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Aberlour Abunadh

Single Malt Scotch Whisky (Speyside, Scotland)

The ABunadh is Scottish Gaelic for "original." Rumour has it that when the second pair of stills
were put in in 1975, a time capsule was discovered behind the name-plate containing an 1898
bottle of Aberlour wrapped around a newspaper about the infamous Aberlour distillery fire.
The workmen who discovered the bottle polished off four-fifths of the bottle during their lunch
break! The remains of the bottle went off to be analysed at laboratories in Keith. The A'bunadh
is an attempt to recreate this single malt and is a great introduction to cask-strength whisky --
whisky that is poured straight from the barrel without dilution.
On the nose, the whisky is extremely piercing, partially due to its high alcohol content with
sherry, cloves and cinnamon spiciness. Warm it up to room temperature and be rewarded with
aromas of Christmas cake, vanilla bean and dark chocolate. With water, orchard fruits come to
the fore with blood plums, peaches and apricot smells amongst nutmeg and cinnamon.
Tasted neat, oak and sherry are met by dry fruit cake, cocoa, orange peel and burnt toffee as
cinnamon brings spiciness. At room temperature or with a little bit of water, soft sweet sherry
and red berries flavours abound strawberry, cranberry and raspberry hitting the tongue in
waves.
The A'bunadh has a fantastic finish with the oak and sherry a constant theme with an
undertow of red grapefruit, cocoa and creamy sweet coffee.

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G.Rozelieures Rare Collection
Single Malt French Whisky (Lorraine, France)

The G.Rozelieures Rare Collection Limited edition is a French single malt, single cask whisky
made from 100% malted barley. Sourced from 250 hectares around the distilliery, the malting,
soaking, extraction of the juice and fermentation are all made at the distillery. It pairs perfectly
with dessert or as an apertif.
The Grallet-Dupic Distillery was founded in 1860 by Hubert Grallet and is still family owned.
The distillery is located in Rozelieures, a small town of only 160 inhabitants given the whisky its
name.
The whiskey is double distilled and aged in 3 different locations on their property matured in
sherry, cognac, and sauternes casks. Some of the barrels are stored in a high-up attic-like area,
a vaulted cellar and a military fort that was abandoned in the 1870s.
Made from a medium peated malt (20 PPM) that is aged in ex-Fino Sherry barrels for 8 years,
the nose has intense floral notes followed by hints of cognac and a little peat. The peat is
completely unlike Scotch peat as its comprised of different plants - think wood smoke.
The palate is elegant and delicate with subtle smoked flavours, notes of sweet sherry and
cognac coming from the ageing in barrels. This is followed by roasted nuts, wood and a little bit
of vanilla. Not incredibly complex but a nice even flavour.
The finish is of medium length, malty and smoky all at once with cocoa and almost
indistinguishable citrus.

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Clyde Mays
Straight Bourbon Whiskey (USA)

Clyde Mays Alabama Style whiskey is the current iteration of whiskies formerly known as
Conecuh Ridge Whiskey. Although the name implies that its made in Alabama, the whiskey is
distilled in Kentucky and bottled in Florida. Confusingly, it is the official state spirit of the State of
Alabama.
The whiskey and its maker have a storied, somewhat sordid past. It was originally produced
illegally in Alabama during the mid to late 20th century by Clyde May - a legendary moonshiner
and bootlegger. In 1973, Clyde served 18 months at Maxwell Air Force Base in jail for breaching
local liquor laws. In 2002, the brand was legalised by the moonshiner's son Kenny May
establishing the Conecuh Ridge company. However, in 2004 Kenny May pleaded guilty to
several violations of Alabama liquor laws resulting in a 15 month ban on the sale of this
whiskey.
Alabama Style refers to Clyde Mays use of spring water from Southern Alabama and addition
of oven-dried apples to barrels of maturing whiskey. This whiskey is simple and fun and works
very well in cocktails.
Apple cider vinegar hits immediately on the nose, followed by a cacophony of tastes running
the spectrum. What at first seems like an apple pie bomb breaks down into many disparate but
friendly elements. Butter followed by toffee, peanut brittle, stewed apple and pear. The finish
leaves that same apple pie bomb lingering on the palate, fading into pressed cider and leather.

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The Macallan 12 Fine Oak
Single Malt Scotch Whisky (Highlands, Scotland)

In what is the most significant new product launch in Macallan's illustrious 180 year history -
The Macallan Fine Oak range is finally available in Australia. These whiskies represent a
completely new range of expressions from Macallan.
Whiskies from The Macallans Fine Oak Series are triple cask-aged, going through a series of
maturations in Spanish oak sherry, American oak sherry, and American oak bourbon barrels. As
the bottle statement indicates, the Scotch in the Fine Oak 12 Year Old is at least 12 years old.
The combination delivers an extraordinarily smooth, delicate yet complex single malt. John
Hansell of 'Malt Advocate Magazine' commented: 'The Fine Oak range is...more approachable,
and has the potential to be embraced by a greater percentage of whisky drinkers....cutting back
on the sherry reveals more of the Macallan spirit, which is first-class.'
Fine Oak 12 Year Old has the colour of pale straw. The nose is mellow and restrained, but
complex, showing a balance of floral sweetness, maltiness, and oak, with slight notes of vanilla
and toffee. The whiskys flavour has no surprises vis-a-vis the smell, with all the same
characteristics there and in the same relative balance, coming across with a silky texture. The
finish is of middling-length, with a sweet and cool quality.

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The Macallan Amber
Single Malt Scotch Whisky (Highlands, Scotland)

The Macallans 1824 Series - Gold, Amber, Sienna and Ruby are sherry matured whiskies in
various casks of various ages to produce various colours and all come with no age statement.
This series is meant to be The Macallan's way forward; replacing their age-statement whiskies
and their Cask Strength edition, ultimately becoming the new identity of the brand.
The Macallan Amber is as the name implies, Amber in colour and matured in refill & first fill
Spanish & American oak sherry casks.
The whisky has a slightly more classic sherry nose here, slightly sweeter and still youthful but
more grown up with malts coming through nicely, spices and fudgy goodness, red toffee apples
eaten in a field of hey late summer.
On the palate this is medium to light in oils, with a touch of older oaks to keep you happy while
the sweetness of the malt and sherry influence comes through. Hold it on your tongue for a
while and gentle spices come in waves to tickle your fancy. Its really easy drinking again, and I
could imagine sitting drinking a fair amount of this happily in an early evening summer breeze.
The finish is short, light, dry and quite bitter with malt, aak, vanilla, strawberry flavour, orange,
nut shells and bread dough. More of the sherry raisins goodness turn up and make a welcome
presence felt.

