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Keene State College

Music Department
Teacher Candidate Assessment of Performance (TCAP)
MU 475/MU 476 Music Student Teaching

STRAND 2: Planning and Preparing

OVERVIEW

Practicum students will design a learning segment consisting of 3-5 lessons that promote students’
development of a music skill with the pre-approval of the cooperating teacher. During weeks 2-3 of
the placement, student teachers will present their created lessons and assessment(s) to the
cooperating teacher for review and discussion. The cooperating teacher will offer suggestions,
edits or adjustments to the lesson plans and assessment(s). Following this discussion, revise the
lesson plans incorporating this feedback. This lesson will be taught during weeks 4-5 (timeline may
vary by placement). Submit the final draft of the lesson plans, instructional materials, and
assessment(s) along with completing the ‘Planning and Preparing’ commentary.

Purpose

The Planning and Preparing Strand provides evidence of your ability to develop plans that:

 Support student learning of artistic perceptions, creative expressions, historical &
cultural contexts, aesthetic valuing, and/or connections, relations, and applications

 Make the curriculum accessible to all students

 Provide opportunities for students to demonstrate their understanding of the
standards/objectives

Insert Lesson Plans and Assessment(s) HERE: *Lesson plan 3 is a work in progress.*
General Music Lesson Plan

Music Concept/Title of Lesson: Music Theory - Intervals
Grade Level: 11-12
Date & Time: Tuesday April 2nd 2018
Objectives: Students will be able to demonstrate their understanding of perfect, major,
minor,
augmented, and diminished intervals.
Students will be able to assess their knowledge in a formative setting.

Materials:
 SMARTBoard
 SMARTNotebook
 Internet (or wireless hotspot)
 Whiteboard Table in HDHS Music Classroom
 Sharpies and Whiteboard Markers
 Student Chromebooks
 Personal Laptop (for SMARTNotebook)
 Bingo Cards
 Bingo Calling Cards

minor. they place a bingo ‘chip’ on the interval. This will allow me to further adjust my lessons to see what it is that will help the concept stick. whether right or wrong. I will observe how each student answers a question. I will then be able to tell who understands the concept.C. o Have a piano and an interval chart on the slide as well. o Play until you run out of cards. and diminished intervals. o Scan worksheet into SMARTNotebook and have students complete assigned exercises. and apply selected teacher-provided or personally-developed criteria to assess and refine the technical and expressive aspects of evolving drafts leading to final versions.Intervals Grade Level: 11-12 Date & Time: Thursday April 4th 2018 Objectives: Students will be able to demonstrate their understanding of perfect.net  Announcements Assessment: Formative. or who is still not close to understanding the concept.IIa Identify. Have students demonstrate to you their use of the resources to find the answer. Materials:  SMARTBoard  SMARTNotebook  Internet (or wireless hotspot)  Whiteboard Table in HDHS Music Classroom  Sharpies and Whiteboard Markers  Student Chromebooks  Personal Laptop (for SMARTNotebook) Procedure:  Have class do exercises on MusicTheory. and the quantity of the interval as displayed on the calling card o If the student has the interval. describe. o Switch cards until each student has had each card. I will write down what I observe in order keep track of improvement or otherwise.1. o ‘Winner’ of each round will receive a small music meme as a prize. General Music Lesson Plan Music Concept/Title of Lesson: Music Theory .  Bingo Markers  Prize music memes Procedure:  Have students complete Exercise ____ on their Theory Worksheet. major. NAfME National Standards:  Curriculum Standard 4: Compose and arrange music within specified guidelines.  Curriculum Standard 5: Read and notate music NH Curriculum Frameworks:  MU:Cr3.  Have class do exercises on MusicTheory. who is on the right track but doesn’t quite have it. Students will be able to assess their knowledge in a formative setting.net  Horse Race Flashcards . augmented.  Interval Bingo o Teacher calls the clef.

