (+0.57%
pa) compared with Ballarat (+0.36% pa) and country Victoria (+0.39% pa), although growth is
expected to be faster in Mildura and Warrnambool (and from a lower base). Refer to Table 6.
· Bendigo has an unemployment rate (7.9% Dec Qtr, 2000) that is higher than the Victorian
average (+6.7%), and higher than a number of other regional centres, although marginally below
the figure for Ballarat (8.9%) and Geelong (8.1%). Bendigo’s unemployment rate (involving
3,100 persons at December 2000) is a significant reason for further developing the Bendigo
economy through infrastructure provision and other actions. Refer to Table 7.
· Bendigo has a broadly similar share of its employed labour force at work in manufacturing,
transport & storage and construction (23%) as does Ballarat (24.6%), but this share is
significantly less than for Geelong (29.5%). These are the types of activities that occupy
industrial land. Geelong has a larger secondary industry base than either Bendigo or Ballarat, or
any other regional centre. Refer Table 8.
· All regional centres suffered a loss in manufacturing employment in the period 1986 to 1996, but
Bendigo has experienced a significant return to previous levels when these employment
positions are expressed as a ratio to population. This is shown in Table 9, with Bendigo in 1996
achieving 96% of its manufacturing employment positions per 10,000 population that it had in
1986. Ballarat also performed well (96.5%). In contrast, Geelong achieved only 77% of its
former level.
· Bendigo lost a significant role in the Transport & Storage sector between 1986 and 1996, and
the level achieved in 1996 was only 58% of that held in 1986 in terms of this employment as a
ratio of population. Ballarat and Geelong also fared less attractively than in 1986, while places
such as Mildura and Warrnambool made important progress in Transport & Storage
employment. Refer to Table 10.

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· In terms of the industrial property market, Bendigo and Ballarat had a similar number of
industrial properties for sale in 1999 (20 and 18, respectively), but the choice in vacant land was
evidently better in Bendigo (10 sites sold) than in Ballarat (3 sites). Yet the choice was even
greater in Geelong (22 vacant sites sold). Refer to Table 11.

Table 6: Population Growth, Bendigo and Selected Centres, 1991, 2001 and 2011

Annual Average Growth Rate


Locality 1991 2001 2011

1991-2001 2001-2011

Bendigo 81,270 87,150 92,280 0.70% 0.57%


Ballarat 79,120 81,590 84,570 0.31% 0.36%
Geelong 181,280 191,750 202,890 0.56% 0.57%
LaTrobe Valley 75,250 70,670 70,850 -0.63% 0.03%
Mildura 44,590 48,120 52,560 0.76% 0.89%
Warrnambool 26,280 28,860 31,120 0.94% 0.76%
Wangaratta 25,980 26,420 26,310 0.17% -0.04%
Victoria 4,420,370 4,770,410 5,099,070 0.76% 0.67%
Country Victoria 1,264,230 1,316,080 1,367,750 0.40% 0.39%
Metropolitan
Melbourne 3,156,140 3,454,340 3,731,320 0.91% 0.77%
Source: Department of Infrastructure, (2000), Victoria in Future
Department of Infrastructure, (1998), Regional Victoria in Fact

Table 7: Labour Force and Unemployment, Bendigo and Selected Regional Centres, 12 months
to September 2000

Locality Labour Force Unemployed % Unemployed

Bendigo 38,030 3,440 9.0%


Ballarat 45,600 4,200 9.2%
Geelong 85,870 7,780 9.1%
LaTrobe Valley 28,570 3,660 12.8%
Mildura 21,670 1,610 7.4%
Warrnambool 13,300 1,110 8.3%
Wangaratta 13,830 880 6.4%
Victoria 2,404,300 160,330 6.7%
Country Victoria 620,430 47,280 7.6%
Metropolitan Melbourne 1,783,880 113,030 6.3%
Source: DEWRSB (Quarterly), Small Area Labour Markets

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Table 8: Key Economic Sectors in Bendigo and Selected Regional Centres, 1996

Non classifiable
Locality Primary Secondary Tertiary Total
or Not Stated

Bendigo No. 1,228 7,134 21,615 843 30,820


% 4.0% 23.1% 70.1% 2.7% 100.0%
Ballarat No. 625 7,247 20,734 809 29,415
% 2.1% 24.6% 70.5% 2.8% 100.0%
Geelong No. 1,123 20,499 45,669 2,177 69,468
% 1.6% 29.5% 65.7% 3.1% 100.0%
LaTrobe Valley No. 1,041 5,040 17,515 723 24,319
% 4.3% 20.7% 72.0% 3.0% 100.0%
Mildura No. 3,593 3,036 11,124 578 18,331
% 19.6% 16.6% 60.7% 3.2% 100.0%
Wangaratta No. 1,067 3,219 6,235 311 10,832
% 9.9% 29.7% 57.6% 2.9% 100.0%
Warrnambool No. 263 2,212 8,101 280 10,856
% 2.4% 20.4% 74.6% 2.6% 100.0%
Victoria No. 78,455 490,749 1,255,964 59,712 1,884,880
% 4.2% 26.0% 66.6% 3.2% 100.0%
Source: ABS 1996 Census of Population and Housing
Note: Secondary' is defined in this instance as Manufacturing, Construction and Transport and Storage

Table 9: Manufacturing Jobs per 1,000 Population

Locality 1986 1991 1996 1996 as % of 1986

Bendigo 55.7 45.0 53.3 95.8%


Ballarat 65.2 56.1 62.9 96.5%
Geelong 100.4 80.5 77.3 77.0%
LaTrobe Valley 43.1 39.0 38.3 89.0%
Mildura 22.5 26.9 31.9 141.4%
Wangaratta 81.1 72.7 93.6 115.5%
Warrnambool 60.6 57.2 45.5 75.0%
Victoria 79.3 68.2 70.2 88.5%
Source: ABS 1996 Census of Population and Housing

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Table 10: Transport and Storage Jobs per 1,000 Population

Locality 1986 1991 1996 1996 as % of 1986

Bendigo 18.5 12.4 10.7 57.6%


Ballarat 16.4 12.2 10.7 65.3%
Geelong 17.6 15.0 13.2 75.3%
LaTrobe Valley 8.8 8.0 7.8 88.8%
Mildura 15.5 11.7 14.2 91.5%
Wangaratta 16.3 12.3 11.7 72.1%
Warrnambool 10.5 11.0 9.6 91.4%
Victoria 20.6 17.6 16.7 81.2%
Source: ABS 1996 Census of Population and Housing

Table 11: Industrial Property Sales, Bendigo and Selected Regional Centres, 1999

No. Sales of
No. Sales of No. Sales of No. Sales of
Locality Other Industrial Total Sales
Vacant Industrial Factories Warehouses
Property

Bendigo 10 3 1 6 20
Ballarat 3 5 3 7 18
Geelong 22 16 14 12 64
La Trobe 10 6 3 11 30
Mildura 4 3 1 6 14
Wangaratta 2 3 1 5 11
Warrnambool 1 - - 1 2
Country Victoria 136 90 41 146 413
Metropolitan
Melbourne 302 805 131 160 1,398
Source: Valuer-General's Office (2000) A Guide to Property Values

This overview of underlying indicators - covering population growth (recent and forecast),
unemployment levels, employment patterns by sector, and available industrial land - indicates there
are strong similarities between Bendigo and Ballarat, although neither regional centre has the
manufacturing ‘pull’ of Geelong. The data also shows that Mildura and (less so) Warrnambool are
strong contenders in attracting economic development.
Given the global (and certainly national) competitiveness involved in attracting new business
investments, new jobs and new skills, it is important that Bendigo is presently investigating ways to
enhance its provision of industrial land, infrastructure and services. A strong industrial base,
combined with investment and employment multipliers, will significantly underpin the regional
economy, provide new and expanded opportunities for existing and new firms, and enhance living
standards for the community.

3.4 VIEWPOINTS ABOUT INDUSTRY IN BENDIGO


As part of the project, personal interviews were conducted with a representative selection of firms
involved in industrial activity in Bendigo, as well as with industry associations, real estate firms and
Council officers. The aim of this interview program was to obtain an appreciation of the underlying

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features and issues which influence industrial activity in Bendigo, and to identify the implications this
holds for industrial property and the supply of industrial land to meet future needs.
The main areas of interest and concern are summarised in the following sections.
Individual comments are contained in Appendix A of this report.
Note: the following views are those of people contacted in the consultation phase – the comments do
not necessarily reflect the views of the consultants.
Bendigo as a Manufacturing Centre
It was indicated in the interviews that manufacturing plays an essential role in the local economy. In
recent years this role has been compromised through the loss of major industry, which has included
Mayfair Hams and more recently Goninans. Interviewees expressed a need for Council to focus on
manufacturing industries and the need to stay competitive with other regional centres such as Ballarat
and Geelong.
Demand for Industrial Property
The interviews indicated that there is minimal demand for industrial land in the municipality. The
enquiries made at Council were generally related to smaller activities, with most interest from owner-
occupiers.
Features Sought in Industrial Land
The interviews indicated that the features sought by new firms include good exposure in a recognised
industrial area; affordable price; flat land; all services provided to site; and good transport access.
Land areas sought are ¼ to ½ to 1 acre in size (approximately 1,000 m2 to 4,000 m2), usually with
buildings up to 300-400 m2.
Localities in Demand
Areas in demand include: Strickland Road, McDowall Road, McGoldrick Road, White Hills, with the
best presented industrial areas being Deborah Triangle and Collins Street, Kangaroo. The Deborah
Triangle Estate is highly sought after due to its proximity to CBD, wide streets, kerb and channel etc.
Interviewees expressed concern over the general amenity of some industrial areas and believe they
need to be better maintained to attract new investment.
Supply of Industrial Land
The interviewees indicated that much of the available industrial land is encumbered by neighboring
uses and expressed the importance of buffers between those residential uses and proposed industrial
uses.
The interviewees believe that Bendigo currently completes for industry investment with other larger
centres including Ballarat, Geelong and Melbourne and the municipality needs to market its central
location to attract new investment.
Future Industrial Land
It was indicated in the interviews that Bendigo East should be further developed for industrial
purposes. Features of the area are: proximity to town services; access to highway network; easy
access to rail if required; close to aerodrome; buffered on all sides; and close to McIvor Highway. For
the longer term, the saleyards were suggested as an appropriate site. The saleyards are considered
an appropriate location due to access to major highways / roads serving this part of the State; minimal
residential development; opportunities for expansion; and has potential to develop as an agri-
industry/business locality
Competition for Industry

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It was indicated in the interviews that Ballarat and Shepparton have more industry in comparison with
Bendigo and therefore a better labour market for these skills. Generally Bendigo is not regarded as an
industrial base.
Future Link Road
The interviewees believe the East Bendigo Link Road to be an important addition to Bendigo’s existing
road network. The ring road would link industrial and commercial areas, open up new land, and ease
traffic congestion in city centre
What Needs Doing for Industry in Bendigo?
Generally the interviewees felt Council need to identify areas for industrial development and the types
of suitable industry. Conflicting views were given regarding the types of appropriate industry ranging
from small niche industry to major State/National firms.
Concerns were raised over appropriate transport for industry. Ideas for improvements included; fast-
tracking the duplication of the Calder Highway; providing a ring road, with NE to W direction; and small
transport companies that can service smaller industries.
Council's Role
Questions were raised over the capacity of Council to make planning decisions quickly and with an
informed approach. There is a need for more appreciation in Council of what people are trying to
achieve in developing new or expanded businesses.
Conclusion
The comments outlined in Appendix A and briefly summarized above, are taken into account in the
subsequent assessment of industrial land requirements and in preparing the strategy for industrial
land and infrastructure provision in Bendigo.

3.5 KEY ISSUES FOR STRATEGIC PLANNING


The following issues are identified from the consultations with industry and with other stakeholders, as
well as reference to the analyses of industrial activity and industrial land. These are the important
matters which need attention.

3.5.1 Direction Needed


Bendigo needs to decide where it wants to go as a major regional city and with special attention paid
to its present and potential role as a centre for manufacturing and associated industry.
3.5.2 New Emphasis to Industry
Council at the City of Greater Bendigo needs to give more emphasis to manufacturing and associated
activities as an important sector in the regional economy. The most quoted example in undertaking
this study is that of Ballarat, however virtually all Councils seek additional industrial investment.

3.5.3 Community Attitudes


The Bendigo community needs to have a more positive appreciation of manufacturing and associated
industry as a cornerstone to the city's growth and well-being, and as an employment sector with
significant multiplier effects.

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3.5.4 Fragmented Industrial Land
a) Existing industrial land is generally fragmented and in many places very untidy – these
characteristics (a legacy of five former council areas) mean the city cannot easily attract
investment as it otherwise would, and therefore action is needed. These existing industrial areas
require attention in terms of enhancing visual amenity.
b) The shortage of readily serviced industrial land must be addressed, with large areas identified as
part of a program to provide serviced or serviceable industrial land in good locations that can
attract new and expanding local firms and attract firms that are new to Bendigo.
3.5.5 New Industrial Areas Needed
a) Council should get involved in planning and developing new industrial areas (and this project is
important in that context), and could also possibly do this as a joint-venture with private interests,
where appropriate. Details of any joint venture will depend totally on the circumstances, however
may include opportunities where common interests are shared between developers (who own
land) and Council who wish to promote development.
b) A total of between 50 ha and 80 ha (high estimate) of industrial land is required in Bendigo to
meet forecast demand over the next 20 years, but this figure (averaging between 2.5 and 4 ha
per year, which is at the high end of the forecast) needs to be kept under review.
c) Design and siting standards need to be applied to existing and new industrial areas so that the
industrial land resource is attractive and can bring new investment to Bendigo.
d) Having regard for the forecast requirement for industrial land, it will be necessary to identify land
that should be identified for particular types of industry, particularly noxious industry, and this will
be influenced by the location, serviceability and availability of land for such use.
3.5.6 Existing Industry Needs Encouragement
Council needs to keep in view the needs of existing industry in Bendigo – these are firms that already
operate here, providing jobs and services, and they require attention in terms of maintaining attractive
and well-serviced industrial land and infrastructure.

3.5.7 Need to Encourage Entrepreneurialism


Entrepreneurialism needs to be encouraged in Bendigo – there is a view that the place lacks this
attribute compared with other regional centres.
Entrepreneurialism can be fostered in numerous ways:
· Encourage a business group which is an umbrella for these activities;
· Awards for most enterprising business (measured through peer votes, increased sales levels,
etc);
· Breakfasts and guest speakers – to inform and encourage discussion;
· Information sessions with key industry leaders as spokespeople;
· Involvement of professional business development consultants (IT, management, etc); and
· Information dissemination etc.
3.5.8 East Bendigo Link Road
The proposed East Bendigo Link Road will provide the city with a key transport link from the McIvor
Highway in Strathdale to the Midland Highway in White Hills. At this stage Council is considering four
routes for the proposed road all of which travel through East Bendigo, a key industrial area of the
municipality. The proposed road has the potential to access areas of industrial land that are currently

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under utilised, as well as providing access to new areas to be considered for future industrial
development.
The route considered most appropriate to facilitate industrial development is illustrated on Precinct
Plans 10 and 11 found in Section 5 of this report. This particular route will provide an unencumbered
link between the Midland and McIvor Highways and open up expansive areas of undeveloped,
serviced industrial land.
3.5.9 An Industry Plan for Bendigo is warranted
Bendigo needs an industry development plan which shows, for example,
· How we can encourage existing firms to grow in output and employment?
· How we can attract new firms and their investments and jobs?
· How we can nurture the exporters?
· How we can address skills shortages?
· How we can improve the image of manufacturing as a sector in which to work?
· How we can generate positive community perceptions about industry?

3.5.10 Role for Council


Council needs to be involved in addressing all of the above-listed issues – it needs to be the driver or
facilitator to get manufacturing and associated industry recognised as the important sector that it is to
the Bendigo economy. Examples of where active industry developments have been successful
include Melton Shire and Knox City. Whilst most Councils in Victoria have some sort of program to
promote industry development, industrial development initiatives include these undertaken by Bass
Coast, Moorabool and Moreland. The City of Hume also has a series of specific industry action plans.
(eg. automotive)

3.5.11 Role for Local Firms


Local firms also need to support industry development, and there may be an opportunity to establish a
Bendigo Industry Council to support and encourage industrial development

3.6 OUTLOOK FOR INDUSTRIAL LAND REQUIREMENTS

3.6.1 Background to the Forecast


Forecasts of land requirements, particularly for industrial land, can be difficult to make with accuracy,
especially over the medium to long-term period (say, over a period of between 5 and 8 years, and 10
to 15 years and beyond). There are many variables that can intervene to upset the most precise of
forecasts, such as national and state economic cycles and policy influences, overseas policy and
pricing changes, interest rates, market conditions in competing regions, states and nations, and the
hard-to-define changes of a serendipitous nature.
What we do know from this assessment of industrial land in Bendigo is that during the latter part of the
1990s (post recession), industrial property sales averaged around 18 to 20 sales per year, including
around 8 to 10 sales of vacant industrial land (refer Section 3). Some of the growth in Bendigo’s
industrial property market has been directed to existing factory buildings and warehouses (about 45%
in recent years).
During this time, employment in those types of activities that typically locate in industrial areas
(including manufacturing, wholesaling, etc) increased by an average of between 2.5% pa and 3% pa.