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Glenfiddich IPA Experiment
Single Malt Scotch Whisky (Speyside, Scotland)

The Glenfiddich distillery, located in the Speyside region, is one of the largest family owned
distilleries in Scotland and holds the accolade of having the best selling Single Malt Scotch in the
world.
In 2016, Glenfiddich announced a couple of experimental whiskies in which they hope to push
the boundaries of Scotch whisky. The Glenfiddich IPA Experiment is a No Age Statement
whisky finished for just 3 months in casks that had held an IPA beer created by the nearby
Speyside Craft Brewery. The ale itself was created using British Challenger hops for its fruity
flavours. The theory is that they would go well with the Glenfiddichs inherent fruitiness.
The colour is a deep gold, definitely hints one of the amber-coloured IPA. The nose is
exceptionally fresh with notes of Chardonnay, perhaps Sauternes. A few classic Glenfiddich
traits are manifest - blood oranges, toffee, yeast and green apples.
In the mouth the IPA is even more distinguishable. The whisky is hoppy, yeasty, and malty.
More citrus and blood orange abound with a silky texture. This is followed by a touch of very
creamy vanilla.
The maltiness and hoppy notes return for the finish. Not a bad whisky by any means, but the
IPA cask doesnt add much complexity to the (already good) spirit not in the same way that,
say, a wine cask or rum cask might. In the end, this is an experiment after all and one thats well
worth trying to see if it appeals to your palate.

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Glengoyne 12
Single Malt Scotch Whisky (Highlands, Scotland)

The Glengoyne distillery sits above the A81 highway in Scotland, which marks the old Highland
Line that divides the Highlands from the Lowlands region. Consequently, the maturing spirit sits
in the Lowland, but is distilled in the Highlands. Founded in 1833 originally as Burnfoot
distillery, it was later changed to Glen Guin and then eventually Glengoyne the valley of the
wild geese.
Glengoyne uses the Golden Promise strain of barley, which is of higher quality but harder to
grow than other commercial strains. This is in common with the more well known Macallan.
The Glengoyne 12 is part of the standard offering from Glengoyne. Most of the Glengoyne
whisky goes towards making blended whiskies. The colour in the glass is gold with a rush of
apples on the nose the distillerys trademark character. The aroma is full of apples in all forms -
from dry cider, to green apples to red delicious. This is followed by an undertone of malted milk
and floral honey.
In the mouth the whisky is clean, fresh, soft, silky and hoppy moving to mead, green apples and
cider. Plenty of cereal character with a nice and viscous, chewy mouthfeel. Just lovely to sit in
the mouth. This is not the most overly complex dram in the world, but it is exceptionally well
executed.
The sherry is more dominant on the finish, with distinct notes of berry jam and fruit juice. An
excellent clean, fresh whisky, well-made and with enough depth of flavour for this being lovely
at the start of the evening.

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Ardbeg Uigeadail
Single Malt Scotch Whisky (Islay, Scotland)

From the southern coast of the Isle of Islay comes a whisky that is a beautifully balanced
example of a peated whisky - The Ardbeg Uigeadail.
"Uigeadail" literally means "dark and mysterious" and its namesake is Loch Uigeadail, the
enigmatic spring from which Ardbeg's water originates. Uigaedail is a limited release Ardbeg
that mixes their standard ten year whisky with an older malt that has been aged in sherry casks.
Just let your first sip linger on your tongue, let the rich Islay breeze and the peat smoke rise
through your nose to the top of your head, sit back relax and enjoy the ride.
The nose smells like youre on the Isle of Islay standing next to a smoking heap of peat. Along
with barely noticed notes of grapefruit, honey, and hot pepper.The palate is amazingly smooth
for the high alcohol content. Deep rich smoke with multiple layers of peat mix together for a very
rich, chocolate mocha flavour.
The finish is surprisingly full of salty, sweet candy, black licorice and even more layers of peat
smoke. Theres very little burn with the heavy alcohol content covered almost completely by the
serious smoke.
Upon second tasting and helped along by a dash of water, the whisky opens up with more of
the grapefruit and hot red pepper. Amazingly smooth, we recommend starting by adding only a
few drops to taste the development of the flavour.

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Aberfeldy 12
Single Malt Scotch Whisky (Highlands, Scotland)

The Aberfeldy 12 is part of the Last Great Malts series by John Dewar & Sons who built the
distillery back in 1896. Aberfeldy is one of the main single malts used in making the Dewars
line of blended scotch whisky and is often called the golden dram due to its source of water,
the Pitilie Burn, supposedly being filled with gold.
The whisky is bright gold in appearance with a pale straw hue. On the nose, overripe fruit jump
out of the glass followed by notes of malt, vanilla and hints of sweet white grapes. A wonderful
sniff.
Five minutes sees the fruity edge only slightly diminished. On the palate, there's more rich
overripe fruit with some hay, malt and citrus rind. Dark honey and dried dates and figs nicely fill
out the role of second fiddle as they moves across the palate.
A delightfully different Speyside expression, the finish is long and driven by apricots and wood.
Notes of vanilla, cinnamon, malt, toffee and dried orchard fruit and dried dark fruit mix in and out
as it slowly fades.
For the bottle price, you are actually getting a fair bit of complexity. Something not seen in other
entry level 12 year old single malts at this price point like the Glenfiddich 12 Year Old. This
whisky has a good balance with some darker notes mixing in with some of the brighter ones.
Full bodied with a soft and chewy texture that makes for a nice drinking experience.

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Green Spot Irish Whiskey
Single Pot Still Irish Whiskey (Cork, Ireland)

Leading the resurgence of traditional pot still Irish whiskey is Green Spot Pot Still Irish Whiskey.
Green Spot was one of the first and still one of the only independent bottlings of Irish whiskey.
The Single Pot-Still is Irish whiskey's equivalent to the "single" in single malt scotch. This
means that the whiskey is not blended and comes exclusively from the stills of a single distillery.
The single pot still tradition was mostly lost during the twentieth century in favour of the
popularity of blended whiskies like Jameson. However it's now being revived by brands like the
Green Spot.
The whisky has a wonderful nose of fall fruits coming out of the bottle with intense apple cider
and then opening up into ripe green pears. You can note the Fino cask flavour, if perhaps not the
Oloroso cask, and a whiff of the white oak behind it.
Upon first tasting, all the big sweets sort of disappear for a nice warm and perfectly balanced
palate. Just some touches of green grapes, a little oaky age, and some very mellow grain.
The finish is just miraculously smooth but relatively short. There's not even a whisper of alcohol
burn. This whisky is just so amazingly drinkable, you'll already be thinking more about your next
sip than about the finish of the last one.

