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Operational

Production Functional Competencies

Quality

Development Guide
70% on the job experiences 20% Relationships & Feedback 10% Formal Training

Supply Chain
This document including all information, drawings or plans contained therein, is the
property of HEINEKEN Supply Chain B.V., The Netherlands and all intellectual property
therein, including all proprietary and confidential information, know-how, designs and/or
data, remains vested in and owned by HEINEKEN Supply Chain B.V., The Netherlands.

This document may also contain information, drawings, designs or plans owned by third
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intellectual property rights of such third parties.

This document and/or drawing may not be used, copied, and/or reproduced in whole or
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specifically permitted in writing by HEINEKEN Supply Chain B.V., The Netherlands.

The trademark HEINEKEN belongs to HEINEKEN Brouwerijen B.V. All use of


the HEINEKEN trademark shall accrue for the sole benefit of HEINEKEN
Brouwerijen
B.V. d shall not be used or claimed, in whole or in part, by any other party without
HEINEKEN Brouwerijen B.V.s prior written consent.

The trademark Amstel belongs to Amstel Brouwerij B.V. All use of the Amstel
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or claimed in whole or in part, by any other party without Amstel Brouwerij B.V.s prior
written consent.

Intellectual Property Statement Supply Chain Policies 09-04-2013

November 2013,
2013 HEINEKEN International
Introduction to Production Competencies Development Guide

The Development Guide is a key component of Heinekens development framework and together
with the functional competencies provide a holistic approach to competence development of our
people.

While the functional competencies are the reference of the knowledge, skills and behaviours required
to succeed in your role, the development guide provides you with suggestions on how you can
develop each competency, based on the 70:20:10 model.

This model provides a framework where learning is no longer addressed as a detached activity,
separate from the daily activities of the workplace. Work and learning are combined and we are
able to focus on the entire range of learning opportunities: on the job, social and formal.

With the use of the development guide, you will achieve a more relevant and motivating personal
development plan (PDP), as well as, better guidance for training programmes and development
opportunities within the business. Make sure, therefore, that your PDP development actions include a
blend of 70%, 20% and 10% learning recommended in these guides.

Success in your personal development!

Henk de Bruin
Senior Director Global Technology and Policies
HEINEKEN Supply Chain

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Special thanks to the following people for:

Creating the descriptions of the functional competencies


Bennett, Sarah J Sensory Manager, HEINEKEN UK
Fotopoulou, Maria Laboratory Coordinator Athens Plant, Athenian Brewery, Greece

Providing advice and feedback


Bakker, Jaco Governance Systems Manager, Supply Chain Technology & Policies,
Global Supply Chain
Bouwmeester, Dini Supply Chain Support Manager, Supply Chain, Region C&EE
Bruin, Henk de Senior Director Global Supply Chain Technology & Policies, Global Supply
Chain
Forster, Clemens Head of Quality, Safety and Environment, Brau Union sterreich AG, Austria
Hollemans, Marja Group Quality & Technology Manager, Grupa ywiec S.A. Poland
Koucky, Ondrej Group Quality Manager Supply Chain, HEINEKEN Czech Republic
Papetti, Paolo Manager, Supply Chain Services Supply Chain, HEINEKEN Italia
S.p.A.
Salib, Raouf Quality Manager, Al Ahram Beverages, El Obour, Egypt
Starcic, Marina Quality Assurance Manager Q&A, Karlovaka pivovara d.o.o., Croatia
Visscher, Hendrik Jan Global Brewing Policy Manager, Supply Chain Technology & Policies,
Global Supply Chain

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Content
The 70:20:10 Learning Philosophy 4

The Quality Functional Competencies


1 Safety 6
2 Quality Systems & Procedures 8
3 Operation & Control of Laboratory Environment & Equipment 10
4 Excellence in Analysis 12
5 Process Support 14
6 Reporting 16

Glossary 18

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The 70:20:10 Learning Philosophy
At HEINEKEN we believe that learning should take place in the context of the operational and strategic
capability needs of our organisation. When we improve the capabilities of our organisation, we can
improve business results in the long and short term.

To ensure that real learning occurs, we encourage a holistic approach by integrating both formal and
informal elements. In short, we believe the most effective way to learn and develop a new skill or
behaviour is to apply and practice it on the job and in real life situations.

