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From:

Bramblett Jimmy - NRCS Washington DC

To:

Cohen Kari - ARCS Washington DC - Erickson Terrell - ARCS yvashinvton DC; Guerrero Rafael - ARCS Fort Worth TX - Herbert Noller • ARCS Washington DC' McKinney Shaun • NRCS Portland OR; Moebius-Clune Bianca - NRCS - Washington DC Porter Jeffrey - NRCS Greensboro NC Tillman Denise - NRCS Washington

DC

Cc:

Tillman lames - MRCS Washington DC • Sadeghzadeh Kaveh - NRCS Washington DC Deavers. Leslie - ARCS Washington De Wickey. Kevin - ARCS Washington, DC • Barry Gavle - ARCS Washington DC • Chessman Dennis • ARCS Lexington.KY • Boozer Astor - NRCS Washington. De Jordan Leonard - NRCS Washington DC• Smith David - ARCS Washington DC Kramer Tony - ARCS Washington DC Reed Lesia - ARCS Beltsville MD: Christensen Thomas - MRCS Washington DC

Subject:

130- AGN - Agency General - Branding

Date:

Tuesday, January 24, 2017 11:41:29 AM

Good Afternoon,

This email is a follow-up to our staff meeting last week. During our visit we discussed the transition

team moving into the Department, and priorities of our new administration.

It has become clear

one of the previous administration's priority is not consistent with that of the incoming

 

administration. Namely, that priority is climate change. Please visit with your staff and make them

aware of this shift in perspective within the Executive Branch.

Within the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), we address resource concerns related to soil, water, air, plants, and animals. We have approved resource concerns and causes associated with Air Quality as follows:

1. AIR QUALITY IMPACTS - Emissions of Particulate Matter- PM - and PM Precursors

• Direct emissions of particulate matter - dust and smoke-, as well as the formation of fine particulate matter in the atmosphere from other agricultural emissions - ammonia, NOx, and VOCs - cause multiple environmental impacts, such as: 14 The unintended movement of particulate matter - typically dust or smoke - results in safety or nuisance visibility restriction, 2) The unintended movement of particulate matter and/or chemical droplets results in unwanted deposits on surfaces, 3) Increased atmospheric concentrations of particulate matter can impact human and animal health and degrade regional visibility.

2. AIR QUALITY IMPACTS - Emissions of Greenhouse Gases — GHGs

• Emissions increase atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases.

3. AIR QUALITY IMPACTS - Emissions of Ozone Precursors Emissions of ozone precursors - NOx

and VOCs

• resulting in formation of ground- level ozone that cause negative impacts to plants and animals.

4. AIR QUALITY IMPACTS - Objectionable odors

• Emissions of odorous compounds - VOCs, ammonia and odorous sulfur compounds - cause nuisance conditions

At this juncture, please be encouraged to use terminology associated with these approved resource concerns to describe the work you/we do to serve our nation's agricultural producers and woodland owners. Having said that, we will be revisiting Air Quality — Emissions of Greenhouse Gases to determine the relevance of its continued use. Prudence when discussing this particular resource concern-cause is advised until further notice.

Page 1 of 2

I will copy other agency leaders on this message for the purpose of alerting them to our current communications within the Deputy Chief for S&T family. Many thanks to each of your for exercising diplomacy when communicating this information internally and externally, and for your leadership during this transient period.

THAN

Jimmy Bramblett Deputy Chief - Science and Technology Natural Resources Conservation Service United States Department of Agriculture

202-720-4783 www.nrcs.gov
202-720-4783
www.nrcs.gov

ji nmy.bramelet -ic-owdc.usda.eov

Page 2 of 2

From:

Hamner, Tim - NRCS, Beltsville, MD

Sent:

16 Feb 2017 16:15:18 +0000

To:

Bramblett, Jimmy - NRCS, Washington, DC

Cc:

Simmons, Machelle - NRCS, Beltsville, MD

Subject:

APG Soil Health Quarter 1 summary

Attachments:

Agency Priority Goal Quarterly Progress Report Template lstQuarter FY17.docx

Jimmy

Could you please review this and make sure there is no problems with any wording. This is the 1st Quarter Soil Health APG report, that is provided to the Department. Quarterly reporting requirements usually are due on the first of the month after the end of the quarter (February 1, for the first quarter). I will seek leadership approval prior to sending to the Department. I utilized the report that Bianca provided previously and put in the format we send to the Department.

Thanks in advance.

Tim Hafner Team Lead for Performance Strategic and Performance Planning Division Strategic Planning and Accountability

Office (301) 504-1616 Cell (859) 327-5073
Office (301) 504-1616 Cell (859) 327-5073
Office (301) 504-1616 Cell (859) 327-5073
Office (301) 504-1616 Cell (859) 327-5073
Office (301) 504-1616 Cell (859) 327-5073
Office (301) 504-1616 Cell (859) 327-5073
Office (301) 504-1616 Cell (859) 327-5073
Office (301) 504-1616 Cell (859) 327-5073

Office (301) 504-1616 Cell (859) 327-5073

Office (301) 504-1616 Cell (859) 327-5073
Office (301) 504-1616 Cell (859) 327-5073
Office (301) 504-1616 Cell (859) 327-5073
Office (301) 504-1616 Cell (859) 327-5073
Office (301) 504-1616 Cell (859) 327-5073
Office (301) 504-1616 Cell (859) 327-5073

Page 1 of 4

Goal Lieutenant(s): Acting Chief Leonard Jordan Reporting Period (i.e. 2017 — QV:

Priority Goal: Soil Health 16-17

Goal Leader: Anne Mills, Deputy Undersecretary for NRE

Update/Accomplishments

Progress

This

Goal Statement:

Period:

Activities

As part of its overall soil health effort, NRCS' "Unlock the Secrets in the Soil" awareness and education campaign continues to provide foundational educational material and messaging to farmers and consumer alike. Quarter 1

The SHD participated in USDA Climate Hub and greenhouse gas (GHG) Building Block activities. The SHD provided

The NRCS Soil Health Division (SHD) provided activities and events reaching over 11,000 participants such as

Established the Soil Health and Sustainability three-day course as a requirement for NRCS national conservation planner certification.

approximately 2,000 NRCS employees.

education on climate smart agriculture and forestry by working with numerous groups including:

conservation partners, farmers and ranchers, researchers, and industry stakeholders and others, including








reviewed papers on the state of the science around grazing land soil health (results from National grazing and grassland workshop, July 2016) participated in state soil health videos outreach events at soil health trial demonstration sites other soil health projects

39 training events 21 outreach activities, including distribution of materials and publications and committee/workgroup sessions reviewed technical papers conducted strategic planning to expand and act on the preliminary literature reviews on soil health assessments

No-Till on the Plains State Soil Health Advisory groups Cover Crop Councils (NRCS helped establish the Midwest, and the new Northeast and Southeast councils) Soil Health Institute committees Climate Hubs

35 and

direct

events:

- Agency Priority Goal Quarterly Progress Report -

assistance activities

Page 2 of 4

Strategies Updates & Additions (where applicable):

Next Steps:

Indicator(s)

Accomplishments include:

Campaign highlights:

Reporting







generating overt billion viewer impressions during phase one USDA's current Top 20 Facebook video views are NRCS soil health videos. over 1 million total video views

provided educational materials and assistance to farmers and consumers aired soil health public service ads through generous donations of TV stations, reaching over 200 million viewers

To meet the national certification goals, the SHD will make a portion of the revamped 'Soil Health and Sustainability' course available via webinar this fiscal year. The course will provide training on the integration of soil health management into conservation planning at a consistent level. Locations for in-field training across the country will be identified. SHD is compiling and designing standardized advanced level trainings that contain the latest updates in the science of soil health. A website to provide public access to all materials. Currently the agency is updating its resource concerns. The goal is to develop a comprehensive list of soil health concerns that need to be addressed as part of the conservation planning process. NRCS will continue to lead the soil health assessment standardization effort. Newly standardized assessments and associated management planning will be cost-shared. State training, participation in field days and workshops, instructors for advanced soil health training will be provided.

this quarter in phase one of the Public Service Announcement (PSA) campaign distributed ads to local TV stations throughout the country and to major national networks in phase two of the PSA campaign featuring Dr. Laura Danly, astronomer and academic, Curator, Griffith Observatory, California (more than 4,500 ad plays) distributed soil health print ads in 16 major metro markets including platform dioramas and 20 bus boards in the Washington D.C. area transit system Posted "Soil Health Lesson in a Minute" video that gathered nearly 500,000 Facebook views.

total donated airtime exceeded $6 million with more than 40,000 ad plays on 293 stations in 131 cities

Target

Actual

Page 3 of 4

Explanation of

Reasons for Edit

Progress/achievements/lessons learned

Stakeholders Reached

Soil Carbon retained

Grants awarded

Number of Soil Health Management system demonstration sites implemented

Literature review

Q1 2017)

0

0

0

11,000

Period (i.e

Tons

Value

200,000

3

3

14,000

15

Value

0

0

0

11,000

Page 4 of 4

The calculation does not include viewer impressions and other forms of social media

Actual (Met/Unmet/Deferr ed + Narrative supporting the result)

(if edits made to indicator/target)

towards Achieving Indicator

From:

Hamner, Tim - NRCS, Beltsville, MD

Sent:

16 Feb 2017 12:33:42 +0000

To:

Bramblett, Jimmy - NRCS, Washington, DC;Moebius-Clune, Bianca - NRCS -

Washington, DC

Cc:

Simmons, Machelle - NRCS, Beltsville, MD

Subject:

Correct terminology

Deputy Chief Bramblett,

I am finalizing the reporting for the 1st quarter for the Department. I would like to know correct terms I

 

should use instead of Climate Changes and anything to do with Carbon.

One of the measures both in

the USDA SOAR (Goal 2.1) and in the Soil Health APG is Carbon sequestered (formally modeled through APEX, now modeled in conjunction to Adam Chambers). I want to ensure to incorporate correct terminology that the agency has approved to use.

Tim Hafner

Tim Hafner Team Lead for Performance Strategic and Performance Planning Division Strategic Planning and Accountability

Office (301) 504-1616 Cell (859) 327-5073
Office (301) 504-1616 Cell (859) 327-5073
Office (301) 504-1616 Cell (859) 327-5073
Office (301) 504-1616 Cell (859) 327-5073
Office (301) 504-1616 Cell (859) 327-5073
Office (301) 504-1616 Cell (859) 327-5073
Office (301) 504-1616 Cell (859) 327-5073
Office (301) 504-1616 Cell (859) 327-5073

Office (301) 504-1616 Cell (859) 327-5073

Office (301) 504-1616 Cell (859) 327-5073
Office (301) 504-1616 Cell (859) 327-5073
Office (301) 504-1616 Cell (859) 327-5073
Office (301) 504-1616 Cell (859) 327-5073
Office (301) 504-1616 Cell (859) 327-5073
Office (301) 504-1616 Cell (859) 327-5073

Page 1 of 1

From:

Hamner, Tim - NRCS, Beltsville, MD

Sent:

16 Feb 2017 13:56:18 +0000

To:

Moebius-Clune, Bianca - NRCS - Washington, DC

Cc:

Bramblett, Jimmy - NRCS, Washington, DC;Simmons, Machelle - NRCS, Beltsville,

MD

Subject:

FW: 130- AGN - Agency General - Branding

Bianca

Could you provide me some edits/ suggestion for those items highlighted (blue and yellow) below.

Tim Hefner

From: Hafner, Tim - NRCS, Beltsville, MD Sent: Thursday, February 16, 2017 8:44 AM To: Bramblett, Jimmy - NRCS, Washington, DC glimmy.Bramblett@wdc.usda.gov> Subject: RE: 130- AGN - Agency General - Branding

Jimmy

This is part of the Soil Health APG

2. The SHD participated in USDA Climate Hub and greenhouse gas (GHG) Building Block activities. The SLID provided education on climate smart agriculture and forestry by working with numerous groups including:

• No-Till on the Plains

• State Soil Health Advisory groups

• Cover Crop Councils (NRCS helped establish the Midwest, and the new Northeast and Southeast councils)

• Soil Health Institute committees

• Climate Hubs

Soil Carbon retained

Page 1 of 4

200,000 Tons

This Indicator is officially what we report, I guess I can inquire to the Office of Budget and Policy Analysis (OBPA) and if we need to inquire with OMB who approved the Soil Health APG and its indicator.

(b)(5)

From: Bramblett, Jimmy - NRCS, Washington, DC Sent: Thursday, February 16, 2017 8:38 AM To: Hafner, Tim - NRCS, Beltsville, MD <tim.hafner@wdc.usda.goy> Cc: Lawson, Dan - NRCS, Washington, DC <Dan.Lawson@wdc.usda.gov> Subject: RE: 130- AGN - Agency General - Branding

(b)(5)

on memo being developed by Dan Lawson on that one. I will copy Dan here so he can fill you in on the latest

THANKS!]!]

Jimmy Bramblett

Deputy Chief —Science and Technology Natural Resources Conservation Service United States Department of Agriculture

14 th and Independence Avenue

Washington, DC 20250 Jimmy.bramblett@wdc.usda.gov

From: Hafner, Tim - NRCS, Beltsville, MD Sent: Thursday, February 16, 2017 8:31 AM To: Bramblett, Jimmy - NRCS, Washington, DC climmy.Bramblett@wdc.usda.gov> Subject: RE: 130- AGN - Agency General - Branding

Thanks Jimmy,

One additional question, how about the name climate hubs.

From: Bramblett, Jimmy - NRCS, Washington, DC Sent: Thursday, February 16, 2017 7:45 AM To: Hafner, Tim - NRCS, Beltsville, MD <tim.hafner@wdc.usda.goy> Subject: FW: 130 - AGN - Agency General - Branding

Tim,

Below is guidance I sent regarding the phrase "climate change". When discussing carbon sequestration, I recommend we use verbiage related to building organic matter in the soil to improve soil health

Let me know if you need more

THANKS!!