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Amrut Fusion
Single Malt Whisky (Bengaluru, India)

Amrut (Sanskrit for nectar of the gods) is the most famous Indian whisky distillery outside
India. World leading whisky writer Jim Murray has praised the distillery, naming Amrut Fusion as
the 3rd best whisky in the world in his Whisky Bible 2010. This has resulted in its increasing
popularity with drinkers worldwide.
Amrut Fusion is a whisky made from a fusion of Scottish and Indian barley thus giving it its
name. Although having a 50% alc/vol content, this whisky is surprisingly easy and dense in
flavour. Best served neat, the Amrut Fusion has a nice amber almost pale gold colour in the
glass.
Take a long, slow sniff and you will notice the smell of lots of malt and cereal with a rich
explosion of very fruity, cherry and tropical aromas. Be sure to let the whisky breathe for a
couple of moments longer before taking another sniff and notice a faint peaty aroma.
When youre ready, swirl the whisky in the glass and take a short, small sip letting the whisky
sit on your tongue and mouth. You will notice the delightful taste of honey and dates with a hint
of lemon. Feel the creamy sweet texture of the whisky in your mouth and feel free to swirl it
around to get the full experience.
The Amrut Fusion has a medium-long finish on the palate that hangs around for minutes after
youve finished drinking. You may notice a slight, mellow smoky flavour as the tannins work their
way through to your taste buds.

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Monkey Shoulder
Blended Malt Whisky (Scotland)

The Monkey Shoulder Blended Malt Whisky is a combination of 3 different Speyside whiskies
mixed together in small 27 barrel batches. The original vatting was made from three distilleries
on the site in Dufftown: Kininvie, Glenfiddich & The Balvenie (sometimes affectionately known
as the KGB).
The Monkey Shoulder occasionally uses other distilleries in the mix, but always three Speyside
distilleries and always in first fill American oak (i.e. first time the barrels have been used in
Scotland).
The origin of the name comes from the temporary shoulder strain that some malt men used to
develop when turning malting barley with a shiel (wooden shovel). The malt men named this
the "monkey shoulder" and a legendary whisky was born.
The nose is big and complex - orchard and tropical fruit followed by malty sweetness, red
licorice a bit of spice and caramel.
The palate has the same complex fruit, malt, licorice and spice from the nose but the flavour
brings in some additional notes of cream soda, juicy fruit gum and some grassy undertones.
The finish is of a medium length and fruity with notes of grassy malt and earth. There's
excellent balance with smooth, almost oily, texture.

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Highland Park 12
Single Pot Scotch Whisky (Highlands, Scotland)

Founded in either 1798 or 1826, depending on which story you go by, Highland Parks location
on windswept Orkney makes it the northernmost distillery in Scotland. Distilling at the site
began back in the late 18th century, but it wasnt until 1826 that a license was granted for
lawful operations. Even today, this Island distillery underscores its north-of-the-law heritage
with vaguely Nordic branding and continuing reminders of its illicit past.
Highland Park is one of the few distilleries to carry on the tradition of floor malting, a
labor-intensive process where barley is spread across a floor and regularly hand-turned for even
germination before being kilned with Orkney peat, a famously heathery peat saturated by eons
of salt spray.
This whisky is a rich ripe, rosy apricot in colour with medium viscosity when swirled in the
glass. The nose has warm hay, citrus zest, white grape, orange blossom, and rose giving an
immediate impression of a late-summer garden. Peat aroma is very mild, expressing itself
primarily as a kind of salty earthiness, like a flower bed in full bloom after being fertilized with
seaweed.
The palate is initially dominated by very fresh, crisp notes of grain, with a continuation of
orange zest and hay from the nose. The finish is long without being overpowering, and delivers
a welcome bitterness to anchor that sherry sweetness. The peat is subtle here, too, expressing
itself as a recently extinguished campfire rather than a blazing pyre and lacking many of those
bandaid/iodine notes that some find challenging.

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Arran Malt Lochranza Reserve
Single Malt Scotch Whisky (Isle of Arran, Scotland)

Arran is the only distillery on the Isle of Arran and was founded in 1994 by Harold Currie, a
former Chivas Brothers director. Arran is one of the last remaining independent Scottish
distilleries. While this distillery is relatively new, it has already proven that it is capable of
producing outstandingly distinct whisky. It shows that great Scotch can be produced even if
decades or centuries of tradition in a distillery are absent.
A citrusy, light and elegant no-age-statement single malt the Lochranza Reserve replaced the
Arran Original in mid-2014. The name comes from the village on the Isle of Arran where the
distillery is located - officially part of the Highlands Region according to the Scotch Whisky
Association.
Appearance is a pale straw gold with slow-moving legs in the glass. The nose is light and
nicely floral, like nosing a meadow of flowers. Fresh green apples, lemon peels and a hint of milk
chocolate. After resting for a while, the whisky releases further aromas - now with sweet honey,
cereal barley malt, slight citrus lemon and lime fruits.
The whisky is sublimely delicate on the palate with orange marmalade first, then berries
starting to dominate. The salty sea air notes grow slightly on the palate, balanced with plenty of
juicy citrus and sweet toffee.
Hints of sour and bitter elements from apple, pear, and plum add a depth and complexity. The
finish is of medium length with barely detectable sweet cereal barley and bitter lemon.

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Deveron 12
Single Malt Scotch Whisky (Highlands, Scotland)

The Deveron name has a confused etymology. Firstly, there is no Deveron distillery - this
expression is made at the MacDuff Distillery. Secondly the MacDuff Distillery does also go by
the name of Glen Deveron which is a different whisky brand with their own whiskies entirely.
Founded in 1960s as the MacDuff distillery by Glen Deveron Distillers Limited they were forced
to stop using the MacDuff name once Diageo took hold of the MacDuff trademark. After 1994,
the whisky was released as Glendeveron and then released as Glen Deveron. However, during
all of this the distillery itself remained named MacDuff.
This whisky is an approachable dram which has a tang of coastal air about it. The distillery is
set up for a light, fruity spirit thats replete with Apple tones and nutty notes. Upon the first sniff,
the sweet aroma of gently baked apples and cinnamon is apparent along with lots of honey.
With a little time there is more pastry notes, Apple Danish pastries, lots of cinnamon, pepper
and touches of nutmeg.
The palate arrives with sugar and a good amount of apple jam fruitiness. Cinnamon again on
the palate, along with that pastry feel. A little hotter ginger and pepper proceed into the
development, which increases in honey and brown sugar notes.
Mouthfeel is light, but with some subtle oiliness. Uncomplicated and easy to sip and enjoy while
relaxing.