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Thus, growth has been taking place in the industrial activity market, and this is reflected in the growth
in industry and related activities ‘on-the-ground’, and growth in the number of property sales.

3.6.2 Industrial Land Forecasts to 2021


Having regard for the vagaries of the property market and all of the factors which exert an influence,
we forecast that vacant industrial land requirements to meet market interest and to allow for choice in
the marketplace are likely to average around 2.5 ha pa (and a higher forecast is also provided for
comparison in Table 12).
The basis to this figure is summarised below:
* Approx. 8 vacant blocks in demand pa x 2000 m2 per block = 16 000 m2
* Plus allowance for site access/infrastructure, etc @ 20% of total= 4 000 m2
* Total vacant industrial land requirements (total site area)= 20 000 m2
* Plus 20% of total to allow for choice in the market place= 5 000 m2
* Total land area, incl. roads etc, choice= 25 000 m2 pa (2.5 ha)

This estimate of vacant land requirements also allows for continuing demand for existing factories and
warehouses in existing industrial areas.
Some of the demand for vacant industrial land would be taken up in existing industrial areas.
Assessments in this report show that there in the order of some 150 vacant industrial allotments in
Bendigo, but we also understand that many of the blocks are unsatisfactory in contemporary market
terms for a number of reasons, such as:
· too large (require subdivision);
· not suitably located to link with main roads;
· no main road (exposure) frontage;
· nil or limited infrastructure and services;
· topography may be unsuitable;
· sites are located too far from town services; and
· sites are constrained by adjoining or nearby residential use.
In view of these limitations, it is our view that the estimate of some 2.5 ha per year for vacant industrial
land should apply to new industrial land (ie, land which is not necessarily located in existing industrial
areas).
In terms of land forecasts for the next 15 years, we have two forecasts which are described as follows:
Forecast A (low):
Allow 2.5 ha / year for 20 years, or 50 ha over the period (ie, 12.5 ha provision for each 5-year period)
Forecast B (high):
Allow 2.5 ha / year in Year 1, increasing at 4-5% pa to allow for real growth in economic activity, giving
a total provision over 20 years of approximately 80 ha of vacant industrial land
These forecasts of potential industrial land provision are shown below for each 5-year stage in the
period June 2001 to June 2021:

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Table 12: Forecasts of Industrial land Requirements, Bendigo, 2001 to 2021 (Year to June)
Forecast 2001-2006 2007-2011 2012-2016 2017-2021 Total
Forecast A 12.5 ha 12.5 ha 12.5 ha 12.5 ha 50.0 ha
flat growth rate
Forecast B 13.0 ha 17.0 ha 22.0 ha 27.0 ha 80.0 ha
growth at 4.5%
pa, rounded
Source: Essential Economics Pty Ltd

The forecast should be reviewed every five years, or more frequently, depending on supply and
demand levels at the time. For example, an economic downturn associated with economic cycles
may mean that at some stage there is no requirement to provide additional industrial land until
demand levels improve.

3.6.3 Market Opportunities and Incentives


One of the objectives in the project brief is to provide consideration of incentives which may be
appropriate to attract industry to Bendigo. This raises the issue of what types of firms might be
appropriate targets for a Bendigo location through such an incentive program. In targeting firms for a
Bendigo location, consideration can be given to any market niches or special attributes Bendigo may
have or may develop for particular industries.
The following Section provides a discussion regarding the targeting of candidate firms for a Bendigo
location, and also addresses the issue of incentives. In some ways, the selection of firms for
incentives or other forms of attraction is like ‘picking winners’, and this is also discussed.
(We note that the preparation of an Industrial Development Strategy or an Economic Development
Strategy would be appropriate ways to fully ascertain development opportunities in these specific
areas of interest).
Bendigo’s Existing Manufacturing Features
Examination of Bendigo’s manufacturing sector helps to identify any market niche the city may have in
this sector. Information on the numbers of businesses and jobs located in Bendigo, classified
according to ANZSIC industry type, is provided in the ABS Business Register (1998). These figures,
including location quotients, are summarized in Table 13, below. Location quotients provide a
measure of the concentration of a particular industry in Bendigo compared with the Victoria-wide
situation. The location quotients indicate which industries are significant in Bendigo, and help to show
in broad terms how ‘specialised’ the city is overall.

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Table 13: Manufacturing Businesses and Employment in Bendigo and Location Quotients for
Key Activities, 1998
Manufacturing Activity No. Firms in No. Jobs in Bendigo No. Jobs in Location
Bendigo Victoria Quotient
Food, Beverage & Tobacco 35 1,383 (27%) 39,499 2.1
Textile Clothing & Footwear 25 666 (13%) 36,014 1.1
Wood & Paper Products 17 148 (3%) 14,800 0.6
Printing, Publishing & 28 801 (16%) 29,573 1.6
Recorded Media
Petroleum & Chemical 12 473 (10%) 34,452 0.8
Products
Non-Metallic Mineral 22 173 (3%) 8,233 1.2
Products
Metal Products 54 669 (13%) 39,146 1.0
Machinery & Equipment 52 574 (11%) 73,178 0.4
Other Manufacturing 34 143 (3%) 20,188 0.4
TOTAL 279 5,030 (100%) 295,083 1.0
Source: ABS Business Register as at September 1998

As the Table shows, the only manufacturing sectors where Bendigo has a more than proportionate
share of jobs (compared with the State-wide situation) is in the Food sector (by a factor of 2.1:1) and
in Printing and allied fields (1.6), and to some minor extent in Non Metallic mineral products (1.2) and
Textiles and clothing (1.1).
The relatively strong position Bendigo holds in the food sector is reflected in the present program
relating to the promotion of agricultural produce, as noted below.
Loddon-Murray Region: The ‘New Mediterranean’
Some localities have special attributes that may lead to a focus on attracting particular types of
industry. One major area in terms of industrial development potential for Bendigo and the surrounding
Loddon-Murray region is that associated with the promotion of the region as the New Mediterranean.
With an agricultural output in excess of $500 million pa, this is one of the main agricultural areas in
Victoria, with climate, soils and water resources providing the region with many of the opportunities
that characterise Europe’s Mediterranean nations. The potential for further agricultural output and
value-adding activity is recognised by the three Councils (Greater Bendigo City, Loddon Shire and
Gannawarra Shire), and they are committed to assisting investors establish their businesses in the
region, combined with strong coordination with industry programs supported by State and
Commonwealth Governments. Details are provided in the publication entitled “The New
Mediterranean – Investing in the Climate Connection to Grow Tomorrow’s Future Today”, with contact
through the Economic Development Unit, City of Greater Bendigo
The New Mediterranean products identified for their likely strong potential in the region surrounding
Bendigo include olives, tomatoes, walnuts, apples, nectarines and plums, and wineries.
In an industrial land context, there may be opportunities for value-adding to the farm output, with
processing, packaging and other potentials for firms located in industrial areas in Bendigo (and in
other centres in the region), and for associated services provision.

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Picking Winners
Traditionally, all spheres of government - whether at the national, state or local level - have attempted
to identify particular market niches in attracting new investment in industry, building on special
attributes of the particular locality. In many ways, this approach is one of trying to ‘pick winners’.
However, such an approach can have variable results.
For example, manufacturing activity today is, in many instances, ‘footloose’ and does not necessarily
hold any loyalties for any particular locality. Thus, a municipality can attract a new firm, then lose it
just as readily when there is a change in market conditions or in some other variable. This pattern has
been evident with the restructure of Australia’s manufacturing sector over the past 15-20 years,
leaving many metropolitan areas, regional centres and small towns denuded of their manufacturing
base.
Globalisation is the new catchword in promoting economic development, but substantial pressure
remains on firms to perform in a viable manner and, if necessary, to operate from off-shore locations.
Other areas of emphasis have included the so-called ‘new economy’, with its emphasis on information
technology etc, linked in with local resources and skills in computer science and technology, etc.
Bendigo has developed a role in this area, although the recent closure of a call centre and the loss of
many jobs suitably demonstrates the risk in developing reliance on footloose industry, as previously
mentioned.
In other instances, trying to ‘pick winners’ has meant having to provide costly incentives in such areas
as infrastructure and services provision, establishment or relocation costs, and so on. These costs
may be supportable where significant numbers of jobs and other spin-offs are created, but the cost to
local rate revenue can be significant, and there is a risk that the firms specifically attracted to the
locality will remain there if conditions change. These aspects are noted below.
Incentives
In Victoria (and elsewhere) the main incentives offered over the years to attract firms have been
associated with financial assistance, including assistance with low cost (even free) industrial land;
assistance with infrastructure and services provision; assistance with building procurement or
construction; contributions to establishment or relocation costs including staff relocation; and so on. In
other cases, local rate holidays or reductions have been important.
These forms of incentives carry costs which are typically borne by Council, and thus to the wider
community, unless the spin-off effects through new employment creation and other benefits are
significant and are beyond what would have been achieved without such incentives. Often, the high
level of competition between Councils (or States) has meant that incentives provided to would-be
candidate firms have soared, as each locality tries to outbid the other.
Another general observation in regard to incentives (especially where financial support is provided), is
that existing firms in a town or city can become very disillusioned when they observe ‘newcomers’
obtaining a perceived ‘cash handout’ to establish, when the existing firms – which may have been
established for some time through their own good efforts and creating local jobs etc – obtain no such
‘handout’.
In today’s climate of seeking to attract new investment in manufacturing and other activities, the
typical incentives are more generally attached to such aspects as -
· fast-tracking of planning applications;
· ensuring the availability of land for sale or lease which is attractively located with high amenity;
· providing for sale or lease land which is well-serviced with all utilities; and

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· ensuring there is access to attractive residential choices and quality services (such as education
and health).
The importance of these aspects has been reinforced in the consultations undertaken in this present
project, where industry representatives have observed the importance of having –
· a range in residential choice (especially at the top end of the market);
· the provision of good schools, locally-based tertiary education opportunities, etc.
The present duplication of the Calder Highway is also regarded by local industry as an important
infrastructure item, leading to reduced travel times between Bendigo and Melbourne.As previously
mentioned, trying to ‘pick winners’ from the wider economy by providing significant financial incentives
is not a favoured approach to building on a community’s industrial base. However, there is merit in
encouraging existing local firms to grow and expand, and this can be achieved by such actions as –
· providing information on market opportunities,
· assisting with the provision of training courses and apprenticeship schemes,
· making the surrounding environment physically attractive (and therefore an incentive to new
investment),
· helping to encourage leadership in the industrial sector,
· providing assistance (with submissions etc) in lobbying State and Federal Governments, and so
on.
Distinct process improvements, Council actions and initiative, must be developed in association with
an overall Economic Development Strategy for Bendigo. Council’s Strategic Planning and Economic
Development Unit is well placed to investigate economic initiatives for the region.
Also, support to a suggested ‘Bendigo Manufacturing Council’ was put forward by one industry
representative as a concrete means by which local government can support existing firms and attract
new investment to Bendigo and region.
With this type of encouragement and support in place, it would be appropriate for Bendigo to have an
industry program that focuses on existing firms and their further development, as well as encouraging
the growth of supporting firms which can develop links with these existing firms, thus reinforcing the
strength of the overall industrial base.
Manufacturing Activities to Promote
Having regard for this discussion on Bendigo’s existing manufacturing base, combined with an
appreciation in broad terms of the region’s special attributes, Bendigo’s present emphasis on pursuing
agro-processing industry is endorsed. This ranges from the New Mediterranean products (olives, etc)
and eucalyptus processing, to poultry farming and processing (ie, building on existing strengths).
The building construction industry is also an important sector, particularly where there is continuing
population growth leading to dwelling construction. In this context, we note that Bendigo is one of the
fastest-growing regional centres in Victoria, and this contributes to growth in local construction
activities.
But the underlying emphasis should remain on support and encouragement to existing firms, and in
this regard we understand that some 80% of the effort of the Bendigo Economic Development Unit is
focused on these enterprises. After all, existing firms have survived the start-up phase; they have
established markets; they have an established, skilled and experienced workforce; and as local firms
they usually enjoy local loyalties and support – all good reasons for continuing support from the
Council and wider community.

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The availability of well-located and accessible industrial land with all services, and provided in high
amenity surroundings, are important ways that Council can assist the location, operational efficiency
and commercial viability of these firms, both existing and new. This is widely considered to be ‘best
practice’ in supporting industry, especially when combined with programs that promote skills and
training, leadership, marketing information and other inputs to promote the viable operation of the
individual firm.

3.6.4 Industrial Land Requirements by Type


With the exception of noxious industry (which clearly requires buffers and other standards), there is no
requirement to identify particular types of industrial land for particular industrial activities.
Development and use of industrial land can take many forms, but the underlying feature is that such
land needs to have an acceptable level of design and amenity. With the application of suitable siting
and design guidelines, the actual range of industrial and associated uses should not be an issue.
In this context, the existing range of activities in industrial areas in Bendigo is noted, with
manufacturing typically accounting for less than one-third of activities. The majority of activities in
most industrial areas in Bendigo involve storage, warehousing, wholesaling and so on, which are
activities that usually have no off-site effects.

3.6.5 Best Practice


Council is keen to learn of examples of Best Practice in regard to strategic planning for industrial land
provision and development, and in assisting existing firms to expand or improve viability and in
attracting new ones to industrial areas in the municipality.
While a number of examples are provided below, it is important to note that many examples of good
planning are identified more through anecdotal comment, rather than being the subject of a rational
assessment of whatever may constitute ‘best practice’.
For example, the most quoted example (during this study) of a sensible approach to industrial
development is Ballarat, as referenced in the report. Comments were made about the City of
Ballarat’s attention to detail, and the widespread support given to industry promotion. Examples
ranged from industry breakfasts (especially for information dissemination and ‘getting to know you’
programs) to ‘industry promotional weeks’ in Ballarat which receive substantial media attention.
However, it is also true that virtually all Councils (in Victoria and universally) seek more industry. Few
Councils don’t seek more industry. And knowing what constitutes “best practice” becomes an
exercise in itself.
Take ‘Entrepreneurialism’, for example. How can this be fostered so that Bendigo’s industrial sector is
developed in a progressive manner with positive outcomes? There are many ways, and it is really a
case of trying out a range of ideas, and then focusing on what is best for Bendigo. For example,
· encourage a business group, which is an umbrella for these activities;
· introduce awards for most enterprising business (measured through peer votes, increased sales
levels, etc);
· hold breakfasts and invite guest speakers – to inform and encourage discussion;
· hold information sessions with key industry leaders as spokespeople;
· involve professional business development consultants (IT, management, etc) to address groups
of interested firms;
· promote information dissemination that is practical and targeted; and

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· introduce mentoring for junior people so they may chart a career path, etc.
Another area of interest is in promoting sensible planning controls for industrial development. Most
Councils, hopefully, have enhanced their planning services over recent years. In the Bendigo case,
the drive for improvement in Planning services has been nominated by business people in Bendigo as
a priority action to achieve.
And in terms of running program of industry promotion and development, most Councils around
Victoria (and beyond) appear to have such a program. Many Councils are now looking at their
potential for industrial development, and current examples include Bass Coast, Moorabool, and
Moreland.
Given the whole range of initiatives and other actions that can be taken at local government level to
promote good industrial land and good industrial development, this whole area of enquiry should,
logically, now be passed on to the Council’s planners and economic development unit; these are the
people who have to pursue and implement the strategic elements we have earmarked or identified in
this report. For example, Council’s EDU is doing a lot with concept of developing “The New
Mediterranean” (see our report, p 25), and this is now an area for product and market feasibility
studies, infrastructure planning and investment promotion.

3.7 STATUTORY PLANNING ISSUES AND EXISTING CONDITIONS


The City of Greater Bendigo consists of the former City of Bendigo, the former Borough of Eaglehawk,
the former Shires of Huntly and Strathfieldsaye, the former Rural City of Marong less the Loddon River
district, the Heathcote and Lake Eppalock districts of the former Shire of McIvor and the Redesdale
district of the former Shire of Metcalfe. The consolidation of the associated planning schemes resulted
in a single Greater Bendigo Planning Scheme, approved on the 22nd June 2000.
The Greater Bendigo Planning Scheme provides a range of planning controls that are designed to
facilitate orderly and sustainable development of the City. The exact provisions of these zones are
dictated by the Victoria Planning Provisions (VPP’s), however Council exercises it discretion as to
which these zones shall apply in the design of the planning scheme. The selection of VPP zones has
often been a result of applying a “best fit” or nearest approximation of the new zone to reflect the
intent and extent of the previous zone.
Therefore, in some instances there are industrial zones applied particularly in rural areas of the City
that are unserviced, have little is any current evidence of industrial or commercial activity or are
located in otherwise rural, residential or commercial neighbourhoods.

3.7.1 Statutory Planning Implications for the Strategy.


“Industry” activity pursuant to the Greater Bendigo Planning Scheme can be defined Land used for
any of the following operations:
a) any process of manufacture;
b) dismantling or breaking up of any article;
c) treating waste materials;
d) winning clay, gravel, rock, sand, soil, stone, or other materials (other than Mineral, stone, or soil
ex-traction);
e) laundering, repairing, servicing or washing any article, machinery, or vehicle other than on-site
work on a building, works, or land; or
f) any process of testing or analysis.

