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ALL NEW AGENCY MAP HUGH MARKS JEFF GOLDBLUM THE MEDIA + MARKETING SUMMIT

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Thinking. Insights. Ideas.


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Presented by

RITSON Tonic Health Media

PRESENTS: FINDING BRAND


THE DIGITAL SUCCESS BUILDING IN A THE NEW FACE HEALTH AND
INFERNO IN FAILURE DIGITAL WORLD OF AGENCIES WELL-BEING
A journey through the nine It takes a brave marketer Has brand building been Whose game is it anyway? We all know that people are
circles of marketing hell. to admit failure. However, sacrificed in the name of When a creative agency can key to business success and
Professor Mark Ritson never those failures whether it digital tactics? Are marketers become a media agency, good quality marketing, but
fails to disappoint. In this all- be planning failures, creative too concerned with push a media agency is a digital its getting ever harder to
new presentation, Ritson will failures, or campaign failures messaging, than pulling shop, and brand becomes balance life in the fast-paced
outline the nine levels of hell will lead to incredible in the hearts and minds of a publisher nothing is black media world. In this well-being
that digital is taking marketers learning experiences. We customers? How is a brand and white. With such blurred psych-up session Matthew
through. Everything from hear from some of those grown and nurtured in a digital lines, its hard to remember Johnstone, ambassador of
bots, programmatic costs, people who have failed, and environment; what are the the important thing is the Tonic Health Media will teach
transparency, viewability, social get a unique insight into how best examples, and what can outcome. How are agencies you how to manage stress in a
context, audiences and screen it changed their tactics and be learned from them? and clients reshaping what busy media environment and
size, the works. strategies forever. they do to deliver better help you and your teams build
results and relationships - and resilience, find balance and
whats working? develop mindfulness.

...plus more to be announced

AN EVENT

PRESENTING PARTNER SUPPORTING SPONSORS FASTFRONT SPONSORS HEALTH AND WELL-BEING


SPONSOR

I N F LUE N C E R S

A PRODUCTION
PRESENTING PARTNER MELBOURNE
WED, 2 AUG
Australian Centre for the Moving Image

SPEAKERS INCLUDE
TE
O
N
EY
K

MARK HARLAND MARK RITSON ADAM FERRIER


Marketing & Customer Experience Director, Adjunct Professor, Consumer psychologist and brand
General Motors International Melbourne Business School strategist

DANIELLE USKOVIC RODDY CAMPBELL NICKIE SCRIVEN CHRIS HOWATSON PAUL BROOKS
Head of Digital & Social, CEO, CEO, CEO, CEO, Carat,
Lenovo Bring (Universal Music) Zenith Australia CHE Proximity Australia & New Zealand

JASON TONELLI GEMMA HUNTER


Chief Digital and PAUL REES-JONES ASHLEY EARNSHAW Executive Creative Director
;LJOUVSVN` 6JLY Executive Planning Director, *OPLM 0U]LZ[TLU[ 6JLY and Head of MediaCom
Publicis Media ANZ Clemenger BBDO, Melbourne Carat, Australia Beyond Advertising, Australia
...plus more to be announced

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Contents
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Features PRINT + DIGITAL

10 The Media + Marketing Summit: Check out the highlights from


the Sydney event, Ritson, Google, News Corp, Visa, IAG and more. SUPER BOWL ADS INSIDE BUZZFEED GUT INSTINCT DATA OBSESSION SIMON SINEK
A G E N C Y O F T H E Y E A R AWA R D S C I N E M A A D S A S I A W O M E N S A F L

Thinking Insights deas


adnews com au

16 TheProfile:NineCEOHughMarkswastaskedwithturningaroundthe
network 18 months ago, he bares all.
CULTURAL
20 Agenda: Three Ds are driving outdoor advertising data, digital and WHITEWASH
Advertising's lack of diversity and culture

dynamic creative.

25 Investigation: A look at how, and why, you should start your own
agency.

39 The Big Question: Do we need more media laws in Australia?

Creative
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8 The Work:AlookunderthehoodofSamsungandLeoBurnettsPocket
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34 Creative Focus: Cannes is just around the corner, but whats it
really about? Stolen awards, footballers, tube-ridingandBollywood, Then only $9.99 every 2-issues thereafter
apparently.
$4.99 an issue

Regulars
LOW FIXED UNLIMITED SET AND
5 Behind the headlines: Snapchat, Facebook, Media Reform,
Accenture and The Monkeys.
PRICE ACCESS FORGET
Secure your Get AdNews You wont have
46 Meet the Team: Nicole Sheffields News DNA team is driving digital. on-going low delivered to your to worry about
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50 Reality Check: Are people buying what Goldblum is selling? an issue after Android, iOS subscription. Its
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Go online to read exclusive, in-depth interviews with
72andSunny MD Chris Kay, R/GAs Nick Law, and
look under the hood of agency repositionings from *Terms and conditions: Your nominated account will be charged regular amounts, in regular
Initiative and DDB. Go to page 26 to pull out instalments, as set out in the terms of the subscription. You may voluntarily stop your sub-
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Editorial www.adnews.com.au | June 2017 4

When I think about agencies that have been around CEO Hugh Marks, looking at how hes instigated
for decades like Ogilvy, M&C Saatchi and DDB, the a programming revival over the last 18 months
brands are so established and imbued with history (p16). We also sit down with News Corp chief dig-
and heritage, its easy to forget that they were once ital officer Nicole Sheffield and her team (p46),
startups too. take a look at the driving forces behind the out-
The founders, David Ogilvy, Maurice and door industry (p20), ask if we need more laws to
Charles, Bill Bernbach, Maxwell Dane and James regulate media (p 39) and hear some tales from
Doyle, all set out with a vision to build an agen- Cannes Lions (p34).
cy, forge a future in advertising, win clients and Meanwhile, on page 10 you can find a brief
change the way advertising was done. They put overview of our Sydney Media + Marketing
their names above the door Summit. Were ramping up
and took the first steps. for the debut Melbourne
There are always new event on 2 August and tick-
agencies starting up, but not ets are on sale.
all of them succeed. As Jules The Melbourne event
Hall, founder of The Hallway will continue to tackle the
sums it up in our cover fea- big topics in media and
ture, its much easier to start marketing, with a distinct-
than to succeed. So which ly Melburnian f lavour. Our
of the current flock of fledg- keynote speaker is Mark
ling agencies will become the Harland, marketing and
stalwarts of the next genera- customer experience direc-
tion? Our cover feature ex- tor of Holden. Sessions will
plores how and why you set cover how to learn from fail-
up an agency and the les- ure, building brands in digi-
sons learned by those who tal and the changing face of
have been there and done it. E D I T O R
agencies.
This issue also includes Mark Ritson will also
R O S I E B A K E R
the all new 2017 Agency map be returning to present his
- a full outline of the agency Digital Inferno, taking digi-
landscape in Australia. It outlines the shape of all tal, and what he sees as f limsy metrics, to task and
the major holding companies and the major in- Tonic Health Media is returning with a health and
dependents. Its presented by WPP - which since well-being session designed to refresh and revive
forming a year ago has been looking at its port- the mind. Tickets are on sale now.
folio and how it can better leverage the talent, Weve also got our Tackling Transparecy half
and skills it has across the group to offer clients day forum coming up later this month. Its not
a better holistic service. There are more than 90 your usual conference, and the two panel debates
agencies in the group, and more than 250 across will take a unique approach guaranteed to offer
the industry. some workable solutions - not just more lip ser-
Also in this issue, a profile of Nine Entertainment vice. See you there.
Behind the Headlines www.adnews.com.au | June 2017 5

