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FACULTY OF ENGINEERING AND THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT

DEPARTMENT OF QUALITY AND OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT

LEARNER GUIDE

OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT PRACTICE 3


OPP3YR3 & PNP31-1

NATIONAL DIPLOMA: OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT

ACADEMIC YEAR

2017

Compiled by:
MS K. MUSHAVHANAMADI
M-TECH, B-TECH, CERT (OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT), ND (PRODUCTION
MANAGEMENT), CERT (ENTERPRISE RESOURCE PLANNING)

COPYRIGHT RESERVED © 2017


SCHOOL OF MECHANICAL AND INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING
UNIVERSITY OF JOHANNESBURG

1
Student Welcome Letter

Dear Student

Welcome to FEBE, Department of Quality and Operations Management and particular


Operations Management Practice: – OPP3YR3/ PNP31-1
This Learner Guide is intended to assist a learner in understanding the general scope of the
experiential learning module and his/ her commitments required to pass the module.
The learner guide is a contract between the University and the learner with the University
being represented by the Lecturer.
As you know by now, you will be regarded as an adult learner and treated as such. Your
lecturer will perform the role as your learning facilitator, to enable you to achieve the
learning outcomes of this module.
You will be required to work individually and in certain circumstances together in groups. The
knowledge which you obtained from the theory component of all you subjects and module will
serve to provide you with background principles and understanding to complete your
experiential training component.
To enable you to evaluate and apply these principles in an experiential mode it will be expected
of you to conduct practical workplace exposure and prepare as such a profile of evidence
illustrating your understanding and “practical / workplace” experience thereof.
This means that if you do not prepare the theory /practical you will be seriously
disadvantaged regarding achieving experiential training outcomes. You will be assessed on
theory, application and workplace experience in your projects and case studies with a stronger
emphasis on application, as the experiential training approach is practical.
You are strongly advised to inform your lecturer / facilitator if you cannot attend experiential
training feedback / consultation sessions. Individual and group consultation times will be
arranged during your experiential training “period”.

It is important that you will give all your contact details such as telephone / cell phone and e-
mail address to your experiential lecturer / facilitator. Also ensure that you provide all
contact details of all your workplace providers.
It is also advisable to get a class friend/learning partner whom you can consult should you be
unable to attend a session. This person will keep you up to date with important information.
Make sure you get this friend’s telephone number, so that you can contact him / her prior to
the next information / consultation sessions. Also make arrangements with the friend to
collect handouts and formative feedback on your behalf.
Ensure that Administration have your correct contact details as the University will not take
responsibility if you cannot be contacted to inform you of any changes that might affects you.

Please ensure that your name appears on the official class list and that you are correctly
registered. Good Luck for 2017

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INTRODUCTION

The Student Guide is intended to assist a student in understanding the scope of the
modules and his/ her commitments required to pass the module.

The student guide is a contract between the university and the student with the
university being represented by the Lecturer.

As you know by now, you will be regarded as adult students and treated as such. Your
lecturer will perform the role as your learning facilitator, to enable you to achieve the
learning outcomes of this module.

You will be required to work individually. The theory will serve to provide you with
background principles and understanding. To enable you to evaluate and apply these
principles in an experiential and practical mode it will be expected of you to search
and research to demonstrate your understanding and application of advanced
operation management principles. This means that if you do not prepare the theory
beforehand you will be seriously disadvantaged of achieving the learning outcomes of
the modules. You will be assessed on both theory and application as the approach is
career oriented.

Take note that there will only be one assessment for this module. It is required of
students to submit a portfolio of evidence of training signed by mentors before the
end of October, Failure to follow this instruction will get zero. A student must obtain
a final mark of 50% to pass or to be found competent for experiential learning.

Please consult your work schedule within this learning guide. Make sure that you
know when, on what work, what type of assessment method will be used and the
criteria you will be evaluated against.