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If on the same land as any of these operations, it also includes:
a) storing goods used in the operation or resulting from it;
b) providing amenities for people engaged in the operation;
c) selling by wholesale, goods resulting from the operation; and
d) accounting or administration in connection with the operation.
If Materials recycling, goods resulting from the operation may be sold by retail.

Industry also includes separate uses (and definitions):


a) Materials recycling
b) Refuse disposal
c) Refuse transfer station
d) Research and development centre
e) Rural industry & Service industry
Source: Bendigo Planning Scheme / Victoria Planning Provisions

Based on this general definition, much of Bendigo’s industrial land is currently not being used for
industrial purposes. The use of industrial land for non industrial purposes present a series of strategic
and statutory planning related issues that include:
· The increased risk of conflict between non compatible uses within close proximity to each other;
· Many uses have existing use rights, that enable their ongoing use which may perpetuate the
above conflict or make difficult any strategy to phase out any non-conforming use within the
zone;
· The increased level of “permitted” and “permit required” discretion made available to Council
through the VPP Zones
Much of the land use activities that are presently occurring in Bendigo’s industrial land would be
considered more commercial or business related. In other instances, residential and other sensitive
uses (churches, recreation or the like) are located within existing industrial zones.
The Bendigo Planning Scheme currently utilises a number standard zones selected from the VPP
suite of zones. It should be noted that activities of industrial nature can in fact be considered in one or
a number of zones, as table 13 illustrates.

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Table 13: Industry “Rights” in VPP Zones
VPP Zone As of right uses Permit required Purpose
Industrial 1 Industry Agriculture Used for light industry including
(IN1Z) manufacturing and storage.
Warehouse Retail Premises
Extensive animal Dwelling
husbandry
Industrial 3 Crop Raising Industry Used to provide buffer between
(IN3Z) IN1Z and more sensitive uses.
Mineral Exploration Agriculture
Telecommunications Office
facility
Business 3 Industry Agriculture Used to encourage the integrated
(B3Z) development of offices and
Office Materials Recycling manufacturing industries.
Warehouse Retail Premises
Business 4 Industry Agriculture Used to encourage the
(B4Z) development of a mix of bulky
Trade Supplies Retail Premises goods retailing and
Warehouse Office manufacturing industry.

Rural (RUZ) Crop Raising Industry Used to provide for sustainable


use of land for extensive animal
Timber Production Agriculture husbandry and crop raising.
Mining Dwelling
Source: Greater Bendigo Planning Scheme 2000

3.7.2 Existing Local Planning Policy & Municipal Strategic Statement – Industrial land
The Planning Scheme presently includes a number of local planning controls and enabling provisions
to guide the use and development of industrial land. Of particular import is the Municipal Strategic
Statement and a series of Local Planing Policies.
(i) Municipal Strategic Statement (MSS)
The MSS makes specific reference to Industrial Development on a number of occasions however the
key issues and or objectives have been highlighted to include:
· The promotion of strong economic growth through industrial development.
· The promotion of a strong and diverse rural industry base, while ensuring that the development
of intensive rural industries does not diminish the natural and cultural values of the non-urban
areas.
· The conflicts between intensive rural industries and residential areas.
· Inappropriate subdivision and development within key intensive rural industry areas.
Clause 21.05-4 of the Greater Bendigo Planning Scheme describes the economic development
objectives of the municipality. It states that the key objective for industry in the municipality is;
· To encourage diversification of the municipality’s industrial base.

The strategies developed to reach this objective are;


· Ensure that an adequate supply of serviced, industrial land is available.
· Ensure that existing and future industrial land is adequately protected from non-industrial areas.

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· Prepare a plan that identifies land for large industrial developments and considers future land
requirements, appropriate infrastructure and competitive advantages of co-locating industries.
· Promote key industrial areas in order to improve the diversification of the municipality’s industrial
base.
Encourage major industries and investigate financial inducements to support potential industries
considering developing within the municipality.
(ii) Local Planning Policy
A number of industrial land related local policies exist in the planning scheme. Of significance to the
Strategy are the following:
a) Industrial Policy (Clause 22.06)
b) Communications and Technology Policy ( Clause 22.07)
a) Industrial Policy
This policy applies to the use and development of land for industry.
Policy Basis
The City of Greater Bendigo wishes to encourage economic development through the growth of
the industrial sector. Industrial development in the municipality remains one of the strongest
generators of economic growth and employment and the Council is constantly involved in the
attraction of new industries to the municipality. Ensuring good industrial development design is
an important part of achieving this goal.
b) Communications And Technology Precinct Policy
This policy applies to any application to develop land within an identified Communications and
Technology Precinct.
Policy Basis
Council wishes to promote the development of communication and technology intensive
industries within the municipality. Identified Communications and Technology Precincts are to be
strategically located to attract and support these industries.
3.7.3 Other Relevant Strategies
· City of Greater Bendigo – Good Design Guide for Industry (1997)
The purpose of the guide is to assist in the “development of industrial areas and encourage
economic development in the City of Greater Bendigo.” The guide aims to provide the
municipality with high quality development standards; provide greater scope for developments
which meet market needs and which demonstrate innovative design; achieve design
consistency; and enable a quicker assessment of planning permit applications. Planning permit
applications relating to industrial land holding are assessed against 8 design elements ranging
from site layout to servicing and landscaping.
· Belle Vue Road Locality – Local Area Strategy Plan (1997)
The purpose of the strategy was to identify and address management issues arising from the
close proximity of, and the interrelationships between light industrial uses, extractive industries
(and possible future mining activities), public land uses, recreational land and housing in the
Belle Vue Road area.

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· Bendigo 2020 Industrial Development Strategy (1992)
The Bendigo 2020 Industrial Development Strategy was undertaken in two stages. The purpose
of the first stage was the identification of the overall supply of serviced and zoned industrial
development land and the likely future demand for industrial land. The first stage also included a
review of the former planning schemes and how they related to industrial land. The second
stage of the strategy included a detailed review of all industrial land and recommendations
relating to the future industrial land requirements.
The findings of these strategies have been taken into account in the preparation of this Industrial Land
Strategy 2001.

3.8 PRINCIPLES FOR THE CONSIDERATION OF INDUSTRIAL USES IN NON INDUSTRIAL ZONES
When a planning authority decides on applications for the use and development of non-industrial land
for industrial uses, the provisions of the relevant planning scheme zone or overlay are of principal
consideration.
Of significance to the long term management of industrial land in Bendigo is the consideration of uses
that typically may not be considered as traditional “industrial” uses. Examples would include retailing,
offices, warehousing and even agriculture. Whilst all are either permitted or discretionary within the
zone, many of these uses are becoming increasingly common within Bendigo industrial areas.
This serves to diversify employment, investment opportunities and maximise service utilisation,
however it may also serve to undermine the long-term viability or these locations to serve traditional
industrial needs.
With the introduction of the VPP’s, Council can now consider a wider range of uses in Industrial 1 and
3 Zones. Accordingly, there is the potential for a greater level of conflict between existing or future
land uses. In addition this may also effectively limit future additional use or development of traditional
manufacturing or industrial uses that possess a higher potential for the creation of off-site amenity
loss. It is important that when considering new uses in industrial zones that Council:
· Initially, whether the use and development can be considered pursuant to the zone and that
Decision Guidelines and Application requirements are met;
· Whether the proposed use and development has the potential to prejudice the future use and
development of surrounding land by virtue of the nature of the use (noxious) or whether the
development requires such an off-site buffer or the like, and whether the approval of this
development would then render surrounding land unattractive to the market place; and
· Whether the use or development complements any emerging business clustering (say
automotive or food processing), distinctive advantage of the location (say warehousing next to
roads) or the like.
More difficultly however, Council needs to recognise that Planning Scheme is but one element in
assisting and facilitating development. Early management, facilitation and nurturing of investors during
the application process and ensuring Real Estate agents are fully aware of Council aspirations, will
assist in guiding appropriate uses, development and investment to the best located in order to
advance the above without the need to rely on the planning scheme.
The consideration of industrial uses in non-industrial zones (say Business 3 or 4 or Rural) also may
result in potential conflict between uses. It is common for major new or re-locating industries to covert
large parcels of often-rural land for the development of new industry, rather than location in existing
industrial zones.

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The attraction of this to may include:
· Significantly reduced land purchase or lease costs;
· The perception that there is greatly reduced operational neighbourhood impact issues;
· The sites can be located next to a resource base (mineral or agricultural) thus reducing need for
excessive transportation and logistic management; and/or
· The ability to be a self contained, and inherent opportunity for expansion if required.
Approaches to Local Government to approve or facilitate these types of uses are usually couched in
terms of the uniqueness of the industry and the need for new land outside the urban area, often for the
above reasons.
However, buoyed by the lure of additional investment, these approaches often require that Council
make considerable investment in time and effort to secure the development. Councils are often asked
to either make specific administrative or planning scheme provisions, or enter into financial
partnerships or agreements with the industry to overcome:
· Often lack of orderly, sufficient or any infrastructure services – a shared infrastructure
development fund is often mooted;
· Significant distance to labour market, skills or training or other uses that may complement;
and/or
· Fastrack and facilitate any development approvals processes.
Whilst the Rural and other zones generally allow the consideration of industrial uses, when
considering discretionary industrial uses within non-industrial land, it is vital that Council consider the
following matters:
1. That the proposal is considered appropriate in terms general planning policy, environmental
management objectives and that it is generally permissible pursuant to the scheme;
2. That the development and any assistance package developed by Council is generally in
accordance with Council’s approved Economic Development Strategy and implementation
programme;
3. That a demonstrated local and regional Net Community Benefit will be obtained from the use and
development of the land;
4. That any Council assistance afforded the investor in terms of facilitation, financial or other kinds is
commensurate with the documented Net Community benefit and the desired operational risk
profile for Council investments having regard to the needs and rights of existing and future
ratepayers, industry and residents;
5. That the industry type and operation will not prejudice the implementation of adopted state,
regional or Local planning use and development policies, and that where possible, the use or
development should advance these policies; and
6. That the site is based on sound selection and development capacity criteria, and not a
speculative property valuing adding exercise. Evidence of a firm commitment from the investor is
recommended prior to Council entering into any extraordinary facilitation partnership.

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4. AN INDUSTRIAL VISION FOR BENDIGO

4.1 INDUSTRIAL VISION FOR THE CITY OF GREATER BENDIGO


Having regard to the economic and market context for industrial development in Bendigo, a vision is
essential for setting a framework the long-term framework for strategy development.
The vision for industrial land within the City of Greater Bendigo is as follows:
“By 2015, Bendigo is recognised as Victoria’s regional industrial centre of choice for new, emerging and expanding
industrial enterprises with distinctive competence in food manufacturing & processing, communications and value
adding IT and technology. Bendigo has retained and expanded existing industrial activities however consolidated
industrial land into identifiable clusters which are fully serviced marketed and managed to best practice standards”.

4.2 GUIDING PRINCIPLES & KEY ACTIONS


Based on strategy investigations, discussion and interviews with existing and prospective
industrialists, real estate agents and development promoters, the Strategy is to be delivered utilising
the following four interrelated cluster of actions and principles. It is useful to think of these clusters as
related planks through which the vision can be delivered.

Strategy Vision

Industrial Land Promotion & Governance Facilitation


Audit Marketing

Infrastructure Exposure Community Statutory planning

Supply & demand Media Stakeholders Education

Design & Landscape Incentives Engagement Training

Location & size Accountability

Decision making

The section identifies key principles through which the strategy vision can be implemented:

4.2.1 Industrial Land Audit


· Council will ensure no additional fragmentation of industrial estates and actively promote the
consolidation of existing industrial precincts into core, fully serviced industrial estates which
possess high exposure and minimal expansion limitations;
· Council will ensure future industrial land shall be capable of being fully serviced prior to
occupation or release of land;

City Of Greater Bendigo Page 38


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· Council will ensure identified existing isolated sites, unserviced or un marketable sites will be
subject to re-zoning to better accord with surrounding land use, better utilisation of land and/or in
order to implement the consolidation of total industrial locations throughout the City;
· All new and recurrent investment for funding for new servicing will be undertaken in a
coordinated manner with appropriate private / public sector partnerships for delivery;
· The sequencing of industrial land release will be in an orderly manner having regard to provision
of services, existing supply of serviced land, uptake of land; and
· All development, design and improvements to industrial land shall utilise best available
technology and design standards and be undertaken in an ecologically sustainable manner.

4.2.2 Promotion and marketing


· Council will promote as priority the expansion, reinvestment or internal re-location of existing
firms within the City or the region;
· All Council and industrial “partner” activities will celebrate, enhance and promote the attributes
that make Bendigo a premier regional centre for industrial investment and development;
· Council will consistently position Bendigo as a regional leader in research, value adding
manufacturing, innovation and education throughout Victoria and South Eastern Australia;
· Council will maintain and encourage positive local and state wide media exposure that position
Bendigo as a place of choice for industry, local employment and is reflective of a buoyant and
thriving community; and
· Council and Partners will develop an affordable, sustainable and effective incentive programme
for the promotion and attraction of business to Bendigo.(Refer section 3.6.3)

4.2.3 Governance
· To ensure that the City of Greater Bendigo is recognised as the governing body trusted in
partnership with industry and community, to deliver sustainable positive industrial development
outcomes;
· Council will ensure that management of industrial development and investment in Bendigo is
always undertaken in an inclusive manner which fully engages with relevant stakeholders,
industry and investors;
· Decision-making will be undertaken in transparent manner and decisions are consistent and
articulated and fully accountable; and
· Council will investigate the value of increased marketing, promotion and communication
partnerships with industry to articulate and agree the core role and services that identifies where
Council can assist in improving the productivity and economic prosperity of industrial activities
and services within the City.

4.2.4 Facilitation
· The statutory planning process will be refined and resourced to provide a proactive, problem
solving and outcome driven mechanism; and
· The Council and Industrial Partners will promote continual professional development of property,
real estate professional, development planning staff and Councillors to increase awareness of
industry sector needs.

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5. INDUSTRIAL LAND AUDIT

5.1 INTRODUCTION TO AUDIT


The industrial land audit was conducted during January 2001, later augmented in March and April.
The audit involved visits to each of the 18 industrial precincts, collating and mapping the existing
conditions of the site and the surrounding land uses. The site audits was combined with various
desktop exercises including a review of planning provisions and infrastructure assessment. The
information forms individual summary tables and siteplans for each of the 18 precincts. The individual
precinct data was then used to determine recommendations for each precinct and to categorise the
industrial land.
The categories of industrial land found within the City of Greater Bendigo include;
Category Definition
Type
A Areas suitable for new and expanding industrial activities, generally well serviced and in key
locations.
B Existing industrial areas suitable for consolidation and possible expansion within the existing
land allocation
C Existing industrial areas that are full or very little expansion room exists. May be high or low
profile but may require careful on-site management. Redevelopment potential may exist in the
longer term.
D Small, isolated or ill defined industrial areas that may require ongoing management or gradual
phase out of industrial activity / zoning to a more suitable use reflective of surrounding use or
the best re-use of existing structures on-site.
E Possible future long term “greenfield” sites or land allocations currently undefined

5.2 INDUSTRIAL LAND AREA IN THE CITY OF BENDIGO


In the City of Greater Bendigo there is a total of 967.8ha of land subject to either the Industrial 1 Zone
or the Industrial 3 Zone. The land is used for a variety of purposes and is scattered across Bendigo
and its surrounding townships. This land is also subject to contrasting levels of development. Site
inspections and aerial photography enabled the land be classified depending on the level of
development. Table 14 summarises the level of development found on industrial land within the
municipality and the approximate areas of land.
Table 14: Industrial Land Development - Summary

Level of Development Land Quantity Percentage


Under Developed <50% 260.9ha 27%
Partially Developed 50%-75% 230.1ha 23.8%
Mostly Developed 75%> 434.1ha 44.8%
Fully Developed 100% 43ha 4.4%
Total 968.1ha 100%

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5.3 INFRASTRUCTURE ASSESSMENT
The infrastructure assessment was primarily a desktop exercise, utilising plans and comments
received from each of the service providers. Those contacted include; Powercor (Electricity), Coliban
Water (Water and Sewerage), TXU (Gas), Telstra (Telecommunication) and the City of Greater
Bendigo (Roads and Drainage). The information was analysed and mapped (refer precinct site plans)
and to provide an overall infrastructure assessment for each precinct.
It should be noted that correspondence received from both Powercor and Telstra stated that all land
within the municipality can be serviced with both electricity and telecommunications.
Upon conclusion of the assessment, the industrial land was categorised depending on the level of
upgrading required to support future industrial development. The categories derived from the
assessment were:
Minor Upgrades:
Roads: Modifications of existing accesses and intersections. No new road construction.
Drains: Available at site or in close proximity.
Water and Sewer: Available at close proximity
Gas: Available (uncertain about capacity)

Substantial Upgrades:
Roads: Short access roads required. Intersection treatments and reconstruction of some existing
roads required.
Drains: Existing drainage inadequate or long out falls required.
Water and Sewer: Generally available but short external connections required.
Gas: Generally available (uncertain about capacity)

Major Upgrades:
Roads: New roads required or reconstruction of main road and intersection treatment to existing road
required.
Drains: No drainage available or extensive long out fall drains need to be constructed.
Water and Sewer: Generally available. Long external works may be required.
Gas: Generally available (uncertain about capacity).
Not Suitable
Precinct requires extensive modification or additions to all existing infrastructure.
Table 15 summarises the infrastructure assessment.
Table 15: Infrastructure Assessment - Summary
Servicing Description Land Percentage
Quantity
Suitable For Immediate Development or Minor Upgrade To Infrastructure 230.1ha 24%
Suitable For Development With Substantial Upgrade To Infrastructure 531.4ha 55%
Suitable For Development With Major Upgrade To Infrastructure 125.7ha 13%
Not Suitable For Immediate Development 77.5ha 8%
Total 968.1ha 100%
Note: All upgrades refer to off-site infrastructure.