To this end, within HEINEKEN we follow the 70:20:10 model to frame and guide our approach to
learning and development.

70% of learning comes from real life and onthejob experiences, tasks and problem solving. This is
the most important aspect of any learning and development plan. Examples include: Day-to-day
responsibilities and tasks; Job rotations; Stretch assignments; Project-based learning
20% of learning comes from relationships and feedback, coaching and from observing and working
with role models. Examples include: Coaching; Mentoring; (Peer) networking; Role modelling
10% of learning comes from formal training. Examples include: Classroom training; E-Learning;
Conferences; Seminars; Reading

Learning is not compulsory neither is survival - W. Edwards Deming

Today more than ever before, having capable people who are able to rapidly apply continuous
learning is an increasingly critical lever of future business success. The 70:20:10 model helps
HEINEKEN to become a true learning organisation, which values, supports and builds learning
opportunities into corporate culture and structure.

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The 70:20:10 model is not intended as a rigid framework or recipe. It is a reference model drawn from
empirical data and surveys (in particular the research of Morgan McCall and his colleagues at the Center
for Creative Leadership in the USA). It simply validates what many leaders find consistent with their own
experiences: that not all learning happens in formal learning settings.

So, what about formal training? Although this is seen as contributing just 10% to our learning, well-
designed training has a significant amplifying effect clarifying, supporting and boosting the other
90% of our learning.

How can you apply the 70:20:10 Model?


The simplest way to apply your learning is to make sure that your PDP development actions include a
blend of 70%, 20% and 10% learning activities.

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1 Safety
The ability to act in a way that contributes to maintaining a safe environment for employees, contractors
and visitors according to the applicable statutory, HEINEKEN and local regulations, policies and
procedures.

On-the-job experiences
Check safety conditions on a daily basis before starting work so that you minimize risks.
Perform work according to guidance, instructions and procedures (SOPs, analytical methods) using the
appropriate Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) so that you minimize risks.
Participate in safety briefings and safety meetings to develop better awareness of and understand the risks.
Actively participate in and use information from meetings led by your manager (e.g. Safety Pillar meeting,
departmental meeting) to increase safety awareness.
Adjust your methods of work according to the instructions and guidelines derived from safety policy
standards and procedures in order to achieve safety compliance.
Actively participate in safety improvement projects that take place in and impact on your work area to better
understand the changes and need for them.
Share your feedback and experience whenever you participate in the risk assessment team to maintain a high
quality in hazard and risk assessment.
Take an active role in observing unsafe conditions and unsafe behaviours (using tags, STOP or other
Behavioural Based Safety (BBS) tools) to systematically eliminate observed risks and influence personnel to
be proactive in safety and take appropriate action when necessary.
Participate actively in activities to increase awareness (e.g. safety day, evacuation exercise, briefings on safety
alerts).
Where changes in product, instrument or process occur, share your feedback about potential risks created by
the change and adjust your way of working as necessary.
Collect safety data from your activities so that you can report near misses, unsafe conditions and anomalies in
safety (share your feedback in Safety Pyramid).
Share your experience with others to increase awareness about specific job related risks and events from the
past.
Practice your behaviour in crisis situations by participating in evacuation drills and other unexpected situation
simulations (e.g. spill, fire) to be well prepared as to how to act in such situations.
Ensure a high level quality in your work from a safety perspective to proactively avoid unsafe situations.
Audit your area on a periodic basis (5S) to ensure safe conditions of work.
Take time to update your knowledge on safety, for example by reading safety instructions carefully and
approaching your manager with any questions.
Always take appropriate and immediate action to eliminate hazards created by malfunctioning instruments,
system failures, etc.
When accidents, incidents and near misses occur, help the investigation team with root cause analysis to
better define the root causes.

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Relationships and feedback
Visit other departments/production sites and discuss safety with your colleagues and manager. This will
help you learn how they approach safety, understand what is useful for your work area and capture good
practices.
Seek advice and information from safety subject matter experts to increase your knowledge on safety
matters (regarding Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS), handling of glassware, hot surfaces, autoclave, gas
cylinders, storage and handling of chemicals like acids and caustic soda, etc.).
Contact your local safety resource and Safety Pillar members on specific safety questions or issues to
increase your knowledge on how to handle them.
Participate in meetings and projects about safety to increase your understanding and safe behaviour.
Whenever an activity is performed in your area (e.g. repair of an instrument) ask how it will impact your
work and your own safety.
Cooperate with your Safety Pillar or safety committee representatives so that you are well informed about
safety matters.
Share concerns and ideas for improvements with your superior in order to get advice and be the initiator of
changes.
Aim to give feedback to everyone who demonstrates unsafe behaviour, in order to practice giving
constructive feedback.
Use any feedback given to you, so that you can behave by example in safety.

