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Heading: PORTFOLIO ARTEFACTS AND CRITICAL REFLECTION

Portfolio artefacts and Critical reflection

Sam Higginson

18934292

Western Sydney University


PORTFOLIO ARTEFACTS AND CRITICAL REFLECTION 2

Lesson Plan 1
Topic area: Stage of Learner: Syllabus Pages:
Music-Rock Stage 5-Year 10 11-21, 30-48
Date: Location Booked: Lesson Number:
13/02/17 Classroom 2/6
Time: Total Number of students: Printing/preparation
60 minutes 8 Manuscript Paper

Outcomes Assessment Students learn about Students learn to


Syllabus outcomes Informal, diagnostic, Rhythms, rock music, Hear different rhythmic
5.1, 5.3, 5.4, 5.7, 5.8, 5.9, 5.11, 5.12 formative composition, patterns, compose a
Life Skills outcomes rhythmic phrase
LS.4, LS.5, LS.7, LS.10
Cross Curriculum themes & General capabilities Prior Knowledge
Literacy-Music metalanguage Students have a strong understanding of music
Numeracy-counting note values notation. They understand the concepts of music,
however, some students struggle with their
descriptions.

Explicit subject specific concepts and skills


Lesson incorporates learning experiences: performing
composing and listening.
Focus on rock music genre
Focus on concept of music: Duration
Quality Teaching Elements (lesson focus) Highlight the appropriate areas
Intellectual Quality 1.1 Deep knowledge 1.4 Higher-order thinking
This refers to pedagogy focused on producing deep understanding of important, 1.2 Deep understanding 1.5 Metalanguage
substantive concepts, skills and ideas. Such pedagogy treats knowledge as 1.3 Problematic 1.6 Substantive
something that requires active construction and requires students to engage in knowledge communication
higher-order thinking and to communicate substantively about what they are
learning.
Quality Learning Environment 2.1 Explicit quality 2.4 Social Support
This refers to pedagogy that creates classrooms where students and teachers criteria 2.5 Students’ self regulation
work productively in an environment clearly focused on learning. Such pedagogy 2.2 Engagement 2.6 Student direction
sets high and explicit expectations and develops positive relationships between 2.3 High Expectations
teacher and students and among students.
Significance 3.1 Background 3.4 Inclusivity
This refers to pedagogy that helps make learning more meaningful and important knowledge 3.5 Connectedness
to students. Such pedagogy draws clear connections with students’ prior 3.2 Cultural knowledge 3.6 Narrative
knowledge and identities, with contexts outside of the classroom, and with 3.3 Knowledge
multiple ways of knowing all cultural perspective. integration

How the quality teaching elements you have identified are achieved within the lesson.

Teaching Indicators of presence in the lesson


element
1.1 Rhythm and composition are the core focuses on the lesson and are used consistently throughout

1.5 Music metalanguage is used to describe the content in the class

2.1 With such a small class, all students are expected to participate in the class discussion and complete a
high calibre of work.
PORTFOLIO ARTEFACTS AND CRITICAL REFLECTION 3

Time Teaching and learning actions Organisation Centred


T/S
5mins Greet the classroom and explain the outcomes of the Teacher: T
lesson. Greet students outside classroom
“Today we will be looking at duration, with specific Ensure students have their hats off
reference to the rhythms and their use in a and shirts tucked in.
composition.” Explanation of class.
Ensure computer is on to take the
Mark the roll roll

Student:
Listening to teacher.

Resources:
N/A
10mins Class discussion about duration. Teacher: T/S
Asking prompting questions,
Create a mind map with words that are associated evoking the use of metalanguage.
with duration. (see Duration mind in Music drive)
Student:
A brief description should be written next to each Pens, expected participation in class
word so that the students can gain a deeper discussion.
understanding of each characteristic.
Resources:
Duration mind map worksheet,
Key Questions: white board marker, student books.
-What is Duration?
-What is rhythm?
-How is duration used in rock and music as a whole?
10mins Listen to some examples of rock music on the Teacher:
concerhotels website. Analyse the similarities and Pick at least 3 different rock
difference between the rhythms used in the varying subgenres on the concerthotels
rock genres. website.

