Está en la página 1de 90

Craniosacral

 Osteopathy  

Hossein  Khorrami,  Ph.D.  DOMP  


Osteopathic  Principles  
•  The  body  is  a  unit,  and  the  person  represents  a  
combina=on  of  body,  mind  and  spirit  
•  The  body  is  capable  of  self-­‐regula=on,  self-­‐
healing  and  health  maintenance  
•  Structure  and  func=on  are  reciprocally  
interrelated  
•  Ra=onal  treatment  is  based  on  an  understanding  
of  these  principles:  body  unity,  self-­‐regula=on,  
and  the  interrela=onship  of  structure  and  
func=on  
Osteopathic  Principles  

•  Andrew  Taylor  S=ll:  


–  Normal  movement  of  the  body’s  structure  is  
essen=al  to  their  func=on  and  to  effec=ve  
homeostasis    
Dysfunc=on  in  Osteopathy  
•  When  the  normal  movement  of  an  organ  
hindered  
•  Could  be  symptoma=c    
•  Modifica=ons  or  mi=gated  by  the  organism  
Dysfunc=on    
•  Primary  dysfunc=on  
•  Secondary  modifica=on  or  a  new  
dysfunc=on(some=mes)  
•  …..  
•  Restric=on  in  movement  
•  Adapta=on  
•  Characteris=cs  like  morphology,  gene=cs,  
ac=vi=es,  life  style,  habits  and…  are  important  
•  Asymptoma=c    
•  Or  a  complex  dysfunc=onal  network  
Complex  dysfunc=onal  network  
•  If  permanent  and  reaches  vital  structures:  
–  Reduce  adapta=on  ability  
–  e.g.  diaphragm,  liver,  intes=ne…  
–  Fa=gue,  cons=pa=on,  diarrhea,  insomnia,  mood  
disorder…  as  symptoms  
Craniosacral    
•  It  was  an  American  osteopath  in  the  early  
1900's,  William  Garner  Sutherland,  who  made  
a  study  of  the  cranial  bones  and  he  realized  
that  the  sutures  were  designed  to  allow  for  a  
specific  movement  paYern  of  the  cranial  
bones  
•  The  brain  is  surrounded  by  a  fluid,  the  
cerebrospinal  fluid  (CSF),  which  also  surrounds  
the  spinal  cord  
•  The  CSF  is  enclosed  within  a  membrane  
system,  the  dural  membranes,  or  meninges,  
which  together  form  a  hydraulic  system  
•  The  dural  membranes  give  aYachment  to  the  
cranial  bones  and  the  sacrum,  which  together  
with  the  spine,  offer  protec=on  to  the  brain  
and  spinal  cord  
•  Our  brain  and  spinal  cord,  our  central  nervous  
system  (CNS),  is  essen=ally  floa=ng  inside  our  
head  and  spine  
CSF  
•  Choroid  plexus  
•  Ventricles  I-­‐IV  