o Teacher holds up flashcards with intervals on them. General Music Lesson Plan Music Concept/Title of Lesson: Music Theory . This continues until somebody gets a correct answer. describe. o If the student thinks they have the correct answer. they get to tap their horse on the SMARTBoard. or who is still not close to understanding the concept. Students will be able to assess their knowledge in a formative setting. sharps. This will allow me to further adjust my lessons to see what it is that will help the concept stick.C. and flats  Practice exercises on Writing Intervals sheet  Announcements Assessment: Formative. and diminished intervals.  Introduce descending intervals o Give a few examples of descending intervals.com/app/dashboard/home  Pokémon Review Game  Announcements . o First horse to cross the finish line wins. I will write down what I observe in order keep track of improvement or otherwise. who is on the right track but doesn’t quite have it. augmented.IIa Identify. and apply selected teacher-provided or personally-developed criteria to assess and refine the technical and expressive aspects of evolving drafts leading to final versions. Materials:  SMARTBoard  SMARTNotebook  Internet (or wireless hotspot)  Whiteboard Table in HDHS Music Classroom  Sharpies and Whiteboard Markers  Student Chromebooks  Personal Laptop (for SMARTNotebook) Procedure:  Have class do exercises on MusicTheory. whether right or wrong.1.  Curriculum Standard 5: Read and notate music NH Curriculum Frameworks:  MU:Cr3. minor. If they’re incorrect. o Play this at least twice. NAfME National Standards:  Curriculum Standard 4: Compose and arrange music within specified guidelines. major.net  Have class do exercises on https://utheory. I will observe how each student answers a question. the next person to ‘buzz in’ gets a chance.Intervals Grade Level: 11-12 Date & Time: Monday April 8th 2018 Objectives: Students will be able to demonstrate their understanding of perfect. I will then be able to tell who understands the concept. RESOURCES CAN BE USED. they should knock on the table twice to ‘buzz in’ o If the student who ‘buzzed in’ is correct.  Staff paper on SMARTBoard with notes.

 The central focus of my lesson with Theory is thoroughly reviewing intervals. historical & cultural contexts.  Curriculum Standard 5: Read and notate music NH Curriculum Frameworks:  MU:Cr3.  MU:Cr3. You can address each prompt separately. who is on the right track but doesn’t quite have it. describe. This will allow me to further adjust my lessons to see what it is that will help the concept stick. and explain why they successfully impact the final composition and presentation. and apply selected teacher-provided or personally-developed criteria to assess and refine the technical and expressive aspects of evolving drafts leading to final versions. I will observe how each student answers a question. whether right or wrong.C.C. as long as all prompts are addressed.IIb Describe the selected contexts and performance mediums for presenting personal works. and apply selected teacher- provided or personally-developed criteria to assess and refine the technical and expressive aspects of evolving drafts leading to final versions. or a combination of both. and applications? 1. Identify the central focus of the learning segment and National Core Arts Standards that will be addressed in the lesson. Standards: NAfME National Standards:  Curriculum Standard 4: Compose and arrange music within specified guidelines.2. Assessment: Formative. which is different from my original TCAP plan.IIa Identify. We came to the conclusion that my students were not prepared to move on. TOPIC A: How do the plans support student learning of artistic perceptions. .C. and/or connections. Planning and Preparing Commentary Write a commentary that addresses the following prompts.1. Each bolded overarching question corresponds to a rubric that will be used to assess the depth and quality of your responses. relations. or who is still not close to understanding the concept.  Curriculum Standard 5: Read and notate music NH Curriculum Frameworks:  MU:Cr3. so I have rewritten all of my lesson plans to fit around my new goal for this class. NAfME National Standards:  Curriculum Standard 4: Compose and arrange music within specified guidelines. creative expressions. through a holistic essay. I will write down what I observe in order keep track of improvement or otherwise.IIa Identify. I will then be able to tell who understands the concept.1. describe. Explain why the content of the learning segment is important for your particular students to learn. aesthetic valuing.