Key Questions: Student:


-How is rhythm used in rock music? Listen and analyse the songs played.
-What is different between the genres?
Resources:
Computer, projector, whiteboard
markers, student books.
https://www.concerthotels.com/100-
years-of-rock/
15mins Composition task Teacher: S
Students are expected to create and notate an 8 bar Outline the task verbally and on the
rhythmic pattern in 4/4. Manuscript paper will be whiteboard, monitor student
provided progression and ensuring they stay
on task.
They are expected to:
- complete an 8 bar rhythmic pattern Student:
-use at least two tied notes Completing composition activity.
-use semiquavers
Resources:
Whiteboard marker, manuscript.
15mins Each student will take turns clapping their rhythm Teacher: S
for the class. Positive feedback to students
clapping through rhythms.

Self-reflection and discussion of each performance: Student:


-Why did you use those specific notes? They are expected to produce a high
-Did anything influence you? quality performance (even it is only
PORTFOLIO ARTEFACTS AND CRITICAL REFLECTION 4

-How did your performance go? clapping). They should also show
respect by listening to other
*See if two students can clap their rhythms together* students performing.

Resources:
N/A
5mins Summary of lesson Teacher: T
Outlining the main characteristics of duration and Lesson summary.
rhythm, and how they are used in rock music.
Student:
Remind students to bring headphones for next Listening to teacher.
lesson.
Resources:
N/A
PORTFOLIO ARTEFACTS AND CRITICAL REFLECTION 5

Lesson Plan 2
Topic area: Stage of Learner: Syllabus Pages:
Music-Rock Stage 5-Year 10 11-21, 30-48
Date: Location Booked: Lesson Number:
16/02/17 Computer Room 3/6
Time: Total Number of students: Printing/preparation
60 minutes 8

Outcomes Assessment Students learn about Students learn to


Syllabus outcomes Informal, diagnostic, Rhythms, rock music, Hear different rhythmic
5.4, 5.5, 5.6, 5.7, 5.8, 5.9, 5.11, 5.12 formative composition, pitch patterns, compose a
Life Skills outcomes melody for a rhythmic
LS.4, LS.5, LS.7, LS.10 phrase
Cross Curriculum themes & General capabilities Prior Knowledge
Literacy-Music metalanguage Students have a strong understanding of music
Numeracy-counting note values notation.
ICT-music notation software They understand the concepts of music, however,
some students struggle with their descriptions.
Students have experience using music notation
software (Noteflight).

Explicit subject specific concepts and skills


Lesson incorporates learning experiences: composing
and listening.
Focus on rock music genre
Focus on concept of music: Duration and pitch
Quality Teaching Elements (lesson focus) Highlight the appropriate areas
Intellectual Quality 1.1 Deep knowledge 1.4 Higher-order thinking
This refers to pedagogy focused on producing deep understanding of important, 1.2 Deep understanding 1.5 Metalanguage
substantive concepts, skills and ideas. Such pedagogy treats knowledge as 1.3 Problematic 1.6 Substantive
something that requires active construction and requires students to engage in knowledge communication
higher-order thinking and to communicate substantively about what they are
learning.
Quality Learning Environment 2.1 Explicit quality 2.4 Social Support
This refers to pedagogy that creates classrooms where students and teachers criteria 2.5 Students’ self regulation
work productively in an environment clearly focused on learning. Such pedagogy 2.2 Engagement 2.6 Student direction
sets high and explicit expectations and develops positive relationships between 2.3 High Expectations
teacher and students and among students.
Significance 3.1 Background 3.4 Inclusivity
This refers to pedagogy that helps make learning more meaningful and important knowledge 3.5 Connectedness
to students. Such pedagogy draws clear connections with students’ prior 3.2 Cultural knowledge 3.6 Narrative
knowledge and identities, with contexts outside of the classroom, and with 3.3 Knowledge
multiple ways of knowing all cultural perspective. integration

How the quality teaching elements you have identified are achieved within the lesson.

Teaching Indicators of presence in the lesson


element
1.4 Students identify and compare the pitch between rock subgenres.