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Glenfarclas 8
Single Malt Scotch Whisky (Highlands, Scotland)

The Glenfarclas distillery is located in the Speyside region in the Scottish highlands. Founded in
the 1830s, it was purchased by John Grant in 1865 with the fifth and sixth generations of the
Grant family still running the distillery today. It is often regarded as one of the top two examples
of independently-owned distilleries which have survived from the Victorian era (Springbank
being the other).
The Glenfarclas 8 Year Old is an entry-level single malt for the Glenfarclas distillery, which
provides a fascinating insight into their more matured spirits. We will be featuring their more
mature spirits in future WhiskyBoxes.
Glenfarclas produce a heavy spirit that works best maturation in ex-sherry oak casks. Their
traditional dunnage warehouses keep a constant temperature and so their whiskies are uniquely
geared towards long, slow maturations.
The colour is a pale golden yellow with prominent but light highland peat notes on the nose.
This is followed by honey, malt and a hint of orange marmalade. The palate is smooth and nutty,
remaining quite light and leading into a brisk finish.
The finish is short, brief and to the point with a vanilla fudge taste dotted with raisins and red
apples. There are sherry casks involved in this maturation, but they're not pronounced enough
to be overtly obvious just yet.

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Penderyn 41 Madeira
Single Malt Welsh Whisky (Wales, United Kingdom)

The Penderyn Distillery resides in the picturesque Brecon Beacons National Park in Wales.
Distillation started in 2000 and on 1st March 2004, their first whisky was released in the
presence of HRH Prince Charles. This made it the first Welsh distillery in over a century!
The Penderyn 41 Madeira is one of several expressions - a focused, superbly balanced,
eminently flavoursome whisky. An excellent example of how high-quality a whisky can be made
outside of the traditional whisky-making countries.
The spirit is aged in Buffalo Trace first-fill ex-bourbon barrels, followed by a six month finish in
ex-Madeira casks and then filled at 41% alc/vol giving it its name.
One the nose, the first word that comes to mind is clean. Penderyn smells clean, like
freshly-folded laundry and clear spring water. The aroma also presents crushed nuts, lemon
peel, and white chocolate fudge, with a tart high note of fresh plums or green grapes.
The palate is creamy with a moderate tongue burn. You may notice a very nutty, with layers of
pistachio and hazelnut over a bed of crisp roasted malt. The madeira only comes through at the
end, with notes of golden raisin and a barely noticed touch of balsamic. A few drops of water
will make the nose drier and release more of the pure barley flavour and is definitely
recommended.
The finish is medium-long and dry. Tasting of tannins from grape skin ending pleasantly with
no bitterness.

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Johnnie Walker Green Label
Blended Malt Welsh Whisky (Wales, United Kingdom)

The return of a quintessential classic whisky and a part of the WhiskyBox Collection, in May
2015, a 10th Anniversary Release of the Johnnie Walker Green Label was released for sale
around Australia.
The Green Label is a 'blended malt' or 'vatted malt' scotch whisky - a whisky that is a marriage
of single malt whisky from different distilleries. Since 1997 Johnnie Walker have been producing
this nifty little gem by marrying Caol Ila (from Islay), Talisker (The Isle of Skye), Cragganmore
(Speyside) and Linkwood (Speyside) -- a marriage made in heaven.
The a rich and full nose, this whisky has tons of mocchacino and espresso coffee notes
complemented by wood smoke, bitter chocolate and oak.
Upon tasting the whisky really coats the palate. Wild spiced honey up front with considerable
sweetness. The palate is of medium-body with notes of cereals, coffee beans, chocolate, and
maybe some dates and walnuts to a discerning taster. Soon thereafter malty notes appear with
faint sherry and a flourish of gentle peat.
The finish is quite long and spicy with honeyed sweetness and oak with a faint sherry note on
the finish and the taste of bright red raspberries.
Details are scant about how long this iteration of the Green Label will last in the market but
we're proud to have the Green Label as part of the WhiskyBox Collection.

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Nikka From The Barrel
Blended Japanese Whisky (Japan)

Produced by the Nikka Whisky Distilling Company headquartered in Tokyo, the Nikka From The
Barrel is one of the greatest, if not the best, value for money vetted whiskies in the world.
In this case, Nikka have used different ages of single malt from both Miyagikyo and Yoichi and
married them together over time to create a whisky that is a definite must for novice and
experienced whisky aficionados alike.
It is an absolute gem of a whisky -- give it a go, you will not be disappointed. On the nose, this
blended whisky has very floral, rose water and other flower notes, good hints of spice (star
anise, clove, nutmeg, hints of cinnamon), apple peel & hints of other citrus notes (lemon and lime
peel).
Note: At first the floral notes are overwhelming but with airing over 30 minutes it opens up to
one of the most fantastic whiskies that has ever graced a whisky drinkers nose.
Give plenty of sniffing time to this one. To taste, this whisky is a very rich and smooth drink.
Starts very light with building sweetness - notes of grape (almost sweet grappa), apple,
caramel, bourbon-corn sweetness on the nose and palate.
It is quite round and balanced in taste, even when taken neat it stays very measured. almost a
bit restrained. The whisky finish is short with citrus zest, figs vanilla, ginger, quite peppery if
taken neat. With water, the finish is full of warm spice and fruit underscored by an oaky taste.

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Talisker 10
Single Malt Scotch Whisky (Isle of Skye, Scotland)

Talisker is an Island single malt and the only distillery on the Isle of Skye - part of the massive
Highlands region.
The remarkable flavour to take away from Talisker is their ability to capture sea salt and the
ocean in their whisky. While not as overtly peat-heavy as an Islay malt, Taliskers peat provides
a background of earthiness that matches its rocky flavours.
As this is one of the more complex of whiskies, it may take some getting used to. Once you can
appreciate it, though, nothing beats Talisker for relief at the end of a hard day.
The colour of the whisky is a rich golden colour - very similar to the apple juice. The nose gives
you a clear, distinct ocean smell with fragrantly oily, smoke, spicy whisky scents. Each return to
nose the whisky gives you something to sniff at each time you bring the glass up for a sip.
On the palate, you will get sweetness before the smoke blows in and the flavour takes a turn
towards pepper and minerals.
The finish is long, warming and citrusy, with previously hidden notes of marshmallow, moss,
chalk, lemon, white pepper, and orange peel. Adding a dash of water opens up to reveal some
warmer floral scents. Let the whisky air for half an hour to an hour and the body is completely
tamed becoming deliciously creamy and rounding out the peppery flavour.

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Glendalough Double Barrel
Blended Irish Whiskey (Wicklow, Ireland)

Irelands Glendalough Distillery follows what is a tried-and-true pattern for craft outfits in
America. Glendalough have sourced a mix of unaged spirits and whiskies to produce this
Double Barrel expression.
The Glendalough Double Barrel is a no age statement (NAS) whiskey - reportedly between
three and four years old. It is also a single grain whiskey from a corn and malt mash aged in
ex-bourbon barrels before receiving a six month finish in ex-sherry casks (hence, Double
Barrel).
In the glass, the whiskey has the appearance of white wine, which is what we expect from any
young spirit aged in used wood. Not a lot of time has passed for the colour to transfer from the
barrel into the whiskey.
The nose packs apple and grass scents, with a solid note of dry wood. You may also get
medicinal qualities of menthol/mint. The flavour is fruity and woody in equal measures, in a place
where white raisins mingles with peppery wood, mixed in with creamy butterscotch for good
measure. The finish is light, sharp but long lasting full of malted grain.
Glendalough Double Barrel is a nice little sipper, and one where the sherry finish shows itself
well. In going that route, Glendalough has taken what might have been a youthful and
unremarkable grain whiskey and built on it in a relatively short space of time.