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It should be noted that the service providers are unable to provide an estimate of costs involved to
perform these upgrades to the precincts. The cost involved would require site inspections from the
nominated providers and would be dependent on;
· The size and location of the land;
· The type of industrial use proposed;
· The existing conditions of the site (including existing level of servicing); and
· The surrounding uses.

5.4 PRECINCT SUMMARIES AND SITE PLANS


The following section of the report summarises the details of each of the precincts and the precinct
specific recommendations. This information is provided in a detailed audit summary table and
associated comments and a site plan for each precinct. Additional information is provided in the
appendices of this report. This information includes;
Appendix B: Precinct Photos
Appendix C: Infrastructure Summary

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City Of Greater Bendigo Page 43
Gutteridge Haskins & Davey Pty Ltd 16392\AJH\dmf
Precinct 1 - Epsom North / Huntly
INTRODUCTION
Precinct 1 is located in the north east of the City of Greater Bendigo. The precinct combines 4 distinct industrial
areas. The first (1a), is located in the township of Huntly, the remaining 3 (1b-1d) are located in Epsom. The
precinct has potential for future development due to its close proximity to the Midland Highway and existing
level of infrastructure and servicing.

AUDIT SUMMARY TABLE


1. Location 1a - Midland Highway and Willis Road, Huntly 1c- Station Street, Epsom
1b - Midland Highway, Epsom 1d- Wallenjoe Road Epsom
2. Precinct Size 76.3 ha
3. Zoning/Overlay 1a- Industrial 3 Zone 1c- Industrial 3 Zone, Environmental
Controls 1b- Industrial 1 Zone, Land Subject to Significance 1 Overlay, Land Subject to
Inundation Overlay, Environmental Significance Inundation Overlay
Overlay 1, Vegetation Protection Overlay 1d - Industrial 1 Zone, Land Subject to
Inundation Overlay
4. Level of 1a- Mostly Developed Site (75%+) 1c- Mostly Developed (75%+)
Development: 1b- Partially Developed (50%-75%) 1d- Under Developed Site (<50%)
5. Access/Roads 1a- No road infrastructure available 1c- Station Street requiring upgrading
1b- Service road requirement likely by VicRoads 1d- Adequate road infrastructure
or allotment serviced internally
6. Landscaping Landscaping adjacent to the Epsom Community Market (1.3)
7. Distance to Bendigo 12.5km (1.1), 6.5km (1.2), 8.5km (1.3), 8.5 (1.4)
CAD
8. Examples of Current Place of Worship Dwellings
Uses Market Caravan Park
Industry Service Industry
9. Examples of Dwellings Service Industry
Surrounding Uses Agriculture
10. Infrastructure Electricity: Available Water: Available (part)
(Summary) Telstra: Available (part) Gas: Available Drainage: Available (part)

INFRASTRUCTURE ASSESSMENT
Suitable for development with substantial upgrades to infrastructure.

CATEGORY OF LAND
Category B: Typically the industrial land is constrained by surrounding rural uses or environmental values.
There are however opportunities for future industrial development of land neighbouring the Midland Highway.

RECOMMENDATIONS
1a: Retain as Industrial 3 Zone
1b: Retain as Industrial 1 Zone and recognise some significant on-site management issues (flooding and
vegetation in particularly). Generally limited servicing will require long term investment and protection of
Bendigo “gateway” landscape is important – Council should discourage fragmentation of this site.
1c: Retain as Industrial 3 Zone: Possible expansion opportunities subject to full servicing potential to extend to
Midland Highway. 1d: Rezone to Rural Zone should no prospect of industrial development occur within 5 years.

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LOT SIZES
Existing residential dwelling.
< 0.5ha 1.0 - 2.0ha

0.5 - 1.0ha > 2.0ha


D SARGEN
ROA TS
ROAD
LS
WIL

AY
HIGHW
Y
W
H

L AN
D SERVICES (Major)
ID
M

WATER

MIDLAND
SEWER

Ä
GAS
1a
DRAINAGE
Disused extractive Note: Electricity and Telstra can be provided
industry site. to each precinct.

1c Potential long term expansion of industrial MANAGEMENT ACTIONS


estate to front Midland Highway
MINIMISE IMPACT ON RESIDENTIAL
AREAS/SENSITIVE USES

Ä
IMPROVE AMENITY & SIGNAGE
AT KEY GATEWAYS
ADELAIDE
HILLS
ROAD

ENVIRONMENTALLY
LEANS

ROAD

SENSITIVE AREAS

Notes:
Vacant.
ROAD

Unserviced.
Rural/grazing.
Potential rezoning to Rural Zone.
E
WALLENJO

0 200 400m

(1:12500 @ A3)

PRECINCT 1a, c & d


1d EPSOM NORTH/
HUNTLY
City of Greater Bendigo
Bendigo Industrial Land Strategy

Ref. 31/10414
*See audit sheet for detail.
JUNE 2002
LOT SIZES

Maintain existing Key gateway into Bendigo. < 0.5ha 1.0 - 2.0ha
zone boundary Landscape improvements required

0.5 - 1.0ha > 2.0ha

Ä SERVICES (Major)

Discourage the establishment of WATER


non-residential uses.
Encourage development in SEWER
industrial zone.
IRONSTON
E
GAS

DRAINAGE

)
HIGHWAY
ROAD

Note: Electricity and Telstra can be provided


to each precinct.

MANAGEMENT ACTIONS

(MIDLAND
Large areas of predominantly MINIMISE IMPACT ON RESIDENTIAL
undeveloped land.
AREAS/SENSITIVE USES
Variety of sensitive land uses
ROAD

inlcuding church and residential

Ä
IMPROVE AMENITY & SIGNAGE
dwellings. AT KEY GATEWAYS
OE
WALLANJ

ENVIRONMENTALLY
SENSITIVE AREAS
STREET

HOWAR
D

STREET
STREET
ROAD

N
STATIO 0 200 400m

(1:10000 @ A3)
GOYNES

Ä
NAPIER

PRECINCT 1b
EPSOM NORTH/
HUNTLY
Fully developed industrial precinct.
City of Greater Bendigo
Bendigo Industrial Land Strategy

Ref. 31/10414
*See audit sheet for detail.
JUNE 2002
Precinct 2 – Goornong
INTRODUCTION
The town of Goornong is located approximately 25km north – east of Bendigo. The Goornong industrial precinct
(Precinct 2) is situated to the east of the town with frontage to the Midland Highway. The precinct has low
potential for development due to the nature of the existing and surrounding land useage. However, the area
should be promoted for rural based industries given its location and highway frontage.

AUDIT SUMMARY TABLE

1. Location Midland Highway and Axe-dale-Goornong Road, Goornong


2. Precinct Size 74ha
3. Zoning/Overlay Industrial 3 Zone
Controls
4. Level of Under Developed (<50%)
Development:
5. Access/Roads Axedale-Goornong Road – insufficient pavement depth and width
English Road – narrow
Access from Highway – intersection treatment
6. Landscaping No landscaping
7. Distance to Bendigo 28km
CAD
8. Examples of Current Agriculture
Uses
Industry
Dwellings
9. Examples of Agriculture
Surrounding Uses
Private Dwellings
10. Infrastructure Electricity: Available
(Summary)
Water: Available
Telstra: Available
Gas: Not Available
Drainage: Not Available

INFRASTRUCTURE ASSESSMENT
Not suitable for immediate development

CATEGORY OF LAND
Category D: Typically this land is isolated, ill defined and best used for rural activities. Longer term potential
exists for the consideration of expansion of existing industry on-site. There is a need to zone land to the west
to Industrial. There is potential to promote this site for rural based industries, given its location and highway
frontage.

RECOMMENDATIONS
Rezone land to the west adjoining this precinct to Industrial 3 Zone.

City Of Greater Bendigo Page 46


Gutteridge Haskins & Davey Pty Ltd 16392\AJH\dmf
LOT SIZES

< 0.5ha 1.0 - 2.0ha

0.5 - 1.0ha > 2.0ha

D
ROA
ELLIS SERVICES (Major)
WATER

SEWER

AY GAS
HW
HI G

DRAINAGE

LA
N D
Note: Electricity and Telstra can be provided
MID
to each precinct.

ROAD
MANAGEMENT ACTIONS

MINIMISE IMPACT ON RESIDENTIAL


AREAS/SENSITIVE USES

Ä
IMPROVE AMENITY & SIGNAGE
AT KEY GATEWAYS

LE
- AXEDA
ENVIRONMENTALLY

ONG
SENSITIVE AREAS

GOORN
POTENTIAL FUTURE
INDUSTRIAL LAND

0 200 400m

(1:9000 @ A3)
ENGLISHS
ROAD

PRECINCT 2
GOORNONG
Notes: City of Greater Bendigo
Unserviced land.
Good access.
Bendigo Industrial Land Strategy
Possible rezoning to west to accomodate
rural enterprise industrial development Ref. 31/10414
*See audit sheet for detail.
JUNE 2002
Precinct 3 - Maiden Gully
INTRODUCTION
Maiden Gully is located 8km from the Bendigo Central Activities District. The precinct is located on the Calder
Highway, directly west of expanding residential areas. The industrial precinct is a highly vegetated site, which
has not been developed. The land to the west and north of the precinct is generally rural in nature.

AUDIT SUMMARY TABLE

1. Location Calder Highway, Maiden Gully


2. Precinct Size 80ha
3. Zoning/Overlay Industrial 1 Zone, Vegetation Protection 2 Overlay, Environmental Significance 1 & 2 Overlay
Controls
4. Level of Under Developed (<50%)
Development:
5. Access/Roads Access off highway – requires intersection treatment
6. Landscaping No landscaping (highly vegetated site)
7. Distance to Bendigo 8km
CAD
8. Examples of Current Bushland
Uses
9. Examples of Bushland
Surrounding Uses
Private Dwellings
Rural
10. Infrastructure Electricity: Available
(Summary)
Water: Available
Telstra: Available
Gas: Not Available
Drainage: Not Available

INFRASTRUCTURE ASSESSMENT
Suitable for development with major upgrade to infrastructure.

CATEGORY OF LAND
Category D: Continued encroachment of residential development on this site will further render it less attractive
for relocating industrial activities. However it is considered appropriate at this point in time to retain its industrial
status.

RECOMMENDATIONS
Retain as Industrial 1 Zone.

City Of Greater Bendigo Page 48


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LOT SIZES

< 0.5ha 1.0 - 2.0ha

0.5 - 1.0ha > 2.0ha

CALDER
HIGHWAY
SERVICES (Major)
WATER

SEWER

GAS

DRAINAGE

Note: Electricity and Telstra can be provided


to each precinct.

MANAGEMENT ACTIONS

MINIMISE IMPACT ON RESIDENTIAL


AREAS/SENSITIVE USES

Ä
IMPROVE AMENITY & SIGNAGE
AT KEY GATEWAYS
WAY

N
OLY ENVIRONMENTALLY
CA R
SENSITIVE AREAS

0 200 400m
RATHBO
NES
LANE (1:8000 @ A3)

PRECINCT 3
MAIDEN GULLY
Notes: City of Greater Bendigo
Undeveloped land and poorly serviced. Bendigo Industrial Land Strategy
Remnant vegetation.
Limited industrial development potential
Ref. 31/10414
*See audit sheet for detail.
JUNE 2002
Precinct 4 – Heathcote
I
INTRODUCTION
The town of Heathcote is located in the south – east of the City of Greater Bendigo. The precinct combines two
industrial areas. The first, “4a”, is located to the south of the main town centre, with the second, “4b”, located to
the east. The location of the industrial precincts is considered to be appropriate within the town boundaries, but
are relatively isolated within the municipality as a whole.

AUDIT SUMMARY TABLE

1. Location 4a- Herriot Street and Chaurcey Street, Heathcote


4b– Dairy Flat Road and Spring Flat Road, Heathcote
2. Precinct Size 15.8ha
3. Zoning/Overlay 4a – Industrial 3 Zone, Environmental Significance 3 Overlay
Controls
4b - Industrial 3 Zone, Environmental Significance 3 Overlay
4. Level of 4a – Under Developed (<50%)
Development:
4b – Under Developed (<50%)
5. Access/Roads Rural type cross section along Herriot Street, will need upgrading to Ebden Street
6. Landscaping No landscaping
7. Distance to Bendigo 42km (4a), 43.5 (4b)
CAD
8. Examples of Current Timber yard
Uses
Agriculture
9. Examples of Agriculture
Surrounding Uses
Dwellings
10. Infrastructure Electricity: Available
(Summary)
Water: Available
Telstra: Available
Gas: Not Available
Drainage: Upgrade Necessary (4a), Not Available (4b)

INFRASTRUCTURE ASSESSMENT
Suitable for development with substantial upgrade to infrastructure.

CATEGORY OF LAND
Category C: Both sites provide local employment opportunities however are tightly constrained by neighbouring
uses.

RECOMMENDATIONS
4a: Retain as Industrial 3 Zone.
4b: Retain as Industrial 3 Zone; with longer term potential for rezoning for Residential 1 or Mixed Use activities
when current uses reconsider future.

City Of Greater Bendigo Page 50


Gutteridge Haskins & Davey Pty Ltd 16392\AJH\dmf
LOT SIZES

< 0.5ha 1.0 - 2.0ha

0.5 - 1.0ha > 2.0ha

SERVICES (Major)
Notes:
IO
T
Undevloped expect for Council Depot WATER
RR
HE and NRE Works Depot.
Maintain as Industrial Zone. SEWER

Ä GAS

DRAINAGE

Note: Electricity and Telstra can be provided


to each precinct.

MANAGEMENT ACTIONS

AD
RO
MINIMISE IMPACT ON RESIDENTIAL
AREAS/SENSITIVE USES

Ä
TO
N IMPROVE AMENITY & SIGNAGE
NE
AT KEY GATEWAYS
4a
NO ENVIRONMENTALLY
RT
HE SENSITIVE AREAS
RN

HI
GH
W
AY

Residential Land
ROAD

0 200 400m
Notes:
Constrained industrial site. (1:5000 @ A3)
Poor potential for expansion.
Poor servicing.
Maintain in medium term; long term
Poor access relocation of industrial activity and
rezoning to Residential 1 Zone.
PRECINCT 4
HEATHCOTE
JOES

City of Greater Bendigo


4b Bendigo Industrial Land Strategy

Ref. 31/10414
*See audit sheet for detail.
JUNE 2002
Precinct 5 - Epsom (South)
INTRODUCTION
Precinct 5 is located in Epsom South, approximately 4.4 km from the Bendigo Central Activities District. The
precinct combines large land parcels that are accessed via the Eaglehawk – Epsom Road. The precinct is
considered to have low level of development potential as the land is highly vegetated and there are
neighbouring residential developments.

AUDIT SUMMARY TABLE

1. Location Epsom – Eaglehawk Road, Epsom South


2. Precinct Size 62.2 ha
3. Zoning/Overlay Industrial 1 Zone, Industrial 3 Zone
Controls
4. Level of Under Developed (<50%)
Development:

5. Access/Roads Howard Street is a rural arterial road – intersection treatment required


6. Landscaping No Landscaping
7. Distance to Bendigo 44km
CAD
8. Examples of Current Industry
Uses
Native Vegetation
9. Examples of Dwelling
Surrounding Uses
Native Vegetation
10. Infrastructure Electricity: Available
(Summary)
Water: Available
Telstra: Available
Gas: Not Available
Drainage: Not Available

INFRASTRUCTURE ASSESSMENT
Suitable for development with substantial upgrade to infrastructure.

CATEGORY OF LAND
Category D: This site is significantly affected by vegetation, adjoining rural/residential land and is distant from
core industrial precincts. Whilst offering a limited long term potential for development, poor servicing and
expanding residential areas reduces its long term viability. The vegetation on-site is not recognised in existing
planning scheme.

RECOMMENDATIONS
Retain as Industrial 3 Zone and Industrial 1 Zone. Consideration needs to be given to rezoning land west of
Bowles Road into Low Density Residential Zone in the longer term.

City Of Greater Bendigo Page 52


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LOT SIZES
Protection of sewer
easement required. < 0.5ha 1.0 - 2.0ha

0.5 - 1.0ha > 2.0ha

Currently vacant. SERVICES (Major)


WATER
HOWAR
D
STREET
SEWER

GAS

DRAINAGE

Note: Electricity and Telstra can be provided


to each precinct.

