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TEXTO 1

CHECK YOUR TIME BEFORE YOU START. THE WHOLE PROCESS: READING PLUS
SOLVING EXERCISES SHOULDN'T TAKE LONGER THAN 4 HOURS.
Paradies, Yin: “Anti-Racism and Indigenous Australians”. Analyses of Social Issues and Public Policy,
Vol. 5, No. 1, (2005), pp. 1--28

ANTICIPATE
Remember this section can't take longer than 30 minutes!!

1) This is a very well organized text, let's take advantage of this fact. Read title, subtitles and abstract.

2) Write a general hypothesis. Remember to construct this hypothesis by thinking and relating the
concepts you have read up to here and by risking information that might be developed.
3) Where does the author conclude his analysis? Write the line numbers here.
4) What strategy did you use to find this information?
5) Read this section and write a specific hypothesis.
6) Read the text more thoroughly.

7) As he develops his arguments, does the author introduce positions that oppose his own? Indicate
two examples by writing the lines where they are stated here.

8) Define these concepts as the author uses them throughout the text:

a) racialization:

b) racial socialization:

9 ) Explain the following connectors. Indicate the kind of connection they establish and the
two ideas they connect. Abstract and conceptualize. Do not translate. Indicate why these connectors
are important in the organization of the text.
DESPITE: (line 92) Type of connection:
Concept 1:

Concept 2:

THUS: (line 148) Type of connection:


Concept 1:

Concept 2:

10) Indicate the five most important paragraphs in this excerpt. Consider 1 as the most important
and 5 the least important. We believe this exercise is useful because after having read the text in detail
it is important to make the effort to see the text as a whole again before writing your main idea. At the
same time this exercise will allow you to discriminate information on a hierarchical basis.
Indicate the lines of the paragraphs you have chosen and the main concept developed in each
paragraph.
Lines Main concept developed in the paragraph
1
2
3
4
5

12) Lexis: Underline examples of general academic vocabulary. If you do not remember, see the
Grammar Dictionary.

Despite this evidence there has been relatively little research conducted on anti-racism in relation to
Indigenous Australians. This article attempts to summarize and synthesize research on anti-racism that
is of relevance to Indigenous Australians. An overview of the theoretical issues in the study of anti-
racism drawing from sociology is followed by empirical findings from social psychology on the
effective approaches to anti-racism. Institutional and legal policy recommendations are then discussed
in relation to the Australian Indigenous context and, in conclusion, strategies for engendering political
will to combat racism in the current neoliberal capitalist climate are explored.

13- Provide an English equivalent for the following words:

Investigación:
Problemas teóricos
Evidencia
Políticas/abordajes efectivos
Estrategias
Descubrimientos empíricos

INTERNALIZE:

14) Write the main idea of the text in one well-written sentence. This must include the most
important concepts that are dealt with in the text. Remember this is an argumentative text; make sure
you are introducing the author’s proposal. The sentence will be complex and will indicate hierarchy.

15) Draw the outline for this text. Remember you should provide an organic, “visual” picture.
Indicate hierarchies and interconnections of concepts. Include concepts present in your main idea,
other important concepts, subideas and supporting material.

THINKING ALOUD
1) Did exercise 7 help you to discover the line of argumentation? What strategies do you usually
use to detect the argumentation of a text?
2) Did the abstract help you anticipate text organization? Why? Why not?
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TEXT 2
Coad, Jane; Evans Ruth: “Reflections on Practical Approaches to Involving Children and Young People
in the Data Analysis Process”, Children & Society. Volume 22, (2008) pp. 41–52, DOI:10.1111/j.1099-
0860.2006.00062

ANTICIPATE (30')
1) Read bibliography, title, subtitles and abstract.
2) Write a general hypothesis.
3) Suppose you just have one hour to read this paper, which sections would you choose to read?
Why?
4) Now read the first sentence of each paragraph and underline/circle/highlight key words. This
exercise will help you to spot the text main themes, its theoretical framework and the authors'
stance.
5) Draw a sketch (linear outline) that will follow text organization and will include the key
words you underlined in exercise 3. These key words should be connected by icons (arrows,
lines, etc)

Read the text more thoroughly. (2hs 30')


6) In line 109 the authors say “Having discussed the key issues........” what key issues do they
refer to?
7) In the section “Critical reflections on engaging young people in data analysis” the authors
consider different topics connected with including young people in data analysis. What are the
main conclusions as regards each of these topics?
a) Balance of power between children and adults in decision-making:
b) Training, support and ethical considerations:
c) Adequate time and resources:

9) Explain the following connectors. Indicate the kind of connection they establish and the two
ideas they connect. Abstract and conceptualize. Do not translate.

WHILST: (line 184) Type of connection:


Concept 1:

Concept 2:

HOWEVER: (line 308) Type of connection:


Concept 1:

Concept 2:

12- Underline general academic vocabulary in these sections. Make a list and provide a Spanish
equivalent for each word.
Abstract
This article reflects on key methodological issues emerging from children and young people’s involvement in
data analysis processes. We outline a pragmatic framework illustrating different approaches to engaging
children, using two case studies of children’s experiences of participating in data analysis. The article highlights
methods of engagement and important issues such as the balance of power between adults and children,
training, support, ethical considerations, time and resources. We argue that involving children in data analysis
processes can have several benefits, including enabling a greater understanding of children’s perspectives and
helping to prioritise children’s agendas in policy and practice.