NEWS REVIEWS CONTEXT

ACCENTURE BOUGHT Unpacking the package

THE MONKEYS The Australian government


has offered a package
of long-awaited media
Accenture has acquired The more fire-power. Its the oppo- reforms that ticked the
Monkeys and design agency site. The Monkeys now has a cou- boxes and many in the
Maud. Speculation about who the ple of afterburners strapped on to industry encouraged it
10-year old indie would sell to has the back powering it into the fu- to be supported.
been rife for months if not years. ture, Nowell said. Overall, the package
Following the acquisition, the first The Monkeys and Accenture said includes the scrapping
concern many in the market had they were confident the move would of the outdated licence
was whether the agencys culture join the dots of a number of ca- fee in favour of a spectrum
and spirit could survive the tran- pabilities by founding a new model charge, a revision of the anti-
sition to be part of a management that will see consultancy, creative siphoning list with several major
consultancy, however, co-found- and technology merge. events removed and the delisting
er and CCO of The Monkeys Scott Neither The Monkeys nor Ac- period extended to 26 weeks.
Nowell was quick to bat culture centure Interactive would reveal As well as this, gambling ads
doubts away. the terms of the deal, except to would be prohibited in live sport The comprehensive package
This is definitively not the say its a 100% acquisition. Found- shown before 8.30pm including garnered praise from across
death of The Monkeys, he says, ers Mark Green, Justin Drape and a five minute buffer before and adland and government. Nine
adding that it gives the agency Nowell, are certainly smiling. after the event, support for CEO Hugh Marks said the total
Australian-produced content and package should help the industry
under-represented sports such compete with global players
a womens codes and the repeal and Seven West Media chairman
the 75% reach rule and two out Kerry Stokes, understood to be
of three rule which currently one of the major roadblocks to
prevents a network reaching the initial package, called on the
75% of the population or owning senate to pass the package in
more than two media channels. its entirety.

Snaploss
Snapchat Inc failed to meet an- might be the next Twitter not
alysts expectations in its first fi- in a good way'.
nancial earnings announcement Snapchat is attempting to di-
since its IPO. versify its offering to add reve-
While Snap reported US$150 nue, adding the 'Shows' feature
million in total revenue in the to allow broadcasters and media
quarter, up 286% from US$39 partners to develop short TV-like
million a year ago, after nearly content, as it looks to attract TV
$2 billion in stock-based payouts advertising dollars.
Facing the future were stripped out, the business
reported a $2.2 billion loss.
Facebook named its new Austral- compensate clients for errors on Snapchat daily active users
ian MD - revealing that former MD smartphone mobile web and vid- has risen by 36% from 122 mil-
Will Easton was returning - like a eo carousel ads. While Facebooks lion to 166 million, however, this
boomerang - to fill the leadership latest misreporting glitch was is well below the 200 million us-
void left by Stephen Scheelers de- claimed to have had a negligible ers of Instagram stories.
parture earlier this year. financial impact for most advertis- Some in the industry have lik-
Its also yet again facing the ers, it further intensified calls to ened the fate of the photo-shar-
repercussions of misreporting open up more of its data to inde- ing app to Twitter, with an article
metrics this time having to pendent third party scrutiny. in AdAge suggesting: 'Snapchat
JASON SCOTT
CEO

JAMES DIAMOND
Managing Director JOHN MISKELLY
%JKGH&KIKVCN1HEGT

DEBATE #1
THE GREAT TRANSPARENCY DEBATE:
THE MURKY DIGITAL WATERS
Digital reporting, ad fraud, brand safety,
viewability. Helping marketers, media owners,
agencies and vendors see through the complexity.

TONY BELL TIM EGAN


National Digital Sales Director Regional Product Marketing Manager

NICK DURRANT KEVIN ACKHURST


National Head of Trading Director of Agency

NER
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PRES

TS
PRES
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L I N G N C Y
TAC NSPARE
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BRETT DAWSON
Managing Partner

LIAM WALSH
Managing Director

SIMON RUTHERFORD
CEO

DEBATE #2
TRANSPARENCY IN AGENCY AND
CLIENT RELATIONSHIPS
Payment terms; disclosed and non-disclosed
terms; discounts and profitability; the hidden
STEPHEN WRIGHT layers of programmatic; channel planning
Director
decisions, the role of DSPs.

CIARN NORRIS
Director of Marketing &
Business Insights

N
27 JU017
ROS ALLISON KRISTIAAN KROON
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2QUARTER
LING 0pm
Media Buying Director
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KEY 7.45
MON y Forum
Da
Half

N S TO
L U TIO CRISIS
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FO TRAN OPENING ADDRESS
THE Andrew Knott, chief marketing officer of NAB has
taken a strong stand on transparency. He will present ANDREW KNOTT
his perspective on the role that clients play in %JKGH/CTMGVKPI1HEGT
navigating the many sides of the transparency debate,
and how his team is working with its media agency
GET YOUR TICKETS NOW partner Mindshare to find a solution.