Page 2 of 4

Jimmy Bramblett Deputy Chief— Science and Technology Natural Resources Conservation Service United States Department of Agriculture

14th and Independence Avenue

Washington, DC 20250 Jimmy.bramblett@wd@usda.gov

From: Bramblett, Jimmy - NRCS, Washington, DC Sent: Tuesday, January 24, 2017 12:41 PM To: Cohen, Karl - NRCS, Washington, DC <kartcohen@wde.usda.gov>; Erickson, Terrell - NRCS, Washington, DC <Terrell. Ericksonl@vedc.usda.gov>, Guerrero, Rafael - NRCS, Fort Worth, TX <RafaelGuerrero@ftw.usda.gov>, Herbert, Noller - NRCS, Washington, DC <Noller.Herbert@wdc.usda.gov>; McKinney, Shaun - NRCS, Portland, OR Chaun.Mckinney@por.usda.gov>v Moebius-Clune, Bianca - NRCS - Washington, DC <Bianca.Moeblus- Clune@wdc.usda.gov>; Porter, Jeffrey - NRCS, Greensboro, NC @eff rey.porter@gnb.usda.gov>; Tillman, Denise - NRCS, Washington DC <Denise.Tillman@wdc.usda.gov> Cc: Tillman, James - NRCS, Washington, DC <James.Tillman@wdc.usda.gov>• Sadeghzadeh, Kaveh - NRCS, Washington, DC <Kaye h.Sadeghza d e h@wdc.usda.gov>• Deavers, Leslie - NRCS, Washington, DC (Leslie.Deavers@wdc.usda.gov )<Leslie.Deavers@wdc.usda.govm Wickey, Kevin - NRCS, Washington, DC <Kevin.Wickey@wdc.usda.gov>• Barry, Gayle - NRCS,Washington, DC <payle.barry@wdc.usda.vov>. Chessman, Dennis - NRCS, Lexington, KY <Dennis.Chessman@ky.usda.gov@ Boozer, Astor - NRCS, Washington, DC (Astor.Boozer@wdc.usda.gov) <Astor.Boozer@wdc.usda.gov@ Jordan, Leonard - NRCS, Washington, DC <Leona rd.Jorda n@wdc.usda.gov>• Smith, David - NRCS, Washington, DC <David.Smith@wdc.usda.govm Kramer, Tony - NRCS, Washington, DC <Tony.Kramer@wdc.usda.govm Reed, Lesia - NRCS, Beltsville, MD elesia.reed@wdc.usda.govm Christensen, Thomas - NRCS, Washington, DC (Thomas.Christensen@wdc.usda.gov )<Thomas.Christensen@wdc.usda.gov> Subject: 130- AGN - Agency General - Branding

Good Afternoon,

This email is a follow-up to our staff meeting last week. During our visit we discussed the transition team moving into the Department, and priorities of our new administration. It has become clear one of the previous administration's priority is not consistent with that of the incoming administration. Namely, that priority is climate change. Please visit with your staff and make them aware of this shift in perspective within the Executive Branch.

Within the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), we address resource concerns related to soil, water, air, plants, and animals. We have approved resource concerns and causes associated with Air Quality as follows:

1. AIR QUALITY IMPACTS - Emissions of Particulate Matter - PM - and PM Precursors

• Direct emissions of particulate matter - dust and smoke -as well as the formation of fine particulate matter in the atmosphere from other agricultural emissions - ammonia, NOx, and VOCs - cause multiple environmental impacts, such as: 1) The unintended movement of particulate matter - typically dust or smoke - results in safety or nuisance visibility restriction, 2) The unintended movement of particulate matter and/or chemical droplets results in unwanted deposits on surfaces, 3) Increased atmospheric

Page 3 of 4

concentrations of particulate matter can impact human and animal health and degrade regional visibility.

2 AIR QUALITY IMPACTS - Emissions of Greenhouse Gases — GHGs

• Emissions increase atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases.

3 AIR QUALITY IMPACTS - Emissions of Ozone Precursors Emissions of ozone precursors - NOx and

VOCs

resulting in formation of ground- level ozone that cause negative impacts to plants and

animals.

4 AIR QUALITY IMPACTS - Objectionable odors

• Emissions of odorous compounds - VOCs, ammonia and odorous sulfur compounds - cause nuisance conditions

At this juncture, please be encouraged to use terminology associated with these approved resource concerns to describe the work you/we do to serve our nation's agricultural producers and woodland owners. Having said that, we will be revisiting Air Quality— Emissions of Greenhouse Gases to determine the relevance of its continued use. Prudence when discussing this particular resource concern-cause is advised until further notice.

I will copy other agency leaders on this message for the purpose of alerting them to our current communications within the Deputy Chief for S&T family. Many thanks to each of your for exercising diplomacy when communicating this information internally and externally, and for your leadership during this transient period.

THANKS!!!

Jimmy Bramblett Deputy Chief - Science and Technology Natural Resources Conservation Service United States Department of Agriculture

www.nrcs.gov
www.nrcs.gov

202-720-4783 jimmy.bramblett@wdc.usda.gov

Page 4 of 4

From:

Lawson, Dan - NRCS, Washington, DC

Sent:

7 Apr 2017 14:17:40 +0000

To:

Smith, David - NRCS, Washington, DC

Subject:

FW: Climate Change in the News

Dave, not sure your thoughts on this, but what do you think of (oXed

Dan

Dan D. Lawson

National Leader, USDA Climate Hubs

Washington, DC 20250

202-720-5322
202-720-5322

dan.lawson@wdc.usda.gov

https //www.climatehubs.oce.usda.gov/

From: Wilson, Mike - NRCS, Lincoln, NE

Sent: Friday, April 07, 2017 9:53 AM

Subject: Climate Change in the News

\Just a thought

Hi, A few things for the week. Thanks for the submissions.

Workshops and Webinars (Yellow items recently added):

Tuesday, April 11, at 2:00 p.m. EDT, Webinar — Soil Health for Non- Operator Land Owners. Jennifer Filipiak, Associate Midwest Director, American Farmland Trust will discuss educating non-operator land owners on the benefits improving soil health have to increase the value of their land, and that it takes a solid working relationship between the landowner and farmer (often requiring changes in leasing structures) to obtain

changes in soil health.: littp //www conservatianwebinars net/webinars/sail health far non operator land-owners

:April 12, 10 am CDT, Webinar: Getting to Know the Trillions of Friends Underfoot: Focus on Soil Life. NRCS West Regional Soil Health Team Leader Jennifer Moore-Kucera will look at the vast array of living organisms in your farm soils and explain how a thriving soil biology can help improve

crop production. - lt

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Page 1 of 13

April 12, 3:30pm EDT. Webinar: Drought in the Northeast and Implications for Ecosystems. Speaker: Keith Nislow, USDA-Forest Service and UMass Amherst. For more information, visit: hIps: neese edu \r‘ ebimiN drouat-

northenst-and-implleallons-ccoSVSWITIS

April 17-20, 2017: Joint Meeting of the Western Snow Conference & Weather Modification Association, Boise, Idaho: Registration and call for papers is open. The conference venue offers the opportunity to interact with other professionals while enjoying one of the most vibrant cities in the

Intermountain West. http://www.westernsnowconference.org/ . This first

ever combined conference with the Weather Modification Association will kick off with a Monday afternoon short course entitled "Tracing the Effects of Cloud Seeding through the Hydrologic Cycle". Tuesday will begin with a joint plenary session, followed by concurrent sessions of oral and poster presentations. On Thursday, a technical tour will include a visit to the Dry Creek Experimental Watershed, a NRCS SNOTEL site, and a collaborative weather station for youth education.

"1-- April 19 and 20, 2017, 8th Regional Island Sustainability Conference at the University of Guam Center for Island Sustainability. The theme of the

conference is Cultivating Communities for Sustainable Action. 1) Submit a

presentation proposal. Please see the attached file for more details. All proposals are due no later than 5:00 PM, Friday, February 10, 2017. Authors of accepted abstracts will be notified by Friday, February 27, 2017. Abstracts must be submitted online

at http://tinvud.com/2017abstracts. 2) Conference

registration: Registration for the conference is now open

at https://commerce.cashnet.com/uog. More details regarding the

conference will be on our website www.uog.edu/cis2017 soon.

Thursday, April 20, 4:00-5:00 PM EST, Webinar: Climate Change and Health in Indian Country-Resilience and the Health Consequences of Climate

Change. Preparations are being made for the environmental impacts of climate change, but what about the health impacts? In this one hour webinar we will hear from subject matter experts and indigenous scholars to explore what the broad health impacts can be, discuss the ideas of health and resilience in Tribal communities, and learn about resources for

Page 2 of 13

approaching climate change planning. Teleconference access: 1-877-668-

4493, Phone Access Code: 736 404 573, Register Here

>April 25, 2pm EDT, Webinar: Watershed Planning from an NWQI

Perspective: Participants will learn about the watershed assessment used for the National Water Quality Initiative (NWQI) and how it fits into an overall watershed planning process.:

hltp //www conservalionwebinars net/webinarshvatershed-planning-f rom-an-nwqi-perspective

Apr 26, 11:00 am EDT, Webinar: Climate Change Considerations When Developing Updated Seed Zones. Please join the USDA Forest Service Reforestation, Nurseries, and Genetics Resources team for its second discussion about what it will takes to create seed zone guidelines* to serve as tools for improved collaborations and partnership in the region. Aurelia Baca, Climate Specialist with the Southeast Regional Climate Hub (SERCH), will deliver a lecture on the climate science factors that must be considered when developing updated seed zones for the southeastern United States. After the lecture, participants will share their own expertise and have further opportunities to get involved in the effort.

http //maw forettrywebmors net/utedmors/chreate change considerations when dew-tepee updated teed pones

> May 2-4,: 15th Annual Climate Prediction Applications Science Workshop (CPASW). Anchorage, AK. Workshop theme is "Understanding Extreme

Events and Decision-Maker Needs in the Context of Climate Variability and

Change." The abstract deadline is January 13th, 2017. https://accap.uaf.edu/cpasw

> May 3, 2017 1:00 pm EDT, Webinar: Water Quality Credits from Stream

Restoration Projects. Participants will learn basics of Water Quality Trading and how stream restoration, improved crop management, and

conservation practices can lead to water quality credits that can serve as an additional source of income for landowners.:

http://www.conservationwebinars.net/webinars/water-quality-credits-

from-stream-restoration-projects

May 4, 2017 2:00 pm EDT, Webinar: Agricultural Decision Tools from the Cornell Climate Smart Farming Program and the Network for Environment

and Weather Applications. Participants will learn how to navigate the

Page 3 of 13

Network for Environment and Weather Applications (NEWA) and Cornell Climate Smart Farming (CSF) Program websites and use their agricultural decision-making tools based on weather and climate:

http //wino? climateavebinars nrit/avebinars/agneultaral derision tools from the {-email climate smart farming program and the netvi.ork for environment and weather application()

1. May 17, 2:00pm EDT, Webinar: Weather Variability and its Impact on Forest Health. This webinar will discuss the impact weather and climate have on forest health and productivity. We will discuss short- and long-term impacts of droughts, floods, winds, and ice on insect and fungal populations

and damage in southern forests. http //wawa forestryavehinars net/avehinars/weathrir variability

and-its-IMpacts-011-forest-health

May 9-11, 2017: National Adaptation Forum, St Paul, MN. Those who attend the Forum will benefit from exposure to all aspects of the field, professional development, and information sharing through an innovative and comprehensive program featuring plenary sessions, symposia, working groups, training sessions, exhibit booths, poster sessions, and networking

events. httplicampaign.r20.constantcontact.com/render?m=1103636083744&ca=d36

caacb-e9b3-4709-9ccd-6e995016342d

PJune- 12-16, Lleida (Spain), Meeting: 1st WORLD CONFERENCE ON SOIL AND

WATER CONSERVATION UNDER GLOBAL CHANGE: A joint Conference of the "International Soil Conservation Organization" (19th ISCO Conference),

the "World Association for Soil and Water Conservation" (4th Conference

on Soil and Water Conservation of WASWAC ), the "European Society for Soil Conservation" (8th ESSC Congress), the "International Union of Soil Science (IUSS Commissions 3.2, 3.6), the "Soil and Water Conservation Society" (SWCS), the "International Erosion Control Association"(IECA) and the "World Association for Sedimentation and Erosion Research" (WASER):

http://www.consowalleida2017.com/

June 13-15, 2017: Universities Council on Water Resources/National Institutes for Water Resources (ucowRinnwR) conference Water in a Changing EnvironmentColorada State University, Fort Collins, Colorado. There will bea session on drought monitoring! early warning at the UCOWR conference next year. Presentations can be published in the

UCOWR peer-reviewed journal. Abstract due on January 20th, 2017.

http ://u cow no rdco nf e re n ces/2017-u cow r-confe rence

Page 4 of 13

>June 25-28-2017: Tysons, VA: American Water Resources Association Summer Specialty Conference: Climate Change Solutions: Collaborative Science, Policy and Planning for Sustainable Water Management. The conference will provide a unique opportunity for water resources professionals working in research, management, policy and education to gather, discuss and collaborate as they shape the future of sustainable water management. http://www.awra.org/meetings/Tysons2017/ and

http://campaign.r20.constantcontact.com/render?m=1011215259037&ca=

8bc2b566-a266-4123-9c41420415471265

>30-August 2, 2017, Madison, WI. Soil and Water Conservation Society Annual Conference. Symposia and Oral Presentation Submission Deadline:

January 17, 2017. Poster Submission Deadline: March 10, 2017:

http://www.swcs.org/en/conferences/2017 annual conference/

> Nov 8-9, Manhattan, KS: Governor's Conference on the Future of Water in Kansas. Hilton Garden Inn. www.kwo.org

COMET FARM Training Schedule for April:

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1 Farmers can profit economically and politically by addressing climate change: -Agriculture organizations and lawmakers are developing the 2018 farm bill, which will guide U.S. agriculture policy for several years, likely through 2022. Forward-thinking farmers can use this legislation to develop programs to pay for climate-friendly environmental services without radically changing the way we farm. Relatively small innovations can deliver payments for environmental services, which initially would be supported by American taxpayers but later could be funded by carbon markets.": https://theconversation.com/farmers-can-profit-economically-

and-politically-by-addressing-climate-change-73585

Page 5 of 13

,

`4*

fty

2. CO2 could spike to level not seen since the dinosaurs: "Now, humanity's consumption of fossilfuels is pushing the planet toward the CO2 levels of the period when dinosaurs roamed the Earth. And that's the rosier scenario for 200 years from now, a new study has found. By 2300, there would be little precedent for the transformation of the Earth. That's because humanity's billowing of CO2 into the atmosphere, chiefly through the consumption of fossil fuels, may be on track in a few centuries to hit a level not seen in 420 million years, according to the findings published yesterday in Nature Communications.": See attached E&E article, Foster article, and

httus.//www washino lonpost.corninews/eneroy-environment/wp/2017/04/05/carbon-d ioxide-levels-could-reach- their-highest-point-In-50-million-years-H/4 he-end-of-the-

centurvPutm term=.ca5c168d540ba&wpisrc=n1

, reen&wpnini=1

IOWA News: Lawmakers mull water quality bills: "It remains to be seen whether a water quality funding measure will be passed, especially with projected state revenue shortfalls and shrinking budgets. Regardless, ISA officials say work will continue in watersheds to meet the goal of the Iowa Nutrient Reduction Strategy — a science-based initiative to reduce phosphorus and nitrogen loads in Iowa waterways by 45 percent":