Formal training
Legally required safety/fire safety/first aid training for lab technicians
Hazard communication training
Job instructions, site rules training
Globally Harmonized System (GHS) for classification and labelling of chemicals
TPM PKE Safety training or specific parts of it
Operational Risk Reduction (ORR) training (principles)
BBS training (principles)
Any formal safety training designed for lab technicians, such as storage and handling of chemicals (e.g.
acids and caustic soda), use of PPE (e.g. appropriate types of gloves, masks).
Evacuation training and drills
Basics of TPM Safety Pillar tools and methods (Safety Pillar route)
Basics about accident investigation (5WHY)
5S training

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2 Quality Systems & Procedures
The ability to work in accordance with the quality systems in place and HEINEKEN and local procedures, thus
contributing to the excellence of the finished product.

On-the-job experiences
Take an active role in the activities of the Food Safety Team to maintain and improve HACCP system and
product integrity.
Use the principles of locally implemented systems (e.g. International Featured Standard Food (IFS Food), BRC
Global Standard for Food Safety British Retail Consortium, SQF 2000 Safe Quality Food, Codex Alimentarius,
ISO 22000, FSSC 22000, HACCP, Occupational Health and Safety Assurance System (OHSAS), ISO 14000, ISO
9001) as a base line for all activities in Production, Packaging, Utilities and warehouse, especially for new
equipment, process etc. in order to achieve compliance and safe product.
Participate in quality, safety and environment studies before introducing new equipment, process etc. so that you
can anticipate risks.
Execute HACCP or food safety audits in your OpCo to verify that the HACCP or food safety system is adequate
and that food safety system rules are being followed.
Execute Laboratory Star System (LSS) audits in your OpCo to verify that laboratory measurements are reliable and
to ensure compliance with LSS rules.
Execute audits for systems that have been locally implemented (TPM, 5S, Hygiene Order Cleanliness (HOC), ISO,
safety etc.) to ensure compliance with standards.
Take an active role in promoting food safety and contribute to varied activities to increase awareness (e.g. once a
year re-education of Production personnel on HACCP principles, CCP plan, HOC, 5S).
Take an active role in local document control system by checking compliance with the local rules and the
ownership of documents.
Use the HEINEKEN software platforms (e.g. SAP, Qualass, Qualass SA, ONE2Share).
Participate in Daily Control System (DCS) meetings.
Take an active role in implementation of statistical tools for DCS, Repeatability & Reproducibility (R&R),
Statistical Process Control (SPC) etc. and suggest improvements.
In your daily work use the principle copy with pride by copying and sharing good practices that you or your
OpCo are using or you that you see on HEINEKEN intranet (TPM E-room, ONE2Share, OpCo databases, etc.).

Relationships and feedback


Visit other factories/breweries to learn how they approach food safety, in order to understand what is useful for
your own production site and capture good practices.
Seek advice and information from HACCP subject matter experts to increase your knowledge on food safety
matters.
Participate in meetings and projects about HACCP.
Recognize and maintain a good relationship with stakeholders who can support you in food safety matters (e.g.
Sensory-Analytical Services & Research (SASR), external laboratories).
Participate in online discussions about HEINEKEN software platforms like SAP, Qualass, QualassSA, ONE2Share.
Take opportunity to coach or mentor colleagues in using HEINEKEN software platforms.

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Take opportunity to coach or mentor in food safety, occupational health and safety and environment.
Seek advice and information from document control system subject matter expert to familiarize yourself
with local document management and ownership.
Seek advice and information from statistics subject matter expert to familiarize yourself with mathematical
principles used in DCS.