as those are two different methods of learning to diversify the options of how students can learn. Once I’ve circulated and looked at each individuals paper to see how they did. to help them reach answers during our review work. 4.  During these lessons I will be using a variety of methods to try and get my point across.e. But if they haven’t retained enough where I’m confident in their abilities. artistic perception. We do it as a group so I can see them work together as peers because many times. it is easier to retain concepts if you were having fun while learning them. Why are you implementing this pedagogical approach for the learning segment?  I begin with MusicTheory. and assessments and how they build understanding of the central focus of the learning segment. Justify the pedagogical choices (i.2. We will begin class every day with review exercises on MusicTheory. such as their half-step charts and piano diagrams. and/or connections/relations/applications. Describe how the central focus addresses multiple dimensions of learning through any of these aspects: clear connections among creative expression. but do they’re learning and having fun while doing it. I project the sheet on the board and have them write in what they got for and assigned problem. and if it is indeed wrong we discuss what steps they may have missed in the process of getting there.net so they can access the knowledge of their resource use. Then we move on to class work as an individual.  The worksheets on their own are used for me to assess what they can do on their own. we will have very similar tactics given my methods this time around work. we need to go back and work through things to make sure they get to where they need to be. as needed. Reference the instructional materials you have included. 3. We then move on to a game to make it so they aren’t working to the point of getting burnt out. I hope this approach will aid in their ability to remember and retain what they have learned. understanding music in historical and cultural context. a peer explaining something can really help. TOPIC B: How do the plans make the curriculum accessible to the students in the class? . If they’ve retained what they should have. and to see if they are accurately using their resources to get to their answer. so I don’t burn them out early in the game. aesthetic valuing. Once I add descending intervals into the mix. methodology and sequence of steps) that you are making in the planning and preparation of this learning segment by making specific connections to scholarly and/or professional literature.net so I can see how much they’ve retained. which we then go over as a group so we can discuss how we got our answers and fix any misunderstood concepts as a whole.  Playing review games is simply a tactic for learning while making it fun. The students will be using resources they have. Refer to your lesson plans to describe the progression of instructional strategies. They won’t retain anything if they’re burnt out. learning tasks. so making it fun for them may aid in that process. Plus.  Most of my lessons from this point forward with this class will be review in order to get the concept to stick. The review will be done using worksheets and games. we discuss how we got there to make sure they understand the process. we can move on. If its wrong or right.

d. their discussions with their peers. We just need to get it all to a level where they can easily figure things out without constant poking and prodding from myself and Heidi. All of these are formative. We build off of past activities that have worked well.5. b. and their success in the learning games. they as a whole are much slower than past theory classes. Make connections to the description of your students provided in the Contextualizing Strand (* this should be discussed with cooperating teacher during lesson plan review): a. However. and repeating past sections gives the repetition to allow students to keep the information fresh in their minds. so we have to work by trial and error to figure out a method that works for these specific kids. Games give them the chance to learn without really knowing they’re learning. TOPIC C: What opportunities do students have to demonstrate their understanding of the standards/objectives? 6. while the rest of the class listens and takes in what the other students are providing. b. They have learned the concepts within this classroom under the instruction of Heidi. c. These assessments provide access to all students (including those with diverse learning needs) to demonstrate learning relative to specific student standards/objectives  Breaking it down and taking it slow allows for students with diverse learning needs to understand better what is happening. Explaining how your plans draw on students’ prior learning as well as experiential backgrounds or interests to help students reach the learning segment’s standards/objectives  I draw on students past learning just on the mere fact that this is all review. and add extra things to them to make them work for this classes particular needs. You will provide feedback to students on their learning . so I know its there. and then they discuss their answers and how they got them. Review the collection of formative and summative assessment tasks throughout your learning segment and explain how: a. Clearly articulating how scaffolding or other structured forms of support in the plans provide access to grade-level standards/objectives  None of my theory students have diagnosed problems of any kind so there are no plans set up for me to follow. These assessments allow your students’ to demonstrate depth of understanding relative to specific student standards/objectives  The students understanding will show itself by their work on their worksheets. These assessments access both productive (speaking/writing) and receptive (listening/reading) modalities to monitor student understanding  The students do their own work on paper and answer them on the board. and once the concept is clear we can move forward and take a more summative assessment.

and other music techniques. I can talk them through where they may have gone wrong in their problem solving.  “How many half steps from ____ to ____?” i. Highlight the level that best represents your work in the areas below: . Consider the language demands of the oral and written tasks in which you plan to have students engage as well as the various levels of English language proficiency related to classroom tasks as described in the Contextualizing Strand. and if they got the wrong quantity. I can guide them through by simply saying “How many half steps?” b. Why are these important for students to understand and use in completing classroom tasks in the learning segment? Which students?  “What is the quantity of the interval? What can you use to figure that out?” i. Identify words and phrases (if appropriate) that you will emphasize in this learning segment including music terminology. a. and assessment support academic language development? 7. How do key learning tasks in your plans build on each other to support students’ academic language development?  My key learning task is starting each lesson back before the concept being taught that day. Without just telling the students their answer is wrong. *** Please self-assess your Strand 2 submission using the rubrics below. I can tell them this to get them to remember what to do to find the right note for the interval. instruction. I can help the students reach the correct answer by talking through the process step by step. and that they get the right idea in trying to find the right answer. symbolic notation. even if they get the wrong one. c. Students use the music staff to count the quantitative distance between the notes. TOPIC D: Academic Language How does the candidate identify the language demands of learning tasks and assessments relative to the students’ current levels of academic language proficiency? How do the candidate’s planning. How will you assess students’ academic language development?  I will assess them based on whether or not they can identify the written intervals. This has the students use their keyboard and half-steps chart to find the quality of the interval.  During the work alone/respond as a group time. If the student got the incorrect quality. and if they are able to write their own using their resources and get the right answer. I need to be sure that they remember the resources are there for them to use.