Introduction

The growth of research techniques that seek to engage children and young people has generated
widespread interdisciplinary and global interest and now constitutes an important area of study in the
social sciences. This has implications for professionals, policy-makers and researchers who wish to
gain insight into children’s perspectives in order to provide them with services and facilities that meet
their needs (Willow, 2002). However, the success of this participation will be dependent on the
development of strategies which both engage and facilitate meaningful input from children. The
literature to date is, however, limited with regard to how children can be involved in the analysis stage
of the research. This article reflects on practical approaches to engaging children in the data analysis
process and draws on empirical evidence in two case studies to illustrate some of the emerging issues
and challenges.

INTERNALIZE (1 hour)

10) Write the main idea of the text in one well-written sentence. This must include the most
important concepts that are dealt with in the text. Remember this is an argumentative text; make sure
you are introducing the authors' proposal. The sentence will be complex and will indicate hierarchy.

11) Draw the outline for this text. Remember you should provide an organic, “visual” picture.
Indicate hierarchies and interconnections of concepts. Include concepts present in your main idea, other
important concepts, subideas and supporting material.

THINKING ALOUD

1) How long did it take you to complete the exercises? Was the time we suggested enough?
2) Which are the exercises that take you longer to solve?

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TEXT 3
Tavits, Margit: “Clarity of Responsibility and Corruption”, American Journal of Political Science, Vol.
51, No. 1, January 2007, Pp. 218–229 C 2007, Midwest Political Science Association ISSN 0092-5853

ANTICIPATE (30 minutes)

1) Read bibliography, titles, subtitles and abstract.


2) Write a general hypothesis.
3) Read the first sentence of each paragraph and choose the paragraphs that seem to contain
important information.
4) Taking into account the organization of the text and the topic, choose an anticipating activity
you consider suitable to write your specific hypothesis.
5) Write your anticipating activity and your specific hypothesis.

6) Read the text more thoroughly. (2hours)


7) Let' s work on paragraph conceptualization now. Write the main idea of each of the sections.
If you find more than one choose the one you consider more relevant.

Section Main idea


Introduction

The effect of
political
institutions:
Previous Literature

Clarity of
responsibility

Indicators of clarity
of responsibility

Analysis

Individual
components of
clarity
Conclusions

8) The author of this text uses a lot of connectors to link his ideas. Choose two relevant
connectors and specify what ideas they join. These connectors should have different
meanings.
.Connector: .....................line..................Type of connection:.............................................
Concept 1:

Concept 2:
INTERNALIZE ( 1 hour)

9) Write the main idea of the text in one well-written sentence. This must include the most
important concepts that are dealt with in the text. Remember this is an argumentative text; make sure
you are introducing the authors' proposal. The sentence will be complex and will indicate hierarchy.

10) Draw the outline for this text. Remember you should provide an organic, “visual” picture.
Indicate hierarchies and interconnections of concepts. Include concepts present in your main idea, other
important concepts, subideas and supporting material.

THINKING ALOUD

1) Did you resort to the tables to understand the text?


2) How did you deal with the choice of important paragraphs in the Anticipation? What in the
paragraph told you that it was important?

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TEXT 4

Best Susan: “The serial spaces of Ana Mendieta”, Art History – ISSN 0 141 – 6790 – Vol.30 NO 1-
February 2007 – pp.57-82

ANTICIPATE ( 45')

1) Read bibliography, titles and subtitles and have a look at the photos. Write a general
hypothesis.
2) Scan the INTRODUCTION (notice that the author advances the organization of her
argumentation in the last paragraph) and the last paragraph of the section TEMPORALITY,
SERIALITY and underline key words. Write them here.
3) Use these key words to write a specific hypothesis.
4) Read the text more thoroughly. ( 3 hours )
5) Each of the sections of the text introduces different debates around opposed interpretations of
Ana Mendieta's series. Specify what the debates are in each case and what the author's
position is.

SECTION:

DEBATE:

INTERPRETATIONS:

AUTHOR'S OPINION:
6) Does the author include Ana Mendieta's opinions about her own work in the text? Or her
opinion about the different debates her work has aroused? Which are these opinions?
INTERNALIZE (1 hour)

7) Write the main idea of the text in one well-written sentence. This must include the most
important concepts that are dealt with in the text. Remember this is an argumentative text; make sure
you are introducing the authors' proposal. The sentence will be complex and will indicate hierarchy.

8) Draw the outline for this text. Remember you should provide an organic, “visual” picture.
Indicate hierarchies and interconnections of concepts. Include concepts present in your main idea, other
important concepts, subideas and supporting material.

THINKING ALOUD

1) This is the first text that we read in PDF.


a) Did the format add any difficulties to the reading process? Which one/ones?
b) Did it provide any advantage? Which one/ones?