Page 6 of 13

httrileivAcchi cpsoybeans cerrinews/articlesflawarkers-m.11-water-qualdy-

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1 b245d287204bd,f8`8b7097522 ifse7Kesic -6535531e-2515+71 1-8102-5065f3Se4 If 1

108 million people in the world face severe food insecurity — situation worsening: "Despite international efforts to address food insecurity, around 108 million people in the world were severely food insecure in 2016, a dramatic increase compared with 80 million in 2015, according to a new global report on food crises released in Brussels today.":

ittp

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ncni .5-1S99 'code

5 Maya Collapsed Under Heat from Climate Change, Study Says: "But after roughly 500 years, the civilization of various city states gradually tore apart, through wars and atrocities. By the beginning of the lath century A.D., the Maya were left scattered across a ruined landscape. The wars and conflicts grew over the course of half a millennia, due to rising temperatures from climate change, according to a new study by a trio of archaeologists from Simon Fraser University in British Columbia.":

http //wwwlaboratoryequiprnent.corn/news/2017/04/maya-collapsed-under-heat-climate-Change-sludy-says

Down the DRAIN: California gets a jump on Delta tunnels: "Officially named the "Diversion Restoring Almonds Intake," or DRAIN, the diversion intake conveys water into the central Delta to improve water quality and combat damage to water supplies and Delta ecosystems done by salt-water

intrusion during the recent drought.": https //calif orniawaterblag com/201//04/01/down-the- drain-calilornia-gets-a-jum p-on-delta-tunnels/

Page 7 of 13

Greenland's Coastal Ice Passed a Climate Tipping Point 20 Years Ago, Study Says: "Ice caps and glaciers along the coast of Greenland passed a tipping point in 1997, when a layer of snow that once absorbed summer meltwater became fully saturated. Since then, the coastal ice fields— separate from the main Greenland Ice Sheet—have been melting three times faster than they had been, according to a new study published Friday in the journal Nature Communications.": See attached Noel article and

htt ps.//insideclimatenews.org/news/31032017/-climate-chan,c -scionce-grcenland-global-war minmcc- melt +utm source=Insidc-Climate+News&utm campaign=8d124b80f6- Wrokly-Newsletter&utm_merlium-rmailFAutm_term-0_29c922ffh; FM12458016 27209877

8. While Trump promotes coal, Chile and others are turning to cheap sun power: "It wasn't because of a government subsidy for alternative energy. In Chile and a growing list of nations, the price of solar energy has fallen so much that it is increasingly beating out conventional sources of power. Industry experts and government regulators hail this moment as a turning point in the history of human electricity-making.":

htt p //www s hintori post com/sluvorld/2017/03/31/while-trump-promoles-coal-ather-countrie -turnino-to- chea p-sun-powerPutm term= c1558be94ba 1

Page 8 of 13

9. A building boom and climate change create an even hotter, drier Phoenix:

"The sprawling metropolis morphed in a matter of decades from a scorching desert outpost into one of the largest cities in the nation. Today, Phoenix is

a horizon of asphalt, air conditioning, and historic indifference to the pitfalls

of putting 1.5 million people in a place that gets just 8 inches of rain a year

and where the temperature routinely exceeds 100 degrees.":

littp //33tvw latime3 com/nation/la-na-phoemx-chmtte-adtpt-20170327-3tory html

la Soil microbes hold key to climate puzzle: "The discovery that climate change impacts on biocrusts could feed back to future climate is a critical factor that hasn't been considered in the past," says Austin Rutherford, a biologist at the University of Arizona who led the study. "This information is an important step in understanding climate, and may be helpful in

developing future climate models.": hap uclimatenewsnetwork net/soil-microbes-key-climate-

puzzle/?utm source=Chmatc+News+Network&utm campaign=f240839402- FMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2017_03_28t9utm_modium-rm7193utm_torm -0_1198978936 940836402 38798465

The biggest threat to Trump's Mar-a-Lago? Climate change: "Mar-a-Lago,

a 90-year-old National Historic Landmark now valued at $21 million, covers

nearly 18 acres. At its lowest point near the saltwater lake, where so-called king tides already bring flooding, it's just 4 feet above the water.":

http://9943v.bustonglobe cam/metra/201//01/13/9498-seas-threatemiewel-trumpmeal-estate-

einphe6bsleB73TesDoLcVx1BK9LP/story.htmltevent-event25

12 Guest post: Adapting to climate change through 'managed retreat':

"Typically, we manage risks from extreme weather and eroding shorelines

Page 9 of 13

by building flood defenses, reinforcing infrastructure and establishing building codes. However, a changing climate is increasing the likelihood that our existing systems will be overwhelmed at some point. Novel approaches to adapting to climate risks may prove necessary, preferable, or both. One such approach is managed retreat — in other words, deliberately getting out of the way. Managed retreat involves the strategic relocation of assets and people away from areas at risk, enabling restoration of those areas to their natural state.": See attached Hi no article and https.//www carbonbrief org/gucst-post-

adapting climate change through mEmagerl rrtrrat

13 Experts respond to Trump's climate blitzkrieg: "We asked leading experts on climate change to weigh in on what the Trump rollbacks mean for climate change, and for the Paris Agreement in particular. Here are their

thoughts." : hap //thebulletin org/experts-respond LrUmp%E2%80%99s-clirnate

blitzkrieg10648.tlatforrn=hootsuito

14. USDA Southeast Regional Climate Hub - Spring 2017 Newsletter:

https://content.govdelivcry.com/accounts/USDAOCE/bulletins/1921400

15.Pacific Northwest Tribal Climate Change Network, Email Bulletin — March 30, 2017: See attached PNW TCCP file

16.Special issue just released in the journal Climate Risk Management:Useful to Usable: Developing Usable Climate Science for Agriculture

Useful to Usable: Developing Usable Climate Science for Agriculture

S.Im sK1 and 14eae

17.USDA Blog: USDA Authorizes Emergency Grazing in Response to President Trump's Directive: "The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), acting in response to a directive from President Donald J. Trump, today authorized emergency grazing on Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) lands located in Kansas, Oklahoma, and Texas —the three states which were most heavily impacted by ongoing wildfires which began on March 6, 2017.":

https://content.govdelivery.com/accounts/USDA0C/bulletins/1921be9

Page 10 of 13

Is

Then and Now: How Glaciers Around the World are Melting: "Over the past decade, scientists and photographers keep returning to the world's glaciers, watching them shrink with each visit. Now they want others to see how a warming planet is melting masses of ice in a series of before-and- after photos. In the Geological Society of America's GSA Todayjournal , a group of ice researchers and a photographer-filmmaker published pictures showing how much five of the world's glaciers have thinned.": See attached

Burkhart article and livAns2 12poratoryccuipment orn inesns 1201 TM/then and now how u12c ern Aro nd word sins

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19.Research shows significant ways climate already has changed for the Chesapeake: "They chose to focus on the weather trends that tend to stick in memories — periods of unusual warmth or wetness, for example — to help people compare their experiences with actual data. They said they hope this helps people better understand how climate is changing and how their actions contribute to those environmental shifts.":

httpofivoyw washingtenpost com/leeal/research stlevas sodrolleant vaays climate already has champed for the

chesapeake/2017/04/03/c97bd70e-1630-11e7-833c-503e116394c9 story htmPutm term- 80d081ddd001 And

be sure to check out this website:

http://www.chesapeakedata.com/changingchesapeake/

20.Healthy soil is the real key to feeding the world: "Their experiences, and the results that! saw on their farms in North and South Dakota, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Ghana and Costa Rica, offer compelling evidence that the key to sustaining highly productive agriculture lies in rebuilding healthy, fertile soil. This journey also led me to question three pillars of conventional wisdom about today's industrialized agrochemical agriculture: that it feeds the world, is a more efficient way to produce food and will be necessary to

f eed the future.": https //theconversatien cam/healthy-sell is-the-real key te feeding the world 75364

For more insight from David Montgomery: littninivivivi.ecoviiitekenmi soi l-

erosion -reuenen live-Rimlinu-revolution-23440658S3.html

Page 11 of 13

AIMING A

tEYSLITION

11111,1111111,1111 111'11

21.The REDD Resource Newsletter; April/May 2017:

http //campaign r20 constantcontact com/render 2m=1117561240385&ca=pef645ff-9a24-4259 b9f2

b8cc25751676

The REDD+ Resource

seithattiv

N rsokte:

22.Film: The Soil Solution to Climate Change Film "What If A Solution To Climate Change Was Beneath Your Feet? Soil is a living universe beneath our feet. As important to our lives as clean air and water, soil also holds a potential solution to the global climate crisis. Increasing numbers of scientists, farmers and ranchers are implementing innovative land use practices that build fertile soil and sequester atmospheric carbon These methods of land management have the potential to provide us with nutritious food, improved human health, cleaner water, and a healthier planet for all. The Soil Solution to Climate Change was one of thirteen films featured in A Climate of Change Tour sponsored by 350.org, TRUST campaign and Wild and Scenic Film Festival."

httpsWoovot youtu be core/watchbv=Bx0(luLraxk

23 NRCS Film: The hope in healthy soil, combined chapters: How America's farmers are breathing new life into our nation's soils. This video combines the seven-part series exploring how an increasing number of farmers throughout the country are creating a new hope in healthy soil by regenerating our nation's living and life-giving soil. The video series is designed to help consumers, educators and students understand some of the important principles and practices behind the growing soil health

Page 12 of 13

movement.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TucmtBLmeyll&list=PL418PxoprpGaCb11(93 Y5p0m96-

9V1pMX&index-8

24 Increasing tornado outbreaks—is climate change responsible?: "This study raises new questions about what climate change will do to severe thunderstorms and what is responsible for recent trends," says Tippett, who is also a member of the Data Science Institute and the Columbia Initiative on Extreme Weather and Climate. "The fact that we don't see the presently understood meteorological signature of global warming in changing outbreak statistics leaves two possibilities: either the recent increases are not due to a warming climate, or a warming climate has implications for tornado activity that we don't understand. This is an unexpected finding.":

See attached Tippett article and htics flohys.orpfnews/2016-12-lornado-outbreaksisschmate- rrsponsiblr htmlftiCp

25 NOAA This Week on Climate.gov:

http fir imp] gn

constintcontict com/ronder 2ns 11089126E1887 ri d

26 NRCS Water and Climate Update:

si3i7 57as 44r -i clffsl n72 5480756c

ha us //‘.‘w%.? %ICC nrcs usda povfitoref/support/drouphl/dmrot 20170406 prif

U.S. Drought Monitor

27 Weekly Agriculture in Drought Report for USDA Office of the Chief Economist

haps fissvps^d usda po@ocePsveather/Drouphl/ApInDroupht pdf 7utm rnedium-ema

Page 13 of 13

source-povdelivery

From:

Hafner, Tim - NRCS, Beltsville, MD

Sent:

16 Feb 2017 14:22:44 +0000

To:

Simmons, Machelle - NRCS, Beltsville, MD;Morton, Laura - NRCS, Scarborough,

ME;Rahman, Aziz - NRCS, Beltsville, MD

Subject:

FW: Correct terminology

From: Moebius-Clune, Bianca - NRCS - Washington, DC Sent: Thursday, February 16, 2017 8:41 AM To: Hafner, Tim - NRCS, Beltsville, MD <tim.hafner@wdc.usda.gov>; Bramblett, Jimmy - NRCS, Washington, DC Klimmy.Bramblett@wdc.usda.gov> Cc: Simmons, Machelle - NRCS, Beltsville, MD <Machelle.Simmons@wdc.usda.gov> Subject: RE: Correct terminology

Hi Tim, I would suggest that we call this organic matter built, and then explain that we model this as carbon

increase, as this is generally a fairly set fraction of total organic matter.

is generally a fairly set fraction of total organic matter. — there are a lot of
is generally a fairly set fraction of total organic matter. — there are a lot of

— there are a lot of benefits to putting carbon back in the sail, climate

mitigation is just one of them. Below is the guidance we recently sent to our SHD staff — feel free to draw from it. Please let me know if this helps and/or if you need more. Thanks! Bianca

Hi Everyone,

We had promised some further guidance on messaging as we navigate the transition. The SHD leadership team compiled a list of what to avoid, and what to replace it with, as well as concepts/messages that will be neutral or positively seen, so that you all can integrate into/edit presentations as necessary — see below.

We ran these through Kaveh (Public Affairs Division Director). His feedback was that these are all good to go, and that they ask to "tamp down on discretionary messaging right now and not presume to know where the administration will end up on this, but to give them the time. We won't pull the plug on anything, but will also not start up new pushes." He appreciates our efforts to make sure we're staying with our "bread and butter" right now.

If you have questions about anything along these lines, please be sure to send them to me and Ron Nichols.