and learning tasks. understanding music aesthetic valuing. connections/relations/ and/or and and applications. and applications? Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Level 4  The standards. connections/relations/ connections/relation connections/relation  A progression of applications. or prior or interests to help well-integrated have little or no learning to help students reach the instructional relationship to the students reach the learning segment’s strategies that learning segment’s learning segment’s standards/objectives. mostly separate assessments is learning tasks and tasks. social.  Learning tasks or the  Both learning tasks learning objectives. interests. s/applications as s/applications as learning tasks and  A progression of separate tasks. linguistic. 4 Such as multiple ways of representing content. experiential backgrounds  Plans include or prior learning2 that interests. historical & cultural contexts.  Plans for implementation address a OR  Plans for the of learning tasks include variety of  There are significant implementation of scaffolding or other specific content inaccuracies learning tasks include structured forms of student in plans that will lead to support3 to help support4 to provide learning needs. backgrounds. creative expression. i. artistic perception. is primarily one. in historical and understanding music understanding understanding cultural context. circulating to monitor student performance during independent or group work.. are tailored to standards/objectives. How do the plans support student learning of artistic perceptions. sectional rehearsals. modeling strategies. checking on particular students. set of assessment and the set of learning tasks. . struggle with the standards/objectives. perception. creative expressions. expression. and cultural context. How do the plans make the curriculum accessible to the students in the class? Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Level 4  Plans refer to students’  Plans draw on  Plans draw on students’ All components of experiential students’ experiential prior learning as well as Level 3 plus: backgrounds1. aesthetic valuing. dimensional. creative expression. central focus of the understandings of learning segment. standards/objectives.e. sources to enhance curriculum 1 Cultural. multiple content. aesthetic valuing. videos. artistic perception.e. student students who often access to grade-level  Plans include misunderstandings. and cultural context. learning objectives. in historical and music in historical music in historical and/or cultural context. and tasks focus on assessment tasks assessments either assessments have multiple dimensions of focus on multiple have no central an overall focus that learning through clear dimensions of learning focus or a one.. but with planned to build assessments guides vague connections understanding of the students to build deep between them. connections among i. and/or connections. artistic aesthetic valuing. relations.Planning and Preparing Rubrics NH TCAP: Music PLANNING AND PREPARING: ESTABLISHING A BALANCED INSTRUCTIONAL FOCUS 1. economic 2 In or out of school 3 Such as strategic groupings of students. the central focus of the learning segment.  The standards. creative expression. connections among through clear dimensional focus. aesthetic valuing. represent represent creative artistic perception. PLANNING AND PREPARING: MAKING CONTENT ACCESSIBLE 2. guest performers. recordings.

methods and the understandings. opportunities to significant one or more  The assessments access both demonstrate mismatch between standards/ productive understandings and one or more objectives go (performing/speaking/writing skills relative to the assessment beyond ) and receptive standards/objectives instruments or surface-level (listening/reading) modalities . to monitor student standards/objectives understanding. etc. PLANNING AND PREPARING: DESIGNING ASSESSMENTS 3. recordings. what is measured by assessed. students to show some depth and/or designed to assessments. .  Assessments are students to learn learn what is  The assessments allow modified. adapted.  It is not clear of understanding or skill with allow students with OR that the respect to the special needs  There is a assessment of standards/objectives. accessibility such as modeling. videos. What opportunities do students have to demonstrate their understanding of the standards/objectives? Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Level 4  There are limited  Opportunities  Opportunities are provided for All components of opportunities are provided for students to learn what is Level 3 plus: provided for students to assessed. being assessed.