Formal training
Legally required training for operators/technicians
Formal training for internal auditors provided by HEINEKEN or external parties (e.g. IFS Food; BRC
Global Standard for Food Safety British Retail Consortium; SQF 2000 Safe Quality Food; Codex
Alimentarius, ISO 22000; FSSC 22000, HACCP - Keeping it up & alive!, OHSAS; ISO 14000; ISO 9001
etc. )
HEINEKEN e-learning modules for HACCP or other locally implemented systems in ONE2Learn
Supply Chain Academy, Health & Safety Academy etc.
Topics relating to food safety in ONE2Share (e.g. HACCP Topic Map - HEINEKEN HACCP guide and all
appendixes, Fact Sheet Product Contaminants etc.)
Topics relating to Laboratory Star System (LSS) in ONE2Share
Topics relating to Production Materials Standards/Auxiliary Materials/Cleaning & Disinfection in
ONE2Share
HEINEKEN software platforms (SAP, Qualass, QualassSA, One2Share) formal courses
TPM PKE PQ
Local document control system standards and procedures

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3 Operation & Control of Laboratory Environment & Equipment
The ability to maintain a safe optimal laboratory environment and to safely operate and maintain
laboratory equipment, ensuring that the basic conditions are in place to facilitate the generation of
consistently reliable results.

On-the-job experiences
Conduct risk assessments to become aware of potential laboratory and equipment related safety risks and the steps
to take to avoid them.
Assess new equipment with regard to potential risks to the quality of results (e.g. location next to vibrating
equipment, taste room near source of odours).
Take an active role in activities of the laboratory team to maintain and improve the laboratory environment using
5S and locally implemented systems (e.g. Laboratory Star System (LSS), ISO 17025).
Review the visual management used in the laboratory to ensure unambiguous and efficient operation.
Read relevant reference material, SOPs, manufacturers handbooks etc. to gain a clear understanding of the
fundamentals and functionality of the equipment within area of responsibility.
Make a list of the operational and control activities for your area and make improvement suggestions to reduce non
added value activities.
Analyze and discuss with the team standards and procedures to improve the equipment operation and laboratory
performance.
Prepare or review existing documentation (from an OPL to a SOP) and create document feedback requests to
initiate a change to a procedure when necessary
Execute routine calibration and maintenance of lab equipment to become aware of the quality parameters to be
monitored and the implications if these are not completed.
Keep equipment logbook up to date completing maintenance and calibration records. Maintain tracking system
(e.g. LIMS).
Participate in tagging and de-tagging activities to learn how they can influence the quality of analytical
performance.
Make an analysis of the tags over a certain period of time, categorize according to 4Ms and understand if possible
issues are recurring.
Review the information in the logbooks for the equipment within your area of responsibility and look for any
patterns in deviations and ways to improve the equipment operation to ensure reliable results.
Create a diagnostic checklist for the equipment within area of responsibility.
Take an active role in feeding back improvement opportunities for HEINEKEN software platforms like Qualass,
QualassSA.
Analyze and share with the laboratory team current and historical performance data for equipment and the
laboratory (e.g. conformance to the maintenance and calibration) to facilitate continuous improvement.
Participate in the Daily Control System (DCS) meetings and report the appropriate data.
Participate in a TPM team where the operation of the equipment you are responsible for is an indicator of team
performance.
Participate in loss reduction team activity as a team member or a Kaizen. Instigate 5WHY analysis to determine
the root cause.

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Participate as an auditee or auditor in (internal and external) audits (e.g. Laboratory Star System (LSS)/
ISO/Hygiene Order Cleanliness (HOC)) in the laboratory (main or satellite) with experienced auditors in
order to learn to execute audits and to identify areas for improvement.
Execute relevant actions identified during laboratory audits.
Take an active role in recruiting and training new tasters.
Monitor and record the performance of individual tasters and the panel so as to focus refresher training.

Relationships and feedback


Work alongside/shadow a counterpart who has demonstrated a high level of competency.
With specialist support, learn how to carry out special operations in area of responsibility (e.g. troubleshoot
GC performance).
Network with counterparts at other production sites or Sensory-Analytical Services & Research (SASR) to
share and implement best practices in the operation and control of the laboratory equipment and operation.
Share good practices through the use of HeiQ, E-Room and other appropriate communication channels and
adopt the HEINEKEN principle of copying with pride.
Network outside of HEINEKEN to establish best practice in equipment and laboratory environment.
Develop relationships and participate in meetings with equipment suppliers in order to better understand the
critical quality elements of the equipment and how to react when deviations from the set quality
specifications occur.
Ask your equipment supplier to send information about recent improvements to their equipment.
Encourage feedback from stakeholders to identify improvement opportunities (e.g. Daily Control System
meetings, pillar meetings and safety committee).