MANAGEMENT ACTIONS
Significant vegetation
MINIMISE IMPACT ON RESIDENTIAL

ROAD
AREAS/SENSITIVE USES

Ä
IMPROVE AMENITY & SIGNAGE
AT KEY GATEWAYS
Expansion of residential

GOYNES
deelopment.
ENVIRONMENTALLY
SENSITIVE AREAS

BU
C KL
AN
D

0 200 400m
ST
R EE (1:7000 @ A3)
T

PRECINCT 5
Environmentally
EPSOM (SOUTH)
Notes: significant
Extent of native/remnant vegetation. linear reserve City of Greater Bendigo
Poor servicing potential. Bendigo Industrial Land Strategy
Retain as Industrial Zone.
Ref. 31/10414
*See audit sheet for detail.
JUNE 2002
Precinct 6 – Eaglehawk
INTRODUCTION
Eaglehawk is located approximately 4 km from the Bendigo Central Activities District. The precinct combines 3
industrial areas. The first, 6a, is located adjacent to the Loddon Valley Highway. The second, 6b, is located
between Victoria Street and Watson Avenue and the third, 6c, is located between Alexandra and Turner Street.
The precinct is considered to offer medium – high future development opportunities.

AUDIT SUMMARY TABLE

1. Location 6a – Loddon Valley Highway, Eaglehawk 6c – Alexandra and Turner Street,


6b – Victoria Street and Watson Avenue Eaglehawk Eaglehawk

2. Precinct Size 112.41ha

3. Zoning/Overlay 6a – Industrial 1 Zone, Wildfire Management Overlay, 6c – Industrial 1 Zone


Controls Heritage Overlay, ESO 1
6b – Industrial 1 Zone
4. Level of 6a – Partially Developed Site (<50%) 6c – Fully Developed Site (100%)
Development: 6b – Fully Developed Site (100%)
5. Access/Roads Access is via York Street (local road), which requires upgrading. McCormicks /Hopkins Road
requires upgrading/widening. Caldwells Road is a collector road and is in satisfactory condition.
6. Landscaping Landscaping adjacent larger industrial sites (ie. Tip Top Bakery – 6a)
7. Distance to Bendigo 4.2km (6a), 4km (6b), 3.5km (6c)
CAD
8. Examples of Current Motor Repairs
Uses Industry
Transport Terminal
9. Examples of Dwellings, Refuse Disposal
Surrounding Uses Informal Outdoor Recreation
10. Infrastructure Electricity: Available, Water: Available, Telstra: Available, Gas: Available
(Summary) Drainage: Not Available

INFRASTRUCTURE ASSESSMENT
Suitable for development with substantial upgrade to infrastructure.

CATEGORY OF LAND
6b and 6c are typically fully developed and represent better quality landscape and amenity (Category C).
6a is poorly services and comprises old works and mining areas. Strong potential for non-industrial,
recreational/storage/distribution uses (Category D). Part of this site may be required for Bendigo Gold
underground workings.

RECOMMENDATIONS
6b and 6c: Retain as Industrial 1 Zone
6a: Retain Industrial Zone and promote land rehabilitation, active recreation, distribution or commercial goods.

City Of Greater Bendigo Page 54


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LOT SIZES
Mining tailings and
old works sites. < 0.5ha 1.0 - 2.0ha

Railway
Ä LODDON VALLEY HIGHWAY

0.5 - 1.0ha > 2.0ha

YO
RK SERVICES (Major)
ST
RE
ET

WATER

SEWER
Improve access
to existing facilities 6a GAS

McC
DRAINAGE
OR
MA
CKS

Note: Electricity and Telstra can be provided


RO
AD

to each precinct.

Active recreation
potential. RO
AD
Ä Railway

MANAGEMENT ACTIONS

EET
S
WE
LL
MINIMISE IMPACT ON RESIDENTIAL

STR
LD
CA
AREAS/SENSITIVE USES
6b

IA
TOR
VIC
Ä Ä
STREET

Ä
IMPROVE AMENITY & SIGNAGE
AT KEY GATEWAYS

Ä ENVIRONMENTALLY
LL
EWE

SENSITIVE AREAS
BRAC

UP
EAGLEHAWK PE
R
ENTERPRISE CA
L
PARK IF
O
RN
IA

G
UL
LY

RO
AD
MUNICIPAL
TIP
6c
0 200 400m

(1:10000 @ A3)

PRECINCT 6
EAGLEHAWK
Notes: City of Greater Bendigo
Fully developed with exception of York Street Bendigo Industrial Land Strategy
(Old mining area).
Good amenity in smaller areas.
Active recreation potential east of York Street. Ref. 31/10414
*See audit sheet for detail.
JUNE 2002
Precinct 7 - North Bendigo
INTRODUCTION
Precinct 7 is located directly north of the Bendigo. The precinct combines two key industrial areas. The first,
“7a”, is located north of the Bendigo railway line and is primarily occupied by Australian Defence Industries
(ADI). The second, “7b”, is located to the south of the railway line and is occupied by Pauls Victoria.

AUDIT SUMMARY TABLE

1. Location 7a – Loddon Valley Highway, California Gully


7b – Sandhurst Road, California Gully
2. Precinct Size 45.3 ha
3. Zoning/Overlay 7a – Industrial 1 Zone, Heritage Overlay, ESO 1
Controls
7b – Industrial 1 Zone
4. Level of 7a – Mostly Developed Site (75%>)
Development:
7b – Mostly Developed Site (75%>)
5. Access/Roads Access to precinct (via Nolan and Finn Streets) is adequate.
6. Landscaping Both businesses which occupy the site (Australian Defence Industries and Pauls Victoria) have
their own landscaping
7. Distance to Bendigo 1.8km (7a), 1.4km (7b)
CAD
8. Examples of Current Industry
Uses
9. Examples of Dwelling
Surrounding Uses
Primary School
Informal Outdoor Recreation
10. Infrastructure Electricity: Available , Water: Available, Telstra: Available
Gas: Available, Drainage: Upgrade Necessary

INFRASTRUCTURE ASSESSMENT
Suitable for immediate development or minor upgrade to infrastructure.

CATEGORY OF LAND
Category C: In the longer term, the ADI site possesses “micro-industry” redevelopment or re-use as multiple
business site or estate (similar to Mayfair Park Estate). It is likely that site contamination will prohibit any
substantial change of use. Expansion of “Pauls” will introduce traffic management issues and needs
recognition. Increased use of railway needs further encouragement.

RECOMMENDATIONS
7a: Retain as Industrial 1 Zone
7b: Retain as Industrial 1 Zone

City Of Greater Bendigo Page 56


Gutteridge Haskins & Davey Pty Ltd 16392\AJH\dmf
LOT SIZES

< 0.5ha 1.0 - 2.0ha

0.5 - 1.0ha > 2.0ha

SERVICES (Major)
WATER
AD
RO
SEWER
H
RT
WO
O LDS GAS
H

FINN
Continue residential DRAINAGE
expansion.
Note: Electricity and Telstra can be provided
to each precinct.
ADI SITE

7a MANAGEMENT ACTIONS

STREET
MINIMISE IMPACT ON RESIDENTIAL
AREAS/SENSITIVE USES

Ä
IMPROVE AMENITY & SIGNAGE
7b AT KEY GATEWAYS
PAULS VIC.
N OL
AN

ENVIRONMENTALLY
SENSITIVE AREAS
ET
RE
STR

ST

ET
EET

RE
ST
TER
IS

Protect amenity of
NN

Bendigo "Joss House".


BA

0 200 400m
IT H

(1:6000 @ A3)
SM

Existing residential
potential for re-use/
redevlopment.

PRECINCT 7
Notes: NORTH BENDIGO
Maintain and protect amenity of surrounding
residential areas. City of Greater Bendigo
Good access and servicing.
Bendigo Industrial Land Strategy
Little expansion opportunities for precinct.
Redevelopment/reconfiguration potential
within existing precinct. Ref. 31/10414
*See audit sheet for detail.
JUNE 2002
Precinct 8 - California Gully
INTRODUCTION
California Gully is located to the north east of the Bendigo CAD and combines two key industrial areas. The first
“8a” is bounded by the Loddon Valley Highway, Nelson Street and Sandhurst Road and is primarily occupied by
Stafford Ellison. The second “8b” is located between Sandhurst Road and the Bendigo Railway Line and is
primarily used for fuel sales and storage.

AUDIT SUMMARY TABLE

1. Location 8a – Loddon Valley Highway, California Gully


8b – Sandhurst Road, California Gully
2. Precinct Size 13.8 ha
3. Zoning/Overlay 8a – Industrial 1 Zone, Environmental Significance Overlay 1
Controls
8b – Industrial 1 Zone
4. Level of 8a – Mostly Developed (75%>)
Development:
8b – Mostly Developed (75%)
5. Access/Roads Main roads and access roads are adequate.
6. Landscaping Landscaping at Stafford Ellinson site (8a)
7. Distance to Bendigo 3km (8a), 2.4 (8b)
CAD
8. Examples of Current Industry
Uses
Retail Premises
Fuel Depot
9. Examples of Dwelling
Surrounding Uses
Industry
10. Infrastructure Electricity: Available
(Summary)
Water: Available
Telstra: Available
Gas: Available
Drainage: Upgrade Necessary

INFRASTRUCTURE ASSESSMENT
Suitable for immediate development or minor upgrade to infrastructure. . It should be noted that this site is fully
developed; therefore any future development would be re-development only.

CATEGORY OF LAND
Category C: This land is typically full and little expansion potential exists. Improvement of Sandhurst Road
industrial frontage will improve amenity for local residents.

RECOMMENDATIONS
8a: Retain as Industrial 1 Zone.
8b: Retain as Industrial 1 Zone.

City Of Greater Bendigo Page 58


Gutteridge Haskins & Davey Pty Ltd 16392\AJH\dmf
Railway LOT SIZES

< 0.5ha 1.0 - 2.0ha

Local shopping.
0.5 - 1.0ha > 2.0ha
ET
RE
ST

SERVICES (Major)

SA
8a

ND
TH N
OR
PE SO

H
L WATER

UR
NE

S
ST

T
RE
ET
ROAD
SEWER
Rail siding for dispatch
and receipt.

WO
GAS

OD

Ä
DRAINAGE

ST
RE
ET
Note: Electricity and Telstra can be provided
K

to each precinct.
W
LEHA

8b
EAG

RO
MANAGEMENT ACTIONS

AD
ET
STRE

DING
MINIMISE IMPACT ON RESIDENTIAL
DOW
AREAS/SENSITIVE USES

Ä
IMPROVE AMENITY & SIGNAGE
Stafford Ellison. AT KEY GATEWAYS
ET
RE
ST
Railway
ENVIRONMENTALLY
SENSITIVE AREAS
AN

Ä
W
GO
Mc Principal Bendigo fuel
storage/dispatch area.

0 200 400m

(1:6000 @ A3)
Notes:
Segmented and fragmented precinct.
Constrained by residential uses surrounding
Stafford Ellison and adjoining industrial sites

PRECINCT 8
CALIFORNIA GULLY
City of Greater Bendigo
Bendigo Industrial Land Strategy

Ref. 31/10414
*See audit sheet for detail.
JUNE 2002
Precinct 9 - Long Gully
INTRODUCTION
Precinct 9 is a fully developed industrial site located approximately 4km from the Bendigo Central Activities
District. The precinct combines a variety of uses that include a high occurrence of service industries. The area
is considered to have a low level of amenity as a direct result of poor maintenance within the precinct.

AUDIT SUMMARY TABLE

1. Location Holdsworth Road and Havilah Road, Long Gully


2. Precinct Size 31.3 ha
3. Zoning/Overlay Industrial 1 Zone, Salinity Management Overlay, Land Subject to Inundation Overlay,
Controls Environmental Significance 1 Overlay
4. Level of Fully Developed (100%)
Development:
5. Access/Roads Access to precinct is adequate.
6. Landscaping Landscaping adjacent to sites with higher exposure.
7. Distance to Bendigo 1.6km
CAD
8. Examples of Current Motor Repairs Supermarket
Uses
Panel Beating
Industry
9. Examples of Dwellings
Surrounding Uses
Industry
10. Infrastructure Electricity: Available
(Summary)
Water: Available
Telstra: Available
Gas: Available
Drainage: Available

INFRASTRUCTURE ASSESSMENT
Suitable for immediate development or minor upgrade to infrastructure.

CATEGORY OF LAND
Category C: Constrained all sides by Residential land use, this fully developed precinct has little potential for
expansion and must constantly maintain local amenity and minimise impact on local residents particularly along
the main access roads of Havilah and Holdsworth Roads.

RECOMMENDATIONS
Consider rezoning to Industrial 3 Zone, to consider impacts on neighbouring residential areas. Alternatively,
retain existing zone and make effort to improve amenity and appearance of frontages where needed along
Havilah Road. Better “branding” of this precinct will assist economic development.

City Of Greater Bendigo Page 60


Gutteridge Haskins & Davey Pty Ltd 16392\AJH\dmf
LOT SIZES

< 0.5ha 1.0 - 2.0ha

0.5 - 1.0ha > 2.0ha

HO
LM
ES
SHOWGROUNDS
SERVICES (Major)
WATER

RO
AD
Ä

AD
SEWER

RO
W
O
O
D
GAS

ST
DRAINAGE

CREEK
R
EE
ROAD

O RT
H Note: Electricity and Telstra can be provided
SW KI
to each precinct.
LD NR

Ä
HO

Ä
OS
S

ST
MANAGEMENT ACTIONS

AD
K

RE
EHAW

O
GULLY
ET

R
Ä

MO
ET MINIMISE IMPACT ON RESIDENTIAL
EAGL

RE

RAN
ST
AREAS/SENSITIVE USES

STR
Ä
CRAIG IMPROVE AMENITY & SIGNAGE

EET
AT KEY GATEWAYS

H
LA
NG

VI
LO ENVIRONMENTALLY
HA SENSITIVE AREAS

0 200 400m

(1:6000 @ A3)

Notes:
Fully developed and serviced.
PRECINCT 9
Poor amenity - parking issues on street. LONG GULLY
Car related industry.
Good vehicle access.
Consistent signage required. City of Greater Bendigo
Consider rezoning to Indutrial 3 Zone. Bendigo Industrial Land Strategy

Ref. 31/10414
*See audit sheet for detail.
JUNE 2002
Precinct 10 - Bendigo East
INTRODUCTION
Precinct 10 is the largest industrial precinct in the City of Greater Bendigo. The precinct combines two areas;
“10a” located to the west of Rohs Road and “10b” to the east. The precinct is occupied by some high profile
industry including Empire Rubber, Bendigo Bricks and the Mayfair Park Industrial Estate.

AUDIT SUMMARY TABLE

1. Location Strickland Road, Bendigo East


2 Precinct Size 217.3 ha
3. Zoning/Overlay Controls 10a – Industrial 1 Zone, Industrial 3 Zone & Salinity Management Overlay.
10b – Industrial 1 Zone, Industrial 3 Zone, Environmental Significance 1 Overlay, Design and
Development 1 Overlay, Airport Environs Overlay, Land Subject to Inundation Overlay 1
4. Level of Development: 10a- Partially Developed (50% - 75%)
10b- Partially Developed (50% - 75%)
5. Access/Roads No road access to Heywood Street as it narrow/unsealed in parts.
Heywood Street likely to be upgraded as part of the East Bendigo Link Road.
Murphy Street is a road reserve only – unsuitable at Heinz Street end as it is residential.
Ross Street is a gravel road only. Access from Rowena and Murphy Streets is extremely narrow.
6. Landscaping No landscaping apart from that associated with individual occupiers
7. Distance to Bendigo 1.8km (10.1), 2.6km (10.2)
CAD
8. Examples of Current Industry Plant Nursery
Uses Transport Terminal Private Dwellings
Refuse Transfer Station
9. Examples of Animal Husbandry
Surrounding Uses Dwelling
10. Infrastructure Electricity: Available
(Summary) Water: Available
Telstra: Available
Gas: Available
Drainage: Upgrade Necessary

INFRASTRUCTURE ASSESSMENT
Suitable for development with substantial upgrade to infrastructure.

CATEGORY OF LAND
Category A: This precinct is the largest and strongest cluster of industrial activities in Bendigo. It is typically well
serviced and will provide for the long term expansion and consolidation on industrial activities in the city.
Significant expansion potential exist in both precinct 10a and 10b subject to subdivision of lots more marketable
lot sizes. Road access, signage and local amenity need improvements in accordance with a Local Structure
Plan that needs to be prepared.

RECOMMENDATIONS
Maintain as Industrial 1 Zone in core precinct and Industrial 3 Zone on periphery. Subject to the final
consideration and agreement of the Bendigo Link Road alignment, additional land may be suitable for the
industrial zone. Consideration must be given to the existing geo-technical stability of the area, particularly areas
to the north along Bobs Street. A detailed Local Structure Plan is required to articulate development.

Existing Public Park and Recreation Zone along Bobs Street and the Railway alignment may be better suited to
industrial land given the nature of the soil, site conditions and access available to the Midland Highway.
Neighbouring low density residential zones to the north east of the precinct need to be recognised in any future
LSP design process.

City Of Greater Bendigo Page 62


Gutteridge Haskins & Davey Pty Ltd 16392\AJH\dmf
LOT SIZES
Railway
< 0.5ha 1.0 - 2.0ha

0.5 - 1.0ha > 2.0ha

SERVICES (Major)
WATER

McDOWE
ROHS
Existing extractive

LLS
industry.
Mining tailings. SEWER
(Public OPen Space).