Take note that:


 The entire document must be submitted when submitting final portfolio bind
document.
 All criteria’s must be signed by mentor(s)
 All criteria’s require a brief evaluation report by mentor(s)
 Plagiarism document must be signed and included in final portfolio

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GLOSSARY OF
TERMS

Student A registered UJ Student


Lecturer A person appointed by UJ to conduct,
facilitate and assess a specific module /
subject
Assessment Judging the degree to which a student has met
predetermined criteria. Students must show
that they can do certain tasks in a prescribed
way and that they know the context of the
task and why it must be performed in a certain
way.
Continuous Evaluation Continuous Evaluation is a more encompassing
concept it constitutes a sub set of evaluations
and can make use of assessment techniques
for evaluation purposes
Moderation A process whereby the results of assessment
from more than one source are compared
together and against an agreed, accepted
standard.
Moderator An approved person to conduct moderation,
usually with considerable experience in the
curriculum area, they often help with training
and with the interpretation of the curriculum
Criterion references The candidate is assessed against a set of pre-
established criteria. These criteria represent
a consensus of opinion over what forms the
basis of an acceptable standard.
There are only two possible outcomes for a
candidate. They can either be judged
competent against the criteria or not yet
competent against the criteria
Evidence Information from a variety of sources which
proves a students competence or ability

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Validity The assessment process and the evidence
required should be appropriate to what is
being assessed
Reliability The judgments confirms that the candidate’s
performance will be of a consistent standard in
a range of different context
The same judgment would be made about the
candidate by the same assessor on a number of
different occasions
The same judgment would be made about the
candidate by other assessors
Sufficiency The evidence is enough to prove competency
Authenticity The evidence is genuine and has been produced
by the candidate
Currency The evidence can prove that the candidate is
up to date on current methods and equipment
required in the appropriate occupational area.
Formative Assessment Assessment that forms their development
towards a certain desired goal. It is ongoing,
continuous feedback for improvement the
purpose is to diagnose areas of improvement
and to plan
Summative Assessment Final summing up achievements at a particular
point in time. The purpose is to describe and
accredit the student

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Academic Calendar 2017

Activity Dates
Off-site (online) student registration for 2017 Mon 2017-01-09 – Fri 2017-02-03

SSA FSA (exam) of 2nd Semester 2016 Mon 2017-01-09 – Fri 2017-01-13

First year seminar Tue 2017-01-31 – Fri 2017-02-03

First Term (Quarter) Mon 2017-02-06 – Thu 2017-03-24

Mid Semester Break Sat 2017-04-08 – Mon 2017-04-17

Mon 2017-03-27 – Fri 2017-04-07 and


Second Term (Quarter)
Tue 2017-04-18 – Fri 2017-05-19

Study Break for Students Sat 2017-05-20 – Fri 2017-05-26 *

1st Semester Final Assessment (FSAO/Exam) Sat 2017-05-27 – Tue 2017-06-13

Winter Holidays for Students Fri 2017-06-16 – Sun 2017-07-09


Mid-Year Supplementary Assessments (SSA
Mon 2017-07-17 – Fri 2017-07-21
FSAOs)

Third Term (Quarter) Mon 2017-07-24 – Fri 2017-09-08

Mid Semester Break Sat 2017-09-09 – Sun 2017-09-17

Fourth Term (Quarter) Mon 2017-09-18 – Fri 2017-11-03

Study Break for Students Sat 2017-11-04 – Fri 2017-11-10

2nd Semester Final Assessment (FSAO/Exam) Sat 2017-11-11 – Tue 2017-11-28

Summer Holidays for Students From Wed 2017-11-29


End of Year Supplementary Assessments Mon 2018-01-08 – Fri 2018-01-12
(SSA FSAOs)

* The Final Assessments (Exams) of 31 May and 1 June will move to the Study period –
23 & 24 May respectively due to religious reasons. 31 May and 1 June will then be
available for study purposes.

