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Sonata quasi una Fantasia.

To Countess JULIA GlICCIARDI. Op. 27, N9 2.

Abbreviations: M. T. signifies Main TheniPi S. T., Siib-Themei CI. T., Closing Theme; D. G., Development-
grodii; K., Return; Tr., Transition; Md. T., Mid -Theme; Fji., Episode.

I. Adag-io sostenuto. (J = fii.) L.van BEETHOVEN.


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a) It is evident that the highest part, as the melody, requires a firmer touch than the accompanying
triplet -figure-, and the first note in the latter must never produce the effect of a doubling of the mel-

ody in the lower octave.


b) A more frequent use of the pedal than is marked by the editor, and limited here to the most essen-
tial passages, is allowable; it is not advisable, however, to take the original directions sem/>re senza sorditii
'^*^*'°"* dampers) too
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a) The player must g^uard agrainst carrying- his hand back with over-anxious haste. For, in any event, a
strict pedantic observance of time is out of place in this period, which has rather the character of an
improvisation.
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a) The notes with a dash above them may properlj- be dwelt upon in such a way as to g-ive them the effect
of suspensions, e. g., ; in fact, a utilization of the inner parts, in accordance with

the laws of euphony and the course of the modulation, is recommended throughout the piece.
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147 JEMIU I.|,;,(AUV Of IHB PfiRPOBiflNG


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a) A very common amateurisn error. - which, we regret to say, is countenanced here and in other pla-
ces by Herr Lebert's otherwise so meritorious edition — is the notion that a closer legato is obtainable,
in descending octave - passages, by a change of fingers. Precisely the opposite effect is produced by the

following manipulation: i-, the higher part, the one most strongly affecting the ear, suffers a most

sensible interruption. A slight muscular stretching of the palm of the hand, which is no harder to learn
than shifting on a stringed instrument, will amply fulfil all requirements.
b) An undelayed attack (of the Finale) is quite as indispensable to the general effect as in the two repris-
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a) This passage, up to the abrupt stroke on the fourth beat in measure 2, must be
ethereal lifrhtness in the very smoothest j/ii/no. and (if only foi the sake of distinctness as
little /r^r//f>

as is in any way compatible with the preat rapidity of the movement.


b) The second stroke has only the significance of an echo, the repercussion of the first. In
measure 8 it
is different, owing to its leading over to new matter.

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a) This grace is written out in conformity with its undeviating" mode of execution. Avoid a repeat ed ac-
centuation of the lowest bass note; an accent is needful only on its first entrance.
b) The rapid movement, conjoined with required exertion of strength, hardly admits of a long-er trill
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a) These thirds can "be broug-ht out with perfect distinctness only by

in strict time would be incor-


hammering-out of these "passionate" eighth-notes
b)°"ft il se^f- evident that a
the first half of the measure with stronger emphasis (and hence
greater
rect in an ;«sthetic sense. By playing
second eighth-note, and somewhat
freedom), as is demanded in particular by the peculiar rhythmic importance of the
psychical agitation, receive due con-
accelerating the second half, both the unity of the measure as such, and also the
feeling, is probably to be understood
sideration. C; This melodic phrase, whose performance demands the intensest

thus i.e., more singingly sustained than the marking denotes.

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a) The literal execution is:

b) The repetition prescribed here according- to custom impresses us as a chilling- tautolog-y.


c) This movement-fipure, like the similar one in the right hand 4 measures further on, must be played en-
tirely without accentuation; only in the principal modulations, e. p.. the transition from F}t-minor to G- major
and back, individual characteristic intervals may be sligrhtly emphasized. On the other hand, a transformation
of the figures into an indistinct tremolo •«-ould,of course, be wholly out of place.

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a) In thp analopons passapo in fhc first liivision, this period embraces 4 measures, whereas it has but 3
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a) This soconil hold (pnHse) may he sustained longer than the prtMCilirg. Further, a slipht rest must inter-
vene (for acoustic reasons, apart from esthetic ones) before the reentr.ince of the first subject, .is is in-
dicated by a O over the bar.
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a) There is no irreverence, even to the letter of the composer's work, in enhancing- in analogy with the D- minor
Sonata, Op. 31, N92- the accent marked on the fourth beat by a chord struck with the left hand.

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a) The Editor performs this cadenza with the following- rhyth mic divisions, the required ritardaiido then resulting

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Adag-io

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animato e tempestosn

a) Adnffio: twice as slow as the yz-ff^/o- movement, but not slower.


b) Avoid a cresrendu in the preceding measures; the forte must enter with instantaneous abruptness, giving-
us a reproduction of the principal divisions in miniature— the deep melancholy of the Adaffi", the wild des -

peration of the Finnle.

lltftRS 180