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PRESENTING PARTNER SUPPORTING Q&A SPONSOR VIDEO SPONSOR 5 MINUTES WITH...
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A PRODUCTION
The Work

M ore than 40% of Australians cant recognise a rip, however


the majority of us think we can. Our country is known as a
top beach destination the world over, so beach safety remains a
key concern. Surf Lifesavers patrol the beaches and red and yel-
low flags are set up daily
to deter swimmers from
dangerous currents, yet
drowning deaths con- Pocket Patrol
tinue to rise. Constant Agency: Leo Burnett Sydney
patrol is impractical,
but considering the 21 Brand: Samsung
deaths and more than
11,000 rescues each year W O R D S B Y
reported by Royal Life
D A I S Y D O C T O R
Saving Society Australia,
it seems we are well over-
due a rethink.
Cue Samsung and its creative agency of 12 years, Leo Burnett.
They spent time brainstorming product initiatives that would
marry mobile technology with community hazards and the issue
of beach safety resonated most. Armed with the knowledge that
roughly 95% of Australians are likely to bring their mobiles to
the beach, Samsung and Leos began developing Pocket Patrol.
Samsung and Leos contacted Surf Life Saving Australia (SLSA)
to aid in the apps early development and help strategise how it
could be both preventative and educational, and work in hand
with existing procedures. With a particular focus on submerged
rocks, shallow sandbars and rips, the app aimed to help swim-
mers and surf life savers recognise beach dangers and act ac-
cordingly, acting like a personal surf livesaver in your pocket.
Quite early on the team realised the biggest challenge would be
creating reliable and accurate technology that could monitor the
unpredictability of weather, they say. With this in mind, Samsung
and Leos combined GPS, compass and gyroscope technology and
developed a 360-degree virtual reality (VR) experience to demon-
strate what it felt and looked like to be caught in a rip. What the client says:
After months of internal testing through a series two-week
Samsung head of digital, Brett Turnbull,
long sprints, Pocket Patrol was finally trialled for four weeks
We wanted to find a problem that was worth solving and
in October 2016 at Queenslands Coolum Beach and Alexandra
then use technology to solve it. We were really surprised
Headland. During the month-long program, 3600 people down-
that the age-old problem of getting caught in a rip was still
loaded Pocket Patrol and identified beach dangers. A further
being addressed with age-old techniques there wasnt a
13.2 million beachgoers learned about beach safety through live
technological solution. When we partnered with Surf Life
events, social media, a VR 360 film and the online film. The story
Saving Australia, the app began falling into place. In the end,
of Pocket Patrol has already been covered by 144 tech websites,
it was a great collaboration. With projects like these we find
blogs, and both local and international news stations, helping it
that everybodys very passionate, not because theyre exciting
to reach a total audience of more than 20 million.
projects but because they truly make a difference. Working
Kits are now being sent out to all SLSA state offices which will
on something that could potentially save someones life
then be distributed to Surf Life Saving Clubs throughout Australia.
drove a lot of passion from all parties involved.
Samsung is hoping the app will be fully implemented at clubs
across the nation by the end of the 2017-18 summer.
www.adnews.com.au | June 2017 9

What the agency says:


Leo Burnett Sydney joint ECDs,
Grant McAloon and
Vince Lagana
The best innovation is creative. It
seeks to answer a need in a way thats
relevant too. This is something that
underpins a lot of the work weve done
for Samsung. It makes tech meaningful,
particularly when it can provide instant
reminders of potential dangers. By its
very nature, communications tech is
a natural fit to greater safety. It serves
to remind, update and to advise on
how to stay safe. Pocket Patrol is an
extension of that, and we can only
expect that tech will continue to play
that role so we can all go about our
lives, free from dangers we might not
otherwise be aware of or think about.
Media + Marketing Summit

The Media + Marketing Summit


A full day in Randwick
saw Professor Mark Mark Ritsons digital inferno Notafraidtotoothisownhorn,Ritsonproclaimed:
It turned out I was totally fucking correct.
Ritsons latest bombastic Professor Mark Ritson warned marketers they
Its all a load of cock does anyone not
could be falling into the same trap by believing
performance, Visa the hype around programmatic and the
know the age of organic growth is over? Why
marketer Jac Phillips effectiveness of digital ads, as they did around did we all drink the Kool-Aid so quickly?
organic social media in the early days. Whats to stop it happening again with
inspirational keynote, programmatic? You could all fall for another
Ritson, who presented his latest talk The
and a smash up between nine circles of digital hell, walked the audience trick just as easily.
Whats also on the
News Corp and Google though nine areas of digital marketing he
finds fault with. list to navigate? Fake
closed the day. In Number one, he said, was the blind news, murkiness, dodgy
between were thoughtful acceptance of digital. And he drew parallels measurement, over
between the early days of social media marketing pricing, brand risk,
debates on talent, robots, separation, delusion,
when marketers were sold the idea of organic
big ideas, data and reach and growth. That was later undermined, and finally, mania.
metrics and health and he said, by the onset of paid advertising on social You can catch Ritson
platforms that all but destroyed any organic reach at the AdNews Media
well-being. that had been built up. + Marketing Summit -
Recalibration: big ideas and creative flair Psych Up: presented by
Unanimous agreement: big ideas and creative flair have not been Tonic Health Media
forgotten in the digital maelstrom. TBWA CEO Paul Bradbury nailed it on A fiveminute guided meditation kicked
the head with more specifics. off the health and wellbeing session as we
Big ideas have changed in the last three to five years, that is, they now turned our attention inwards. Matthew Johnstone, illustrator,
have to be stronger to cut through, he said. However, we now know the coach and former ad man, offered some breathing space
big idea has to apply to the whole company it needs to inspire product and some wellthoughtout philosophies for coping with the
development, staff and consumers. hectic realities of life in media and marketing, and avoiding
His idea was supported by HCFs former CMO Jenny Williams and burnout. Acknowledgment, acceptance, patience and
Ubanks Jo Kelly who have both been at the forefront of creating and vulnerability are all key to achieving mindfullness, he said.
recreating brands by driving change across entire organisations. You can catch the session at the AdNews Media + Marketing
Kelly referenced her controversial and confronting campaigns, Summit - Melbourne on 2 August.
particularly Real Estate Tips From The Terminally Ill, which was produced in
conjunction with The Monkeys. The decision to run the campaign became
less about a subjective point of view, but more if it was the right work to
present us as a challenger. As such, the ambition and bravery to hit the
market with the campaign had to be supported across the company.
Williams was clear about her perception of the playoff between
PRESENTING PARTNER SUPPORTING SPONSORS
digital targeting and big brand messaging.
Digital allows you to become effective at the pointy end, she said.
But, you cant have the pointy conversation without having the big idea
at the front end.
Talking about pointy ends, Brent Smart, IAGs newly appointed CMO, set it
straight for the audience. The starting point is people dont give a shit about HEALTH & WELLBEING
FASTFRONT SPONSORS SPONSOR
advertising or they dont give a shit about your brand. Youre competing with
culture, he insisted. Youre competing with the latest show on Netflix.
Carat Australia in partnership with 12

Australian retailers: underestimating an amazonian impact?