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PLAGIARISM

UNIVERSITY OF JOHANNESBURG
FACULTY: ENGINEERING AND THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT
DEPT: QUALITY AND OPERATIONS
WARNING ABOUT PLAGIARISM
The Department of Quality and Operations Management at the University of Johannesburg

places great emphasis on integrity and ethical conduct in the preparation of assignments. It is

very important to us that all of our students know how secondary material should be used, as

well as the scholarly method of presenting and acknowledging references.

Plagiarism is the unacknowledged use of the words or ideas of others. It is tantamount to

academic theft, and is therefore a very serious offence. To plagiarise means to use the words

or ideas of another to create the false impression that these words and ideas are your own. In

order to avoid committing plagiarism, you must, at all times, acknowledge the source from

which you have borrowed certain words or ideas. If after reading this warning about

plagiarism you are still uncertain about how to avoid committing plagiarism, you should speak to

your lecturer about it before your assignment is submitted. Students who submit assignments

in which plagiarism can be demonstrated will be referred to student affairs for disciplinary

action.

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Student Profile

FACULTY OF ENGINEERING AND THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT


DEPARTMENT OF QUALITY AND OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT

EXPERIENTIAL TRAINING REPORT

Name and Surname:

Course: ND OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT

Subject/Module: OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT

Subject Code:

Student ID Number:

Student Number:

Student e-mail address

Contact Telephone Number

Final day of submission: 17 October 2017

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MODULARISATION
MODULARISATION

Experiential Training evaluation will be based on submitting a profile of evidence of your


workplace experience linked to specific subject / modules outcomes. Student will illustrate an
integrated knowledge of theory and practical application of outcomes. Submitting partial
(incomplete) evidence of outcomes / subject / modules will not be accepted. Operations
Management consists of a “total body of knowledge” and not small “buckets” / or subsections.
A learner must obtain a final mark of 50% to pass or to be found competent for experiential
learning.

GENERAL
INFORMATION

Consultation time

Day Session Time Venue


Name and Contact Details
Thursday 12:10-13:10 209.3 Con Cowan Ms K Mushavhanamadi
Tel : 011 559 1055
Fax :011 559 1347
E-mail:
kmushavhanamadi@uj.ac.za
Office: 209.3 Con Cowan
Building , APB

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PORTFOLIO
OF EVIDENCE

You are required to hand in an experiential training logbook by not later than the end of
October 2017 of your final year. This should cover experiential training period of at least 3
months. This logbook will consist of:

Logbook Report

A report written by yourself covering all aspects of your training. The report and
feedback will be at least 30 typed pages, excluding diagrams, spreadsheets, sketches
and illustrations where relevant. The report will include the following:

 Contents list and page numbers


 Introduction
 Background of experiential training / workplace experience
 Discussion per work area
 Summary of experiential training outcomes
 Recommendations
 Conclusion
 Appendix
 Report(s) of workplace trainer / companies

 Very important – Documents must be completed and verified for each


company in which you worked.

Introduction

The overall objective of experiential training for Operations Management students is


to ensure that an appropriate level of skill is gained during their three-year period of
study at UJ.

In order to acquire the appropriate level of skill it is essential for the student to be
exposed to the application of theoretical knowledge as it is applied in the work
environment.

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General

 The students should adhere to the rules and regulations of the workplace as
agreed upon by the workplace and him / her.

 Remuneration is agreed upon between the workplace and the student and the
University is not involved.

 Training aspect - The student should carry out the training requirements as
indicated in this logbook and must be given the opportunity to do so. The
compiling of detailed reports and support documents is required. These
comprehensive reports may, at the end of the student's training period, be
considered as a portfolio, which will form the basis of a curriculum vitae.

 University academic staff will visit students in their workplaces by arrangement


with companies concerned.

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TRAINING
CRITERIA

Training Criteria and Outcomes

Programme: ND. Operations Management

Purpose: A student who has completed his / her experiential training will show and
provide that he / she have acquired the necessary knowledge to apply and integrate the
concepts to all areas contributing to operations management. This includes understanding
of concepts, such as quality, planning, scheduling, productivity, etc. On a practical level
the student will be able to analyze and apply these concepts in an organization to achieve
optimal performance.