Thanks so much! Bianca

Avoid 3 use instead

 

Climate Change-) Weather Extremes

 

Climate Change Adaptation-) Resilience to Weather Extremes/Intense Weather Events: Drought, Heavy

Rain, Spring Ponding

 

Page 1 of 3

Reduce Greenhouse Gases 3 Build Soil Organic Matter, increase nutrient use efficiency

Reduce Greenhouse Gases 3 Build Soil Organic Matter, increase nutrient use efficiency

Sequester Carbon-) Build Soil Organic Matter

Gases 3 Build Soil Organic Matter, increase nutrient use efficiency Sequester Carbon-) Build Soil Organic Matter

Additionally the following messages should be tolerated if not appreciated by all:

Soil Health is an opportunity for:

• economic growth

• building equity in land investment

• emerging business opportunities in rural America

• increased production efficiency = increased competitiveness for American agriculture

• wildlife

• agro-tourism

• improved aesthetics green landscapes are more beautiful than brown

Soil Health improves:

• Production system resilience to stresses

• Economic risks of production

• Nutrient cycling

• Soil organic matter

• Soil structure

• Infiltration

• Water holding capacity

• Rooting depth

• Biodiversity, diversity of microbes, diversity of soil life, soil microbiome

Bianca Moebius-Clune, Ph.D. Director, Soil Health Division, USDA-NRCS, Washington, DC

Page 2 of 3

From: Hafner, Tim - NRCS, Beltsville, MD Sent: Thursday, February 16, 2017 7:34 AM To: Bramblett, Jimmy - NRCS, Washington, DC climmy.Bramblett@wdc.usda.gov>; Moebius-Clune, Bianca - NRCS - Washington, DC <Bianca.Moebius-Clune@wdc.usda.gov> Cc: Simmons, Machelle - NRCS, Beltsville, MD <Machelle.Simmons@wdcusda.gov> Subject: Correct terminology

Deputy Chief Bramblett,

I am finalizing the reporting for the 1st quarter for the Department. I would like to know correct terms I should use instead of Climate Changes and anything to do with Carbon. One of the measures both in the USDA SOAR (Goal 2.1) and in the Soil Health APG is Carbon sequestered (formally modeled through

APEX, now modeled in conjunction to Adam Chambers).

through APEX, now modeled in conjunction to Adam Chambers). Tim Hafner Tim Hafner Team Lead for
through APEX, now modeled in conjunction to Adam Chambers). Tim Hafner Tim Hafner Team Lead for

Tim Hafner

Tim Hafner Team Lead for Performance Strategic and Performance Planning Division Strategic Planning and Accountability

Office (301) 504-1616 Cell (859) 327-5073
Office (301) 504-1616 Cell (859) 327-5073
Office (301) 504-1616 Cell (859) 327-5073
Office (301) 504-1616 Cell (859) 327-5073
Office (301) 504-1616 Cell (859) 327-5073
Office (301) 504-1616 Cell (859) 327-5073
Office (301) 504-1616 Cell (859) 327-5073
Office (301) 504-1616 Cell (859) 327-5073

Office (301) 504-1616 Cell (859) 327-5073

Office (301) 504-1616 Cell (859) 327-5073
Office (301) 504-1616 Cell (859) 327-5073
Office (301) 504-1616 Cell (859) 327-5073
Office (301) 504-1616 Cell (859) 327-5073
Office (301) 504-1616 Cell (859) 327-5073
Office (301) 504-1616 Cell (859) 327-5073

Page 3 of 3

From:

Hamner, Tim - NRCS, Beltsville, MD

Sent:

16 Feb 2017 16:24:47 +0000

To:

Simmons, Machelle - NRCS, Beltsville, MD

Subject:

Q1 APG Soil Health 2017

Attachments:

Agency Priority Goal Quarterly Progress Report Template lstQua rter FY17-

jb.docx

Machelle

This contains Jimmy's edits.

Tim Hafner Team Lead for Performance Strategic and Performance Planning Division Strategic Planning and Accountability

Office (301) 504-1616 Cell (859) 327-5073
Office (301) 504-1616 Cell (859) 327-5073
Office (301) 504-1616 Cell (859) 327-5073
Office (301) 504-1616 Cell (859) 327-5073
Office (301) 504-1616 Cell (859) 327-5073
Office (301) 504-1616 Cell (859) 327-5073
Office (301) 504-1616 Cell (859) 327-5073
Office (301) 504-1616 Cell (859) 327-5073

Office (301) 504-1616 Cell (859) 327-5073

Office (301) 504-1616 Cell (859) 327-5073
Office (301) 504-1616 Cell (859) 327-5073
Office (301) 504-1616 Cell (859) 327-5073
Office (301) 504-1616 Cell (859) 327-5073
Office (301) 504-1616 Cell (859) 327-5073
Office (301) 504-1616 Cell (859) 327-5073

Page 1 of 4

Goal Lieutenant(s): Acting Chief Leonard Jordan Reporting Period (i.e. 2017 — QV:

Priority Goal: Soil Health 16-17

Goal Leader: Anne Mills, Deputy Undersecretary for NRE

Update/Accomplishments

Progress

This

Goal Statement:

Period:

Activities

As part of its overall soil health effort, NRCS' "Unlock the Secrets in the Soil" awareness and education campaign continues to provide foundational educational material and messaging to farmers and consumer alike. Quarter 1

The SHD participated in USDA Climate Hub and USDA greenhouse gas (CHC) Building Block activities. The SHD provided

The NRCS Soil Health Division (SHD) provided activities and events reaching over 11,000 participants such as

Established the Soil Health and Sustainability three-day course as a requirement for NRCS national conservation planner certification.

approximately 2,000 NRCS employees.

education on soil health principles related to agriculture and forestry by working with numerous groups including:

conservation partners, farmers and ranchers, researchers, and industry stakeholders and others, including








No-Till on the Plains State Soil Health Advisory groups Cover Crop Councils (NRCS helped establish the Midwest, and the new Northeast and Southeast councils) Soil Health Institute committees USDA Climate Hubs

reviewed papers on the state of the science around grazing land soil health (results from National grazing and grassland workshop, July 2016) participated in state soil health videos outreach events at soil health trial demonstration sites other soil health projects

39 training events 21 outreach activities, including distribution of materials and publications and committee/workgroup sessions reviewed technical papers conducted strategic planning to expand and act on the preliminary literature reviews on soil health assessments

35 and

direct

events:

- Agency Priority Goal Quarterly Progress Report -

assistance activities

Page 2 of 4

Strategies Updates & Additions (where applicable):

Next Steps:

Indicator(s)

Accomplishments include:

Campaign highlights:

Reporting







generating overt billion viewer impressions during phase one USDA's current Top 20 Facebook video views are NRCS soil health videos. over 1 million total video views

provided educational materials and assistance to farmers and consumers aired soil health public service ads through generous donations of TV stations, reaching over 200 million viewers

To meet the national certification goals, the SHD will make a portion of the revamped 'Soil Health and Sustainability' course available via webinar this fiscal year. The course will provide training on the integration of soil health management into conservation planning at a consistent level. Locations for in-field training across the country will be identified. SHD is compiling and designing standardized advanced level trainings that contain the latest updates in the science of soil health. A website to provide public access to all materials. Currently the agency is updating its resource concerns. The goal is to develop a comprehensive list of soil health concerns that need to be addressed as part of the conservation planning process. NRCS will continue to lead the soil health assessment standardization effort. Newly standardized assessments and associated management planning will be cost-shared. State training, participation in field days and workshops, instructors for advanced soil health training will be provided.

this quarter in phase one of the Public Service Announcement (PSA) campaign distributed ads to local TV stations throughout the country and to major national networks in phase two of the PSA campaign featuring Dr. Laura Danly, astronomer and academic, Curator, Griffith Observatory, California (more than 4,500 ad plays) distributed soil health print ads in 16 major metro markets including platform dioramas and 20 bus boards in the Washington D.C. area transit system Posted "Soil Health Lesson in a Minute" video that gathered nearly 500,000 Facebook views.

total donated airtime exceeded $6 million with more than 40,000 ad plays on 293 stations in 131 cities

Target

Actual

Page 3 of 4

Explanation of

Reasons for Edit

Progress/achievements/lessons learned

Stakeholders Reached

Soil Carbon retained

Grants awarded

Number of Soil Health Management system demonstration sites implemented

Literature review

Q1 2017)

0

0

0

11,000

Period (i.e

Tons

Value

200,000

3

3

14,000

15

Value

0

0

0

11,000

Page 4 of 4

The calculation does not include viewer impressions and other forms of social media

Actual (Met/Unmet/Deferr ed + Narrative supporting the result)

(if edits made to indicator/target)

towards Achieving Indicator

From:

Hamner, Tim - NRCS, Beltsville, MD

Sent:

16 Feb 2017 13:31:24 +0000

To:

Bramblett, Jimmy - NRCS, Washington, DC

Subject:

RE: 130- AGN - Agency General - Branding

Thanks Jimmy,

One additional question, how about the name climate hubs.

From: Bramblett, Jimmy - NRCS, Washington, DC Sent: Thursday, February 16, 2017 7:45 AM To: Hafner, Tim - NRCS, Beltsville, MD <tim.hafner@wdc.usda.gov> Subject: FW: 130 - AGN - Agency General - Branding

Tim,

Below is guidance I sent regarding the phrase "climate change". When discussing carbon sequestration,

Below is guidance I sent regarding the phrase "climate change". When discussing carbon sequestration,

I recommend we use verbiage related to building organic matter in the soil to improve soil health

carbon sequestration, I recommend we use verbiage related to building organic matter in the soil to

Let me know if you need more

THANKS!!

Jimmy Bramblett Deputy Chief —Science and Technology Natural Resources Conservation Service United States Department of Agriculture

14th and Independence Avenue Washington, DC 20250 Jimmy.bramblett@wdc.usda.gov

From: Bramblett, Jimmy - NRCS, Washington, DC Sent: Tuesday, January 24, 2017 12:41 PM

To: Cohen, Karl - NRCS, Washington, DC <kari.cohen@vvdc.usda.gov>• Erickson, Terrell - NRCS,

Washington, DC <TerrellEricksonl@wdc.usda.gov>- Guerrero, Rafael - NRCS, Fort Worth, TX

<Rafael.Guerrero@ftw.usda.gov>- Herbert, Noller - NRCS, Washington, DC <Noller.Herbert@wdc.usda.gov>• McKinney, Shaun - NRCS, Portland, OR

<Shaun.Mckinney@por.usda.gov>• Moebius-Clune, Bianca - NRCS - Washington DC <Bianca.Moeblus- Clune@vvdc.usda.gov>• Porter, Jeffrey - NRCS, Greensboro, NC <jeffrey.porter@gnb.usda.gov >• Tillman, Denise - NRCS, Washington DC <Denise.Tillman@wdc.usda.gov>

Cc: Tillman, James - NRCS, Washington, DC <James:Fillman@wdc.usda.gov>• Sadeghzadeh, Kaveh -

NRCS, Washington, DC <Kaveh.Sadeghzadeh@wdc.usda.gov>• Deavers, Leslie - NRCS, Washington, DC

(Leslie.Deavers@wdc.usda.gov )<Leslie.DeaverilCilVwdc.usda. ov>• Wickey, Kevin - NRCS, Washington,

DC <Kevin.Wickey@vvdcusda.gov>• Barry, Gayle - NRCS,Washington, DC < a le.barrcic.usda. ov>•

Chessman, Dennis - NRCS, Lexington, KY <Dennis.Chessman@ky.usda.gov>; Boozer, Astor - NRCS,

Washington, DC (Astor.Boozer@wdc.usda.gov) <Astor.Boozer@wdc.usda.gov>; Jordan, Leonard - NRCS, Washington, DC <Leonardhorda n@wdc.usda.gov>; Smith, David - NRCS, Washington, DC

Page 1 of 3

<David.Smith@wdc.usda.gov>; Kramer, Tony - NRCS, Washington, DC <Tony.Kramer@wdc.usda.gov>; Reed, Lesia - NRCS, Beltsville, MD <loci a.reed @wdc.usda.gov>; Christensen, Thomas - NRCS,

Washington,

Subject: 130- AGN - Agency General - Branding

DC (Thomas.Christensen@wdc.usda.gov ) <Thomas.Christensen@wdc.usda.gov>

Good Afternoon,

This email is a follow-up to our staff meeting last week. During our visit we discussed the transition team moving into the Department, and priorities of our new administration. It has become clear one of the previous administration's priority is not consistent with that of the incoming administration. Namely, that priority is climate change. Please visit with your staff and make them aware of this shift in perspective within the Executive Branch.

Within the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), we address resource concerns related to soil, water, air, plants, and animals. We have approved resource concerns and causes associated with Air Quality as follows:

1.

AIR QUALITY IMPACTS - Emissions of Particulate Matter - PM - and PM Precursors

Direct emissions of particulate matter - dust and smoke -as well as the formation of fine particulate matter in the atmosphere from other agricultural emissions - ammonia, NOx, and VOCs - cause multiple environmental impacts, such as: 1) The unintended movement of particulate matter - typically dust or smoke - results in safety or nuisance visibility restriction, 2) The unintended movement of particulate matter and/or chemical droplets results in unwanted deposits on surfaces, 3) Increased atmospheric concentrations of particulate matter can impact human and animal health and degrade regional visibility.

2

AIR QUALITY IMPACTS - Emissions of Greenhouse Gases — GHGs

Emissions increase atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases.

3

AIR QUALITY IMPACTS - Emissions of Ozone Precursors Emissions of ozone precursors - NOx and VOCs

resulting in formation of ground- level ozone that cause negative impacts to plants and animals.

4

AIR QUALITY IMPACTS - Objectionable odors

• Emissions of odorous compounds - VOCs, ammonia and odorous sulfur compounds - cause nuisance conditions

At this juncture, please be encouraged to use terminology associated with these approved resource concerns to describe the work you/we do to serve our nation's agricultural producers and woodland owners. Having said that, we will be revisiting Air Quality— Emissions of Greenhouse Gases to determine the relevance of its continued use. Prudence when discussing this particular resource concern-cause is advised until further notice.

I will copy other agency leaders on this message for the purpose of alerting them to our current communications within the Deputy Chief for SgLT family. Many thanks to each of your for exercising diplomacy when communicating this information internally and externally, and for your leadership during this transient period.

THANKS!!!

Page 2 of 3

Jimmy Bramblett Deputy Chief - Science and Technology Natural Resources Conservation Service United States Department of Agriculture

Conservation Service United States Department of Agriculture www.nrcs.gov jimmy.bramblett@wdc.usda.gov Page 3 of 3

www.nrcs.gov

jimmy.bramblett@wdc.usda.gov

From:

Hamner, Tim - NRCS, Beltsville, MD

Sent:

16 Feb 2017 13:52:39 +0000

To:

Bramblett, Jimmy - NRCS, Washington, DC

Cc:

Smith, David - NRCS, Washington, DC

Subject:

RE: 130- AGN - Agency General - Branding

Jimmy

You are correct with the current measure, in the past we measured utilizing APEX modeling. Once Bianca arrived and in the current Soil Health APG she had us utilize Adam Chambers. Laura Morton on my staff has worked with him.