t shouldnt come as a surprise First responders
I to anyone that our local retail
landscape is on the verge of dras-
Far from taking it lying down, a num-
berofAustralianbrandshavestepped
tic disruption. up their defences in anticipation of
Discount retailer T.K. MAXX Amazons arrival, with a particular
opened its doors in Australia only focus on cutting down delivery times,
a few short weeks ago, and already increasing digital capabilities, and
has announced plans to open 35 better leveraging data to personalise
additional stores by the end of the the customer experience.
year. The other elephant in the Even more notably, however,
room, Amazon, isnt even here yet, is the fact that many are rejecting
and its presence is already being the idea of their bricks-and-mortar
keenly felt. Or so we thought. store networks becoming redun-
Appa rent ly not, however, dant, seeing them instead as a valu-
according to a recent retail insights able asset in their Amazon arsenal.
report, Innovation in Retail, from Super Retail Group chief Peter
The Commonwealth Bank. Birtles describes their retail net-
When surveyed, only 11% of work of over 670 stores as a platform
Australian retailers classified to offer customers a more engaging
Amazon as a significant threat, with experience in an increasingly trans-
49% declaring themselves unfazed. actional, product-focused economy.
Even more alarmingly, it revealed The recent arrival one. If youve currently got one, They are currently working to cre-
that the majority dont have a plan its going to need to get better. A ate a more seamless shopping experi-
in place to combat Amazon when it
of T.K.MAXX signals whole lot better. ence between stores and their online
arrives on our shores. Of the 70% of only the first of a Without experiencing it first- offering, adding a range of delivery
retailers who were actually aware of series of seismic hand, it can be easy to underesti- options including 90-minute click
Amazons impending arrival, only mate the extent to which Amazon and collect and same-day services,
14% had a formal plan in place to shifts on the way has changed the game when it as well as using customer data more
effectively compete. for the Australian comes to ecommerce. However, effectively to create personalised loy-
Thats when I start to sweat. See, those who have, for example, lived alty programs for customers.
unfazed is fine admirable even.
retail landscape, in a market where youre able to sub- Myer, Wesfarmers and JB Hi-Fi
Unprepared is not. most notably scribe to Amazon Prime understand are also said to be implementing
The fact is, when Amazon enters the impending just how far the bar has been raised. similar changes to ensure their sur-
a market any market it has a trans- While this undoubtedly repre- vival in Amazons age of extreme
formative impact. Whether or not you arrival of online sents an obvious threat, it also cre- convenience. Supermarket giant,
are among the brands considered to retail behemoth ates an avenue of opportunity for Woolworths, has even established
be directly in Amazons cross-hairs brands by contributing to the overall a separate unit to review ways to
the likes of JB Hi-Fi, Harvey Norman,
Amazon. Carats growth of the ecommerce category. minimise the Amazon threat and
or Myer the Amazon Effect is going Head of Innovation, Many Australian retailers have improve its home delivery and
to change the way your consumers Robert Tilt, wants world-class online experiences online businesses.
want to do business with you. already The Iconic for example
brands to have a plan and for them, this is an opportu- Not all doom & gloom
No place for complacency in place, not just to nity to ride the Amazon wave to Amazons arrival doesnt need to
Such is the scale of its market influ- even greater success, as more and spell doomsday for your business. It
ence, Amazon drives a seismic
defend themselves more people look to shop online. has the potential to present as many
shift in both consumer expectation against the Amazon For smaller retailers, Amazons opportunities as it does threats for
and behaviour. In every market it effect, but to expansion represents an opportu- brands willing to be proactive in
has entered, the appetite for ecom- nity to break into the ecommerce adapting to the new economy.
merce has grown substantially, capitalise on it. market by setting up shop on Amazon will also need to prove
as has consumer expectation on Amazon Marketplace. themselves locally and lure con-
the quality of every aspect of the For those who find them- sumers away from more estab-
online shopping experience. selves somewhere in the middle, lished competitors such as eBay,
According to Internet Retailer, Amazons arrival is a reckoning. so are not arriving unencumbered.
Amazon comprised 65.9% of the Luckily, theres still time to bol- To learn more about what the
$53.1 Billion growth in U.S. online ster your ecommerce offering in future holds for the Australia
retail in 2016.Put simply, if you line with consumer expectation, retail landscape, download Carats
dont have an ecommerce offering ensuring youre not left behind Retail Redefined booklet via the
currently youre going to need when the big day arrives. website: carat.com.au.
CARAT
PROUD TO BE
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W ED N E S DAY 2 N D AU G U S T

EARLY BI R D T I C K E T S O N S A L E N O W
Media + Marketing Summit

Jac Phillips: Leadership is everything


Jac Phillips senior director and head of marketing for Visa Australia,
New Zealand and South Pacific, was first on stage for the day, kicking
off with an inspiring walk through her experience.
She spoke about the need for a brand to have a consistent purpose
and to live its values through everything it does. Touching on the Makers
campaign she launched while at Bank of Melbourne, Phillips explained
that the bank, and the positioning, was about supporting Melburnians.
Because of this, it made sure every supplier, agency, actor and
contributor was based in Melbourne. And that all its ads featured Bank of
Melbourne customers.
Phillips talked about marketers obsession with digital, and the
tendency to favour the new shiny thing at all costs. While she raised
the topic, she also admitted that 60% of Visas spend is in digital. What will set us apart in Australia is talent, and tapping into the
The difference is we know its effective were tracking it, she said. diversity that exists around us every day, Phillips said.
The targeting available allows us to be more personal in our approach As a senior marketer with access to significant marketing resources,
than any other media, and personalisation increases engagement. and because money talks, I personally have quite an influence on the
She also spoke about the lack of female leaders in marketing and industry and its future.
CEO positions, and called for quotas to get the ball rolling. Quotas are It kills me to think that no large creative agency Ive worked
controversial, but thats not something that scares Phillips. with has had female creatives or Asian or Indian or other cultures at
While diversity gets talked about a lot, Phillips said she had to hire a senior levels.
female creative director on her team at Bank of Melbourne because she An enlightening Q&A session afterwards with Carat CEO Paul Brooks
wasnt convinced the agency took it seriously enough. touched on the importance of leadership. Its everything, she summed up.

Google and News Corp by the fireside imminent IAB/Nielsen digital daily ratings, and whether the tech giant
should take more responsibility over funding content creation as it
Unsurprisingly, the first thing Google managing director Jason
consumes a growing slice of the ad revenue pie.
Pellegrino did on stage was apologise for letting people, and the
The discussion moved towards current questions over the
industry, down around brand safety concerns. However, he went on to
effectiveness of digital channels, which both were quick to dismiss.
state that no media channel, digital or otherwise, can promise 100%
Pellegrino said fighting against the media consumption trend towards
brand safety.
digital platforms or trying to prove its not happening is counter-
While News Corp chief digital officer and IAB chair Nicole Sheffield
productive.
and Pellegrino agreed on a few things, it didnt take long before things
However, I think weve done an incredibly bad job as an industry in
heated up in the passionate fireside chat which closed the day.
proving the value of marketing and media to CEOs and boards across
The pair spoke at length about brand safety, the benefits of the
all channels, he said. How do I know that? Because the growth in
spend is incredibly anaemic.
Sheffield also focused on the role of digital media
as a discovery channel for consumers not just a last
click channel and that the industry hasnt put enough
emphasis on that.