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Glenlivet Nadurra Batch 615
Single Malt Scotch Whisky (Speyside, Scotland)

Glenlivet is typically the whisky you get on an airplane if you ask for a scotch. The Glenlivet is a
distillery based on Ballindalloch in Moray, Scotland about 100 km from Aberdeen and has been
in business since 1824 with their whisky expressions having won numerous international
awards.
Ndurra is Gaelic for natural and indicates that no chill filtration or colour has been added.
Each expression in The Glenlivet Ndurra range is crafted in small batches using traditional
production methods and is matured exclusively in a different cask-type, showcasing the
versatility and flawless quality of The Glenlivet spirit.
The whisky is aged for at least 16 years in first fill, Olorosso Sherry barrels from Jerez, Spain
and then bottled at cask strength. The batch you are drinking was bottled at 60% ABV in Jun
2015 (hence the Batch 615).
The colour is a bright gold with dried fruit aromas of raisins and apricots complemented with
gentle notes of cinnamon and liquorice. On the palate hints of rich dark chocolate and spicy
orange marmalade add depth to its smooth creaminess. This leads to a long, slightly dry, spicy
finish.
If youre looking for a good Speyside whisky without the heavy wine or sherry finish, the
Nadurra is the one to go for. Its also great as a gentle introduction to cask-strength whiskies -
being a lot easier to handle for those new to cask strength than something like the Aberlour
Abunadh.

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Glenfiddich Rich Oak
Single Malt Scotch Whisky (Speyside, Scotland)

The Glenfiddich distillery, located in the Speyside region, is one of the largest family owned
distilleries in Scotland and holds the accolade of having the best selling Single Malt Scotch in the
world. Straight-forward and approachable, this whisky is a good choice for newcomers to both
single malt whisky and bourbon offering the best of both worlds: the light fruity sweetness of
Speyside whiskies with the vibrancy and zestiness of new oak common to bourbons.
This expression is matured for 14 years and then finished in New American Oak & Spanish Oak
casks for up to 12 weeks to provide a harmony of fruit and new oak flavours. The casks are
sourced from Louisville, Kentucky in the US and Jerez, Spain.
This is a departure from Glenfiddich's normal finishing process which typically has the spirit
finish in an ex-"something" casks, e.g. sherry, bourbon, port, or wine. Glenfiddich claims this is
the first American and European oak finished whisky in the world.
First released in 2010, the colour of this whisky is a rich deep gold with the nose a full of fresh
fruits and spices. Unsurprisingly there's a bourbon-like feel to the nose - initial spicy oak notes
follow vibrant vanilla and rich dried fruit. Letting the dram breathe for a while seems to allow
more fruity and toffee elements to come to the fore.
The palate is rich and sweet vanilla with a silky texture and elegant hints of fruit. This gets
deeper and richer with time in the glass. The breathing helps release a subtle nutty character.
The finish is full of vanilla-tinged spiciness with the dram gently fading out with drying and
chewy flavours of dried fruit and nuts.

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Mortlach Rare Old
Single Malt Scotch Whisky (Speyside, Scotland)

Mortlach was once a hidden gem. Much of its yearly 3 million litres of spirit goes into Johnnie
Walker Black Label, one of the worlds great blends. Coming from a small, eccentric distillery in
Speyside, Mortlach was prized to the point it was unavailable in an official distillery bottling for
many years, except in small amounts as part of Diageos Flora and Fauna series.
More recently, Diageo decided to invest significantly in the distillerys refurbishment and
expansion leading to the creation of the Mortlach Rare Old. The whisky is a NAS whisky that is
matured in a mixture of Sherry and bourbon casks.
The colour in the glass is a deep amber. A light nose that grows into dry sherry, fresh orange
skins, vanilla bean, peach ice cream with black cherries, spearmint and lawn clippings. The initial
taste starts with a mild, sweet fruitiness chased by some vanilla extract and then a wood spice
follow-through. This is very smooth whisky, as there is no spirit burn at all. But there is plenty of
spicy bite.
The drying wood of the immediate finish is soon flooded, as the mouth waters prodigiously.
The finish remains woody, with a faint vegetable bitterness that turns to minerals.
A drop or three of water spreads out the bitter and the sweet, and helps the distillery character
to blossom with fatty nuts, earthy peat, lush grasses, and figs. It is best to limit the water to
droplets. This is a nuanced whisky, soft and supple in its complexity. It wont set the world or
your palate on fire, but theres a wonderful balance of sweet and sour flavours on show that
makes it a worthwhile dram to try.

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Lagavulin 8 200th Anniversary Edition
Single Malt Scotch Whisky (Islay, Scotland)

An exceptionally fine whisky.


Thats not our observation, nor the invention of the Marketing Department at Diageo
(Lagavulins owner). This was the judgement of the first ever whisky journalist, Alfred Bernard
on Lagavulin's 8-year-old single malt when he visited Islay back in 1887.
Released to commemorate the 200th anniversary of the founding of Lagavulin distillery by John
Johnston in 1816, the Lagavulin 8 is a fitting tribute to this fine brand. Instead of just releasing a
super-premium, unobtainable, uber-expensive commemorative expression exclusively for
deep-pocketed connoisseurs, Lagavulin have released this special edition whisky for those just
starting their whisky discovery journey and won a place in our hearts.
The appearance in the glass is classic Lagavulin - clear, very pale straw. The nose has tons of
smoke and peat mixed with a fresh grainy sweetness, like multigrain bread toasted over an
industrial fire and slathered in clover honey. Notes of briny salt overlay a fundamental freshness,
aromas of ripe pear and soft dried apricot. Theres also a bit of hay-like character, but very lively
and fresh-cut.
The palate is also unflinchingly smoky in a heavy, extinguished campfire kind of way. Lots of
kippered fish character sticks around from the nose, salty and iodine, without straying over into
meatiness. This tapers off to a long, dry, pleasantly ashy finish that hangs for a long time. So
delightful that you will be loath to taste anything else.