Specific outcomes: The student will be in a position to:

- understand and apply the basic concepts of operations management


- Identify and apply specific factors affecting operations planning and control
systems
- Identify, apply and assessment of quality
- Identify and apply productivity, utilization, yield and efficiency factor calculations
- Understand and apply the dynamics of (1) Material / Resource Planning (MRP), and,
(2) Just-in Time (JIT) principles
- Understand and apply effective: (1) Capacity Planning, (2) Production Activity
Planning, (3) Scheduling, (4) Demand Management, (5) Supply Chain Planning and
Control, (6) Inventory Management and Distribution Management in an organization
- Identify factors which enhances operational performance and throughput
- Understand, identify and apply Total Quality Management Principles
- Identify and apply project management principles
- Identify and apply inventory, purchasing and logistic principles

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LETTER OF ASSISTANCE
UNIVERSITY OF JOHANNESBURG

01 February 2017

TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN

LETTER OF ASSISTANCE FOR EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING

Dear Sir/ Madam

The University of Johannesburg requires the assistance of industry in providing the following
student: ,
Student Number: with an experiential learning placement.

The National Diploma: Operations Management offered at the University includes a minimum
of three months (120 notional hours) in industry during the third year of study. Students
attend classes on Monday and Tuesday only. With the economic situation being what it is at
present, it has been suggested that students be employed or undergo training under different
conditions to those that have been prevalent in previous years. Students may therefore
arrange with various organizations to assist them in compiling their portfolio of evidence in
order to obtain firsthand knowledge of the workplace.

Students come equipped with a number of basic skills but require some practical exposure to
work in industry before they can obtain their National Diploma.

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The suggestions made are:

1. That the student be offered (if possible) a minimum honorarium sufficient to pay for
directs costs when undergoing “training”.
That the student be exposed for a minimum period of 3 months (120 notional hours) to
carry out an agreed programme of learning in an approved operations environment
beyond which there is no further commitment on the part of the employer. (There will
be an agreement on experiential learning by means of a contract for experiential
learning between the employer and student. The student will also sign a memorandum of
understanding regarding experiential learning with the University).
2. Students need to do experiential learning in the following operations management
disciplines: e.g. operations planning, organizing, and controlling which will include layout,
process performance measurement, work-study, quality, location and productivity (See
Student Training Schedule). The company needs to assign a mentor to coordinate the
entire process. The University will assign an industrial coordinator to manage the
entire process. During this period, the student is expected to carry out an agreed
programme of learning as per the attached learning guide. The student is also required
to hand in his or her project reports on the prescribed target dates.

2. Students have already been exposed to the theory and some practical aspects of
Operations Management during their first two years of study. They have thus
sufficient grounding in such topics as Operations / Production Processes/ Method
Studies/ Plant, Worker and Machine Utilization Calculations/ Resource Productivity
Determination / Workplace Layout, / Facility Planning/Distribution, MRP/ etc.

3 Who would be able to utilize the services of these students?


Any employer in the industry - small firms / large firms / banks / building societies /
local government / correctional services / developers / mines etc.? Any organisation
involved in any aspect of operations management could provide work at least for a
limited period to cover the experiential learning.

We appeal to all employers within industry to give this matter their serious attention,
and believe that employers in all industries can assist these young people, who will later
provide the skilled management personnel desperately needed for the future.

There may be some incentive scheme from your SETA and Government (youth training
programme) to reclaim some of the Skills Development levies paid.

Kind regards
Ms. Khathutshelo Mushavhanamadi
Email: kmushavhanamadi@uj.ac.za
Tel: 011 559 1055

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MENTOR
GUIDE

MENTOR GUIDANCE SHEET

Dear mentor

We hope that the student undergoing experiential / workplace training makes a valuable
contribution to your business. This document provides some idea and guidelines of what is
required for this training. This is not prescriptive but it would be to the best advantage of
the student to get exposure in as many functional areas as possible. See experiential training
disciplines.