ROAD
ROAD
GAS

Proposed East Bendigo DRAINAGE


Link Road.
Note: Electricity and Telstra can be provided
ET
RE
ST

to each precinct.
Chinese
10a Diggings
BS

MANAGEMENT ACTIONS
BO

T
EE
STR
BENDIGO

Ä
AIRFIELD

Ä
BRICKS
RP
HY
MINIMISE IMPACT ON RESIDENTIAL
AREAS/SENSITIVE USES
MU

Potential for
"Airport related"
storage/repairs

Ä
IMPROVE AMENITY & SIGNAGE
or works.
EMPIRE AT KEY GATEWAYS
RUBBER
VICTA

ROAD

Ä
ENVIRONMENTALLY
SENSITIVE AREAS

POTENTIAL FUTURE
GONINANS
INDUSTRIAL LAND

10b

Ä
ST
R IC
KL
A ND
MAYFAIR PARK
ESTATE 0 200 400m
RO
AD
(1:15000 @ A3)
Redevelopement
opportunities. Precinct 11

Ä PRECINCT 10
BENDIGO EAST
City of Greater Bendigo
Bendigo Industrial Land Strategy
Railway
Ref. 31/10414
*See audit sheet for detail.
JUNE 2002
Precinct 11 – Bendigo East /Strathdale
INTRODUCTION
Precinct 11 combines four key industrial areas. The first (11a) is located at the intersection of Nolan and
Kennedy Streets, with the second (11b) located directly north at Baker Street. The third precinct (11c) is the
largest of the four and comprises land to the south of Strickland Road, between Murphy Street and Range
Road. The fourth is located to the south of the McIvor Highway, opposite the intersection with Pratts Park Road.

AUDIT SUMMARY TABLE

1. Location 11a- Kennedy Street and Nolan Street, East Bendigo 11c- Strickland Road, East Bendigo
11b - Baker Street, East Bendigo 11d- McIvor Highway, Strathdale
2. Precinct Size 111.2 ha
3. Zoning/Overlay 11a -Industrial 1 Zone, Heritage Overlay 11d – Industrial 3 Zone, Design and
Controls 11b -Industrial 1 Zone Development 1 Overlay, Airport Environs
11c -Industrial 1 Zone, Industrial 3 Zone, Land Subject Overlay
to Inundation Overlay, Environmental
Significance 1 Overlay, Airport Environs Overlay
4. Level of 11a – Fully Developed Site (100%)
Development: 11b – Fully Developed Site (100%)
11c - Partially Developed Site (50%-75%)
11d –Mostly Developed Site (75%>)
5. Access/Roads The land off Hyde Street is accessed via residential streets. It would be preferable to have an
alternative route.
The land south of Strickland Road requires traffic management to keep commercial vehicles out of
residential area to south on side roads.
6. Landscaping Minimal Landscaping
7. Distance to Bendigo 240m (11a), 400m (11b), 2.2km (11c), 3.8km (11d)
CAD
8. Examples of Current Industry, Service Industry , Transport Terminal
Uses Extractive Industry
9. Examples of Animal Husbandry
Surrounding Uses Dwellings
10. Infrastructure Electricity: Available, Water: Available (part)
(Summary) Telstra: Available, Gas: Available
Drainage: Available (part)

INFRASTRUCTURE ASSESSMENT
Suitable for development with minor upgrade to infrastructure.

CATEGORY OF LAND
Category A: Expansion potential exists in precincts “11c” and “11d.” Significant limitations for southerly
development in precinct “11c” due to residential land use, however, existing rural land adjacent to Pratts Park
Road may be a candidate for commercial development opportunities subject to the final alignment of the
Bendigo Road Link Project. The “Goninans” site offers a significant redevelopment opportunity for freight or
transport related activities.

RECOMMENDATIONS
Retain existing zones and undertake a combined Local Structure Plan with Precinct 10. Land north of Nolan
Street (11A) can be considered for rezoning to Mixed Use to encourage residential development.

City Of Greater Bendigo Page 64


Gutteridge Haskins & Davey Pty Ltd 16392\AJH\dmf
LOT SIZES

< 0.5ha 1.0 - 2.0ha

0.5 - 1.0ha > 2.0ha


Redevlopment

Ä
opportunities.

Drainage easment to be
SERVICES (Major)
protected.
Poor development land. WATER
GONINANS

SEWER
Proposed East Bendigo
GAS
11b ST
R IC
KL
A ND
Link Road.

11c

McGOLDRICK
DRAINAGE

HAPRIN
RO
AD

BEISCHER
Note: Electricity and Telstra can be provided
to each precinct.
AD

Recreational trail.
RO

STREET
EET
STR

MANAGEMENT ACTIONS

ROAD
Business zone.
N
O
ST
LE
R
HA
C

11a LLOYD STREET


MINIMISE IMPACT ON RESIDENTIAL
AREAS/SENSITIVE USES

POWELLS
STREET
HY
RP
MU

Ä
IMPROVE AMENITY & SIGNAGE
"A" AT KEY GATEWAYS

AVENUE
"B" ENVIRONMENTALLY
SENSITIVE AREAS

Ä
McIVOR
HIGHWAY

POTENTIAL FUTURE
INDUSTRIAL LAND
SELKIRK
BRICKS

0 200 400m

(1:13500 @ A3)
11d

PRECINCT 11
BENDIGO EAST/
STRATHDALE
"A & B" City of Greater Bendigo
Notes:
Potential long term industrial
Servicing generally sufficient. Bendigo Industrial Land Strategy
development opportunites upon
Constrained to south by residential land.
final alignment of Bendigo Link
Road Project. Ref. 31/10414
*See audit sheet for detail.
JUNE 2002
Precinct 12 - West Bendigo
INTRODUCTION
Precinct 12 comprises four of the smaller industrial areas of land that are located directly west of the Bendigo
CAD. Each of the sites have good access to major transport routes; either the Loddon Valley Highway or the
Calder Highway. The precinct is considered to have low development potential as much of the land is adjacent
to dwellings or is not currently used for industrial purposes.

AUDIT SUMMARY TABLE


1. Location 12a- Calder Highway, West Bendigo 12c- Wattle Street, Bendigo
12b- Marong Road, West Bendigo 12d- Lily Street, Bendigo
2. Precinct Size 20.3 ha
3. Zoning/Overlay 12a– Industrial 1 Zone, Industrial 3 Zone, 12b - Industrial 1 Zone
Controls Wildfire Management Overlay, Vegetation 12c– Industrial 1 Zone, Heritage Overlay
Protection Overlay 2, Environmental
Significance Overlay 2 12d - Industrial 3 Zone, Heritage Overlay

4. Level of 12a – Mostly Developed Site (75%>)


Development: 12b – Fully Developed Site (100%)
12c – Fully Developed Site (100%)
12d - Fully Developed Site (100%)
5. Access Access off Calder Highway and service road to be constructed particularly on the north side and
perhaps on the south.
6. Landscaping No landscaping
7. Distance to Bendigo 2.9km (12a), 800m (12b), 2.5km (12c), 1.3km (12d)
CAD
8. Examples of Current Dwellings
Uses Medical Centre
Retail Premise
9. Examples of Native Vegetation
Surrounding Uses Dwellings, Hospital
10. Infrastructure Electricity: Available , Water: Available , Telstra: Available, Gas: Available
(Summary) Drainage: Not Available

INFRASTRUCTURE ASSESSMENT
Suitable for immediate development or with minor upgrade to infrastructure.

CATEGORY OF LAND
Category D: Most of these precincts are tightly constrained by surrounding land uses, possess limited industrial
expansion opportunities and are better suited to provide commercial or mixed use/residential activities.
Potentially contaminated with mercury tailings on site 12a.

RECOMMENDATIONS
12a: Consider rezoning to Business 1 Zone
12b: Consider rezoning to Business 3 or 4 Zone
12c: Rezone to Residential 1 Zone
12d: Rezone to Business 3 Zone to facilitate re-use as accommodation, shop or entertainment use.

City Of Greater Bendigo Page 66


Gutteridge Haskins & Davey Pty Ltd 16392\AJH\dmf
LOT SIZES

Existing native
< 0.5ha 1.0 - 2.0ha
vegetation - undeveloped.

GO
LD
ASS
OC
0.5 - 1.0ha > 2.0ha
IAT
ES
Notes:
Generally unkept
BENDIGO
GO KART EE
T appearance. SERVICES (Major)
R
CLUB ST Conflict of uses inside.
Residential vs commercial. WATER
Not industrial in nature.
Potential for rezoning to
LI
S
commercial, business or SEWER
G
IN

ROA
residential.
Rezone to Business 1 Zone. GAS

D
DRAINAGE
WAY
HIGH
Note: Electricity and Telstra can be provided
to each precinct.

MANAGEMENT ACTIONS
CALDER

MINIMISE IMPACT ON RESIDENTIAL


AREAS/SENSITIVE USES
EXISTING
DAM

Ä
IMPROVE AMENITY & SIGNAGE
AT KEY GATEWAYS

ENVIRONMENTALLY
SENSITIVE AREAS

12a
0 200 400m
LA
ZA
RU
S

(1:5000 @ A3)

HO
NE
YS
ST

UC
RE
E

KL
T

E
W
AT
TL
E

LIL
ST
RE

Y
ET

ET
RE

ST
ST

PRECINCT 12
RE
ET
ST
RE

ET
ET

ST

RE
ST
RE

WEST BENDIGO
ET

AY
HIGHW

CALDER AN
W
RO
D
AR
RN
BA

EAGLEHA
WK
ROAD

City of Greater Bendigo


12b 12c 12d Bendigo Industrial Land Strategy
Notes: Notes: Notes:
High profile site. Residential and Business uses. Former bakery.
Rezone to Residential 1 Zone. Rezone to Business 3 Zone. Ref. 31/10414
Remain as industrial site but
rezone to Business 3 Zone. *See audit sheet for detail.
JUNE 2002
Precinct 13 - Golden Square / Quarry Hill
INTRODUCTION
Precinct 13 comprises four areas of industrial land located in Golden Square and Quarry Hill. The precinct
includes industrial land that ranges from being fully developed to land that is vacant. The first industrial area
(13a) is located at Allingham Street in Golden Square. The second (13b) is located at Breen Street, Golden
Square. The third (13c) is located in Quarry Hill, at Garsed Street

AUDIT SUMMARY TABLE

1. Location 13a– Allingham Street, Golden Square 13c- Garsed Street, Quarry Hill
13b– Breen Street, Golden Square
2. Precinct Size 50.5 ha
3. Zoning/Overlay 13a– Industrial 3 Zone 13c– Industrial 1 Zone, Heritage Overlay
Controls 13b– Industrial 1 Zone, Industrial 3 Zone,
Heritage Overlay, Environmental
Significance Overlay 1
4. Level of 13a– Partially Developed Site (50%-75%)
Development: 13b– Mostly Developed Site (75%+)
13c- Fully Developed Site (100%)

5. Access Access is adequate.


6. Landscaping Minimal Landscaping
7. Distance to Bendigo 2.5km (13a), 1.1km (13b), 800m (13c),
CAD
8. Examples of Current Retail Premises, Motor Repairs, Plant Nursery, Store
Uses
9. Examples of Retail Premises, Transport Terminal, Dwellings
Surrounding Uses
10. Infrastructure Electricity: Available, Water: Available
(Summary) Telstra: Available, Gas: Available, Drainage: Available

INFRASTRUCTURE ASSESSMENT
Suitable for immediate development or minor upgrade to infrastructure.

CATEGORY OF LAND
Category B: Few traditional industrial activities remain in these precincts as they typically include wholesale,
commercial sales or display uses. Being located on the periphery of the Bendigo central commercial precinct,
this area will play an increasing popular location for commercial and business uses requiring larger land areas
and proximity to markets.

RECOMMENDATIONS
Consider rezoning entire precinct to Business 3 Zone. Note: land east of Precinct 13B, north of Breen Street
and east of Stanley could be considered for Business 3 Zone.

City Of Greater Bendigo Page 68


Gutteridge Haskins & Davey Pty Ltd 16392\AJH\dmf
LOT SIZES

< 0.5ha 1.0 - 2.0ha

0.5 - 1.0ha > 2.0ha


Central Commercail Precinct
of Bendigo
SERVICES (Major)

Opportunity for commercial WATER


business, mix residentail
rezoning. SEWER
13c
GAS

DRAINAGE

STR
E ET
Ä ST
R
EE
T
Commercial
(Home Display)
MILLER

STRE
ET
Note: Electricity and Telstra can be provided
to each precinct.

MANAGEMENT ACTIONS

STREET
EEN
BR

D
ST
O
N
E
Disused quarry.
LA
G

MINIMISE IMPACT ON RESIDENTIAL


13d

EET
AREAS/SENSITIVE USES

STR
CARPENTER
STREET
Ä
IMPROVE AMENITY & SIGNAGE

LEIL
ERV
AT KEY GATEWAYS

SOM
THISTL

ay
ilw
Ra
E

13a
Ä STREET

Ä
ENVIRONMENTALLY
SENSITIVE AREAS

13b
BELLEVUE
r
e
Riv
y
rra

AM
AD
STREET
McDOUGALL

0 200 400m
ROAD

(1:12000 @ A3)

PRECINCT 13
Notes:
Warehouse retail uses.
Notes:
Disused quarry.
GOLDEN SQUARE/
Wholesale and homewares. Potential residential rezoning. QUARRY HILL
Good access and amenity.
Generally fully developed.
Cater for extension of CBD amenities. City of Greater Bendigo
Consider rezoning entire precinct to Bendigo Industrial Land Strategy
Business 3 Zone.
Ref. 31/10414
*See audit sheet for detail.
JUNE 2002
Precinct 14 - Golden Square
INTRODUCTION
Precinct 14 is located south of the Bendigo Central Activities District, a distance of approximately 3km. The
precinct comprises two key industrial areas, both located at Hattam Street, Golden Square. The first (14a) is
located to the east of Ham Street and the second (14b) is located to the west. The Deborah Triangle Industrial
Estate is located in sub-precinct 14b.

AUDIT SUMMARY TABLE

1. Location 14a- Hattam Street and Allingham Street, Golden Square


14b- Hattam Street, Golden Square
2. Precinct Size 77.5 ha
3. Zoning/Overlay 14a– Industrial 1 Zone, Industrial 3 Zone, Wildfire Management Overlay, Vegetation Protection
Controls Overlay 2, Environmental Significance Overlay 2
14b– Industrial 1 Zone, Industrial 3 Zone, Environmental Significance 1 Overlay, Environmental
Significance 2 Overlay, Vegetation Protection 2 Overlay
4. Level of 14a- Mostly Developed (75%)
Development: 14b- Mostly Developed (75%)
5. Access Allingham Street/Hattam Street are secondary arterial roads to a good standard.
No other internal roads constructed apart from Mc Dougall/Woodward/Vain Streets.
Upgrade McDougall and Woodward – flank widening.
6. Landscaping Minimal landscaping
7. Distance to Bendigo 3km (14a), 2.5km (14b)
CAD
8. Examples of Current Extractive Industry Industry
Uses Store
Retail Premises
9. Examples of Secondary School Dwellings
Surrounding Informal Outdoor Recreation Residential Village
Uses Native Vegetation
10. Infrastructure Electricity: Available , Water: Available, Telstra: Available, Gas: Available
(Summary) Drainage: Available

INFRASTRUCTURE ASSESSMENT
Suitable for immediate development or with minor upgrade to infrastructure.

CATEGORY OF LAND
Category B: Whilst much of the land in “14a” is developed it is not to the extent that the area’s proximity,
location and servicing warrants. Re-development and more intensive use of land on the corner of Hattam and
Allingham Streets will assist in developing a profile for precinct 14b. Significant vegetation and environmental
rural zones hinder expansion of 14b.

RECOMMENDATIONS
Retain existing zoning.

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LOT SIZES

< 0.5ha 1.0 - 2.0ha


Railway Deborah Triangle Estate

0.5 - 1.0ha > 2.0ha

Ä
SERVICES (Major)

Ä
STR
EET
HATT
AM
Ä
WATER

SEWER

GAS

BE
ET
STRE

L
LE
VU
E
DRAINAGE

ROAD
14b Note: Electricity and Telstra can be provided
Electricity ROA to each precinct.
D
substation

MANAGEMENT ACTIONS

Ä MINIMISE IMPACT ON RESIDENTIAL


AREAS/SENSITIVE USES

L
UGAL
Ä
Significant ironbark IMPROVE AMENITY & SIGNAGE

McDO
vegetation. AT KEY GATEWAYS

ENVIRONMENTALLY
SENSITIVE AREAS
GHAM
ALLIN

14a

ET
RE
ST
0 200 400m

(1:9000 @ A3)
HAM

Significant development
opportunites.

PRECINCT 14
GOLDEN SQUARE
Notes: Notes:
Agricultural (hay) storage under utilises High profile site/areas.
industrial land. Good amenity and presentation. City of Greater Bendigo
Good access and profile. Limited vacant land available. Bendigo Industrial Land Strategy
Fully serviced.
Ref. 31/10414
*See audit sheet for detail.
JUNE 2002
Precinct 15 - Kangaroo Flat East
INTRODUCTION
Precinct 15 is located in Kangaroo Flat, with street frontage to the Calder Highway. It is located approximately 6
kilometres from the Bendigo CAD and has an area of 11.7 hectares. The precinct is occupied by Rocklea
Spinning Mills and the Poppit Head Industrial Estate which has a variety industrial occupiers.