From: Bramblett, Jimmy - NRCS, Washington, DC Sent: Thursday, February 16, 2017 8:50 AM To: Hafner, Tim - NRCS, Beltsville, MD <tim.hafner@wdc.usda.gov>

Cc: Smith, David - NRCS, Washington, DC <David.Smith@wdc.usda.gov > Subject: RE: 130- AGN - Agency General - Branding

Tim,

I think we should loop Dave Smith in on this discussion. We do have some overlap with this topic, but he is our lead on the building blocks project. Dave, it may be a summation of COMET that was used in the past? If so, I will ask Adam Chambers to provide an update.

THANKS!!!

Jimmy Bramblett

Deputy Chief —Science and Technology Natural Resources Conservation Service United States Department of Agriculture

14th and Independence Avenue

Washington, DC 20250 Jimmy.bramblett@wdc.usda.gov

From: Hafner, Tim - NRCS, Beltsville, MD Sent: Thursday, February 16, 2017 8:44 AM To: Bramblett, Jimmy - NRCS, Washington DC <Jimmy.Bramblett@wdc.usda.gov> Subject: RE: 130- AGN - Agency General - Branding

Jimmy

This is part of the Soil Health APG

Page 1 of 5

2. The SHD participated in USDA Climate Hub and greenhouse gas (GHG) Building Block activities. The SLID provided education on climate smart agriculture and forestry by working with numerous groups including:

• No-Till on the Plains

• State Soil health Advisory groups

• Cover Crop Councils (NRCS helped establish the Midwest. and the new Northeast and Southeast councils)

• Soil Health Institute committees

• Climate Hubs

Soil Carbon retained

200,000 Tons

This Indicator is officially what we report, I guess Iran inquire to the Office of Budget and Policy Analysis OBPA) and if we need to inquire with OMB who approved the Soil Health APG and its indicator.

(b)(5

From: Bramblett, Jimmy - NRCS, Washington, DC Sent: Thursday, February 16, 2017 8:38 AM To: Hafner, Tim - NRCS, Beltsville, MD <tiro hafner@wdc.usda.gov> Cc: Lawson, Dan - NRCS, Washington DC <Dan.Lawson@wdc.usda.gov> Subject: RE: 130- AGN - Agency General - Branding

b)(5)

Tim,

There D a

n memo being developed by Dan Lawson on that one.I will copy Dan here so he can fill you in on the latest

THANKS!!!!

Jimmy Bramblett

Deputy Chief —Science and Technology Natural Resources Conservation Service United States Department of Agriculture

14th and Independence Avenue

Washington, DC 20250 Jimmy.bramblett@wdc.usda.gov

From: Hafner, Tim - NRCS, Beltsville, MD

Sent: Thursday, February 16, 2017 8:31 AM To: Bramblett, Jimmy - NRCS, Washington, DC climmy.Bramblett@wdc.usda.gov> Subject: RE: 130- AGN - Agency General - Branding

Page 2 of 5

Thanks Jimmy,

One additional question, how about the name climate hubs.

From: Bramblett, Jimmy - NRCS, Washington, DC Sent: Thursday, February 16, 2017 7:45 AM To: Hafner, Tim - NRCS, Beltsville, MD @Lim hafner@wdc.usda.gov> Subject: FW: 130 - AGN - Agency General - Branding

Tim,

Below is guidance I sent regarding the phrase "climate change". When discussing carbon sequestration, I recommend we use verbiage related to building organic matter in the soil to improve soil health

Let me know if you need more

THANKS!!

Jimmy Bramblett

Deputy Chief —Science and Technology Natural Resources Conservation Service United States Department of Agriculture

14th and Independence Avenue

Washington, DC 20250

Jimmy.bramblett@wdc.usda.gov

From: Bramblett, Jimmy - NRCS, Washington, DC Sent: Tuesday, January 24, 2017 12:41 PM To: Cohen, Kari - NRCS, Washington, DC <kan.cohen@wdc.usda.gov@ Erickson, Terrell - NRCS, Washington, DC <TerrellEricksonl@wdc.usda.gov@ Guerrero, Rafael - NRCS, Fort Worth, TX <RafaelGuerrero@ftw.usda.gov@ Herbert, Noller - NRCS, Washington, DC <Noller.Herbert@wdc.usda.gov >• McKinney, Shaun - NRCS, Portland, OR

<Shaun.Mckinney@por.usda.gov>• Moebius-Clune, Bianca - NRCS - Washington DC <131anca.Moeblus- Clune@vvdc.usda.gov@ Porter, Jeffrey - NRCS, Greensboro, NC <jeffrey.porter@gnb.usda.gov@

Tillman, Denise - NRCS, Washington DC <Denise.Tillman@wdc.usda.gov> Cc: Tillman, James - NRCS, Washington, DC <James.Tillman@wdc.usda.gov>• Sadeghzadeh, Kaveh - NRCS, Washington, DC <Kaveh.Sadeghzadeh@wdc.usda.gov>• Deavers, Leslie - NRCS, Washington, DC

(Leslie.Deavers@wdc.usda.gov )<Leslie.Deavers@wdc.usda.gov >• Wickey, Kevin - NRCS, Washington,

DC <Kevin.Wickey@vvdc.usda.gov >• Barry, Gayle - NRCS,Washington, DC < a le.barrrecic.usda. ov>• Chessman, Dennis - NRCS, Lexington, KY <Dennis.Chessman@ky.usda.gov>- Boozer, Astor - NRCS,

Washington, DC (Astor.Boozer@wdc.usda.gov ) <Astor.Boozer@wd@usda.gov@ Jordan, Leonard -

NRCS, Washington, DC <Leonard.Jordan@wdc.usda.gov@ Smith, David - NRCS, Washington, DC

<DavickSmith@wdc.usda.gov@ Kramer, Tony - NRCS, Washington, DC <Tony.Kramer@wdc.usda.gov@

Reed, Lesia - NRCS, Beltsville, MD <lesia.reed@wdc.usda.gov>; Christensen, Thomas - NRCS, Washington, DC (Thomas.Christensen@wdc.usda.gov )<Thomas.Christensen@vvdc.usda.gov> Subject: 130- AGN - Agency General - Branding

Page 3 of 5

Good Afternoon,

This email is a follow-up to our staff meeting last week. During our visit we discussed the transition team moving into the Department, and priorities of our new administration. It has become clear one of the previous administration's priority is not consistent with that of the incoming administration. Namely, that priority is climate change. Please visit with your staff and make them aware of this shift in perspective within the Executive Branch.

Within the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), we address resource concerns related to soil, water, air, plants, and animals. We have approved resource concerns and causes associated with Air Quality as follows:

1.

AIR QUALITY IMPACTS - Emissions of Particulate Matter - PM - and PM Precursors

Direct emissions of particulate matter - dust and smoke -,as well as the formation of fine particulate matter in the atmosphere from other agricultural emissions - ammonia, NOx, and VOCs - cause multiple environmental impacts, such as: 1) The unintended movement of particulate matter - typically dust or smoke - results in safety or nuisance visibility restriction, 2) The unintended movement of particulate matter and/or chemical droplets results in unwanted deposits on surfaces, 3) Increased atmospheric concentrations of particulate matter can impact human and animal health and degrade regional visibility.

2

AIR QUALITY IMPACTS - Emissions of Greenhouse Gases — GHGs

Emissions increase atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases.

3

AIR QUALITY IMPACTS - Emissions of Ozone Precursors Emissions of ozone precursors - NOx and VOCs

resulting in formation of ground- level ozone that cause negative impacts to plants and animals.

4

AIR QUALITY IMPACTS - Objectionable odors

• Emissions of odorous compounds - VOCs, ammonia and odorous sulfur compounds - cause nuisance conditions

At this juncture, please be encouraged to use terminology associated with these approved resource concerns to describe the work you/we do to serve our nation's agricultural producers and woodland owners. Having said that, we will be revisiting Air Quality— Emissions of Greenhouse Gases to determine the relevance of its continued use. Prudence when discussing this particular resource concern-cause is advised until further notice.

I will copy other agency leaders on this message for the purpose of alerting them to our current communications within the Deputy Chief for SgLT family. Many thanks to each of your for exercising diplomacy when communicating this information internally and externally, and for your leadership during this transient period.

THANKS!!!

Jimmy Bramblett

Deputy Chief - Science and Technology Natural Resources Conservation Service United States Department of Agriculture

Page 4 of 5

www.nrcs.gov
www.nrcs.gov

202-720-4783 jimmy.bramblett@wdcusda.gov

From:

Lawson, Dan - NRCS, Washington, DC

Sent:

6 Apr 2017 13:21:21 +0000

To:

Baker, Suzanne - NRCS, Walton, NY

Cc:

Wilson, Mike - NRCS, Lincoln, NE

Subject:

RE: Climate Hub article from CCE

Until we get further guidance from General Counsel regarding the Executive Order and a Secretary in place to layout the Administration's priorities, etc., we are carrying on until directed to proceed differently.

Dan D. Lawson National Leader, USDA Climate Hubs Washington, DC 20250 dan.lawson@wdc.usda.gov

Climate Hubs Washington, DC 20250 dan.lawson@wdc.usda.gov https //www.climatehubs.oce.usda.gov/ From: Baker, Suzanne

https //www.climatehubs.oce.usda.gov/

From: Baker, Suzanne - NRCS, Walton, NY

Sent: Wednesday, April 05, 2017 3:25 PM To: Lawson, Dan - NRCS, Washington, DC <Da n.Lawson@wdc.usda.gov> Subject: RE: Climate Hub article from CCE

This is the article. I made some edits and sent it back to Kitty for her acceptance and return

I wondered
I wondered
it back to Kitty for her acceptance and return I wondered From: Lawson, Dan - NRCS,
it back to Kitty for her acceptance and return I wondered From: Lawson, Dan - NRCS,

From: Lawson, Dan - NRCS, Washington, DC Sent: Wednesday, April 05, 2017 3:19 PM To: Baker, Suzanne - NRCS, Walton NY <Suzanne.Baker@ny usda.gov> Subject: RE: Climate Hub article from CCE

What was Mike's response and what do you mean "permissible that outside sources use the phrase "climate change"?

Dan D. Lawson National Leader, USDA Climate Hubs Washington, DC 20250

202-720-5322
202-720-5322

dan.lawson@wdc.usda.gov

https //www.climatehubs.oce.usda.gov/

From: Baker, Suzanne - NRCS, Walton, NY Sent: Wednesday, April 05, 2017 3:11 PM To: Lawson, Dan - NRCS, Washington, DC <Dan.Lawson@wdc.usda.gov> Subject: RE: Climate Hub article from CCE

Page 1 of 2

Hi Dan,

I talked with Mike W. It was about an article being published in the upcoming NE Hub newsletter. Is it permissible that outside sources use the phrase "Climate Change"?

From: Lawson, Dan - NRCS, Washington, DC Sent: Wednesday, April 05, 2017 2:51 PM To: Baker, Suzanne - NRCS, Walton, NY Cuzanne.Baker@ny usda.gov> Subject: RE: Climate Hub article from CCE

Sorry Suzanne, time flew by. You around tomorrow for a call.

Dan D. Lawson National Leader, USDA Climate Hubs Washington, DC 20250 dan.lawson@wdc.usda.gov

202-720-5322
202-720-5322

https //www.climatehubs.oce.usda.gov/

From: Baker, Suzanne - NRCS, Walton, NY

Sent: Wednesday, April 05, 2017 10:40 AM To: Lawson, Dan - NRCS, Washington, DC <Dan.Lawson@wdc.usda.gov > Subject: Climate Hub article from CCE

(b)(6)

Good morning Dan,

If you have a minu

from home today and available until 2:30

t articles from outside sources could you give me a call? I'm working

Thank you

Suzanne

Suzanne Palter, CPESC NRCS Project Liaison to the NE Climate Hub Resource ConSertationist Southeast Area New York New York Civil Rights Ad is or Committee 44 West Street Walton. NY 13856

rtationist Southeast Area New York New York Civil Rights Ad is or Committee 44 West Street

Page 2 of 2

From:

Lawson, Dan - NRCS, Washington, DC

Sent:

5 Jul 2017 16:42:09 +0000

To:

Roesch McNally, Gabrielle - FS

Cc:

Schattman, Rachel - FS;Wiener, Sarah - FS;Steele, Rachel - OCE;rschattm

(rschattm@uvm.edu)

Subject:

RE: Survey 2 pagers for the executive committee meeting

Yup, totally understand that and had the same concern on what the survey said and how we present the results. Need to be consistent so totally get that. So let's march on

Dan D. Lawson National Leader, USDA Climate Hubs Washington, DC 20250 dan.lawson@wdc.usda.gov

Climate Hubs Washington, DC 20250 dan.lawson@wdc.usda.gov https //www.climatehubs.oce.usda.goy/ From: Roesch McNally,

https //www.climatehubs.oce.usda.goy/

From: Roesch McNally, Gabrielle - FS Sent: Wednesday, July 05, 2017 12:36 PM To: Lawson, Dan - NRCS, Washington, DC <Da n.Lawson@wdc.usda.gov> Cc: Schattman, Rachel - FS <rschattma n@fs.fed.us>; Wiener, Sarah - FS <sarahwiener@fs.fed.us>; Steele, Rachel - OCE <RSteele@oce.usda.gov>; rschattm (rschattm@uvm.edu) <rschattm@uvm.edu> Subject: RE: Survey 2 pagers for the executive committee meeting

Hello Dan,

2 pagers for the executive committee meeting Hello Dan, Thanks for getting back to me so

Thanks for getting back to me so quickly. You know, it really doesn't fit with the framing of our project

(b)(5)

(b)(5)

would prefer to keep the language as is. Please remember that these documents are for

would prefer to keep the language as is. Please remember that these documents are for the executive

committee meeting and are not, as of now, for public consumption. I do think this raises some issues

are for the executive committee meeting and are not, as of now, for public consumption. I

(b)(5)

call. However, for the purposes of our work here, we prefeii(b)(5)

aligns best with the language used in our research and maintains the scientific integrity of the work.

ut I will leave that for a leads because this

Any other thoughts or edits on the documents?