2.3 Teacher expectations are explicitly written in the lesson plan, and should be translated to the students.

3.1 The tasks draw on background knowledge achieved in the previous lesson and general prior
knowledge.
PORTFOLIO ARTEFACTS AND CRITICAL REFLECTION 6

Time Teaching and learning actions Organisation Centred


T/S
5mins Greet the classroom and explain the outcomes of the Teacher: T
lesson. Greet students outside classroom
“Today we will be expanding on your composition Ensure students have their hats off
from last lesson. We will be looking at pitch, and by and shirts tucked in.
the end of the lesson I expect your composition to Explanation of class.
contain the three main elements of pitch.” Ensure computer is on to take the
roll
Mark the roll
Student:
Listening to teacher

Resources:
N/A
15mins Class discussion about duration and pitch. Teacher: T/S
Asking prompting questions,
Create a mind map with words that are associated evoking the use of metalanguage.
with pitch.
Student:
Class discussion prompting the following key Pens, expected participation in class
questions: discussion.
-What is tonality?
-What is a melody? Resources:
-What is a harmony? Computer, projector, white board
- How is pitch used in rock music? marker, student books.
-Are there similarities and differences pitches in https://www.concerthotels.com/100-
songs? (Compare the same rock subgenres used for years-of-rock/
duration last lesson).
-How are pitch and duration related?

It is expected that all students participate and


contribute to the mind map/discussion.
25mins Composition task Teacher: S
Students are to input their hand notated rhythm from Outline the task verbally and on the
last lesson into Noteflight. whiteboard, monitor student
progression and ensuring they stay
They are to further their composition by creating a on task.
melody and harmony line.
Student:
By the end of the lesson, it is expected that students Completing composition activity.
will have:
-a melody (Accommodation) Resources:
-a harmony Pitch mind map worksheet,
-bassline (Enrichment) whiteboard marker, computers.

Students should consider the pitch characteristics


mind map

Extra
If students finish early, they can:
-create a second 8 bar phrase with a different melody
and harmony.

10mins Each student will play their composition for the Teacher: S
class. Positive feedback to students
clapping through rhythms.
PORTFOLIO ARTEFACTS AND CRITICAL REFLECTION 7

Class discussion of composition


Self-reflection and discussion of each performance: Student:
-Why did you use those specific notes? They are expected to produce a high
-Did anything influence you? quality composition. They should
-How did your performance go? also show respect by listening to
other students performing. They
should give positive constructive
feedback on each other’s
compositions.

Resources:
N/A
5mins Summary of lesson Teacher: T
Outlining the main characteristics of duration and Lesson summary.
rhythm, and how they are used in rock music.
Student:
Listening to teacher.

Resources:
N/A
PORTFOLIO ARTEFACTS AND CRITICAL REFLECTION 8

Reflection-Lesson 1

The first lesson plan focused on rock music, duration (with specific reference to

rhythm), and composition. The lesson sought to actively engage students through both

class discussions and individual work. I feel that this lesson did a great job in utilising

the key learning experiences; aurally identifying duration characteristics in rock music

(listening), creating a rhythmic phrase (composition), and the performance of the

students’ compositions (performance).

Deep Knowledge

On reflection, I believe that this lesson effectively demonstrates the NSW Quality

Teaching Model Element 1.1 “Deep Knowledge” (Ludwig & Gore, 2003). It focuses

on the central idea of duration, which is a concept of music that must be addressed in

stage 5 music (BOSTES, 2003). The lesson explores the depth of this concept through

the participation in the 3 key learning concepts: performing, composing and listening.

Each activity is clearly established and flows coherently throughout the lesson.

Combining these elements to create an engaging lesson is essential for students to

gain a deep knowledge of rock music and rhythm. This deep knowledge can be, and

should be adapted to other genres of music so that students can further their

experience of music.

In my lesson, I incorporated a combination of open-ended and direct questions that a

teacher could ask their students. Establishing open-ended questions allows for

stimulating discussions to take place in the classroom. This is essential for students as

it moves them from a fixed mindset and onto a growth mindset. And ultimately, will

help students to gain deep understanding of a topic or concept (Walsh & Sattes,

2015).
PORTFOLIO ARTEFACTS AND CRITICAL REFLECTION 9

Metalanguage

Upon reflection of my lesson plan, I noticed that whilst only some metalanguage was

not always directly stated, it is evident in the worksheet and should be a natural

occurrence when discussing the topics covered. Each concept of music has several

key characteristics that outline what they are about. My lesson utilised a mind map to

help students identify the key characteristics of duration. Some of those key

characteristics include duration, metre, beat, rhythm and tempo. Using the specialist

terminology allows students to better analyse and describe what happens in a piece of

music. Students are provided with a context to explore music metalanguage through

aurally identifying how duration is used in multiple subgenres of rock (Ludwig &

Gore, 2003).