•  Foramen  of  Magendie  

hYps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gqw4vd8qApQ    
Ventricles    
CSF  &  BBB  
Flow  of  CSF  
CSF    
•  CSF;  produc,on:  650ml/day-­‐  total  vol:  
125ml/  circula,on/composi,on:  isosmo,c;  
low  protein  &  glucose,  hi  Na  &  Cl,    
•  O2  consump,on  at  rest:  49  ml/min  (20%  of  
total)  
•  Blood  flow  at  rest:  798  ml/min  (15%  of  total)      
•  Glucose  consump,on  at  rest:  77  mg/min    
Maninges    
•  Dura  mater  
–  AYachments:  occip.  Sagital,  frontal,  Crista  Galli  of  
ethmoid,  sella  tursica  of  sphenoid,  C2-­‐3,  S2-­‐3  
•  Arachnoid  
•  Subarachnoid  
•  Pia  mater  
•  the  CSF  is  able  to  circulate  around  the  brain  
and  up  and  down  the  inside  of  the  spine  
•  The  pulsa=on  is  called  "THE  CRANIAL  
RHYTHM",  the  movement  paYern  of  the  skull,  
dural  membranes  and  CNS  is  known  as  
"CRANIOSACRAL  MOTION”  
•  Not  only  the  skull  and  CNS,  but  all  body  
=ssues  exhibit  cranio-­‐sacral  mo=on  
CSF  Absorp=on  
•  Dura  95%  
•  Lympha=c  system  5%  
Dura  MaYer  &  Dural  Sinuses  
AYachment  Points  In  Dural  System  
•  In  front,  the  crista  galli(part  of  Ethmoid)  and  
clinoid  processes(Sphenoid)  
•  Laterally,  the  two  temporal  bones  
•  In  back,  the  occipital  bone  
•  Below,  the  sacrum  
Dural  aYachments  
Reciprocal  Tension  Membranes  
Malposi=on    
•  A  sacral  malposi=on  affects  the  
occipitoatlantoaxial  (OAA)  complex  just  as  
much  as  a  malposi=on  in  the  temporal  bone  
or  sphenoidal  bone  
•  The  consequences  are  even  greater  in  the  
spinal  column  because  the  sensi=ve  muscle  
spindles  there  have  an  exponen=al  effect  
Theory  
•  Balancing  CSF  circula=on  and  pressure  by  way  
of  releasing  the  reciprocal  tension  membrane  
of  the  Meningeal  System  or  the  Dural  tube    
•   Cranial  Sacral  Therapy  u=lizes  the  cranial  
bones  and  the  sacrum  as  levers  on  the  Dural  
tube  in  a  manner  that  through  trac=on  'folds'  
or  ‘riqs’  on  the  meningeal  membrane  are  
stretched  and  re-­‐aligned    
Important  Sutures  
1.  Coronal  Suture  –  between  frontal  &  Parietal  bones    
 Very  few  adult  cases  with  frontal/  Metopic  Suture    
2.  SagiYal  Suture  (Parietal  Suture)  between  the  2  Parietal  Bones    
 a.  Parietomastoid  Suture    
 b.  Sphenoparietal  Suture    
3.  Sphenofrontal  Suture    
 a.  Spheno  parietal  suture    
 b.  Spheno  squamosal  suture    
 c.  Spheno  zygoma=c  suture    
4.  Squamosal  Suture    
 a.  Sphenosquamosal  Suture    
 b.  Zygoma=c  temporal  Suture    
5.  Lambdoidal  Suture    
 a.  Occipitomastoid  Suture    
•  The  metopic  suture  (also  known  as  the  
median  frontal  suture)  is  a  type  of  calvarial  
suture.  It  is  oqen  associated  with  frontal  sinus  
agenesis  or  hypoplasia    

hYps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FrpVzSK23Q0    
Temporal  Bone  
•  Mastoid  part  
•  Squamous  part  
•  Tympanic  part  
•  Zygoma=c  part  
•  Styloid  process  (  anchor  for  muscles  and  ligaments)  
–  stylohyoid  ligament  
–  stylomandibular  ligament  
–  styloglossus  muscle    
–  stylohyoid  muscle    
–  stylopharyngeus  muscle    
Temporal  bone  
•  The  temporal  bone  ar=culates  with  five  skull  
bones:  
•  Occiput        
•  Parietals      
•  Sphenoid        
•  Zygomas  
•  Mandible    
Pterion    
Pterion    
•  the  region  where  the  frontal,  parietal,  temporal,  and  
sphenoid  bones  join  together  
•   The  pterion  is  known  as  the  weakest  part  of  the  skull  
•  The  anterior  division  of  the  middle  meningeal  artery  
runs  underneath  the  pterion  
•  Consequently,  a  trauma=c  blow  to  the  pterion  may  
rupture  the  middle  meningeal  artery  causing  an  
epidural  hematoma  
•  The  pterion  may  also  be  fractured  indirectly  by  blows  
to  the  top  or  back  of  the  head  that  place  sufficient  
force  on  the  skull  to  fracture  the  pterion  
Bevel  angle    
•  Perpendicular  
–  Frontal-­‐parietal  
•  Flat    
–  Temporal-­‐parietal  
Sutherland  model  
•  By  Garner  Sutherland  
–  Movement  of  cranial  sutures,  -­‐-­‐-­‐>  craniosacral  
concept  
–  Cranial  Rhythmic  Impulse(CRI)  
•  Is  the  mo=lity*  of  the  nervous  system  