Cheers,

Gabrielle

From: Lawson, Dan - NRCS, Washington, DC Sent: Wednesday, July 05, 2017 9:20 AM To: Roesch McNally, Gabrielle - FS <groeschmcnally@fs.fed.us> Subject: RE: Survey 2 pagers for the executive committee meeting

Page 1 of 4

Soo() Gabrielle, in the documents would it be to much of a change to say

(b)(5)

Dan D. Lawson

National Leader, USDA Climate Hubs

Washington, DC 20250

202-720-5322
202-720-5322

dan.lawson@wdc.usda.gov

https //www.climatehubs.oce.usda.gov/

(b)(5)

From: Roesch McNally, Gabrielle - FS

Sent: Wednesday, July 05, 2017 12:14 PM

To: Lawson, Dan - NRCS, Washington, DC <Dan.Lawson@wdc.usda.gov>

Cc: Schattman, Rachel - FS <rschattman@fs.fed.us>• rschattm 1(b)(6) Eck)

1(b)(6) redu>• Steele, Rachel - OCE <RSteele@oce.usda.gov>• Wiener, Sarah - FS

<sarahwiener@fs.fed.us>• Wilson, Mike - NRCS, Lincoln, NE <mike.wilson@lin.usda.gov>

Subject: RE: Survey 2 pagers for the executive committee meeting

Hey Dan,

Just curious if you had any edits on these final docs? We were hoping to wrap up these documents and

get them out to the directors by early next week to give folks at least a little time to review before the

Committee meeting.

Many thanks,

Gabrielle

From: Lawson, Dan - NRCS, Washington, DC

Sent: Friday, June 30, 2017 10:04 AM

To: Roesch McNally, Gabrielle - FS <groeschmcnally@fs.fed.us>

Cc: Schattman, Rachel - FS <rschattman@fs.fecLus>- rschattm edu)

edu>• Steele, Rachel - OCE <RSteele@oce.usda.gov>• Wiener, Sarah - FS

<sarahwiener@fs.fed.us>• Wilson, Mike - NRCS, Lincoln NE <milceamilson@lin.usda.gov>

Subject: Re: Survey 2 pagers for the executive committee meeting

Okay, may have a minor edit or two.

Sent from my iPhone

On Jun 30, 2017, at 12:46 PM, Roesch McNally, Gabrielle - FS <groeschmcnally@fs.fed.us> wrote:

Dan,

Just as a reminder, we had hoped that these versions would now go out to the Hub

Directors as we discussed as they should get a chance to review before the Executive

Committee meeting. If you find that you need another bit of editing before we send along

Page 2 of 4

then please let us know but we had discussed the importance of the Hub Directors not getting surprised by these at the EC meeting. Also, just a reminder that all of our respective directors gave approval and made edits so this final version reflects all of their edits and prior edits from you, Rachel, Mike, Rich, Mary, etc,

Cheers,

Gabrielle

From: Lawson, Dan - NRCS, Washington, DC Sent: Friday, June 30, 2017 6:01 AM To: Schattman, Rachel - FS <rschattman@fs.fed,us>• rschattm du)

<I(b)(6) ledu>• Steele, Rachel - OCE <RSteele@oce.usda.gov>• Roesch McNally, Gabrielle - FS <proeschmcnally@fs.fed.us>• Wiener, Sarah - FS <sarahwiener@fs.fed.us >•

Wilson, Mike - NRCS, Lincoln, NE <mike.wilson@lin.usda.gov>

Subject: RE: Survey 2 pagers for the executive committee meeting

Thanks Rachel, we'll take a look and appreciate the effort on this. I've included Mike Wilson an this review as well.

Dan

Dan D. Lawson National Leader, USDA Climate Hubs Washington, DC 20250

National Leader, USDA Climate Hubs Washington, DC 20250 dan.lawson@wdc.usda.gov https://vvww climatehubs.oce.usda

dan.lawson@wdc.usda.gov

https://vvww climatehubs.oce.usda gov/

From: Schattman, Rachel - FS Sent: Friday, June 30, 2017 8:36 AM To: rschattm edu) (b M6) edu>• Steele, Rachel - OCE <RSteele@oce.usda.gov >• Lawson, Dan - NRCS, Washington, DC <Dantavvson@wdc.usda.gov >• Roesch McNally, Gabrielle - FS

<groeschmcnally@fs.fed.us >• Wiener, Sarah - FS <sarahwiener@fs.fed.us>

Subject: Survey 2 pagers for the executive committee meeting

Dear Dan and Rachel- Please find attached the 2 pagers for the NRCS survey and ESA survey that we have created for the Executive Committee meeting. Thanks for the earlier review of the content. We hope you like the new layout and presentation. Because these are intended for an internal audience, I didn't include any "equal opportunity employer" language or anything like that. If there is something of that nature h,

that should be added before July 19t

Kind regards,

Rachel

lease let me know.

Page 3 of 4

Rachel E. Schattman Produce Safety Specialist University of Vermont Extension Vegetable and Berry Program

327 US Route 302 Barre, Vermont 05641 802-476-2003 extension 212 (office) 802-476-2006 (fax) (b)(6) (mobile)
327 US Route 302
Barre, Vermont
05641
802-476-2003
extension 212 (office)
802-476-2006
(fax)
(b)(6)
(mobile)
(b)(6)

Post Doctoral Research Fellow, USDA Forest Service Northeast Climate Hub rschattman@fs.fed.us

Research website: rschattma n.net

From:

Roesch McNally, Gabrielle - FS

Sent:

5 Jul 2017 22:55:58 +0000

To:

Lawson, Dan - NRCS, Washington, DC

Cc:

Schattman, Rachel - FS;Wiener, Sarah - FS;Steele, Rachel - OCE;rschattm

(b)(6)

.edu)

Subject:

RE: Survey 2 pagers for the executive committee meeting

Attachments:

NRCS_v6.pdf, FSAv9.pdf, Hello Hub Directors_2.docx

Importance:

High

Hello Dan,

Attached are the final versional the two-pagers with edits from Mike Wilson included

Below is draft language you can use to send along to the directors- feel free to modify- also put in a word document just in case.

Many thanks!

Gabrielle

Draft letter

Hello Hub Directors,

This past year, three Climate Hub Fellows from Northeast (Rachel Schattman), Southeast (Sarah Wiener) and Northwest (Gabrielle Roesch-McNally) worked in partnership with NRCS and FSA to develop and administer surveys to employees of these respective agencies. The surveys were adapted from the NIFA funded project, Useful to Usable. They were designed to make comparisons between the surveys, and to feed into longitudinal social science research about agricultural service providers' perspectives regarding weather and climate resources and responses. Scientific information in this regard is critical to the success of the Hubs. Attached are 2-pager summary documents that highlight the findings from these surveys. These 2-pagers will be shared with the Climate Hub Executive Committee at their next meeting on July 19th, where the three fellows will also give an in-person presentation of the results. The 2-page summaries were reviewed by Agency colleagues at NRCS and FSA, as well as by the Fellow's Hub Directors. We wanted to be sure to share these with you in the lead up to the Executive Committee meeting. For the time being, these are internal documents, and we ask that you do not share them. These documents will provide the basis for a fruitful conversation on how best to share the results of this research more broadly.

Many thanks,

From: Lawson, Dan - NRCS, Washington, DC Sent: Wednesday, July 05, 2017 9:46 AM To: Roesch McNally, Gabrielle - FS <groeschmcna I ly@fs.fed. us> Cc: Schattman, Rachel - FS <rschattman@fs.fed.us>, Wiener, Sarah - FS <sarahwiener@fs.fed.us>;

Page 1 of 11

Steele, Rachel - OCE <RSteele@oce.usda.gov>; rschattm (b)(6) Subject: RE: Survey 2 pagers for the executive committee meeting

edu>

If you want to craft up something and send it to me, I can turn it around and send to um. If that works.

Dan D. Lawson National Leader, USDA Climate Hubs Washington, DC 20250 dan.lawson@wdc.usda.gov

202-720-5322
202-720-5322

https //www.climatehubs.oce.usda.gov/

From: Roesch McNally, Gabrielle - FS Sent: Wednesday, July 05, 2017 12:44 PM To: Lawson, Dan - NRCS, Washington, DC <Dan.Lawson@wdc.usda.gov>

Cc: Schattman, Rachel - FS <rschattman@fs.fed.us >• Wiener, Sarah - FS csarahwiener@fs.fed.us>•

Steele, Rachel - OCE <RSteele@oce.usda.gov >• rschattm (b)(6) Subject: RE: Survey 2 pagers for the executive committee meeting

edu>

Great! Thanks for understanding Dan

Do you want to send these out to the Directors or shall I? Either way works for me but I want to be sure it is consistent with your vision for how to prep for the Executive Committee meeting.

Cheers,

Gabrielle

From: Lawson, Dan - NRCS, Washington, DC Sent: Wednesday, July 05, 2017 9:42 AM To: Roesch McNally, Gabrielle - FS <groeschmcnally@fs.fed.us> Cc: Schattman, Rachel - FS <rschattman@fs.fed.us >- Wiener, Sarah - FS <sarahwiener@fs.fed.us>• Steele, Rachel - OCE <RSteele@oce.usda.gov >• rschattm (b)(6) .edu> Subject: RE: Survey 2 pagers for the executive committee meeting

Yup, totally understand that and had the same concern on what the survey said and how we present the results. Need to be consistent so totally get that. So let's march on

Dan D. Lawson National Leader, USDA Climate Hubs Washington, DC 20250

202-720-5322
202-720-5322

dan.lawson@wdc.usda.gov

https //www.climatehubs.oce.usda.gov/

Page 2 of 11

From: Roesch McNally, Gabrielle - FS

Sent: Wednesday, July 05, 2017 12:36 PM

To: Lawson, Dan - NRCS, Washington, DC <Dan,Lawson@wdc.usda.gov>

Cc: Schattman, Rachel - FS <rschattman@fs.fed.us>; Wiener, Sarah - FS <sarahwiener@fs.fed.us>,

Steele, Rachel - OCE <RSteele@oce.usda.gov>; rschattm (b)(6) edu>

Subject: RE: Survey 2 pagers for the executive committee meeting

Hello Dan,

Thanks for getting back to me so quickly. You kno

(b)(5)

(b)(5)

really doesn't fit

h the framing of our project

We

would prefer to keep the language as is. Please remember that these documents are for the executive

committee meeting and are not, as of now, for public consumption. I do think this raises some issues

(b)(5)

call. However, for the purposes of our work here, we prefer

aligns best with the language used in our research and maintains the scientific integrity of the work.

because this

but I will leave that for a leads

Any other thoughts credits on the documents?

Cheers,

Gabrielle

From: Lawson, Dan - NRCS, Washington, DC

Sent: Wednesday, July 05, 2017 9:20 AM

To: Roesch McNally, Gabrielle - FS <groeschmcnally@fs.fed.us>

Subject: RE: Survey 2 pagers for the executive committee meeting

S000 Gabrielle, in the documents would it be to much of a change to say (b)(5)

(b)(5)

Dan D. Lawson

National Leader, USDA Climate Hubs

Washington, DC 20250

dan.lawson@wdc.usda.gov

Climate Hubs Washington, DC 20250 dan.lawson@wdc.usda.gov https //www.climatehubs.oce.usda.goy/ From: Roesch McNally,

https //www.climatehubs.oce.usda.goy/

From: Roesch McNally, Gabrielle - FS

Sent: Wednesday, July 05, 2017 12:14 PM

To: Lawson, Dan - NRCS, Washington, DC <Dan.Lawson@wdc.usda.gov>

Cc: Schattman, Rachel - FS <rschattman@fs.fed.us>; rschattm (b)(6) • edu)

<1(d)(6) edu>• Steele, Rachel - OCE <RSteele@oce.usda.gov>; Wiener, Sarah - FS

<sarahwiener@fs.fed.us>; Wilson, Mike - NRCS, Lincoln, NE <mike.wilson@lin.usda.gov>

Subject: RE: Survey 2 pagers for the executive committee meeting

Page 3 of 11

Hey Dan,

Just curious if you had any edits on these final does? We were hoping to wrap up these documents and get them out to the directors by early next week to give folks at least a little time to review before the Committee meeting.

Many thanks,

Gabrielle

From: Lawson, Dan - NRCS, Washington, DC Sent: Friday, June 30, 2017 10:04 AM

To: Roesch McNally, Gabrielle - FS <groeschmcnally@fs.fecl.us>

Cc:

Schattman, Rachel - FS <rschattman@fs.fed.us @ (b)(6)

(b)(6)

I; Steele, Rachel -

OCE <RSteele@oce.usda.gov@ Wiener, Sarah - FS

<sarahwiener@fs.fed.us @ Wilson, Mike - NRCS, Lincoln, NE <mike.wilson@lin.usda.gov>

Subject: Re: Survey 2 pagers for the executive committee meeting

Okay, may have a minor edit or two.

Sent from my iPhone

On Jun 30, 2017, at 12:46 PM, Roesch McNally, Gabrielle - FS <groeschmcnally@fs.fed.us> wrote:

Dan,

Just as a reminder, we had hoped that these versions would now go out to the Hub Directors as we discussed as they should get a chance to review before the Executive Committee meeting. If you find that you need another bit of editing before we send along then please let us know but we had discussed the importance of the Hub Directors not getting surprised by these at the EC meeting. Also, just a reminder that all of our respective directors gave approval and made edits so this final version reflects all of their edits and prior edits from you, Rachel, Mike, Rich, Mary, etc.

Cheers,

Gabrielle

From: Lawson, Dan - NRCS, Washington, DC Sent: Friday, June 30, 2017 6:01 AM To: Schattman, Rachel - FS <rschattman@fs.fed.us>; (b)(6)

b)(6)

1 Steele, Rachel - OCE <RSteele@oce.usda.goy>; Roesch McNally,

Gabrielle - FS <groeschmcnally@fs.fed.us>; Wiener, Sarah - FS <sarahwiener@fsfed.us >; Wilson, Mike - NRCS, Lincoln, NE <mike.wilson@lin.usda.gov> Subject: RE: Survey 2 pagers for the executive committee meeting

Thanks Rachel, we'll take a look and appreciate the effort on this. I've included Mike Wilson on this review as well.

Page 4 of 11

Dan

Dan D. Lawson

National Leader, USDA Climate Hubs

Washington, DC 20250

dan.lawson@wdc.usda.gov

Climate Hubs Washington, DC 20250 dan.lawson@wdc.usda.gov https://www.climatehubs.oce.usda.gov/ From: Schattman,

https://www.climatehubs.oce.usda.gov/

From: Schattman, Rachel - FS

Sent: Friday, June 30, 2017 8:36 AM To: rschattm (rschattm@uvm.edu) <rschattm@uvm.edl(b)(6) I - OCE

<RSteele@oce.usda.gov >• Lawson, Dan - NRCS, Washington, DC

<Dan.Lawson@wdc.usda.gov>• Roesch McNally, Gabrielle - FS <groeschmcnally@fs.fed.us >• Wiener, Sarah - FS <sarahwiener@fs.fed.us>

Subject: Survey 2 pagers for the executive committee meeting

Dear Dan and Rachel-

Please find attached the 2 pagers for the NRCS survey and FSA survey that we have created for the Executive Committee meeting. Thanks for the earlier review of the content. We

hope you like the new layout and presentation.

