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Maasehyahu Isra-Ul

2016 D28 Publishing


SYNOPSIS:
Our inner-city children are struggling with a
behavioral framework which has not been
meeting their individual needs. Their struggle
has manifested into students who are acting
out (behaviorally) in ways that at one time
were considered rare. What can be done to
change this negative and challenging trend?
How people relate to each other is a critical
component to the success of a learning
community (Marshall & Wong, 2012).
Creating an environment of mutual respect is
necessary for each student to develop the
confidence needed for success (Marshall &
Wong, 2012).
In helping urban youth it is important to
understand the five resources they require (i.e.
emotional, mental, spiritual, physical and
relational) (Payne, 1996).
Use data to inform all decisions
Administrators and Teachers who are the most
proficient in student management are those
who analyze the data and engage in a
systematic planning of action (Lemov, 2010).
It is not wrong to challenge students with ideas
outside of their experience to teach them
(Lemov, 2010).
If learning is invitational it can draw students
in who would normally create problems in
classrooms (Wong, 2009).
Students are entering classrooms wildly
and are off-task for the first 10 minutes of
class in 60% of classroom.
5% of the student population is cutting
class at least twice per week.
Male students are receiving 20% more
referrals for negative behavior than the
female students.
There is a higher population of Latino
students who are being suspended than
African-American, Asian or White
students.
30% of the teachers are non African-
American or Latino
41% of all teachers are new teachers
Students are entering classrooms wildly and are off-task for the first 10
minutes of class in 60% of classroom.
Response: Writing referrals for this repeat behavior
everyday resulting in hundreds of referrals by
weeks end.
5% of the student population is cutting class at least twice per week.
Response: Staff continuing with lessons as usual
while administrators attempted to round up
students to place in in-school suspension.
Male students are receiving 20% more referrals for negative behavior than
the female students.
No specific response
There is a higher population of Latino students who are
being suspended than African-American, Asian or White
students.
Calling and meeting with parents
30% of the teachers are non African-American or Latino
No action taken
41% of all teachers are new teachers
No action taken
Simply writing referrals was not effective for
changing behavior for longer intervals
Not involving teachers in the process of
discipline took some of their power and
created a disconnected faculty.
Lack of responses to data were well-meaning
but created no opportunities for change and
left things to business as usual.
It is now mandatory for all teachers to
set visual/audio timers at the beginning
of each class.
Ensure that a snapshot (warm up) is
given in the first 10 minutes of every
class. It will be collected and graded.
Students who are cutting class will
have their cutting documented and
will then be returned to their classrooms
by security. (Student reentry will be quiet
and non-disruptive. All disruptions will
be handled by security on the spot.)
A bi-weekly (every two
weeks) assembly will be held
for male students by grade
level in the auditorium.
Special guests speakers will
be asked to address the male
students and engage them in
morale building exercises and
motivational speaking. (A
program at the other local
high school has shown a 5%
decrease in referrals for male
students in two months of
running the program.
Latino students will have interpreters in the front
office to help with discipline meetings and parent
meetings.
Each day the morning and afternoon
announcements will be said in English and
Spanish (a different Spanish student will be
requested to participate each week).
All non-minority teachers will be given Ruby
Paynes Framework for Understanding Poverty
text at the beginning of the new nine weeks. (A
grant was written by admin which would provide
for these free copies).
There will be specific training for new teachers
on urban teaching once a month after school
for one hour. Teachers will receive
recertification points for their attendance.
All teachers will be expected to follow specific
techniques from the Teach Like a Champion
text. (These techniques on behavioral
management will be assessed at each
administrative teacher evaluation.)
In poverty, discipline is about penance and
forgiveness, not necessarily change (Payne,
1996).
Teach a separate set of behaviors as opposed to
attempting to destroy cultural behaviors of the
students (Payne, 1996).
Teach the students and model for them what
you want them to do (Payne, 1996); (Lemov,
2010).
Maintain consistency with all rewards and
consequences (Wong, 2009).
Am I defining the misbehavior by how it
looks?
Why did the student do what they did?
Is it what the student is doing or not doing
which is causing the issue?
Is there a reason why my initial approach did
not work?
Do I violate my own classroom
rules/expectations in front of students?
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put students on the path to college. San Francisco, CA:
Jossey-Bass.

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without stress. Edinboro, PA: Piper Press.

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poverty. Highlands, TX: aha! Process, Inc.
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