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Benromach 10
Single Malt Scotch (Speyside, Scotland)

Benromach, like many of the lesser-known distilleries in Scotland, had its malt used principally
for blending until the new millennium, when new owners Gordon & MacPhail (independent
bottlers) gave the distillery a fresh lease on life with a refurbishment and a marketing push for a
new line of single malts. Benromach say their aim is to recreate the pre-1960s Speyside flavour
which used to have a bit of peat in it.
The Benromach 10 is the first of many of these new offerings and a flagship whisky for
Benromach. Take the time to savour this one - both the nose and the palate are extremely
rewarding to those who patiently sample this complex whisky.
The complexity of this whisky comes from the expertly distilled, lightly peated spirit. Its
matured in ex-bourbon and ex-sherry barrels (80/20) for at least 9 years before being blended
together and finished for another year in ex-oloroso casks.
The colour of the whisky is a brownish yellow. The nose is full and buttery - malted with rich
citrus fruit and a touch of peat and hay. Its a wonderful aroma we could sit and sniff this for
hours! Indeed, this is the best way to pick up all the different notes rich sherry with fruit & nut
chocolate, delicate spice, green apples, malty biscuit and a touch of light peat smoke.
The palate continues the overall theme with rich malt and fruit accompanied by spicy notes,
butterscotch, sherry and a bit of peat. The whisky has a medium finish with notes of fruit,
butterscotch, malt and golden raisins. A thoroughly enjoyable dram.

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Teeling Single Malt
Single Malt Irish Whiskey (Dublin, Ireland)

Teeling is one of the big new Irish whiskey brands. However the company has actually been
around for a while. Teeling Distillery is the first new distillery in Dublin in 125 years, the
company has existed since 1782. The Teeling Single Malt consists of aged malt whiskey (some
of it up to 23 years old distilled back in 1991) matured in five different wine casks including
Sherry, Port, Madeira, White Burgundy and Cabernet Sauvignon.
This combination of cask maturation techniques has never been done before in Irish whiskey
and creates a truly innovative Irish whiskey bursting with personality. The colour is a deep rich
gold.
On the nose, this whiskey is quite gentle and has almost imperceptible aroma. You may pick out
some honey and malted milk (think Milo) and maybe some green apples. Its very pleasant, if not
especially complex.
What was lacking on the nose is more than made up for on the palate. Upon first sip, there is
an explosion of intense fruitiness - grapes, sweet apples, ripe oranges, pineapple and honey
make an appearance one after another. Going in for seconds exposes an undercurrent of
currants, fresh plums, digestive biscuits, ginger and allspice.
The finish is long with sweetness in harmony with dry tannins from the wood. Vanilla is present,
naturally along with the remains of fruit and malt leaving a lasting creamy mouthfeel. An
exceptionally well-balanced and very tasty whisky!

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Teeling Single Grain
Single Grain Irish Whiskey (Dublin, Ireland)

Teeling Irish Single Grain Whiskey is a good representation of a changing attitude toward
whats historically been called Irish Whiskey. The Teeling Single Grain is an award-winning
whiskey that has won best in class annually at the World Whiskies Awards since its release. It
is one of only a handful of Single Grain bottlings in the world and an exemplary expression of its
type.
Adding less water and not removing the oils gives this whiskey a nice rich flavor and texture -
incredibly surprising when you find out this whiskey is only 5 years old. Young grain whisky
rarely tastes good, but the Teelings have found a way to get the most out of this young 95%
corn whiskey.
The Teeling Single Grain is fully matured in Cabernet Sauvignon casks from California. With a
corn base, one would expect a bourbon-like sweetness. However the Cabernet Sauvignon
maturation really adds a lot of fruity and floral characteristics, in addition to the oak.
The colour is a amber yellow with a fruity sweet nose, like dried red apples and a hint of some
grape. Leaving the whiskey to breathe for a while reveals further sweetness - caramel, vanilla,
toffee. This sweetness is balanced out by lighter notes of nuts, dark fruit and some spice.
The palate is sweet and light like the nose with additions of banana, apricot, nuts. The
undertones continue with spice, cocoa and earth adding some complexity to this grain whiskey.
The finish is long, dry and dominated by wood, caramel and spice.

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Glenkinchie 12
Single Malt Scotch Whisky (Lowlands, Scotland)

Glenkinchie, called The Edinburgh Malt for its proximity to that city, uses Oregon Pine
washbacks and hard water, which previously flowed from the Kinchie burn. Now the water
comes from Hopes Reservoir which is fed from springs in the Lammermuir hills.
One of the few remaining Lowland distilleries, Glenkinchie represents the Lowlands in Diageos
Classic Malts series. While Glenkinchie has always operated with just two stills, they are some
of the largest stills in Scotland.
The Lowlands region has only six distilleries within it. Like the name suggests, Glenkinchie lies
in a glen of the Kinchie Burn farmland near the village of Pencaitland, East Lothian.
The colour is a bright golden in the glass with a nose that is light and fruity with barley, Lowland
grass, crisp apple and a bit of cocoa mixed in. The palate of this whisky is smooth then quickly
turns a bit spicy and astringent.
Green fruits, apples and pears along with grassy notes. Crispy and sweet. Bit watery, like water
melon. And very mildly hot. Drops of water and time in the glass makes it very smooth.
The finish is sharp, yet quite fast. Mildly spicy, with oak tannins. Fresh, earthy and fruity.
Addition of water does make the tannic oak more dominant and bitter notes appear.

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Auchentoshan Three Wood
Single Malt Scotch Whisky (Lowlands, Scotland)

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Bowmore 12
Single Malt Scotch Whisky (Lowlands, Scotland)

Bowmore is not a distillery that leaps to mind when discussing Islay whisky. Although
overshadowed by its mighty neighbors to the south, Laphroaig, Lagavulin, and Ardbeg,
Bowmores whisky displays a restraint that can provide much-needed relief to the
bog-soddened palates of peat lovers.
The is because Bowmores malt is peated for less time than the more intense malts from the
southern Islay distilleries, which contributes to its reputation as a tamer cousin, and reputably
more smoky than peaty. The water used picks up heather in the hills, minerals from the
sandstone and limestone rocks from which it rises, and peat from the lowland bogs on its trip to
the distillery. All of these factors combine to yield a well-balanced, not peat-dominated, flavour
profile. If peaty expressions like Ardbeg are not your thing, this may be your whisky.
The nose is full of concentrated smoke, hay, coal dust, and cayenne pepper. The palate is silky
smooth and heavy bodied. Malty sweetness upfront, developing into smoky hay bales, caramel,
and sugar. The peat is well-integrated and refined not in your face, but still clearly Islay in
character.
The finish is long, with typical Islay smoke and slightly bitter charred wood. The thickness of the
mouthfeel is excellent, and the peat smoke notes are refined and well-rounded. Other notes are
too subtle to detect on a first try, but further exploration is warranted. Dont add any water it
ruins the thick mouthfeel and reveals only a small amount of lemon and floral aroma.