If you missed out on the Sydney


conference, The Media + Marketing
Summit is coming to Melbourne on
2 August with a brand new line up.
Plus, Professor Ritson will be back at
the Melbourne event. You can check
out the agenda and buy tickets online at
www.mediamarketingsummit.com.au
Innovation: gimmick or 15
genuine growth driver?
There are often two types of innovation thrust at
a brand: innovation porn which favours fancy,
shiny gadgets; and almost pious innovation which
takes itself too seriously and requires, longterm
investment, Maxus global director of innovation,
Tom Kelshaw said. He appeared before the
panel with a 10minute keynote, stressing the
importance of trying to find a healthy middle.
Fairfax chief revenue officer Matt Rowley, who
also leads its innovation strategy, was bold
enough to talk about his companys future
in light of the recent instability its faced
and when its also cutting jobs. Fairfax is
using innovation to rescue the bottom
line, he said. If panellists were prepared
to entertain the notion of innovation as a
gimmick, that was certainly not the reality
faced by Rowley and his team.
James Sugrue, whose company AFK
specialises in building out innovative
mobile platforms, explained that
innovation tends to work best when trust
has been built with a client, so there is an
appetite and a commitment.
Will a robot steal your job? The panel also touched on innovation
It might be feared, but a robot is labs and the role they play for brands and
not about to steal your job, and we agencies, with the panel split on whether
probably have 20 years before AI is they provide genuine revenue-driving
going to transform the workplace, innovation or are a frivolous playground.
agreed the panel. Overall, its still a
people business. This will come as no
surprise to those in the creative field.
As Clint Parr head of people and
culture at Clemenger BBDO Sydney
Data and analytics in a A question from AdNews editor
said: Computers havent quite cracked
Rosie Baker in the audience challenged
it. We need people in the creative posttruth world Facebooks ability to offer trusted metrics in
industry who can oversee what the We would like YouTube to open up and light of its numerous admissions of mistakes
robots are doing. move to thirdparty measurement, was in its reporting. Lockwood gave a top-line
Clint then went on to cite the book the call from GroupMs chief digital officer answer regarding Facebooks openness in
Deep Work by Cal Newport, who John Miskelly. Issues such as thirdparty the face of the revelations.
stresses that in a world with so many measurement, viewability standards and RadiumOne managing director, Adam
distractions, those who are able to metrics, being the most discussed issues Furness, agreed there needs to be a
focus or concentrate will be rewarded within marketing, were given an airing at business conversation.
in the future. the summit. The metrics conversation has turned
The panel, however, was conflicted Miskelly was the first to call out Google into a boring one, he complained. I want to
on the current pool of talent in Australia, but the panel did not shy away from opin- move it on to one about sales outcomes.
and raised the topic off the back of ions. Facebooks head of marketing science, ADMA IQ managing director, Richard
the recent 457 visa announcements. Steve Lockwood as you might expect Harris, was also blunt about the viability
Virginia Hyland, founder of Hyland, reiterated the platforms call for establishing of viewability metrics. Viewability is not a
stressed there was not an absence a new metric; one that moves away from successful metric for a number of reasons,
of talent in Australia, however, more viewability as a silver bullet. He suggested he said. Agencies want to prove outcomes,
people who have greater specialisation the most important metric must be based but there are brands who dont trust their
are required to teach people. on return on spend and that such a metric agencies, and this is where a lot of the
Her thoughts were echoed by could be applied across any channel. problems lie.
Airtaskers VP of marketing, Simon
Reynolds, who said the startup hasnt
looked overseas for talent.
Anthony Hourigan, CEO of Hourigan
International, warned the talent pool
in advertising and media has shrunk,
and that the great free flow of human
capital increases wealth in Australia.
He said the governments move to
restrict the 457 visa does not send
the right signals out.
The Profile

Making a mark
ive months into his new role,
F Nine CEO Hugh Marks could
have been forgiven for wondering
what he had gotten himself into.
The network was being trounced
by its arch rival Seven, culminat-
ing in the embarrassing situation
Hugh Marks has had a rollercoaster ride since taking the helm of Nine in which Sevens juggernaut My
Entertainment Company 18 months ago. At a pivotal time for media Kitchen Rules offered its winning
owners in Australia, he explains how he led a programming revival and contestants more prize money
($250,000) in its finale than Nines
what the future media owner-advertiser relationship looks like. reality flop Reno Rumble could
attract viewers (249,000) to its
W O R D S B Y showstopper.
A R V I N D H I C K M A N
One of the countrys most
respected content guys already
had a major task on his hands
without the ratings false start.
Taking the helm from Nine legend
David Gyngell, Marks was charged
with revitalising the network and
transforming the business for a
fragmented, digital age where
audiences and advertising budg-
ets were slowly leaving traditional
media channels.
That first 12 months was
really tough, there were many
challenges, Marks recalled.
Programming had staffing issues,
there was no CFO for six months,
legal disputes with channel Seven
[over claims about Today and
Sunrise], disputes getting out of the
Warner Brothers contract. There
was a whole bunch of things that
we just had to get done to basi-
cally put the business in a position
where we could move forward.
To be fair, Marks had little to
do with the 2016 schedule. He took
over in November 2015 well after
programming was mapped out.
MKR has dominated ratings in
every season since it launched in
2010 and a reboot of Australias
Got Talent was never likely to
make much headway. The show
began earnestly with average
metro ratings of 865,000, but grad-
ually declined to a season low of
594,000 five weeks later.
Its a challenge this network
has had for a fair period of time,
launching a season effectively
against My Kitchen Rules, but that
was probably not one of our better
efforts, Marks pointed out.
Few in the industry understand
what it takes to create top qual-
ity TV programs like Marks. In a
17-year career, he has served as a
director of Nine Films & Television
www.adnews.com.au | June 2017 17