Also, as students are completing their compositions, they will need to have an

understanding of music notation. Learning and know music is like learning another

language (Tsoulas, 2013). The must implement the correct symbols such as crotchets,

quavers minims and more as they create their composition. This comprehension of

music notation is essential metalanguage needed for the study of music. Whilst not all

of the terminology is explicitly mentioned in the lesson plan, it is expected that the

use of music metalanguage will be utilised throughout the lesson.

Explicit Quality Criteria

As I reflect on my lesson plan, I believe that I adequately detailed my expectations of

the students and their quality of work. In starting the composition task with, “I expect

you to produce high quality work…” I have explicitly stated that I would like high

quality work. This can be reinforced by acknowledging the fact that the students are

in year 10 and completing the stage 5 elective music course. The students have been

studying music for several years so they should have a reasonably sound
PORTFOLIO ARTEFACTS AND CRITICAL REFLECTION 10

understanding of music notation and produce high quality work. Eliot (2003) implores

the importance of a whole school approach when looking trying to improve student

achievement and resilience. If the school community, including teachers, students and

parents/caregivers can work together to establish a bass line for the quality of work

that should be completed, the students will benefit greatly.

Reflection-Lesson 2

The second lesson was formed on the foundations established in the first plan, in that

the students would expand their composition and focus on a new concept of music.

The concept for this second lesson was pitch, and similarly to lesson one, began with

a class discussion and mind map task identifying the key characteristics of pitch. The

lesson incorporated the learning experiences through aural identification of pitch in

rock subgenres (listening), developing their compositions further by adding pitch

elements (composition) and having student’s playback their compositions

(performance).

High Expectations

After reflecting on my lesson plan for lesson two, I feel that there was a strong

emphasis on establishing high expectations of the students. I endeavoured to

communicate my expectations and reinforce the notion that each student should strive

to challenge themselves and potentially take risks with their melody (using chord

extensions, alternate scales). Establishing expectations of students can be very

beneficial to students learning, however, it can also have some drawbacks. Teachers

can be subject to a bias, with rigid beliefs, as they put students into a category of low

expectations or high expectations (Marzano, 2010; Ludwig & Gore, 2003). This can

lead to tough student-teacher relationships escalating to behavioural issues, however,


PORTFOLIO ARTEFACTS AND CRITICAL REFLECTION 11

if teachers can behave positively towards all students, the students will be more

inclined to engage (Marzano, 2010). Ultimately, students should be seen as dynamic

learners and taught about how important it is to have a growth mindset. This will

allow students challenge themselves and take risks especially when they are presented

with a task that contains high expectations.

Furthermore, in my lessons I added a class reflection/peer review at the end of each

performance or composition playback. Studies in Australia have shown that when

peers review a task, it can result in students improving their academic performance

(Mulder, Baik, Naylor & Pearce, 2013). Clearly, trying to meet the expectations of

their peers is also a contributing factor for student productivity and achievement.
PORTFOLIO ARTEFACTS AND CRITICAL REFLECTION 12

Concept Resources:

https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B1std1SWFx-8ZUVaT19jbFUxclk
PORTFOLIO ARTEFACTS AND CRITICAL REFLECTION 13

References

BOSTES. (2003). Music years 7-10 syllabus. http://educationstandards.nsw.edu.au/

wps/wcm/connect/49538efb-ba34-4bb3-99783e92fb1627cc/music_710_

syllabus.pdf?MOD=AJPERES&CVID=

Eliot, T. S. (2003). Quality Teaching for Diverse Students in Schooling: Best

Evidence Synthesis–. Building Teacher Quality, 24.

Ludwig, J., & Gore, J. (2003). Quality Teaching in NSW Public Schools A classroom

practice guide Retrieved from http://www.rqt.edu.au/files/5514/1774/9895/

NSW_DET_2003-Quality_Teaching_Guide.p

Marzano, R. J. (2010). High Expectations for All. Educational Leadership, 68(1), 82-

85.

Mulder, R., Baik, C., Naylor, R., & Pearce, J. (2014). How does student peer review

influence perceptions, engagement and academic outcomes? A case study.

Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education, 39(6), 657-677.

doi:10.1080/02602938.2013.860421

Tsoulas, G. (2014). Explainer, How are learning languages and music linked. The

Conversation. Retrieved from http://theconversation.com/explainer-how-are-l

earning-languages-and-music-linked-34325

Walsh, J. A., & Sattes, B. D. (2015). Questioning for Classroom Discussion :

Purposeful Speaking, Engaged Listening, Deep Thinking. Alexandria, VA:

ASCD.