It would be appreciated if you could complete and sign the training schedule for the student.
Do not be concerned to follow training disciplines outlines rigidly as it indicates disciplines in
which the learner should provide evidence of “competency”. Please advise the student what
you expect from him and assist him / her in planning their training schedule. The student will
plot detail of actual time spent against the items in the left column of the schedule. It will be
appreciated if you / mentor could complete the training schedule at the end of the student
experiential training and where applicable initial their training schedule.

Kind regards,

Ms Khathu Mushavhanamadi

Lecturer/ Programme Manager (Operations Management)


Email: kmushavhanamadi@uj.ac.za
Office: 209-3 Con Cowan Building | APB Campus| 1 Bunting Road | Auckland Park | 2092
Dept.: Quality and Operations Management | Faculty of Engineering and the Built Environment |
University of Johannesburg
Tel: +27 11 559 1055 | Fax: +27 11 559 1347

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MENTOR - STUDENT PERFORMANCE
EVALUATION APPRIASAL

Employers / Mentors Performance Appraisal

Aspects of performance to be completed by Mentor

Listed on the next page are selected aspects of performance which have a significant bearing
upon the ability of the student to work at a higher level. Each aspect is described (Likert
Scale) in terms of (1) Excellent Performance, (2) Good, (3) Mediocre, (4) Poor (5) and
Unacceptable

All assessment outcomes are relayed to a five point Likert scale, as this system of

measurement is used for all the areas of assessment and lends itself to meaningful statistical

analysis :

Competency Description
Level
1 Displays no knowledge/competency
Applies basic concepts and methods but needs to be
2
continuously supervised
Applies knowledge /concepts and methods. Can work alone
3
with limited supervision and work with others
Applies more complex knowledge/concepts and methods.
4
Manages well alone and with teams
Leads the direction and achieve all outcomes, goals and
5
objectives of the organisation

Please complete the assessment by marking the appropriate point on the scale.

RATING CRITEREA:-

1 – Unacceptable
2 – Bad and only satisfy limited expectations
3 – Average
4 – Good, meet expectations
5 – Excellent

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LEARNERS WORKPLACE EVALUATION REPORT
Rating

Highest Rating Guideline

Excellent ( 80> x <100)


Mediocre (40 > x < 60)
Unacceptable (0 < 20)
Poor / unacceptable

Good (60 > x < 80)


Poor (20 > x < 40)
Rating Guideline /
/ Criteria

Criteria
Companies expectation versus Fulfill all Limited and
expectations disappointed
Outcomes of Course contents
Duration of experiential learning / Complete comments. Complete comments.
Have met all criteria Student not coping at
students achieving company within time all
expectations (A) constraints

Students individual planning, Well planned, Erratic planning,


organized and always organizing, time
organising and time management on time management not good
versus expectations (A) with excuses

Response time to solve Always on time given Slow – quality output


the nature of queries not good and
administrative / process queries or and solving them continuously ask
problems (C) assistance

Student adherence to quality Adhere to quality Needs continuous


standards and assistance. Have to
standards (C) procedures and perform rework & redo
focused on regularly
continuous
improvement
Academic level (A) Meeting all Does not meet
requirements academic level
expectations
Insight and judgment related to Gets to the root of a Cannot see the “bigger
problem and solve it picture” and only solve
work and responsiveness if basic problem areas
questions raised (D)
Exception of responsibility. Seeks Will take Dodge away from
responsibility responsibility and
and accepts responsibility at all tends to find excuses
times (D)
Verbal expression. Presentation Clear, concise and to Not sure & mmmm /
the point and can aaaaah most of the
skills and ability to transfer transfer knowledge time. Battle to
knowledge to other. Put point transfer knowledge
across convincingly and concisely
(E)
Knowledge of various operations Thorough Knowledge Display only limited
of concepts. Not just knowledge and battle
management concepts applied in theory to bring theory and
company (A) practice together