and Nine Network Australia (1998- show when the two juggernauts
2002) before becoming CEO of went toe-to-toe.
Southern Star Entertainment How well it did even surprised
(2002-2005) and the Southern Star us, Marks admitted, even though
Group (2005-2009), overseeing sales boss Michael Stephenson was
more than 500 hours of film and particularly bullish with AdNews
TV production. prior to launch.So its been a
We were forced quite early really pleasant surprise. I think
to make some pretty bold deci- the other thing that is interesting
sions around how we were going about that show is how its per-
to respond to that, Marks said. formed across all of our platforms,
We felt that in Married At First not just on television.
Sight, having watched the show The other platforms Marks
in a previous eight-episode run, referred to is its 9Now advertis-
there were a lot more story arcs ing on demand platform (AVOD),
in the content than we were where Married regularly attracted
currently let ting happen in more than 100,000 viewers on
the way the show played out. catch-up. The secret behind
Even from this year to next year, Marrieds success, Nines boss said,
we can still see the same. There are was winning over the hearts and
still a few episodes towards the end eyeballs of young women, where
of this year where we would have MKR might be vulnerable.
liked the content to be a bit tighter, In a sense, we had the per-
but we can still see there are story fect show for that dynamic and
points to be brought out in the the numbers that played out were
show that contribute to what the really what we planned, Marks
essence of the show is: an experi- said. The extent of the result was format that places families of cooks
ment about what makes great part- more than we planned, but having up against one another.
nerships, great couples. said that, Im sure Seven will make
What keeps me The plan was very much to
Backing an expanded Married a strong comeback next year. awake at night is build and deliver consistency across
At First Sight format to lead 2017 Since Married, Nine has con- how do I continue to the year, especially in those early
was a calculated gamble to say tinued its strong resurgence in grow the amount of evening slots, Marks explained.
the least. Since the show debuted ratings, with The Voice averaging money I can spend on Big shows, big entertainment
in 2015, the series average audi- above 1.1 million in the blind audi- attracts a big audience. Then to
ence had declined from 1.12 mil- tions phase and often ahead of
the type of content cleverly work out around those
lion metro viewers to 880,000 Tens major tent pole MasterChef I know Im going slots where we can find other
in series three. The longest the and Sevens House Rules. to get audience opportunities to launch shows
series had previously run was Nines The Last Resort hasnt engagement? that may have more potential or
eight episodes - now Nine was quite gone to script. The first two just work as a nine oclock show
going to expand it to 29. If it failed episodes posted poor ratings of just around the bedrock of the news
to resonate, the potential fallout above 400,000 metro viewers at and current affairs franchises.
would be massive. the time of writing, raising ques- Another important develop-
We used to make it internally, tions about whether theres too ment, Marks pointed out, is Nines
but Shine had just lost The Bachelor much relationship car crash reality Hugh Marks, Nine investment in Stan where it is a 50%
so they had a crew there that was TV at the moment. Entertainment CEO joint venture with Fairfax Media.
ready for this sort of program, Beyond this, Nines program- This gives Nine skin in the game
Marks explained. Obviously we ming slate promises more hits than in the important and growing sub-
have a long and strong relation- misses with Hamish and Andys scription television sector where
ship with those guys, and I always new show coming in June before the an increasing number of younger
felt confident that we had more widely anticipated Australian Ninja viewers are watching content as
improvement in our performance. Warrior, which looked impressive in and when they please.
What resulted were far higher production. We can start to see the way
production values, better cast- Ive seen the first episode of the that audiences are consuming free-
ing and a storyline that hooked show and it is something that audi- to-air and on-demand content and
younger viewers from the first ences havent seen before, Marks we are getting some real interesting
episode. The show debuted at said. Ninja Warrior fits that same learnings out of that, Marks said.
820,000, but only eight episodes thing for me which is always giving The two very much work as com-
later smashed through the one mil- the audience something thats new plementary viewing experiences.
lion mark and never looked back. and surprising rather than just nec- So then how you balance your
In fact, by the end of February, essarily a recycle of something that budgets and your cost of acquisi-
Married At First Sight had dislodged someone else has done. tion of audience on free-to-air ver-
the previously impenetrable MKR This is followed by ratings stal- sus Stan, between the two, thats
as the top rating entertainment wart The Block and a new food our business.
The Profile

Nines Married At First Sight


would be an example of expand-
ing a successful format even if the
production quality has increased
this time around. Another way to
reduce costs is to trim spending on
elements of a show that are not as
materially important to the success
of the final package.
Having a bit of history in that
myself over many years thats
what I did for a good decade of
my career hopefully Ive brought
some of those skills to this place
and the odd million here and there
that you can either reduce or get
a greater efficiency out of pro-
grams. That margin makes a huge
difference to your business, Marks
explained.
He believes the major challenge
across the media industry is pro-
ducing high demand content that
brings in an audience and engage-
ment whether that be print, televi-
sion, radio, digital or any channel.
Nines turnaround in ratings We are just all in the process of So what keeps me awake at
is likely to see an uplift in its sec- working out what that transition is night is how do I continue to grow
ond-half FY17 results after a diffi- and how fast you make that transi- the amount of money that I can
cult first half. The group reported tion to what that business looks like spend on that type of content
a 5% drop in revenue to $659.2 in the future. where I know Im going to get that
million and 6% decline in earnings Marks told AdNews one chal- audience engagement? Marks
(EBITDA) to $101.4 million, com- lenge in the TV business is finding revealed.
pared to the same period in FY16. the right balance between what The second thing is when I get
Nines u-turn from a terrible we spend on cost and what we that content, how do I innovate
start in 2016 to a strong 2017 is the We need to innovate make in revenue, something Nine my distribution platforms so I am
inverse of fortunes to rival Ten. and Seven have managed more suc- aggregating audiences across more
The difference between the two,
in how we work with cessfully in recent times. platforms rather than just my old
according to Marks, is that Nine advertisers so it We have to be in the business platform which was free-to-air tele-
maintained a reasonable degree of becomes more of a of managing effectively that cost of vision? And do that in a way where
profitability and wasnt straddled business relationship programming compared to the rev- you are adding audience across
with the same levels of debt. that will dominate enue that we make, he explained. your platforms rather than neces-
Its not good for our interests As an example, between the 2017 sarily just looking at a fragmenting
for there to be a poor perform-
the future. schedule and the 2016 schedule for business on one side?
ing network, he said. Last year, Nine, for our prime time entertain- In the past couple of years, all
Nines performance generally, ment programming, our cost per of the major networks have been
when we had a poor year, actually hour of program is down by 13%. at pains to tell the market that
contributed to a bit of decline in the When he became CEO at Nine, they are very much more than
market, he revealed. Marks took a decision to reduce TV with significant digital media
So really you want all broad- Nines unit cost of production, businesses. Nine has spent much of
casters performing strongly and which had risen in the years prior. the past 18 months restructuring its
vibrantly and for it to be a really Hugh Marks, Nine This involved going through each digital offering into verticals that
great industry and the competition Entertainment CEO program and the mix of program- it can go to market with, such as
to be intense. ming to bring costs down. its womens network 9Honey, its
He said that Ten is a good busi- Sometimes the answer is to celebrity portal The Fix, cooking
ness they have got a good team, do more of a successful show, but section Kitchen and more.
theyve made some good shows. in a way where it brings your unit The verticals make it easier for
Its just got some things that are cost per hour down. So if the audi- the network to go to advertisers
working against it at the moment ence is still there for those extra within specific categories and are
that are contributing to that neg- hours and youve brought your designed to make it easier for users
ative noise around profitability, cost down, well thats effectively an to find articles that interest them,
funding, financing - long-term cash additional investment at a higher driving traffic with clickable con-
flow issues, Marks said. marginal return, he said. tent. Nine has also grown 9Now to
www.adnews.com.au | June 2017 19