AUDIT SUMMARY TABLE

1. Location Calder Highway, Kangaroo Flat


2. Precinct Size 11.7 ha
3. Zoning/Overlay Industrial 1 Zone, Industrial 3 Zone
Controls
4. Level of Mostly Developed (75%>)
Development:
5. Access Good Access
6. Landscaping Good street landscaping
7. Distance to Closest 6km
Activity Centre

8. Examples of Current Car Sales


Uses
Industry
Display
Display
9. Examples of Dwellings
Surrounding Uses
Shop
Motel
10. Infrastructure Electricity: Available, Water: Available , Telstra: Available
(Summary)
Gas: Available, Drainage: Available

INFRASTRUCTURE ASSESSMENT
Suitable for immediate development or with minor upgrade to infrastructure.

CATEGORY OF LAND
Category B: A fully developed site and one of the highest quality amenity estates (Poppit Head). The site has a
premium location for micro industry redevelopment in the longer term. Expansion exists in the Poppit Head
Estate. Car yards are appropriate in this area.

RECOMMENDATIONS
Retain as existing Industrial 1 and 3 Zones.

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Gutteridge Haskins & Davey Pty Ltd 16392\AJH\dmf
LOT SIZES

< 0.5ha 1.0 - 2.0ha

0.5 - 1.0ha > 2.0ha

SERVICES (Major)

ET
WATER

S TR E
SEWER

GAS

CH
CHUR
Excellent exposure DOUG
LAS
to the highway. STRE
ET
DRAINAGE

Note: Electricity and Telstra can be provided


to each precinct.
AD
RO

Potential micro-redevelopment
for industrial/commercial activities MANAGEMENT ACTIONS
in long term.
AY
HIGHW

ROCKLEA MINIMISE IMPACT ON RESIDENTIAL


OE

SPINNING AREAS/SENSITIVE USES


US

MILLS
CR

Ä
IMPROVE AMENITY & SIGNAGE
AT KEY GATEWAYS

ENVIRONMENTALLY

Ä SENSITIVE AREAS
ER
CALD

Expansion
ooportunites.
BUNNINGS 0 200 400m

(1:4500 @ A3)

PRECINCT 15
KANGAROO FLAT
EAST
Notes: City of Greater Bendigo
Good access and profile. Railway Bendigo Industrial Land Strategy
Well maintained.
Ref. 31/10414
*See audit sheet for detail.
JUNE 2002
Precinct 16 – Marong
INTRODUCTION
Precinct 16 is located on the Calder Highway, Marong, approximately 13.5km from the Bendigo CAD. The
precinct is totally undeveloped and has low development potential as there is minimal market demand for
industry in this area. The site is located on the periphery of the Marong Township and would be suitable for
future rezoning.

AUDIT SUMMARY TABLE

1. Location Calder Highway, Marong


2. Precinct Size 3.5 ha
3. Zoning/Overlay Industrial 3 Zone
Controls
4. Level of Under Developed (<50%)
Development:
5. Access Roads will need to be upgraded as they are only gravel.
Intersection works required at Calder Highway.
6. Landscaping No landscaping
7. Distance to Closest 6km
Activity Centre

8. Examples of Current Agriculture


Uses
9. Examples of Dwellings
Surrounding Uses
Retail Premises
Primary School
10. Infrastructure Electricity: Available
(Summary)
Water: Not Available
Telstra: Available
Gas: Not Available
Drainage: Not Available

INFRASTRUCTURE ASSESSMENT
Not suitable for immediate development.

CATEGORY OF LAND
Category E: Little development interest or potential exists on this site, however it does possess large frontage
to Sandhurst and Inglewood Railway and the Calder Highway. With poor servicing and proximity to residential
land and caravan park, major industrial development may be better located in Rural Zone outside the town
centre. However given the low development risks, the site may serve as a longer-term development option.

RECOMMENDATIONS
Retain as Industrial 3 Zone. In the longer term, this site could provide opportunities for the location of new rural
related industry.

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Gutteridge Haskins & Davey Pty Ltd 16392\AJH\dmf
LOT SIZES

< 0.5ha 1.0 - 2.0ha

0.5 - 1.0ha > 2.0ha

SERVICES (Major)

EET
WATER

STR
SEWER

GAS
TOR
RE NS DRAINAGE
CARAVAN PARK
Note: Electricity and Telstra can be provided

CA
to each precinct.
STR

LD
EET

ER
MANAGEMENT ACTIONS

RT
HCA
MINIMISE IMPACT ON RESIDENTIAL
AREAS/SENSITIVE USES

CA T
Ä
IMPROVE AMENITY & SIGNAGE
AT KEY GATEWAYS
EXISTING

HIG
DWELLING ENVIRONMENTALLY

H
SENSITIVE AREAS

WA
SAN

Y
DHU
RST
&
ING
LEW
O OD
RAI
LWA 0 200 400m
Y
(1:3000 @ A3)

PRECINCT 16
MARONG
Notes:
Entirely vacant. City of Greater Bendigo
Limited servicing.
On periphery of Marong Township
Bendigo Industrial Land Strategy

Ref. 31/10414
*See audit sheet for detail.
JUNE 2002
Precinct 17 - Kangaroo Flat West
INTRODUCTION
Precinct 17 is located 5.8km south of the Bendigo CAD, approximately 1km from the Calder Highway, the key
gateway to the City of Bendigo. The precinct includes the Collins Street Industrial Estate, which is considered to
be a stable industrial area with medium development potential.

AUDIT SUMMARY TABLE

1. Location Collins Street, Kangaroo Flat


2. Precinct Size 38.2 ha
3. Zoning/Overlay Industrial 1 Zone, Industrial 3 Zone, Environmental Significance 1 Overlay, Wildfire Management
Controls Overlay
4. Level of Mostly Developed (75%>)
Development:
5. Access Access along Fairview – road is a rural type road with poor vertical alignment
Road along south boundary is unmade and has creek in the middle.
Access is difficult due to creek and existing developments – residential and industrial.
Fairview is only access to undeveloped land.
6. Landscaping Minimal Landscaping
7. Distance to Closest 5.8km
Activity Centre

8. Examples of Current Extractive Industry


Uses
Industry
Service Industry
9. Examples of Native Vegetation
Surrounding Uses
Dwellings
10. Infrastructure Electricity: Available , Water: Available
(Summary)
Telstra: Available, Gas: Available, Drainage: Not Available

INFRASTRUCTURE ASSESSMENT
Suitable for redevelopment with substantial upgrade to infrastructure. Fairview Street needs constructing if this
area is to be fully developed.

CATEGORY OF LAND
Category B: A fragmented precinct with environmental constraints (neighbouring bushland). Long term potential
exists for site to be maintained as a key industrial precinct and better access and overall amenity.

RECOMMENDATIONS
Retain existing zones. This location would benefit from better “branding.”

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LOT SIZES

< 0.5ha 1.0 - 2.0ha

0.5 - 1.0ha > 2.0ha

SERVICES (Major)
WATER

SEWER

OL
YM
PIC
GAS

CO
LLI
T DRAINAGE

NS
E
RE
ST
Note: Electricity and Telstra can be provided

PA
to each precinct.

RA
ST
RE
E

DE
T
N ZIE
Bushland KE
Mc MANAGEMENT ACTIONS

MINIMISE IMPACT ON RESIDENTIAL

Ä
AREAS/SENSITIVE USES

Ä
AD IMPROVE AMENITY & SIGNAGE
RO AT KEY GATEWAYS
W
IR VIE Brickworks
FA
ENVIRONMENTALLY
SENSITIVE AREAS

D
ROA

0 200 400m

(1:6000 @ A3)

LOC
KWO
OD
PRECINCT 17
KANGAROO FLAT
WEST
Notes:
High profile estate. City of Greater Bendigo
Access is generally sufficient. Bendigo Industrial Land Strategy
Maintain as industrial zone.
Ref. 31/10414
*See audit sheet for detail.
JUNE 2002
Precinct 18 - Kangaroo Flat South
INTRODUCTION
The precinct is located at Furness Street, Kangaroo Flat, approximately 7.6km from the Bendigo CAD. Precinct
18 is bound by Crusoe Road in the north, Cannon Lane and Hammil Street in the east and the Crusoe
Reservoir in south west. The precinct is relatively undeveloped and includes a high proportion of reserved land.

AUDIT SUMMARY TABLE

1. Location Furness Street, Kangaroo Flat


2. Precinct Size 25.4 ha
3. Zoning/Overlay Industrial 3 Zone, Environmental Significance 1 Overlay
Controls
4. Level of Under Developed (<50%)
Development:
5. Access Furness Street is rural type cross section – requires widening and strengthening.
North of Furness Street – boundary road unmade.
South of Furness Street – gravel road access
6. Landscaping No Landscaping
7. Distance to Bendigo 7.6km
CAD

8. Examples of Current Animal Husbandry


Uses
Caravan Sales
Dwelling
9. Examples of Dwellings
Surrounding Uses
Native Vegetation
10. Infrastructure Electricity: Available , Water: Available
(Summary)
Telstra: Available, Gas: Available, Drainage: Not Available

INFRASTRUCTURE ASSESSMENT
Suitable for Development with major upgrade to infrastructure.

CATEGORY OF LAND
Category D: Principally undeveloped rural living land, this precinct possess no strategic industrial value to
Bendigo and is better suited given landscape and environmental values as a rural living precinct. Permits can
be issues to existing uses to maintain conformity with planning scheme. Opportunities exist to retain industrial
zone or occupied sites only.

RECOMMENDATIONS
Rezone to Rural Living/Low Density Residential Zone.

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Gutteridge Haskins & Davey Pty Ltd 16392\AJH\dmf
LOT SIZES

< 0.5ha 1.0 - 2.0ha

0.5 - 1.0ha > 2.0ha

SERVICES (Major)
WATER

SEWER

AD
RO
GAS
Extent of industrial/
commercial development.
E
DRAINAGE

AY
SO
RU

HIGHW
C
CA R Note: Electricity and Telstra can be provided
COO
LA to each precinct.
DRIVE

MANAGEMENT ACTIONS

MINIMISE IMPACT ON RESIDENTIAL


AREAS/SENSITIVE USES

FURNE
SS

Ä Ä
STREE
IMPROVE AMENITY & SIGNAGE
T
AT KEY GATEWAYS

ENVIRONMENTALLY

R
SENSITIVE AREAS

CALDE
PHYLIS

STREE
T

Reservoir
Reserve

0 200 400m

(1:7000 @ A3)

PRECINCT 18
KANGAROO FLAT/
BIG HILL
Notes:
Limited business/industrial uses exist.
City of Greater Bendigo
Significant landscape and vegetation on site.
Potential for low density rezoning and Bendigo Industrial Land Strategy
issue permits for existing uses.
Ref. 31/10414
*See audit sheet for detail.
JUNE 2002
Precinct 19 – Big Hill
INTRODUCTION
The precinct is located on the Calder Highway, Big Hill, approximately 9.2km from the Bendigo CAD. The site is
considered to have high development potential due to its main road frontage and levels of servicing.

AUDIT SUMMARY TABLE

1. Location Calder Highway, Big Hill


2. Precinct Size 3.4 ha
3. Zoning/Overlay Industrial 1 Zone
Controls
4. Level of Partially Developed Site (50% - 75%)
Development:
5. Access Access is adequate
6. Landscaping Minimal landscaping
7. Distance to Bendigo 9.2 kilometres
CAD
8. Examples of Current Vacant Site
Uses
9. Examples of Dwellings
Surrounding Uses
Native Vegetation
10. Infrastructure Electricity: Available, Water: Available
(Summary)
Telstra: Available, Gas: Available, Drainage: Not Available

INFRASTRUCTURE ASSESSMENT
Suitable for immediate development of with minor upgrade to infrastructure.

CATEGORY OF LAND
Category B: This precinct has a prime Calder Highway frontage, but is constrained by encroaching residential
development and neighbouring bushland. Long term potential exists for site to be maintained as a key industrial
precinct with possible future expansion to the south to provide better access and overall amenity.

RECOMMENDATIONS
Retain as Industrial 1 Zone.

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LOT SIZES

< 0.5ha 1.0 - 2.0ha


BIG HILL
PRIMARY SCHOOL

0.5 - 1.0ha > 2.0ha

SERVICES (Major)

CENT
WATER

CRES
SEWER

GAS

NES
AY

McIN
DRAINAGE

HIGHW
Note: Electricity and Telstra can be provided
to each precinct.

MANAGEMENT ACTIONS

MINIMISE IMPACT ON RESIDENTIAL


AREAS/SENSITIVE USES

Ä Ä
IMPROVE AMENITY & SIGNAGE
AT KEY GATEWAYS

ENVIRONMENTALLY
Possib SENSITIVE AREAS
le future e
xpansio
n
ER
LD
CA

CH
ER 0 200 400m
R Y
TR (1:4000 @ A3)
EE
LA
NE

PRECINCT 19
BIG HILL
Notes:
High profile site. City of Greater Bendigo
Currently vacant.
Room for expansion. Bendigo Industrial Land Strategy
Sufficently serviced.
Potential for light industrial use. Ref. 31/10414
*See audit sheet for detail.
JUNE 2002
6. IMPLEMENTATION

6.1 STRATEGY OUTCOMES


Currently in the City of Greater Bendigo there is a total of 971.2ha of land subject to either the
Industrial 1 Zone or the Industrial 3 Zone. The industrial land varies in development type and intensity,
with some precincts being fully developed (eg. Long Gully) and some entirely undeveloped (eg.
Maiden Gully). Summary Table 1, below, describes the various levels of industrial development found
in the municipality and the quantities/percent of land subject to those levels of development.
Summary Table 1
Level of Development Land Quantity Percentage
Under Developed <50% 260.9ha 27%
Partially Developed 50%-75% 230.14ha 23.8%
Mostly Developed 75%> 434.1ha 44.8%
Fully Developed 100% 43ha 4.4%
Total 968.1ha 100%

At the current rates of development it is estimated that the municipality will experience between 50.0
ha and 65.0ha of new industrial development to 2021. The research undertaken has illustrated that
the City of Greater Bendigo has sufficient serviced industrial zoned land to serve its future industrial
land requirements for the strategy period.
Bendigo East is considered to hold the most opportunities for the City of Greater Bendigo’s future
industrial development due to the existing and proposed transport links, levels of servicing and
surrounding land uses. Results from the industrial land audit have indicated that future industrial land
requirements can be met in East Bendigo (Precincts 10 and 11), as available industrial land is
estimated to be between 81.2ha and 160ha.

Precinct Land Size Level of Estimated Estimated


Development Available Land Available Land
(Lower) (Upper)
10a 119ha 50% - 75% 29.7ha 59.5ha
10b 98ha 50% - 75% 24.5ha 49ha
11a 6ha 100% 0ha 0ha
11b 7ha 100% (ex. 7ha 7ha
Goninans)
11c 80ha 50%-75% 20ha 40ha
11d 18ha 75%> 0ha 4.5ha
Total 328ha NA 81.2ha 160ha
Note: Lower and Upper estimates are calculated on the basis of the existing levels of development or land within the precinct.
For example, if the level of development is between 50% - 75 %, the Upper estimate is 50% of the land developed
(therefore 50% undeveloped) and the Lower estimate is 75% of the land developed (therefore 25% undeveloped).

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6.2 IMPLEMENTATION SCHEDULE
Implementation of the Bendigo Industrial Land Strategy will require a coordinated approach to the
consideration of actions, of which the responsibility will need to be shared by Government, Council,
Industry and the wider Community. Articulation of final responsibilities and timing targets will be a
function of usual resource and management allocation by Council and others. However, the following
represents a summary of the core actions required to implement the vision as outlined in this Strategy.
The attached Implementation Schedule and work plan is an illustration as to where these key actions
will be integrated to other agency and Council activities. A projected timescale and responsibility for
implementation has also been assigned.
Task 1. Adopt Strategy
This Strategy needs to be exhibited, revised and adopted having regard to specific comments and
submissions as received. Prior to the exhibition of the strategy, all affected land owners will be notified
regarding the content and implications of the document. It is important for the community and Council
to recognise that the role of a strategy is to take stock of existing issues, trends and opportunities,
establish a vision and establish a framework. The Strategy will be adopted in whole or in part and will
signal the integrated commitment to the implementation of the Strategy.
Task 2. Secure Re-Zoning of specific sites
An initial and cost effective action for Council is to initiate the preparation and exhibition of rezoning
requests for the highlighted land contained in this report. A request should be to the Minister to
consider the rezoning of land as articulated in this strategy. A consolidated implementation of all
rezonings will give an early indication of the intent of Council to implement the Strategy. This rezoning
request will need to be accompanied by necessary explanatory report and documentation – much of
which the Strategy will be able to assist with.
Task 3 . Undertake Local Structure Plan (LSP) for East Bendigo
East Bendigo precinct and surrounds has been identified by the Strategy as the preferred location for
industrial investment, marketing and industrial expansion potential for Bendigo. Presently however,
the area lacks a long-term development, re-subdivision and infrastructure investment programme and
design strategy. The preparation of a detailed Local Structure Plan is required to articulate and
document the future of the precinct. The purpose of the LSP would be to:
· Identify the short, medium and long term desired subdivision pattern for the precinct;
· Identify and secure the long term plan form, lot layout, road alignment for the area having regard
to the need to capitalise on the Bendigo East Link Road alignment and synergies that this will
generate for the area;
· Identify in detail geotechnical, development and servicing constraints that may hamper
development interest in the market place, and design a development plan that responds to these
issues;
· Provide a secure vision for and statement of intent for the land for future developers, investors
and land managers; and
· Allow for a statutory and marketing focus for the premier development site in the precinct.
The LSP would be incorporated in to the Planning Scheme and provide a clear indication to the long-
term future for the precinct.