Formal training
Attend relevant workshop (e.g. LSS)
Specialist equipment courses e.g. GC troubleshooting
Join relevant industry association
English language

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4 Excellence in Analysis
The ability to work in accordance with laboratory standards and operate laboratory equipment to the
desired level of control to ensure the generation of consistently reliable analytical results.

On-the-job experiences
Conduct risk assessments in order to become aware of potential safety risks and the steps to be taken to avoid
them.
Understand the risks that can jeopardize the quality of analytical results and define measures to mitigate these
risks.
Use the principles of locally implemented systems (e.g. Laboratory Star System (LSS), ISO 17025) as a base line
for all activities in the laboratory to achieve consistently reliable analytical results.
Take an active role in the activities of the laboratory team to sustain and improve the integrity of the analysis.
Read relevant standards and procedures and keep up to date with corporate communications.
Take an active role in the local document control system by creating and managing documents through to final
approval and raising document change requests or creating new procedures and standards to facilitate the
consistent generation of reliable analytical results.
Analyze and discuss standards and procedures to improve analytical performance.
Execute routine analysis to become aware of the quality parameters to be monitored and the implications if not
completed.
Follow the laboratory training procedure and only execute the analysis once the specified level of competence
has been met.
Contribute to training documentation.
Consistently evaluate the performance indicators from your analyses (e.g. positive/negative controls in
microbiology, use of reference product in sensory and Shewhart in physical chemical analyses).
Discuss with laboratory team members any specific recurring issues in your area of responsibility in order to
develop proactive behaviour.
Systematically monitor complaints from the customers to evaluate whether your analysis is robust. Where
deviations occur, take appropriate actions.
Participate in Progressive Quality (PQ) meetings and improvement teams to get experience with PQ tools (e.g.
Root Cause Failure Analyses (RCFAs), Defect Analysis Sheet (DAS)), so that you can choose the right tools
when deviations occur and initiate corrective actions.
Participate in Daily Control System (DCS) meetings.
Participate as auditee or auditor in internal and external audits (e.g. LSS and ISO in the laboratory - main or
satellite) with experienced auditors in order to learn to execute audits and to identify areas for improvement.
Execute relevant actions identified during laboratory audits.
Actively review any internal or external audit outputs to ensure that actions have been appropriate, accurate,
effective and sustained.

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Learn from mistakes and share good and bad practices during team talks. Exchange experience and
collect feedback from colleagues to identify opportunities for improvement.
Participate in taste test sessions and product release sessions to experience the criteria on which release
decisions are taken.
Participate in a TPM team (e.g. Kaizen) to experience the practical application of data.
Make a list of the operation and control activities for your area and make improvement suggestions to
reduce non added value activities.
List production site priorities and explain what this means for your area of responsibility and workplace
targets.

Relationships and feedback


Network with counterparts in other departments and at other production sites or Sensory-Analytical
Services & Research (SASR) to share and implement best practices. Use HeiQ, E-Room and other
appropriate communication channels and adopt the HEINEKEN principle of copying with pride.
Work alongside/ shadow a counterpart who has demonstrated a high level of competency.
Network outside HEINEKEN to establish best practice and optimize the analysis. Share information
through document feedback in ONE2Share.
Visit other laboratories to learn and share your good practices in order to understand what is useful for your
own laboratory and to capture their good practices.
Meet with the TPM Manager/Coordinator to understand what data can be used for loss reduction
deployments.
Encourage feedback from stakeholders to identify improvement opportunities and to understand their needs
in terms of quality information.
Develop the relationship with your main equipment supplier and exchange information. Participate in
relevant HEINEKEN Community Of Practice (COP).

Formal training
Attend relevant workshop (e.g. LSS)
Specialist analytical courses (e.g. microbiology, sensory)
Join relevant industry association
English language

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5 Process Support
The ability to provide technical and analytical support for the Production process in accordance with the
HEINEKEN standards and local procedures, thus contributing to the optimization of process control.