beyond three million subscribers weve got a growing on-demand This will involve working
and is pushing out more content business and weve got these dig- closely with agencies and clients
on social. The new structure has ital publishing businesses and the to try to build holistic relationships
helped Nine grow its digital reve- ability to publish onto social - we across a year, where we start to
nue to about 12% of total revenue, havent yet fully explored how address the whole business issue
still well below televisions share. we can turn our content produc- rather than just selling them a
Marks believes that closing the tion machine to that full execu- sponsorship of a particular pro-
sales loop across all of Nines assets tion across all those platforms. gram Marks said.
and changing the way the network I think thats the next challenge I think we are just looking at
deals with advertisers is the next for us as a business. Take adver- where the categories of revenue
step in its evolution. tisers and sponsors on that jour- are, where clients are looking for
Rather than hav ing this ney with us in ways where we are either programmatic, native, data-
purely trading relationship that actually really providing business driven or mobile-type solutions
has dominated the past, we need solutions rather than just trading and starting to build more exper-
to innovate in how we work with opportunities. tise in those specialties rather than
advertisers so it becomes more of a Of course the trading bit will looking at it just as a digital busi-
business relationship that will dom- still dominate, but thats where ness, he revealed.
inate the future, he explained. we need to work at the margins. So we are resourcing for
Because what you can do when Thats something Im quite enjoy- that, resourcing for specialty and
you are a media organisation like ing getting involved with and really basically building much stronger
us now - where youve got this challenging what advertising rela- and close relationships between
great big free-to-air business, tionships look like in the future. agency, client and media.

3 to 7 August
International Convention Centre Sydney
and Cockle Bay Marina, Darling Harbour

SydneyBoatShow.com.au
Agenda

Outdoors dynamic future


In the wake of the
collapsed Ooh!Media
merger with APN Outdoor
that would have stirred up
dramatic change, digital,
data and dynamic creative
remain the three forces
driving the future of out of
home advertising.

W O R D S B Y
D A I S Y D O C T O R

here are three 'D's driving


T the out-of-home industry at
the moment, digital, data and dy-
namic creative, JCDecaux CEO Ste-
ve O'Connor recently told AdNews.
It sums up the forces at play
from advancements and invest-
ments in technology and digital
screens to the backend systems
that inform what appears on them
and how campaigns are planned.
Outdoor has changed dramat-
ically in recent years and just last
month the planned merger of
Ooh!Media and APN Outdoor,
which would have massively the dominant audience profile, never be completely one-to-one. A data tsunami
shifted the playing field again, ensure external factors and adver- Posterscope MD Bryan Magee Each outdoor company is adapt-
collapsed. Both sides walked tisers can adapt content according- says although audiences are tight- ing to data is different ways with
away from the deal following a ly. Shifting from claimed to actual ening and becoming more target- partnerships playing a key role. In
"surprisingly adverse" response metrics, OOH can now offer a guar- ed, it's a mass channel - one- the last three months, Adshel has
from the ACCC. Explaining the de- antee of audience and accuracy like to-many or one-to-few where taken steps to ramp up its data of-
cision, Ooh!Media CEO Brendon never before, meaning less wastage advertisers direct messages at fering, establishing partnerships
Cook said the company remained for advertisers and more relevance clusters of people. with big players in data including
committed to innovation and dig- to the consumer. For Cook, while he sees a future The Rubicon Project and Lotame.
ital. He also said Ooh! would in- However, there is an Orwelli- where anything that is possible Lotame will provide Adshel
vest around $40 million CAPEX an flip side to the advancements in online advertising is possible locations with audience insights
in developing and building data which conjure Big Brother-esque in outdoor, he says using data is from its Data Management Plat-
systems that would underpin a anxieties. We've edged closer to about answering a question for form (DMP), focusing on online
"well-rounded digital strategy". a Minority Report reality of acute your client. and mobile demographics, behav-
By marrying data and out-of- profiling and personalised out- The more sources available to ioural and purchase intent pro-
home (OOH), the true potential of door advertising. Wherever data answer that question, the more files. Adshel chief revenue officer
the channel is being realised and it's is in play, there are concerns over effective and contextual a cam- David Roddick called the partner-
allowing the medium to shift from privacy and anonymity. OOH paign becomes. He agrees OOH ship a game changer and con-
broadcast to targeted. Media own- companies are quick to quell fears will never be entirely one-to-one, siders it a step towards 'person-
ers can gauge the number of 'eye- with the reminder all data is an- but says his job is to define the alisation at scale' via automated
balls' passing a billboard or screen, onymised and the medium will many better. technologies.
www.adnews.com.au | June 2017 21