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Glenmorangie The Tayne
Single Malt Scotch Whisky (Highlands, Scotland)

This expression honours the local lore of a Spanish Armada galleons lost treasures in the
depths of the Tayne Firth (a river estuary) and is part of the Glenmorangie Legends - a collection
of single malts inspired by the legendary lands that have been home to the Glenmorangie
Distillery.
Legend has it that just offshore from our Distillery is the shipwreck of a 16th Century Spanish
Galleon. Once loaded with treasure, it is one of many ships lost when the Spanish Armada fled
from the English Navy round the Scottish coast.
The Tayne captures this tale and is something of a Spanish treasure itself, having been aged in
carefully selected Amontillado Sherry casks, a rarely seen finish in the world of whisky.
The resulting single malt, Glenmorangie Tayne, is a rich mahogany whisky showcasing a
unique harmony of deep, spicy Sherry cask notes, unusually fragrant top notes with a warming
texture leading into rich, sweet flavours of toffee.
The aroma is heady, fragrant and floral with hints of rose and roasting chestnuts. Lots of
toffee/caramel, sweet apricots, and some nuttiness. Further exploration yields muscovado sugar,
hints of aromatic coffee and chocolate coated raisins.
The palate is an oily and warming texture leading into rich, sweet flavours of toffee, brown
sugar, tropical fruits (peaches, mango and orange) and a gentle nuttiness, like walnut or Brazil
nuts. The Tayne has a long, spicy finish, with bitter-sweet citrus and dried fruits.

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Glenmorangie Lasanta
Single Malt Scotch Whisky (Highlands, Scotland)

Glenmorangie has been an innovator in the industry for years, pioneering cask expressions and
experimental bottlings of their exceptional Highland whisky. The Glenmorangie Lasanta, at 12
years of age, is in the same Glenmorangie Extra Matured Series such as the Quinta Ruban and
Nectar dOr. This one, after the same initial 10 years in ex-bourbon, spent 2 years in Oloroso
sherry casks.
This makes it sherry finished, as opposed to sherry matured. The idea of the Extra Matured
Series is to showcase Glenmorangie whisky as a canvas for other flavours, and and in this the
Glenmorangie Lasanta delivers.
On the nose, the sherry finish is very evident with a predominant fragrance of dried fruits and
caramel. The effect though is milder than whiskies matured in sherry and the fruit less robust
than Macallan or GlenDronach.
On the palate, there is alternating sweet and tart fruit. Good integration between fruit jam and
the layers of caramel, and soft cereals. The finish is medium-long. A little on the hot side, but
with some nice concentrated dried mixed fruit with the ending slightly bitter, with a touch of
nuttiness.
With water, reveals a burst of raspberry coulis, but the alcohol vapour gets a little hot. The
palate turns slightly sweeter and there is more fruit on the finish. Definitely give some water a
try.

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Glenmorangie The Duthac
Single Malt Scotch Whisky (Highlands, Scotland)

At the centre of the Royal Burgh of Tain, Ross-shire, where the Glenmorangie Distillery has
stood since 1843, lies the resting place of St Duthac. The Duthac expression honours the annual
pilgrimage made by King James IV to the shrine of St Duthac in Tain during the Middle Ages.
The Duthac is part of Glenmorangie Legends a collection of single malts inspired by the
legendary lands that have been home to the Glenmorangie Distillery.
A selection of single malt aged in ex-bourbon casks was carefully finished in casks representing
the Kings often contrasting nature. The first, finished in casks from Pedro Ximnez, to add a
layer of rich sweetness exemplifying the Kings tempered, diplomatic side. The second, finished
in charred virgin oak casks, providing an intense, spicy side embodying the Kings fiery,
impulsive nature.
The Duthac, is a deep bronze whisky having a seductive aromas of pear, toffee apple, Brazil
nuts in toffee, with an underlying spicy note, some toasty oak. A beguiling series of flavours
with rich, dark, luscious notes of milk chocolate, toffee, Brazil nuts, and gentle spice juxtaposing
the delicate, delicious sweetness of vanilla, apricots in cream and almond marzipan.
The palate is a series of mouth-filling flavours - milk chocolate, toffee, Brazil nuts, leather and
some aniseed. The spiciness is definite, but gentle, with hints of ginger and clove. The finish is
replete with vanilla, apricots in cream and some almond marzipan.

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Glenkinchie 12
Single Malt Scotch Whisky (Lowlands, Scotland)

Glenkinchie, called The Edinburgh Malt for its proximity to that city, uses Oregon Pine
washbacks and hard water, which previously flowed from the Kinchie burn. Now the water
comes from Hopes Reservoir which is fed from springs in the Lammermuir hills.
One of the few remaining Lowland distilleries, Glenkinchie represents the Lowlands in Diageos
Classic Malts series.
While Glenkinchie has always operated with just two stills, they are some of the largest stills in
Scotland. The Lowlands region has only six distilleries within it. Like the name suggests,
Glenkinchie lies in a glen of the Kinchie Burn farmland near the village of Pencaitland, East
Lothian.
The colour is a bright golden in the glass with a nose that is light and fruity with barley,
Lowland grass, crisp apple and a bit of cocoa mixed in.
The palate of this whisky is smooth then quickly turns a bit spicy and astringent. Green fruits,
apples and pears along with grassy notes. Crispy and sweet. Bit watery, like water melon. And
very mildly hot. Drops of water and time in the glass makes it very smooth.
The finish is sharp, yet quite fast. Mildly spicy, with oak tannins. Fresh, earthy and fruity.
Addition of water does make the tannic oak more dominant and bitter notes appear.

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Buffalo Trace
Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey (Kentucky, USA)

Buffalo Trace came about when in 1999 visitors to the newly renamed Buffalo Trace Distillery
asked why there wasnt a bourbon called Buffalo Trace. The Master Distiller Elmer T Lee
decided to create a whiskey that matched up with his views on what a full bodied, robust
character, Kentucky straight bourbon should taste like.
Everything about this bourbon feels like its been masterfully engineered to be the perfect
example of what a bourbon should be. Its hard to find any faults with this one and thats by
design. The nose is instantly likeable and pleasant with notes of caramel, honey, orange, and
vanilla. The nose balances these flavours well while also providing an underlying layer of oak
and mint.
The palate is sweet and mellow with notes of brown sugar, vanilla, and toffee. The palate might
be too sweet for some, but probably very enjoyable for most. Light amounts of oak and rye spice
round out the palate.
With a moderate length finish with oak at the forefront and then opening up to fill your nostrils.
Its a very interesting and full flavoured finish for a 90 proof bourbon. Buffalo Trace is a solid
bourbon that will appeal to any level of whiskey drinker. For someone new to bourbon, its
extremely accessible with its sweet nose and palate, and a finish that introduces a perfect mix
of oak and spice. Although it may not challenge a seasoned bourbon drinkers developed palate,
theyll still appreciate its overall quality and great value. This could easily become anyones
everyday bourbon.