On-the-job experiences
Analyze and discuss standards and procedures to improve equipment operation and
process control.
Communicate deviations and or improvements to the team.
Participate in Progressive Quality (PQ) meetings and improvement teams to get experience in PQ tools e.g.
Root Cause Failure Analyses (RCFAs), QA/QM/QX matrices. This will enable you to choose the right tools
when deviations occur and initiate corrective actions.
Participate in Daily Control System (DCS) meetings.
Join the Autonomous Maintenance (AM) team to understand how Cleaning Inspection Lubrication Tightening
(CILT) standards work.
Prepare or review existing documentation and create document feedback requests to initiate a change to a
procedure when necessary.
Contribute to training documentation (e.g. OPLs, SOPs).
Participate in sampling sessions to help shop floor people make the link between process control and product
quality as experienced by the consumer and identify the opportunities for improvement.
Participate in tagging and de-tagging activities to learn how it can influence the quality of analytical
performance.
Take an area of responsibility and improve its visual management in order to improve operation and
execution. Suggest improvements for visual management.
Make a list of the operation and control activities for the area and make improvement suggestions to reduce
non added value activities.
List the parameters for an area and describe how to act when deviations occur.
With support of the Quality team, make First Time Right (FTR) calculations for an area, learn how it works
and identify what influence the equipment/process has on these calculations.
Act as a useful source of information in New Product Development (NPD) and New Product Introduction
(NPI).
Participate as auditee or auditor in internal audits (e.g. ISO, 5S, Hygiene Order Cleanliness (HOC)) with
experienced auditors in order to learn to execute audits and identify areas for improvement.
Actively review any internal or external audit outputs to ensure that actions have been appropriate, accurate,
effective and sustained.

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Relationships and feedback
Spend time in other departments to understand their critical tasks and their input/output requirements.
Visit other breweries and take/implement best practices.
Contact your cleaning and disinfection partner and get feedback from your CIP equipment and procedures.
Ask your equipment supplier to provide information about any improvements to their equipment.
Seek equipment technical advice from technicians or equipment suppliers.
Encourage feedback from stakeholders and identify improvement opportunities (e.g. Daily Control System
meetings, pillar meetings, safety committee, maintenance tasks).
Identify learning opportunities to develop competency and explore with line manager as part of the Personal
Development Planning (PDP) process.
Ask for advice from machine expert or colleagues to develop improvements and best practice.
Meet with the TPM manager/coordinator to understand what data can be used for loss reduction
deployments.
Share good practices through the use of ONE2Share, E-Room and other appropriate communication
channels. Adopt the HEINEKEN principle of copying with pride.
Participate in relevant HEINEKEN Communities of Practice (COPs) (e.g. hygiene, yeast management).

Formal training
Fundamentals of Brewing, Utilities and Packaging processes
PQ PKE training programme to understand the pillar responsibilities and deployment route
HACCP (HEINEKEN University course and e-learning module)
Cleaning and disinfection courses
Statistics courses
Soft skills/Communication Workshop
English language

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6 Reporting
The ability to collect and report reliable data in a timely way and to effectively communicate with the
relevant stakeholders in order to facilitate optimal decision making.

On-the-job experiences
Participate in Progressive Quality (PQ) Pillar activities to understand PQ data capture.
Consult with the TPM manager/coordinator to understand what data can be used for loss reduction
deployments.
Participate in the PQ pillar to understand data capture and reporting for Root Cause Failure Analysis (RCFA).
Shadow a colleague who has demonstrated a high level of competency reporting and communicating. Work
alongside him/her for a period of time (as needs dictate) to improve knowledge of data capture techniques, the
impact of deviations and reporting methods.
Meet key stakeholders to establish appropriate data to be reported and to understand impact and escalation
routes.
Attend key Daily Control System (DCS) meetings to understand the impact of data reporting and how it is
applied to decision making.
Attend TPM team audits to understand how data is being received and applied.
Participate in a TPM team to experience the practical application of data and reporting. Seek opportunities to
present data at management meetings and steering committees,
Participate in SAP/Brewery Comparison System (BCS) preparation processes to understand how data can be
applied.
Join internal audits such as corporate quality to understand how data is being received and applied.
Join compliance or assurance teams such as ISO 9001,to experience the application of data for control and
compliance.