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Interaction with other employees, Interact well with Battle to interact with
people, participate as people and displays
teamwork and participation (B) team member little teamwork – only
when required
Friendliness and willingness to Always friendly, Not really friendly,
assisting where ever must be requested to
assist & learn and treating others possible and are assist and must be
with dignity (B) always want to learn encouraged to learn
and share
Sensitivity to working environment Always sensitive Does not care about
about working working environment.
(A) environment Untidy working
environment
Interest in work and company Want to know “more” Just want complete the
and whole heartily “job”
objectives and goals (A) carries the company
objective and goals
Self drive and determination. Go – getter. Must be supervised
Determined to carry most of the time and
(D) out and complete a lacks energy
task Whole hearted
applications to tasks:
Determined to carry
a task to the end

Applied and professional knowledge Highly proficient in Does only apply limited
practical application professional / technical
(A) of professional / knowledge to meet
technical knowledge desired standard of
output
Technical skills and knowledge. Competent and apply Apply only limited skills
relevant skills / and knowledge
Apply relevant skills (C) knowledge.
Knowledge. Highly
proficient in the
practical application
of professional!
technical knowledge

Provision of (possible) solution to Is able to generate Display / interact only


possible solutions to limited solutions to
problems (C) problems. Handles problems. Handles
problems immediately problems only after
as they arise they arise

Handles and interprets figures Competent / Have limited grasp of


accurate and feel at “accuracy” , figures and
with particular ease, accuracy, and ease working with graphs
understanding. Handling of figures and graph.
Know how to
quantitative / qualitative analysis
interpret calculations
(E) / figures and graph
See “processes” in totality Sees the “bigger” Not able to see
picture in totality “bigger” picture
(integrated system). See bigger
picture (A)
Handling of pressure and Can handle work Battle to cope with
pressure and work pressure /
bottlenecks (B) bottlenecks bottlenecks
Total Score

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PLACE RESULTS IN THE "TOTALS" ROW_ ADD THESE TOTALS TO
DERIVE THE "FINAL SCORE".

Final statistical analysis of students “profile” will be performed by University

Mentor / Manager / Evaluator Signature:

Name:

Designation:

Company:

Contact Details:

Tel (w): .......................

Cell: .......................

E-Mail: .......................

Date:

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Student
Profile

Student Surname:

First Name:

Address:

Tel. No.:

Registration Date:

Record Company(s) Details:

Name:
Physical Address:
Postal Address:
Code:
E-mail:
Tel. No.:
Contact person:
Name:
Tel. No.:

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EVALUATION SCHEDULE AND GUIDE

STUDENT EXPERIENTIAL EVALUATION

TRAINING SCHEDULE

Ten topics must be analyzed and discussed. Six (6) of the ten topics are compulsory as indicated in table - Compulsory topics mark – X
Weeks / Dates
DISCIPLINE Signature
Trainer / Trainee

Requirements
Fulfill basic
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16

Rating %
Week ending Yes No
Quality – X Planned
Actual
Scheduling – X Planned
Actual
Maintenance Planned
Actual
Time studies Planned
Actual
Capacity Planning - X Planned
Actual
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Productivity Measurements - X Planned
Actual
Design Processes Planned
Actual
Purchasing / Logistics Planned
Actual
Inventory – X Planned
Actual
Personnel Planned
Actual
Budget / Finance Planned
Actual
Industrial relations Planned
Actual
Integrated Software Application
Actual
i.e. MRP, ERP, etc
Planned
Project – X Actual
Planned
Other Planned
Actual

1. It is recommended that the employer communicate a proposed experiential training / workplace experience plan to the student in this
format.
2. The student to complete and stipulate actual week(s) spent in the specific department in the format.
3. Employee / Mentor to sign document and evaluate student:
3.1 Fulfill Requirements: Yes / No
3.2 Rate student’s skills, knowledge and ability accordingly. I.e. Time spend per category versus application of theory and practical
experience (learning curve). Consideration of difficulty level must also be considered.
An example would be: The applications of Statistical Process Control (SPC) and Analysis versus time spend in mastering application
thereof. Good and fair judgment to be exercised for rating of student. This must be supported with evidence and will be part of
student’s final experiential report.