Because these are intended for an internal audience, I didn't include any "equal

opportunity employer" language or anything like that. If there is something of that nature

that should be added before July 19 th, please let me know.

Kind regards,

Rachel

Rachel E. Schattman Produce Safety Specialist University of Vermont Extension Vegetable and Berry Program

327 US Route 302 Barre, Vermont 05641 802-476-2003 extension 212 (office) 802-476-2006 (fax) (b)(6) (mobile)
327 US Route 302
Barre, Vermont 05641
802-476-2003 extension 212 (office)
802-476-2006 (fax)
(b)(6)
(mobile)

rschattm@uvmedu

Post Doctoral Research Fellow, USDA Forest Service Northeast Climate Hub rschattman@fs.fed.us

Page 5 of 11

Research website: rschattma n. net

NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION SERVICE:

NATIONAL SURVEY ON CLIMATE AND WEATHER

Prepared by Gabrielle Roesch McNally (USDA Northwest Climate Hub), Sarah Wiener (USDA Southeast Climate Hub), arid Rachel Schattman (USDA Northeast Climate Hub)

Key Points

of NRCS employees who responded to the survey believe that it is important for pro- ducers to adapt to climate change to ensure the long-term viability of U.S. agriculture.

of the respondents reported that they are confident in their ability to apply weather forecasts and information to the services that they provide.

Opportunities for future collaboration between NRCS and other agency partners include outreach and education on climate and weather-related issues by linking them to existing programs that help producers to reduce climate-related risks.

Project Overview

The USDA Climate Hubs, NRCS, and the University of Vermont collaboratively designed a survey, admin- istered in February/March 2017, to capture NRCS field staff views and understanding related to climate change, weather variability, and potential impacts on agriculture. The survey also addressed NRCS employ- ees' perceptions about the risk that weather variabili- ty poses for U.S. farmers. Over 8,000 NRCS employees nationwide were targeted and 1,893 NRCS staff com- pleted the survey (response rate = 22.3%, calculated using the RR4 method of the American Association for Public Opinion Research, AAPOR). The three main positions held by respondents were District Conserva- tionist (25%), Soil Conservationist (19%) and Soil Con- servation/Engineering Technician (16%). The majority work at NRCS Service Centers (74%), followed by Area Offices (12%) and State Offices (10%).

Current weather conditions

1-7 day forecasts

Historical weather trends

8-14 day outlooks

Monthly or seasonal outlooks

Weather data for the past 12 months

Annual or longer term outlooks

 

8

Very depu nderit

Mode-ately dependent

Slightly dependent

Not dope )(dent

Figure 1: NRCS respondents reported dependency on eather and climate inlorma tior

fle UnIVOrSi tat Ver111011E

USDA

Ur.it.d SUt.

ir- 22:1 or

Natural Resources Conservation Service

Page 7 of 11

USDA

united States Department of Agriculture

Climate Hubs

Survey Result Highlights

NRCS employees most commonly integrate daily, weekly, or seasonal weather forecast information into guidance to clients for the following topics: in-field conservation practices (73%), grazing and forage management (71%), tillage (67%), livestock management systems (64%), and on-farm water management (60%). Survey respondents are most depen- dent on current and short-term weather information (1-7 day forecasts), and much less dependent on monthly and season- al outlooks or annual and longer-term outlooks (Figure 1). Of 12 weather-related tools and resources, respondents most frequently use the U.S. Drought Monitor (68%), growing de- gree day tools (41%), and evapo-transpiration indices (38%).

NRCS employees reported regularly working with producers who have experienced adverse events/conditions in the past few years largely tied to extreme or variable weather events. Climate or weather trends reported to be the most con- cerning in each state vary (Figure 2). The majority of states and territories (29) reported producers are most concerned with longer dry periods/drought, followed by increased soil erosion (6), increased weed pressure (4), higher incidences of tree pathogens (4), and higher incidence of wildfire (3).

Most respondents (65%) agree or strongly agree that there is increasing variable and unusual weather in their areas, and that to cope with increasing climate variability farming practices will need to change (70% agree or strongly agree). More than half (52%) agree or strongly agree that extreme weather events in recent years have affected the long-term

0

0

0

0

0

0

(Th

o

o

o

management goals of producers in their service area. Most respondents (65%) agree or strongly agree that producers use climate information when making farm-re- lated decisions and 41% agree or strongly agree that there is an increased need for NRCS's programs in their service area due to changing weather patterns. The ma- jority agree or strongly agree (66%) that they would like climate or weather forecasts to inform the services they provide in the future. While 53% of respondents believe that assisting producers to prepare for weather variabil- ity is part of their job, only 35% agree or strongly agree that they have the knowledge and technical skill to help producers deal with those threats.

Discussion

The mission of the Climate Hubs is to work with USDA agencies and partners to develop and deliver sci- ence-based, region-specific information and technologies to agricultural and natural resource managers, enabling climate-informed decision-making, and assisting in the implementation of those decisions. As a result of this survey analysis, we have identified three areas of poten- tial collaboration between NRCS and the Climate Hubs:

(1) providing greater access to and awareness of weath- er and climate related tools; (2) providing educational resources on the topic of climate science and global weather dynamics; (3) developing outreach and educa- tion messaging through the NRCS Public Affairs Division on climate and weather-related issues. Messaging could be linked to existing NRCS efforts, such as the Soil Health Initiative and to conservation practices that reduce risks, increase productivity, and build resilience across produc- tion sectors.

Count of Respondents

0

s

I o

1

20

40

60

80

100

120

Climate or Weather Concern

Higher inctdence of tree pathogens

I

: Higher incidence of wildfire

.

Increased heat stress on crops increased heat stress on timber stands

: I Increased loss of nutrients into waterways 0 Increased pressure from animal species Increased pressure from plant species :I Increased sod erosion Increased weed pressure Longer dry periods and drought More frequent extreme rains

Figure 2 Most common climate or weather concern of NRCS field staff per state (n-1,376) Twenty-six climate and weather trends were rated on a I ikert scale (1-not concerned, 2-slightly concerned. 3-concerned, and 4-very concerned

Figures by Sarah Wiener, Photography credits: Rachel Schattman

Page 8 of 11

FARM SERVICE AGENCY:

NATIONAL SURVEY ON CLIMATE AND WEATHER

Prepared by Rachel Schattman (USDA Northeast Climate Hub), Sarah Wiener (USDA Southeast Climate Hub), and Gabrielle Poesch-McNally (USDA North-- - Climate Hub)

Key Points

of ESA employees who responded to the survey believe that it is important for pro- ducers to adapt to climate change to ensure the long-term viability of U.S. agriculture.

of respondents agreed or strongly agreed that they personally have the knowledge to help producers deal with weather-related threats.

Opportunities for future collaboration between FSA and other agency partners include outreach and education on climate- and weather-related issues by linking them to existing programs that help producers to reduce climate-related risks.

It is important for producers Lo adapt to climate

Project Overview

In November/December of 2016, a survey collaboratively designed by the USDA Climate Hubs, FSA, and the Universi- ty of Vermont was administered to capture ESA field staffs' beliefs and attitudes related to climate change and poten- tial impacts, as well as their perceptions about the risk that weather variability poses for U.S. farmers. The survey also investigated the types of climate and weather tools ESA staff currently use in their work with land managers. Over 10,000 FSA staff throughout the U.S. were contacted for the survey; in total 4,621 ESA staff responded (response rate = 42%, calculated using the RR4 method of the Ameri- can Association for Public Opinion Research, AAPOR).

nge Lc ensure the lung-Lerm success 01 U.S.agriculture

Producrrs should tnkr nddionnl steps to protect thrir operations from incrrnsed wrnther vnrinbility

Producers should do more to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from their farm operations

In my current rein, I should help produr

to prepnrr for incrensrd werahrr vnrinhility

Climate change is not a big issue because human ingenuity will enable producers to adapt to changes

I have the knowledge to help producers deal with any weather-related threfls to the viability of their farm operations

Figure 1 FSA respondents' percent agreement with climate and weather statements (n=3,572)

 

USDA

I he University of Vermont

SIM

Farm Service Agency

Page 9 of 11

USDA

united States Department of Agriculture Climate Hubs

Survey Result Highlights

FSA employees reported using weather and climate resourc- es when discussing the following topics with producers: crop rotations/field assignments (32% of respondents); crop/ variety choices (35%); purchasing crop insurance or enrolling in the Noninsured Crop Disaster Assistance Program (NAP) (51%); and planting or harvest schedules (42%). One third (33%) of respondents do not use historical weather trends and/or forecasts for any of the topics listed in the survey. Respondents do not use or are not familiar with many of the weather-related resources listed in the survey, with the ex- ception of U.S. Drought Monitor (74% use this resource) and livestock heat indices (42% use these resources, which are often state-specific). Nearly one-third of respondents report using the Farmers' Almanac as a weather resource in their professional service.

When asked to rank level of concern for 18 different climate and weather effects, the majority of states and territories (40 out of 53) reported the most concern with longer dry periods and drought (Figure 2). Most respondents agree or strongly agree that there is increasing variable and unusual weather in their areas (59%), and that to cope with increasing cli- mate variability, farming practices will need to change (54%). Additionally, nearly half (42%) agree or strongly agree that extreme weather events in recent years have affected the long-term management goals of producers, and that there is increased need for FSA's programs in their service area due to changing weather patterns (42%). One-third agree or strongly agree that they would like climate or weather forecasts to inform the services they provide in the future, while 61% agree or strongly agree that producers use climate information when making farm-related decisions.

Adapting to changing weather conditions is something the majority of respondents agree is important (Figure 1). Over half of respondents agreed or strongly agreed that producers should take additional steps to protect their operations from increased weather variability (61%), and that it is important for producers to adapt to climate change to ensure the long-term viability of U.S. agriculture (65%). However, only 14% agree or strongly that they personally have the knowledge to help produc- ers deal with weather-related threats.

Discussion

The mission of the Climate Hubs is to develop and deliver science-based, region-specific information and technologies, with USDA agencies and partners, to agricultural and natural resource managers that enable climate-informed decision-making, and to provide access to assistance to implement those decisions. Based on the findings from this national level survey, we have identified three potential areas of future collaboration between the Climate Hubs and FSA: (1) provide training and support for FSA employees to work with and under- stand weather and climate data, tools, and resources; (2) better integrate specific weather and climate tools into specific FSA program areas; (3) hone outreach and edu- cation on climate- and weather-related issues by linking them to existing programs that help producers to reduce climate-related risks on farm (such as the Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program).

Count of Respondents

1

100

200

300

350

'

Figure 2: Most cornmon climate or weather concern of HA field staff per state (n=3,571) Eighteen climate and weather trends were rated on a Likert scale (1= not concerned; 2=slightly concerned; 3=concerned; and 4=very concerned)

Figures by Sarah Wiener Photography credits Rachel Schattman

Page 10 of 11

Climate or Weather Concern

E

Excessive moisture Increased flooding

, Increased heat stress on crops

Increased incidence of hurricanes or

tropical depressions

fl

Increased insect pressure & higher

incidence of crop disease (tie)

Increased soil erosion Increased weed pressure

Longer dry periods and droughts

Hi More frequent extreme rain events

Hello Hub Directors,

This past year, three Climate Hub Fellows from Northeast (Rachel Schattman), Southeast (Sarah Wiener) and Northwest (Gabrielle Roesch-McNally) worked in partnership with NRCS and FSA to develop and administer surveys to employees of these respective agencies. The surveys were adapted from the NIFA funded project, Useful to Usable. They were designed to make comparisons between the surveys, and to feed into longitudinal social science research about agricultural service providers' perspectives regarding weather and climate resources and responses. Scientific information in this regard is critical to the success of the Hubs. Attached are 2-pager summary documents that highlight the findings from these surveys. These 2-pagers will be shared with the Climate Hub Executive Committee at their next meeting on July 19th, where the three fellows will also give an in-person presentation of the results. The 2-page summaries were reviewed by Agency colleagues at NRCS and FSA, as well as by the Fellow's Hub Directors. We wanted to be sure to share these with you in the lead up to the Executive Committee meeting. For the time being, these are internal documents, and we ask that you do not share them. These documents will provide the basis for a fruitful conversation on how best to share the results of this research more broadly.

Many thanks,

Page 11 of 11

From:

Lawson, Dan - NRCS, Washington, DC

Sent:

12 Jun 2017 10:22:53 +0000

To:

Deavers, Leslie - NRCS, Washington, DC;Smith, David - NRCS, Washington,

DC;Sadeghzadeh, Kaveh - NRCS, Washington, DC;Wilson, Mike - NRCS, Lincoln, NE

Cc:

Bramblett, Jimmy - NRCS, Washington, DC;Branham, Sharif - NRCS, Washington,

DC

Subject:

RE: Survey two-pagers for review

Thanks Leslie, I will work with Mike Wilson/others regarding your comments/edits.

Dan

Dan D. Lawson National Leader, USDA Climate Hubs Washington, DC 20250 dan.lawson@wdc.usda.gov

Climate Hubs Washington, DC 20250 dan.lawson@wdc.usda.gov https //www.climatehubs.oce.usda.gov/ From: Deavers, Leslie

https //www.climatehubs.oce.usda.gov/

From: Deavers, Leslie - NRCS, Washington, DC Sent: Sunday, June 11, 2017 5:29 PM To: Lawson, Dan - NRCS, Washington, DC <Da n.Lawson@wdc.usda.gov>; Smith, David - NRCS, Washington, DC <David.Smith@wdc.usda.gov>; Sadeghzadeh, Kaveh - NRCS, Washington, DC <Kaveh.Sadeghzadeh@wdc.usda.gov>; Wilson, Mike - NRCS, Lincoln, NE <mike.wilson@lin.usda.gov> Cc: Bramblett, Jimmy - NRCS, Washington, DC <Jimmy.Bramblett@wdc.usda.gov> Subject: RE: Survey two-pagers for review

All, thank you for providing these documents for review. I found the responses interesting I've included my comments in the attached file.