Relationships and feedback


Encourage feedback from stakeholders to ensure appropriate data is being captured with correct follow-up
actions, and identify improvement opportunities.
Identify learning opportunities to develop competency levels and explore with your line manager as part of the
Personal Development Planning (PDP) process.
Actively review any internal or external audit outputs to ensure that data has been appropriate, reliable and
effective.
Check with internal customers as to how they use data reports in order to identify improvement opportunities
and establish whether the data reports are fit for purpose.

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Formal training
Attend BCS, SAP, Qualass, Qualass SA and other system and reporting platform workshops to ensure that
they are current and future-proofed wherever possible
Test own competency on Excel, Access, PowerPoint etc. by carrying out online assessment tests. Select
appropriate e-learning material to reach a more advanced competence level or select alternative appropriate
training sources
Attend PQ PKE training programme to understand the pillar responsibilities and deployment route
Attend statistics courses

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Glossary
Quality
Term Definition
4M Men, Machine, Method, Material
5S Activities that are part of a workplace organization method that is
part of AM mehtodology: Sort, Set, Shine, Standardize and Sustain
5 WHY The 5 Whys is a question-asking methodology used to explore the
cause-and-effect relationships underlying a particular problem
AM Autonomous Maintenance
BAPS Beer Analytic Proficiency system
BBS Behavioural Based Safety
BCS Brewery Comparison System
BDA BreakDown analysis
BI reports Business Intelligence reports
BRC British Retail Consortium
CCP Critical Control Points
CIP Clean In Place
CpK Current Process Capability
CILT Cleaning Inspection Lubrication Tightening
DAS Defect Analysis Sheet
DCS Daily Control System
FI Focused Improvement
FTR First Time Right
FSSC 22000 Food Safety System Certification 22000
GC Gas Chromatography
GHS Global Harmonized System
GSC Global Supply Chain
HACCP Hazard Analysis of Critical Control Points
HARA Heineken Analytical Ring Analysis
HeiQ The global Supply Chain Knowledge Management system
(includes: Rules, Standards, Procedures, Knowledge Items and
Good Practices)
HMESC HEINEKEN Materials & Equipment Standards and Code
HMRA Heineken Microbiology Ring Analysis

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Term Definition
HOC Hygiene Order Cleanliness
HSRA Heineken Sensory Ring Analysis
ISO International Standards Organization
IT Information Technology
KPI Key Performance Indicator
LIMS Laboratory Information Management System
LSS Laboratory Star System
MCRS Management, Control and Reporting System
MSDS Material Safety Data Sheet
NPI New Product Introduction
O2 Oxygen
OG Original Gravity
OHSAS Occupational Health and Safety Assurance System
ONE2Share Online source for HEINEKEN knowledge and People's Expertise
OPL One Point Lesson
ORR Operational Risk Reduction
OTIF On Time In Full
PPE Personal Protective Equipment
PQ Progressive Quality (part of PKE)
Q-points Machine Parameters which can impact the product quality
defined by application of QX matrix
QA matrix QA matrix is a basic tool of PQ pillar, which is applied to prioritise
actions against the sources of defects of a process and their link
with 4M - man, method, material, machine
QM matrix QM matrix is an advanced tool of PQ pillar, which is applied in
order to maintain the operating conditions that will ensure the
desired quality performance
QX matrix QX matrix is an advanced tool of PQ pillar and is used to define
the machine conditions that, if respected, allow the machine to
work at its best and the production to comply with specifications.
Specifically, it correlates 4 entities: defect modes
(Nonconformities), value of process characteristics, machine
components, machine parameter values ensuring zero defect
modes
Qualass Quality Assurance System

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Term Definition
QualassSA Sensory version of Qualass used for sensory analysis
RCFA Root Cause Failure Analysis
R&R Repeatability & Reproducibility
SAP Enterprise Resource Planning software tool
SASR Sensory-Analytical Services & Research
SQF 2000 Safe Quality Food
SHE Safety Health & Environment
SOP Standard Operating Procedure
SPC Statistical Process Control
STOP Behavioural based program designed to improve safety awareness
and make safe behaviours and workplace conditions part of work
culture
TPM Total Productive Management
TTS Taste Test Score
WWTP Waste Water Treatment Plant

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design: SSO studio.com
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