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Cragganmore 12
Single Malt Scotch Whisky (Speyside, Scotland)

Cragganmore was built in 1869 and named for the hill of Craggan More in Speyside.
Cragganmore lacks the popularity of many of its Speyside neighbours such as the Glenmorangie
Series. Wooden washbacks, worm tubs, and an unorthodox combination of still shape, and size
make for a very complex, meaty whisky.
If you are a Johnnie Walker Green Label fan, this is the single malt answer to that fine blend.
Cragganmore, along with Linkwood, Talisker and Caol Ila form the core of Green Label. If you
like one, you will definitely enjoy the other. On the nose, this whisky has an incredible aroma --
one of the strongest of any Speyside whisky. Flowers and baked bread will wash over you in full
force in a most wonderful fashion holding up their claim of having a complex nose.
Upon first tasting, there are distinct malt, honey and marzipan notes distinctive to Speyside
whiskies. This then quickly changes to a delicate smoke with a beautiful sweetness throughout.
There is a tapestry of rich, smoky flavours, perfectly in balance, woven such that there are no
unsightly seams. Truly heaven sent.
The finish is of slightly burnt toast, cinnamon, and brown sugar woven in with gentle spices
that linger considerably upon the palate. This is a whisky that is smooth, refined, sophisticated
and wonderful beyond its mere 12 years of aging. The Cragganmore 12 would handily best any
18 year old single malts.
If you dislike peaty flavours of any kind, then you will love Cragganmore 12 yr old.

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Iwai Tradition
Blended Japanese Whisky (Nagano, Japan)

This is a malt and grain blend whisky from Shinshu Mars Distillery, a very highly respectable
Japanese producer, known for its "Iwai Tradition" style whiskies. Iwai, named after Kiichiro Iwai
who designed the stills used to distill the whisky is one of the base releases for Shinshu Mars.
Shinshu Factory where Iwai Tradition is produced is located in the Komagatake Mountains, in
the Japanese Alps. This terrain is an ideal place to produce whisky, where the air is pure, misty
and cool, and the place is rich in good water courses.
Instead of the normal pale straw colour that you would expect from a bourbon barrel aged
whisky, the Iwai is instead the deep, rich amber colour of a whisky aged in port or sherry casks.
The mash bill for the Iwai is mostly corn (75%), with malted barley making up the remainder. So
for all intents and purposes, the Iwai is essentially a Japanese bourbon!
An easy drinking Japanese whisky in our opinion, and a perfect introduction to traditional
Japanese blended whiskies.
The palate has great pleasant complexity created by vatting of various cask malts with peaty
malts. As it is a full bodied whisky, the finish and thick & rich flavours are not lost when having it
on the rocks or as highballs.
The finish is surprisingly soft and round, despite being categorised as a thick & rich whisky. The
finish is quite long with a crisp lingering flavour.

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Craigellachie 13
Single Malt Scotch Whisky (Speyside, Scotland)

The Craigellachie 13 is the second release of Dewars The Last Great Malts series comprising
the Aberfeldy, Aultmore, Royal Brackla, Craigellachie and Macduff. This murky little dram with
the name like a monster straight out of Tolkiens notebook magically captures both the light and
dark aspects of Speyside.
Located at the confluence of the River Spey and the River Fiddich, the Craigellachie distillery is
smack dab in the middle of Speyside territory. The whisky is different (in a good way) from usual
Speyside whisky profile - comprising meaty aromas with light fruity sulphur. Be warned, this
may not be a good fit for sulphur sensitive whisky tasters.
In the glass, the whisky is a pale golden straw colour unusual in comparison to other Speyside
whiskies. The nose is full of rich complex fruit; apples, pears and apricots with some honey,
grassy malt and vanilla. Hints of cinnamon and a sugary sweetness lounge in the background
until a splash of water is added and then they become more pronounced.
On the palate, that same rich and complex fruit delivers, but this time it comes with a charred
and woody companion. Glazed honey, and a slightly nutty character may remind you of honey
roasted nuts. A splash of water brings out a bit more of the wood, malt and earth.
The finish is long with big notes of fruit, woody char and vanilla that moves to malt, earth and
apricots on its way out.

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Talisker Storm
Single Malt Scotch Whisky (Isle of Skye, Scotland)

Talisker is an Island single malt and the only one on the Isle of Skye. In terms of Scotch Whisky
Associations region categorisation, its part of the Islands sub-region of the massive Highlands.
Founded in 1830 by Hugh and Kenneth MacAskill, the distillerys name comes from the
settlement it leased land from, a settlement owned for centuries by the Clan Macleod (the clan
of the fictitious Duncan and Connor Macleod from the Highlander series!).
Talisker was acquired by Diageo in 1925. Taliskers regular lineup features a 10yo, 18yo, 25yo,
and a Distillers edition. The remarkable flavour to take away from Talisker is their ability to
capture sea salt and the ocean in their whisky. You get the smoke, you get all the hints that its
an island malt, but no one else has captured the ocean in a bottle.
The Storm by comparison carries no age statement, which is something Diageo has been
trending towards and they use a mix of first-fill and refill casks.
The colour of the whisky is a rich, dark gold. The nose gives you a clear, distinct ocean or ocean
spray smell immediately with a hint of citrus, smoke, and sweetness. On the palate, you will get
sweetness and smoke a reminder that Talisker are still using peat in the drying of the malted
barley.
The finish is moderate and mostly sweet. You may also get a hint of cigar tobacco as if from a
lightly rolled habanos (cuban cigars).

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Russells Reserve Single Barrel
Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey (Kentucky, USA)

Russells Reserve is named after Wild Turkeys Master Distiller Jimmy Russell and was released
to commemorate his 45th anniversary in 1999. Aged for 10 years in heavily charred barrels
(called 'alligator' barrels) the bourbon receives a more assertive woody character.
With a dark caramel colouring and a rich, sweet vanilla, caramel and toffee aroma, the
bourbon is a rich and satisfying pour. This is such a deep, rich and complex nose we
recommend taking your time to smell before taking your first sip. Let it rest for even longer
and you may also pick up burnt sugar, butterscotch, and browned butter.
On the palate, dark fruit, caramel and an entire rack of baking spices start things off. Wood
comes right behind with rye in tow while toffee and vanilla follow through. Like the aroma this
has an insanely rich and complex flavour.
Brilliantly balanced with the strong rye and wood keeping the menagerie of sweet flavours in
check. A thick full body thats warm, syrupy and feels heavy on the tongue with just the right
amount of burn to keep things interesting. The finish is pleasantly long full of wood, toffee,
caramel, rye, dark fruit, vanilla and mint slowly fading to a warm sweet wood.
If someone asked us what should a bourbon taste like, we would offer them a glass of the
Russell's Reserve. Afterwards, we could of course explore wheated bourbons, traditional
bourbons, high rye etc., but to bring it all home we would still end with this. A thoroughly
enjoyable glass of bourbon.

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