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RATING CRITEREA:-
1 – Unacceptable = 0 > x < 20
2 – Only satisfy limited expectations = 20 > x < 40
3 – Average = 40 > x < 60
4 – Good, meet expectations = 60 > x < 80
5 – Excellent = 80 > x < 100
4. Please insert dates for week ending

Signed: Employer:.............

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FACILITATOR EVALUATION

GENERAL EVALUATION – DEPARTMENT ONLY

Section A: REPORT FORMAT Max Mark Mark Obtained Comments


General appearance from professional point 10
Command of Language 10
Classification 10
Completeness 10
Neatness 10
References 10
TOTAL MARKS: SECTION A 60
PERCENTAGE MARK: SECTION A

Section B: CONTENTS: TECHNICAL ASPECTS OF


EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING
Description of actual work done: evidence / topics,
130
recorded & witnessed, conclusion & recommendations
Description of organization, management, process
equipment, activities, working conditions, observation 30
in the field of operations management (A)
Technical correctness (B) 30
Innovativeness (C) 10
Conclusions and proposals (D) 40
TOTAL MARKS: SECTION B 240
PERCENTAGE MARKS: SECTION B
Total Marks Obtained (Section A & B) 300
Percentage 100

TOTAL MARK (Average section A and B out of 100)

REMARKS:………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………
………………………………………………

Marked by: ................................. Date: ..........

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MARK AWARDED (%)

EVALUATION:
COMPETENT YES NO

Signature of Marker:
________________________________________
Signature of Moderator

Date:

EXPERIENTIAL TRAINING RECOMMENDATIONS AND COMMENTS:


.. ................ ......................... ...
.................. …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………
……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………
……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………
………..... ... ....
.................................................................................................................................................................................
................................................................................................

PROGRAMME MANAGER: Ms K Mushavhanamadi


,
Room 209.3 Con Cowan Building

SIGNATURE:.................................

DATE:.................................

Tel: (011) 559 1055 Fax: (011) 559-1374

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ASSISTANCE LETTER

APPENDIX B
ASSIGNMENT COVER PAGE / ANTI-PLAGIARISM DECLARATION
University of Johannesburg
Department: ..................
ASSIGNMENT COVER PAGE

Title: ………………………………………………………………………………..
Full name: ……………………………………………………………..............
Student number…………………………………………………….................
Course: ……………………………………………………………………...........
Lecturer: ………………………………...........................................................
Due date: ………………………………...........................................................
1. Plagiarism is to present someone else’s ideas as my own.

2. Where material written by other people has been used (either from a printed source or

from the internet), this has been carefully acknowledged and referenced. I have used the

Geneva Convention for citation and referencing. Every contribution to and quotation from

the work of other people in this essay has been acknowledged through citation and

reference.

3. I know that plagiarism is wrong.

3.1 I understand what plagiarism is and am aware of the University’s policy in this regard.

3.2 I know that I would plagiarise if I do not give credit to my sources, or if I copy

sentences or paragraphs from a book, article or Internet source without proper citation.

3.3 I know that even if I only change the wording slightly, I still plagiarise when using

someone else’s words without proper citation.

3.4 I declare that I have written my own sentences and paragraphs throughout my essay

and I have credited all ideas I have gained from other people’s work.

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4. I declare that this assignment is my own original work.

5. I have not allowed, and will not allow, anyone to copy my work with the intention of

passing it off as his or her own work.

SIGNATURE …………………………………….DATE………………………………..

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STUDENT
PORTFOLIO REPORT

STUDENT PORTFOLIO REPORT (Written Report)

Training Programme

Operations Management Experiential Training Report


Provision of Log Book Evidence

Relevant operations concepts and aspects covered


Provide examples and provide proof if unacceptable / poor:

Student opinion
Describe in detail at least five of the experiential learning events that were most
important to you.

Attached as part of your report

In which respects did you performed most / where you gained your experience, during the
training programme?

Name:

Student Number:

Signature:

Date:

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