*mobility  is  possibility  of  being  moved  


*mo=lity  is  move  by  itself  
•  The  CNS  has  been  found  to  expand  and  
contract  in  a  rhythmic  mo=on,  to  pulsate,  at  
the  rate  of  about  6-­‐12  =mes  per  minute,  or  
should  do  so  in  health    
•  To  allow  for  this  normal,  pulsing  movement,  
the  dural  membranes  must  be  free  and  
flexible  and  the  cranial  bones  need  to  move  in  
a  regular,  coordinated  paYern  
 
Receptors  
(eyes,  ears,  other  sense  organs)  
change  informa=on     from  outside  the  
body  (  for  example,  light  waves)  into  
electrical  impulses.  
Digitaliza=on    

59  
Recep=ve  field    

60  
S,mulus     Receptor   Loca,on   Recep,ve   Adapta,on    
field  
mechanorecep=on  
Touch,  pressure     Free  nerve  ending   Hair  root     Variable    
 
Small    
Texture,  steady   Merkel  receptor     Slow    
pressure   Superficial    
FluYer,  stroking     Meissner     Rapid    
Stretch     Ruffini     Deep   Large     Slow  
Vibra=on     Pacinian  corpuscle   Extremely  rapid  
Thermorecep=on    
Cold     Free  nerve  ending   Superficial     Small     Rapid    
Warm    
Nocicep=on    
Thermal         Small     Rapid    
Free  nerve  ending   Superficial    
Mechanical     Large     Slow    
Polymodal  (  chemical)   Large     Slow    
61  
Flexion  and  Extension  
•  Flexion  is  the  normal  mo=lity  movement  
–  Induces  a  swelling  sensa=on  
Flexion/Extension  
Cranial  Flexion  
Primary  Respiratory  Mechanism(PRM)  

•  Fluctua=on  of  CSF  


•  Ar=cular  mobility  of  the  cranial  bones  
•  Involuntary  mo=on  of  sacrum  
•  Inherent  mobility  of  brain  &  Sp.cord  
Meninges    
•  Dura  mater  
–  Outer  layer  
•  Fibrous  connec=ve  =ssue,  covering  inner  aspect  of  
cranial  bones,  extend  to  sutures  and  outer  surface  
–  Innermost  layer  
•  Falx  cerebri  
•  Tentorium  cerebelli  
–  Sinuses  between  them  
•  Arachnoid  
•  Pia  mater  
Dural  AYachments  
•  Cranial  vault,  crista  galli,  sella  turcica    
•  Foramen  magnum  to  C2-­‐C3  
•  Anterior  por=on  of  sacral  canal,  S2  (S3)  
•  Periosteum  of  coccyx  
Reciprocal  Tension  Membrane(RTM)  
•  Dural  membranes  are  under  constant  tension  
•  Movement  of  brain  &  CSF  transmit  to  
membranes  as  a  dynamic  shiqing  of  the  
reciprocal  tension  
Flexion    
•  The  occipital  bone  makes  a  backward  rota=on,  
and  the  sphenoidal  bone  makes  a  forward  
rota=on,  in  which  the  SBS  rises    
•  The  occipital  bone  slides  forward  over  the  atlas      
•  This  corresponds  to  a  mechanical  extension  of  
the  occiput  
•  The  ethmoidal  bone,  lying  in  front  of  the  
sphenoidal  bone,  makes  the  same  rota=on  as  the  
occipital  bone    
•  The  paired  or  peripheral  bones  make  an  external  
rota=on  during  flexion  
Flexion  &  Extension  
•  The  forward  movement  of  the  occipital  bone  
and  upward  
•  movement  of  the  basilar  part  shiq  the  
foramen  magnum  forward  
•  This  results  in  a  cranial  pull  on  the  spinal  dura  
mater  
•  Consequently,  the  base  of  the  sacrum  pulled  
upward  
•  Causes  sacrum  extension  &  spine  stretch  
Venous  Sinuses    
•  1/3rd  of  blood  in  brain