I'm cCing Jimmy Bramblett on this response because there are some issues with the text related to programs in the beginning of the report. I've noted where I had concerns but he may see other issues.

In addition, I recommend we remove or significantly alter the paragraph on employee beliefs about climate change and whether or not it was human induced. I don't think it is necessary to meet the ultimate objective which is to ensure NRCS staff have the tools and skills to address climate resiliency in the planning process.

Let me know if we need to discuss my comments.

Leslie

From: Lawson, Dan - NRCS, Washington, DC Sent: Friday, June 09, 2017 8:55 AM To: Smith, David - NRCS, Washington, DC <David.Smith@wdc.usda.gov>; Deavers, Leslie - NRCS, Washington, DC <Leslie.Deavers@wdc.usda.gov>; Sadeghzadeh, Kaveh - NRCS, Washington, DC

Page 1 of 4

<Kaveh.Sadeghzadeh@wdc.usda.gov>; Wilson, Mike - NRCS, Lincoln, NE <mike.wilson@lin.usda.gov> Subject: FW: Survey two-pagers for review Importance: High

All, I want to close the loop with everyone on this survey just to be sure that from an NRCS perspective we are all on the same page. As you can see in the attachments and the below email, it continues to move forward. Just want to be clear what our position is on distribution (if at all) of the survey results

and in presenting at the July 19 th Climate Hub Executive Committee.

Please advise

Thanks

Dan

Dan D. Lawson National Leader, USDA Climate Hubs Washington, DC 20250 dan.lawson@wdc.usda.gov

202-720-5322
202-720-5322

https //www.climatehubs.oce.usda.gov/

From: Roesch McNally, Gabrielle - FS Sent: Thursday, June 08, 2017 2:41 PM To: Steele, Rachel - OCE <RSteele@oce.usda.gov>; Lawson, Dan - NRCS, Washington, DC <Dan.Lawson@wdc.usda.gov>; Wilson, Mike - NRCS, Lincoln, NE <mike.wilson@lin.usda.gov>; lovanna, Rich - FSA, Washington, DC <Rich.lovanna@wdc.usda.gov> Cc: Schattman, Rachel - FS <rschattman@fs.fed.us>; rschattm (b)(6) edu) (b)(6) edu>; Wiener, Sarah - FS <sarahwiener@fs.fed.us> Subject: Survey two-pagers for review Importance: High

Hello Dan, Rachel, Mike, and Rich,

First of all, thanks so much for your patience with the survey analysis and report writing process. We recognize that there have been communication hiccups along the way and while we have tried to keep everyone in the loop, there are simply some things about this process that have not gone as smoothly as one would hope but I suppose that is life. All that to say, we are ready for the next step in the process. I have tried to be very explicit and clear in the process and our approach in this email so that we are all on the same page so to speak.

Attached you will find three documents. The first two documents are the primary focus as it was decided by Hubs leadership (Dan and Rachel) that we would create two-pagers for the Executive Team meeting to review and make a decision about what to do next with the full reports.

You will find a NRCS 2 pager and a ESA 2 pager. Both Mike and Rich are included in this email as you have been the key points of contact with your agencies. Please don't share these reports with others in

Page 2 of 4

your teams just yet as I want to be sure that Rachel and Dan have a chance to review and ideally, the Exec committee before we share this beyond a small group. For now, these are meant as internal

documents. Please review these documents and get us comments by June 19th if you can.

The next step will be to send a revised version of these two-pagers (based on your input) to the Hub directors (including Lynn Knight in NE) to get their review before Exec Committee meeting in July. We can decide internally (this group) how much editing we want or expect from them or if we just want them to get the preview so they are not surprised by anything (plus I know many of them are VERY keen to see preliminary results).

Finally, once we are happy with the contents of the two-pagers, Rachel Schattman will work her InDesign magic to make them a bit more visually attractive for the Exec Committee meeting.

The third document is a draft full report for NRCS since we wanted to be sure the Dan, Mike and Rachel could look at this updated version since it is now more, or less, where the FSA report is in terms of completeness. We obviously don't know where this report will go at this stage but we wanted to be sure that you had the most up-to-date version for reference since the two-pagers are very brief and leave a lot out due to necessity. As a note, there is a general discussion that figures and how some of these data are presented would like change for greater clarity and aesthetic appeal for any final report we have but we have not gotten there yet due to wanting to wait on how the process develops.

As an aside, the FSA full report has received some great edits from Rachel, Rich and Mary but we are waiting on incorporating those until after the Exec Team meeting to see where we are directed to go with these reports.

I hope this process is clear and the documents are more or less what you had hoped for.

Many thanks for your review and support during this process.

Cheers,

Gabrielle

Gabrielle Roesch-McNally, PhD Fellow, Northwest Climate Hub

Forest Service Northwest Regional Climate Hub p: 541-750-7091 proeschmcnallytats.fed.us 3200 Jefferson Way
Forest Service
Northwest Regional Climate Hub
p:
541-750-7091
proeschmcnallytats.fed.us
3200 Jefferson Way
Corvallis, OR 97331

www.fs.fed.us

Page 3 of 4

Caring for the land and serving people

From:

Smith David - NRCS Washington DC

To:

Bramblett Emmy NRCS Washington DC; Sadezhpadeh Kaye)) - NRCS Washington Dc

Cc:

Wilson Mike - NRCS. Lincoln. NE Cerretany Katie NRCS Washington DC Lawson. Dan - NRCS. Washington DC; Hafner Tim NRCS Beltsville MD

Subject:

RE: 130 - AGN - Agency General - Branding

Date:

Thursday, February 16, 2017 8:08:28 PM

(b)(5

(b)(5

Hi All,

Dan is correct about a misunderstanding about a decision memo. The possible need for one was

discussed, but then dropped after OSEC simply cleared the voluntary survey about CC awareness to

o out to NRCS employees

We've not received any guidance directing us to change anything about USDA's Regional

Climate H

various activities under the Building Blocks for Climate Smart Agriculture and

Forestry

Changing climate conditions and extreme weather events have been arid are likely to continue

impacting ag The USDA Hubs and climate-smart efforts focus on ways to help producers maintain

or increase production under various climate scenarios while also reducing emission and energy

use.

(b)(5)

In line with the "Interim Procedures" memo, we are

(b)(5)

informing the Department of our upcoming activities and communications, so there shouldn't be

any surprises As long as we keep abiding by that memo and focus on maintaining ongoing work (no

new initiatives), we should be able to talk about these issues in that context.

Dave

From: Lawson, Dan - NRCS, Washington, DC

Sent: Thursday, February 16, 2017 8:55 AM

To: Bramblett, Jimmy - NRCS, Washington, DC <Jimmy.Bramblett@wdc.usda.gov>; Hafner, Tim -

NRCS, Beltsville, MD ctim.hafner@wdc.usda.gov>; Smith, David - NRCS, Washington, DC

<David.Smith@wdc.usda.gov>

Cc: Wilson, Mike - NRCS, Lincoln, NE <mike.wilson@lin.usda.gov Cerretani, Katie - NRCS,

Washington, DC <Katie.Cerretani@wdc.usda.gov>

Subject: RE: 130- AGN - Agency General - Branding

All, I'm sorry but I'm not aware of a decision memo being developed that addresses climate change

and branding. We worked on a memo a few weeks ago regarding the survey, but that's all I'm aware

of

Please advise and whether I'm the appropriate person to do this or who is working on it, if it's being

done.

Page 1 of 5

Thanks

Dan

Dan D. Lawson National Leader. USDA Climate Hubs Washington, DC 20250 usda.00y 202-720-5322
Dan D. Lawson
National Leader. USDA Climate Hubs
Washington, DC 20250
usda.00y
202-720-5322

http://www.usda.govklimatehubs

From: Bramblett, Jimmy - NRCS, Washington, DC

Sent: Thursday, February 16, 2017 8:38 AM

To: Hafner, Tim - NRCS, Beltsville, MD Crn halnenlOwdc- LltiCa p()V>

CC: Lawson, Dan - NRCS, Washington, DC <Das gorson'Usiodo (15C.a gov>

Subject: RE: 130- AGN - Agency General - Branding

TIM,

There is a decision memo being developed by Dan Lawson on that one (b)(5)

the latest (.:-7)

(b)(5)

Jimmy Bramblett

Deputy Chief — Science and Technology

Natural Resources Conservation Service

United States Department of Agriculture

le and Independence Avenue

Washington, DC 20250

lirmy braqiblett(upwdL _sda gov

I will copy Dan here so he can fill you in on

From: Hafner, Tim - NRCS, Beltsville, MD

Sent: Thursday, February 16, 2017 8:31 AM

To: Bramblett, Jimmy - NRCS, Washington, DC clim -ny.Bramb ettav.idc.usda.gov>

Subject: RE: 130- AGN - Agency General - Branding

Thanks Jimmy,

One additional question, how about the name climate hubs.

From: Bramblett, Jimmy NRCS, Washington, DC

Sent: Thursday, February 16, 2017 7:45 AM

Page 2 of 5

To: Hafner, Tim - NRCS, Beltsville, MD <t

Subject: FW 130- AGN - Agency General - Branding

hafnerQ*Ndc usca gov>

Tim,

Below is guidance I sent regarding the phrase "climate change". When discussing carbon sequestration, I recommend we use verbiage related to building organic matter in the soil to improve soil health.

Let rile know if you nee( m r

THAN

Jimmy Bramblett Deputy Chief —Science and Technology Natural Resources Conservation Service United States Department of Agriculture

le and Independence Avenue Washington, DC 20250

nv bra nblett g ck. „yid vov

From: Bramblett, Jimmy - NRCS, Washington, DC Sent: Tuesday, January 24, 2017 12:41 PM To: Cohen, Kari - NRCS, Washington, DC <kari.cohen(L3pwdc_sda.Eov>• Erickson, Terrell - NRCS, Washington, DC <Tay rel Erickson1Pvadc. us:Ja .ov>• Guerrero, Rafael - NRCS, Fort Worth, TX

<Rafael.GuerrefoPft \.v

sda.aov>•

Herbert, Noller - NRCS, Washington, DC

<Nol er.Herber:Xavadc.usda.aov>• McKinney, Shaun - NRCS, Portland, OR <Shaun.Mcki eyPpor.usda.gova• Moebius-Clune, Bianca - NRCS - Washington, DC <Bianaa.Moesius-CluneXa wcia.uscia POV> Porter, Jeffrey - NRCS, Greensboro, NC

<je"rra.porter@gnb.usda.cov>• Tillman, Denise - NRCS, Washington, DC

<Denise.Til friana;aavdc.asda.gv>

Cc: Tillman, James - NRCS, Washington, DC <James. - illrnanfaavdc.usca.gov >• Sadeghzadeh, Kaveh -

NRCS, Washington, DC <<aveh.Sacealizadef ava:Jc. us:Ja aova• Deavers, Leslie - NRCS, Washington,

DC (LeslicaDeavefsPavdc.usda.gov )<_ralir.Deavers6X \aidc.usda.cov>• Wickey, Kevin - NRCS,

Washington, DC <1<evi - MickeyaXavdc.usda.gov >• Barry, Gayle - NRCS,Washington, DC

<ad- e.barrvia)wdc.usda.aov>• Chessman, Dennis - NRCS, Lexington, KY <Dennis Chessinall@<\XUSdiXaov>• Boozer, Astor - NRCS, Washington, DC

(Astor.BoozerP \aidc

sda.aov)<Astof

Boozernnivdc.usca.gova-

Jordan, Leonard - NRCS, Washington,

DC < eonard Jordanaaavoc.usca.>• Smith, David - NRCS, Washington, DC

<David.Smithaa.,.vdc.usca.gov>• Kramer, Tony - NRCS, Washington, DC <Torry. Kramerfaxmic LltiCa p()V>• Reed, Lesia - NRCS, Beltsville, MD < esia reecPwdc usda.00v>•

Christensen, Thomas - NRCS, Washington DC (Thomas.Christe - sen@wdc.usda.cov)

<T - omas.Christense - av.,dc

usda.gov>

Subject: 130- AGN - Agency General - Branding

Page 3 of 5

Good Afternoon,

This email is a follow-up to our staff meeting last week. During our visit we discussed the transition team moving into the Department, and priorities of our new administration. It has become clear one of the previous administration's priority is not consistent with that of the incoming administration. Namely, that priority is climate change. Please visit with your staff and make them aware of this shift in perspective within the Executive Branch.

Within the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), we address resource concerns related to soil, water, air, plants, and animals. We have approved resource concerns and causes associated with Air Quality as follows:

1. AIR QUALITY IMPACTS - Emissions of Particulate Matter- PM - and PM Precursors

• Direct emissions of particulate matter - dust and smoke-, as well as the formation of fine particulate matter in the atmosphere from other agricultural emissions - ammonia, NOx, and VOCs - cause multiple environmental impacts, such as: 14 The unintended movement of particulate matter - typically dust or smoke - results in safety or nuisance visibility restriction, 2) The unintended movement of particulate matter and/or chemical droplets results in unwanted deposits on surfaces, 3) Increased atmospheric concentrations of particulate matter can impact human and animal health and degrade regional visibility.

2. AIR QUALITY IMPACTS - Emissions of Greenhouse Gases — GHGs

• Emissions increase atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases.

3. AIR QUALITY IMPACTS - Emissions of Ozone Precursors Emissions of ozone precursors - NOx

and VOCs

• resulting in formation of ground- level ozone that cause negative impacts to plants and animals.

4. AIR QUALITY IMPACTS - Objectionable odors

• Emissions of odorous compounds - VOCs, ammonia and odorous sulfur compounds - cause nuisance conditions

At this juncture, please be encouraged to use terminology associated with these approved resource concerns to describe the work you/we do to serve our nation's agricultural producers and woodland owners. Having said that, we will be revisiting Air Quality — Emissions of Greenhouse Gases to determine the relevance of its continued use. Prudence when discussing this particular resource concern-cause is advised until further notice.

I will copy other agency leaders on this message for the purpose of alerting them to our current communications within the Deputy Chief for SgzT family. Many thanks to each of your for exercising diplomacy when communicating this information internally and externally, and for your leadership during this transient period.

THANKS!!!

Jimmy Bramblett Deputy Chief - Science and Technology

Page 4 of 5

Natural Resources Conservation Service United States Department of Agriculture

Natural Resources Conservation Service United States Department of Agriculture JITIrTy.brarilflletaWdC.USda E0V Page 5 of 5

JITIrTy.brarilflletaWdC.USda E0V