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Task 4 . Prepare an Economic Development Strategy
The Bendigo Industrial Land Strategy has primarily focused on land development, planning and
infrastructure related side of economic development. Local Government is typically well placed to
facilitate economic development through securing and providing the supply of serviced land. However
Local Government can also assist in improving the marketing, promotions, advocacy and identification
of incentive programmes for industry.
This Strategy has identified that other significant influences on the success of industry within Bendigo
will include local skills training, marketing, retention of staff and access to labour, regional promotion
and strategic alliances with industries or other Councils etc. An integrated Economic Development
Strategy as discussed in this Strategy, is an essential element of promotion of socially beneficial
development in Bendigo.
Task 5. Process Improvement review
This strategy has noted a number of areas where Council can with little effort improve, revise and
refine current administrative procedures to maximise the efficiency of approvals and information
process for industry. A “whole of Council” approach to increasing customer assistance, for small as
well as large high profile employers is increasingly seen within local industry as a positive step.
In many instances, assisting existing industry to expand and develop, is a more cost effective and
efficient means of stimulating or retaining economic investment in Bendigo. Attracting and securing
high profile “footloose” industry should not be pursued at the expense of assistance to local existing
industry.
Existing customer surveys used to identify satisfaction, usefulness and results are to be circulated to
key industries in the municipality. Council are to review their statutory planning process to ensure an
efficient, timely and cost effective process.
Task 6. Strategy Review and Monitoring
The accuracy and usefulness of this Strategy is reliant upon the currency of the information on which it
has been based. Constant and periodic (at least yearly) monitoring of data, particularly industrial land
sales, change of uses in key precincts, demand and land release and employment will assist in
ensuring the Strategy remains active and current.
This monitoring will be particularly important in order to advise new business for suitable locations,
and to assist in the forthcoming review of the Bendigo Municipal Strategic Statement.
Task 7. Capital works and Infrastructure
Each industrial precinct as identified has been broadly assessed with regard the nature and extent of
the current infrastructure services available to that site. The Strategy has also recommended that
many of the existing zones present in Bendigo be subject to a change of planning scheme zone in
order to better reflect the current or long term potential for the site.
The Strategy clearly focuses all high order investment in infrastructure to East Bendigo as a means to
promote the development and consolidation of that area. Servicing efficiencies are gained by
concentrating development in a confined area. A detailed infrastructure investment study needs to be
undertaken in parallel with the Local Structure Plan for East Bendigo and the Bendigo East Link Road
project. Accordingly, decision making for location to receive infrastructure investment shall need to
consider the following matters. These are generally in a descending order of significance:
· Areas where life / property safety are of significant risk;
· Areas that are experiencing urgent and high risk or are threatened from the above;

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· The East Bendigo area as associated with an integrated infrastructure development program
associated with the Link Road;
· Category A land according to the Strategy documentation;
· Category B;
· Category C;
· Category D;
Category E land or land that is generally out of sequence for development may be considered on its
merits but purely on a documented ”public-private funding partnership” where full costs and
responsibilities are borne in a mutually beneficial manner between developer, servicing agencies and
Council, and which does not prejudice the orderly and efficient servicing of other infrastructure
priorities.
Existing industrial precincts that are outside the priority investment locations must also be continually
managed and maintained in order to maximise the economic viability of the areas and to minimise
conflict with existing or neighbouring uses. When prioritising capital works for those areas, Council
should adopt as a minimum the first criteria as noted above with the following additions:
· What is the long term strategic direction for the precinct and consideration of whether the
proposed infrastructure will service to assist and achieve the strategic aims;
· Whether the works would result in a substantive and material improvement of amenity, market
attractiveness and environmental and economic sustainability for the precinct.
Included in this consideration must be those activities that may appear small however would increase
the liveability within the precinct for neighbouring residents and areas/operators. Suck works could
include relatively minor activities as;
· Lighting and consistent signage;
· Footpath and kerb /channel improvements or repairs; and/or
· Minor traffic management works, including traffic directional improvements or speed limits.

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Implementation Schedule
Bendigo Industrial Land Strategy
Key Activity
Principal Mar-02 Apr-02 May-02 Jun-02 Jul-02 Aug-02 Sep-02 Oct-02 Nov-02 Dec-02 Jan-03 Feb-03 Mar-03 Apr-03 May-03 Jun-03 Ongoing
Responsibility
1 Secure rezoning of specific Sites
1a) Prepare draft re-zoning documentation CGB
1b) Prepare consultation strategy for landholders CGB
1d) Exhibit, revise and gain Ministerial approval CGB

2 Undertake Local Structure Plan for East Bendigo


2a) Investigate and secure DoI / DIIRD funding CGB
2b) Engage consultant to prepare LSP CGB
2c) Prepare Consultation Strategy CGB/Cons
2d) Undertake development of LSP Cons/CGB
2e) Exhibit and approve east Bendigo LSP CGB
2f) Prepare Planning Scheme Amendment to Implement LSP CGB

3 Prepare a Economic Development Strategy


3a) Investigate and secure DoI / DIIRD funding CGB
3b) Prepare brief / engage consultant CGB
3c) Exhibit and Adopt Strategy CGB/Cons
3d) Implement Strategy CGB
3e) Review effectiveness of Strategy CGB

4 Process Improvement review


4a) Review Best Practice / Best Value opportunities CGB/MAV/Cons
4b) Undertake internal approvals improvement review CGB
4c) Implement process improvements CGB

5 Strategy Review & Monitoring


5a) Update Sales, land uptake & development data CGB, RE, ABS

5b) Schedule MSS/PS review CGB/Cons/DoI

6 Capital Works
6a) Undertake Infrastructure Servicing Strategy as identified in LSP VR/CGB/POW/
CW/TXU/TEL
6b) Prioritise individual works based on Strategy VR/CGB/POW/
CW/TXU/TEL
6c) Undertake detailed funding & financing options as required. VR/CGB/POW/
CW/TXU/TEL
6d) On-going management of all industrial sites CGB

6e) Prioritisation of local amenity works CGB

Code Legend

CGB : City of Greater Bendigo

RE: Real Estate Industry MAV : Municipal Association of Victoria

ABS : Australian Buereu of Statistics POW: Powercor

Cons : External Consultant CW: Coliban Water

DoI : Dept of Infrastructure TXU: TXU Gas

VR : Vic Roads TEL: Telstra

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Appendix A: Interview Comments

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Bendigo as a Manufacturing Centre
· Manufacturing accounts for 15% of employment in Bendigo, which is significant,
especially as manufacturing industry has a high employment multiplier (2 or 3). For every
manufacturing job, another 1 or 2 are created in the wider economy (ie, in the Bendigo
economy and wider afield)
· Manufacturing sectors presently doing well are those associated with housing
construction (bricks, truss manufacture etc) , but engineering are feeling the pinch - just
waiting for that 'next contract'
· "We've lost Gonigons (railway workshops) last week and 300 jobs"
· Have lost a of major industry over the years (Mayfair Hams, Railway Workshops, etc) -
"It's not an issue of land availability, but more entrenched loss of activity"
· Bendigo is susceptible to "call centre failure" - ie, firms can up and leave; they have no
firm roots or loyalties to the region.
· We would like to see more emphasis by Council on developing manufacturing industry in
Bendigo. "Council's actions don't support its rhetoric". "Compare this with other places
like Ballarat and Geelong" where there is (it seems) on- going promotion of industry.
Demand for Industrial Property
· There are mainly enquiries and sales for smaller activities - depots, light manufacturing,
etc. No demand for property for heavy industry. Most interest is from owner-occupiers.
· Currently there is no major levels of demand for industrial land
Features Sought in Industrial Land
· Features sought by new firms include good exposure in a recognised industrial area;
affordable price; flat land; all services provided to site; good transport access. First
preference is for a highway location, but now virtually impossible to find land with this
feature.
· Land areas sought are Y4 to Y2 to 1 acre in size (approximately 1,000 m2 to 4,000 m2),
usually with buildings up to 300-400 m2. Otherwise larger sites mean wastage and other
firms cannot move into the area.
· There is need for access suitable for B-doubles, etc - pavement quality, turning circles,
and easy through-access (ie, no requirement for trucks to turn in a small court), etc
Localities in Demand
· Areas in demand include: Strickland Road, McDowall Road, McGoldrick Road, White
Hills.
· Best presented industrial areas are Deborah Triangle, Collins Street, Kangaroo Flat - all
other areas are "really just odds-and-sods"
· Deborah Triangle is most asked-for, with proximity to GBD, wide streets, kerb and
channel etc. But property is tightly held - not much sales or development activity here in
past 6 months; all owner-occupiers

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· Council needs to get other industrial areas cleaned up, Dirt roads become dusty and
muddy, etc - does not help to attract new investment
· Long Gully has potential for further development
· Fitt Court area is suitable for 200-300 m2 factories
· Seems to be too many small industrial areas all over the place - a legacy of 5 Councils!
· Mayfair area has 430 to 450 jobs, including 275 jobs in food; therefore need to keep this
and surrounding area for "clean industry" (eg, no paint . manufacturing, no chemicals,
etc). AQIS-approved factory. 60% of rent comes from 4 or 5 firms on the estate, Many
are very small operations
· Eaglehawk Enterprise Park has 15 factories over 6 sites. Run as a community-based
organization
Supply of Industrial Land
· There is not a lot of industrial land on the market. Most land has been taken up.
Infrastructure and services provision is not an issue - this is available, or can be made
available.
· Much of the industrial land which is available is actually encumbered by nearby
residential use
· Industrial land need buffers so that firms can operate as they need to, without residential
objections
· We need opportunities for people to work from home, such as plumbers, etc on small
blocks (eg, 1/3 acre or 1 ,250 m2 blocks) .
· Our main competition is with larger centres. Bendigo now larger than Ballarat. Ballarat is
more conservative. Geelong has strong attributes, with port, heavy industry, Melbourne
access, etc
· Bendigo is central location in Victoria, and this should be a strong attribute in attracting
new investment
· Land prices - expect to pay $100,000 for a reasonable site
· Demand is usually for "1 acre" (approximately 4,000 m2), and buyers usually settle for
sites which are 2,000 to 3,000 m2
· Existing (dispersed) supply of industrial land reflects the planning of the (former) 5
Councils - has led to fragmented industrial areas in Bendigo
· Industrial land availability is really only a problem for the new firms interested in coming
to Bendigo.
Future Industrial Land
· There is an over-riding need is for a large area of land to be zoned for industrial
purposes. Most likely area is to the north-east of the city centre, although there could be
some supplementary areas to the south and south-west. No chance for industrial (and (or
other urban development) to east because of forest areas;
· There is consensus is that Bendigo East / Epsom is the place to further develop for
industry;

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· An alternative view is that this land has no connection to Calder Highway and is therefore
not suitable, or that it is too far out for those involved in 'traded services' that depend on
high exposure and easy of access and proximity to the market place (however. this view
need not be at odds with -the view in previous point);
· Some of the land in north-east area is unattractive (old tip, gravel reserves, etc) but can
be enhanced in the medium to longer-term. Railway area and embankments here could
form suitable western and southern buffers in this area. These buffers allow for good
transition from one use to another. Flat
· land is towards aerodrome and Mayfair;
· Features of this general area are: proximity to town services; access to highway network;
easy access to rail if required; close to aerodrome; buffered on all sides; close to McIvor
Highway. Also the area is not densely populated here. One concern was raised that this
land may be difficult to consolidate;
· For the longer term, will expect to see industry develop out near saleyards (to the north);
· The saleyards is an excellent location in terms of access to major highways / roads
serving this part of the State; no residential is around here; room to expand; and has
potential to develop as an agri-industry/business locality. Saleyards is part of national
grid for truck-washing
· New noxious industry could locate to north, past Huntly;
· Some development potential exists on Ortech land which is presently under- used as
sheds for haybale storage; very low density development at present. Has good locational
features, including proximity to town centre;
· Kangaroo Flat has an area of about 5 ha, but is too close to houses to allow industrial
development (need to avoid future complaints from residents);
· Eaglehawk has some land between the Tip Top Bakery and Keoghs Engineering that
could be suitable. but could be NRE land; need to check availability. "The only land that
NRE will sell is not what the market is looking for";
· Epsom Huntly corridor should be rezoned industrial. Flat land, accessible, good
exposure, good highway access, and rail access etc. Could be good supply for 20 to 30
years;
· There is plenty of land near Marong and Calder Highway suitable for industry (flat, etc) -
but not so popular in terms of market interest. Inland port was to locate here, but local
objections prevented this from proceeding
Competition for Industry
· "Ballarat and Shepparton have more industry compared with Bendigo", and therefore a
better labour market for these skills Bendigo is 80% commercial. rather than
manufacturing
· "Bendigo not regarded as an industrial base"
Future Link Road
· "Yes, need this! But nothing has happened. . ,"

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· The ring road would link industrial and commercial areas, open up new land, and ease
traffic congestion in city centre
What Needs Doing for Industry in Bendigo?
· identify an area
· put in the infrastructure
· promote the locality - firms will come here!
· need to be proactive to get businesses here
· We need to identify just what sort of industry we want here; what do we want for
Bendigo?
· We should try to attract major firms from outside Bendigo - 1 or 2 large employers
needed (like 300 to 500 jobs)
· We should focus on niche markets and firms with 150 - 200 employees (not larger)
· There is potential industries in agro-processing, small engineering, innovative small firms,
etc;
· We need to ensure supporting community and social infrastructure is in place, such as
schools and medical services. Create an up-market housing area to attract senior
management to Bendigo;
· Fast-track the duplication of the Calder Highway;
· Provide a ring road, with NE to W direction. This will open up the land to
· development and facilitates traffic to bypass the city centre;
· We need transport companies that can serve small markets - we can easily get
containers shipped, but to ship a single pallet can be difficult (in terms of getting a
transport company to handle this);
· We need to take a 50-year perspective, or even 100 years, for good planning and to
attract and accommodate industry and related activity here in Bendigo;
· Council should be encouraged to own some of this land (in north-east) so that we can
deal with enquiries and get action happening on the ground;
· An alternative is for Council to have a joint venture development with private interests;
· It can be difficult to get private investors/developers involved because of nature of
industrial land market (typically this is a slow moving market), hence need to have
Council involved; and
· It would be good to have an industrial area in place with all infrastructure and services,
and then this 'hurdle' is out of the way for any new businesses coming to town.
Other Issues
· Bendigo can't attract skilled metal workers;
· One firm has an apprentice scheme, but not many others do in Bendigo, so the skilled
workers get poached;
· One issue is how to find work for the partner of someone to whom you are offering a job
and need to attract to live in Bendigo?
· Problems here in Bendigo with electronic data transmissions (slow - Epsom exchange
not upgraded), but will be rectified with Bendigo Telco (new entity);

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· There are existing firms in Bendigo which can be supported or encouraged to expand -
don't always have- to look to attracting new firms from outside. Bendigo Bank can help
here;
· We need a "buy-local" plan here to support local firms in selling their products and
services;
· We need to educate people about what's available here in Bendigo - many in . Bendigo
don't know what's available from local businesses, so valuable links are not made
between suppliers;
· There is a lack of entrepreneurial 'get-up-and-go' in Bendigo;
· "Call centres" - could leave tomorrow. We need industry here; we need a manufacturing
base;
· People perceive freight costs are higher here because Bendigo is not on a freeway and
the Calder is not yet fully upgraded (eg, compared with Albury- Wodonga and Ballarat
and Geelong, which are served by freeways);
· Many products go by road - rice, skins, fruit Murray Goulburn products, etc;
· Loss of the Inland Port development appears to have left a lingering level of doubt about
what can be achieved in Bendigo;
· There is business potential in waste recycling; paper and pulp (using energy from brick
manufacturing); and
· We need to get a strong local Business Group or Council in place to push for industry in
Bendigo.
Council's Role
· Council needs the capacity to make planning decisions quickly;
· Businesses need certainty in planning, and need to feel confident that Council has an
understanding of commercial reality facing firms;
· A planning permit can take 2 months; one permit took 4 months and the proposal was a
conforming one;
· There is a need for more appreciation in Council of what people are trying to achieve in
developing new or expanded businesses. There is a view that some business people say
"it's all too hard" and walk away from developing their projects, "So how can a major
proposal ever get up?"
· Council is under-staffed in planning department and in economic development unit;
· We need "more as-of-right development required, without having to deal with every Tom,
Dick and Harry as objectors";
· "Too much detail is required in the early stages of permit application - almost need
working drawing for an activity in the right zone anyway";
· Bendigo needs a plan to show where industry should locate (this is happening with this
project);

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Appendix B: Precinct Photos

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Appendix C: Infrastructure Summary

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