can show UV rays measured down one-stop shop for buying and selling
to 10 metre area. A campaign for outdoor across Australia. The 'single
the Cancer Institute saw panels No longer will source transaction system' is also
react to UV levels and change the advertising be seen to be world leading, but it's not
message served depending on the delivered in the a full programmatic solution.
rating. hope that it will VMO, which only operates dig-
Soon, JCDecaux will launch its ital screens, is aggressive in its
Codex DMP, the result of a part-
be delivered to the programmatic endeavours. It re-
nership with Data Republic. It will right audience. cently launched a programmatic
overlay the OMAs Move with West- offering using data collected from
pac transactional data. It will know its Digital Outdoor Audiences in
where consumers shop, when Real Time (DART) measurement
and how much they spend, where system, to deliver personalised
they live and how they move in Anthony Deeble content that targets specific audi-
and around JCDs coverage are- VMO MD ences. VMO MD Anthony Deeble
as, allowing JCD to optimise and says at its core, the offering will
demonstrate the value of its net- mean less wastage and better ads.
work locations with real precision. No longer will advertising be
A year ago Ooh!Media formed delivered in the hope that it will
an exclusive data partnership be delivered to the right audience,
with Quantium which is coming we now have a better perspective
to fruition now, says CEO Cook. and better engagement with con-
It combines transaction data with sumers, says Deeble.
mapping tools, audience profil- Others still believe true pro-
ing, measurement and research grammatic in general is still some
to give weight to true multiplat- way off. Goa's Tyquin separates the
form campaigns. intertwining of dynamic creative
and real-time buying arguing Goa is
Programmatic realities already using automated platforms
The proportion of outdoor screens to change content in campaigns.
that are digital is ever increasing, People are understandably ap-
and most see programmatic as prehensive about programmatic.
the next step for OOH, but what Automated buying would mean we
that actually means is often un- would become a commodity, the in-
clear. It's a buzzword within OOH, dustry is not ready, he warns.
but the implementation of a pro- For Cook, it is about fu-
grammatic buying system, which ture-proofing automatic trading;
streamlines the planning and implementing bigger and more
buying of campaigns targeted to robust systems. With the medium
relevant demographic audience clearly in the public space, Cook
would put outdoor in the same says the industry needs to remain
league as any other digital screen. conscious that not all systems and
JCDecauxs Orbit is a geo-spatial It's simultaneously considered far- rules work with OOH and, in rela-
tool which stitches a number of in- off and already in existence de- tion to brand safety and automated
dustry sources using census data pending on the definition of pro- trading, we cant afford to the kind
as its backbone. Sources inducing grammatic. of mistakes happening online.
ABS data, Enhanced Media Metrics While its partnership with The
Australia, as well as segmentation Rubicon Project is Adshel's first Dynamic creative
products like Helix Personas are step towards automating the pro- For many, programmatic goes hand-
fused together to map metro loca- cess giving trading desks access in-hand with dynamic creative, using
tions to granular levels. to its inventory, Roddick says he a multitude of different data points
Orbit is used in the business prefers to steer clear of the term to build and serve different creative.
three to four times a day and now 'programmatic' entirely. But, if The possibilities are almost endless,
uses proximity variables, where this method of buying and plan- but often the complaint is that cre-
things like Commonwealth Bank ning means unilateral campaigns, ative ideas are not keeping up with
branches and childrens kinder- then for Roddick, programmatic is the technological capabilities.
gartens can be mapped to help the gateway for media channels to Cook says: As an industry we
meet a clients objectives, says finally come together. If it means move relatively quickly, the scale
marketing director Essie Wake. we can buy and plan campaigns of digitisation means classic crea-
Heat maps can indicate the af- alongside each other, it has to be a tive use of the medium was always
fluence of a suburb and show what good thing, Roddick said. going to lag.
demographic is passing an area at The OMA's Automated Trans- Cook has his sights set on in-
a particular time, weather maps action Platform aims to provide a novation and contextual creative,
Agenda www.adnews.com.au | June 2017 23

which will always be a better planning teams need to be en- thing, he cautions against data be-
sales proposition. couraged to keep up. The data is People are coming the Achilles heel of the
High profile examples such as all there, the difficulty is making apprehensive about industry.
Bonds Boys show the potential advertisers get behind it. We should be very aware of pri-
of OOH but Cook says at the start
programmatic. vacy policies. As technology chang-
of the campaign the client wasnt Warnings and privacy Automated buying es, we need to constantly be think-
aware of what was available. The While there's tonnes of opportu- would mean we ing with a customer perception, as
Bonds Balls screen, which hung nities, there are definitely some would become a well as thinking about our clients.
in Melbourne CBD on the Bourke 'watch-outs' and all players are commodity, the At the crux of it, data is giv-
Street Mall site, reacted to weather careful to emphasise safety as data ing media owners, agencies and
conditions. When the temperature becomes more pervasive. APN
industry is not ready. advertisers a level of accountabil-
dropped, the boys would shrink to Outdoor CEO Richard Herring ity hitherto unseen in the OOH
the top of the billboard, and hang warns with technology moving so industry. Roddick sums up the
low on warmer days. fast and as audience measurement challenge: Its hard sometimes in
This level of reactivity through tools become more sophisticated,
Goa CEO Chris Tyquin the blood and bullets of the work-
data was not difficult to execute the industry needs to work togeth- ing day to remember how much
he explains; the data is available, er to avoid major mistakes and change is going on in how we plan
its now the creatives and media maintain consumer trust. and buy media. We have to keep
agencies that need to catch up. He acknowledges the need to reminding the industry of what's
Roddick says while there has been harvest data anonymously and possible and inspire advertisers
a central shift in the way media not cross boundaries when it to use every ounce of potential in
is being perceived, creative and comes to privacy. More than any- this medium.

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81%
TV sales
%
53 contribution
TV spend
allocation

Ave media spend allocation (%) Ave sales contribution from media (%)

TV RADIO DIGITAL (DISPLAY, VIDEO, SOCIAL) SEARCH PRINT OOH CINEMA

Ebiquity; Payback Australia Automotive Report 2017.


All figures quoted are category averages.
Investigation

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Investigation www.adnews.com.au | June 2017 26

here will always be new agencies launching and most people have
T toyed with the idea of going it alone at some point but it isnt for
everyone. The temptation of being your own boss, working with clients
you like and doing work that inspires you is understandably attractive.
Particularly when the stress of agency life sees a lot of people sitting at
their desk, frustrated by the organisation theyre in, uninspired by lead-
ership and sick of working all the hours of the day for the man.
Meanwhile, there is a flurry of new creative shops opening up in Aus-
tralia making headlines.
It was timely that Adam Ferrier, Jim Ingram and Ben Couzens, just re-
vealed the details of their new venture Thinkerbell as we went to press,
just three months after their sudden exit from Cummins&Partners.
(See page 29).
Hazelle Klnhammer, former CEO and founder of Anomaly Amster-
dam, exTBWA Sydney ECD Gary McCreadie, and former M&C Saatchi
head of strategy Ross Berthinussen, also teamed up to launch Ugly.
Chris Campbell has launched experiential agency Mr Glasses, and in
a slightly different set of circumstances, 72andSunny officially opened
its doors in Sydney after months of speculation.
But whats it really like to start an agency? ABOVE: Uglys three founders
clicked immediately.
Have passion and purpose viced by a plethora of different
While there are endless ways to go about setting up an agency, and a specialist agencies.
multitude of reasons to do so, there was one piece of advice every single For Uglys three founders, they
agency founder offered. Passion is the vital ingredient. wanted to build an agency that
If you dont have a passion for what youre about to embark on stripped out the complexity they
dont. And they were unequivocal under no circumstances should you saw elsewhere.
consider setting up an agency if you dont thrive on risk and adventure. Values are critical to a startup,
You have to be driven to create an enduring entity, The Hallway found- Klnhammer said. Its as much
er Jules Hall said. Starting your own business sounds like the key to liber- about your values as it is your cre-
ation but its actually a massive commitment its like becoming a parent. ative ambition. You want to do it
You build resilience along the way, but you have to go in with your based on your own expertise, com-
eyes open. Its the most rewarding thing in the world, but any small busi- bined with your personal values.
ness owner will tell you that its terrifying. Jim Ingram sums up how they feel
Mr Glasses Chris Campbell said experiential and bringing brands to about launching. Its been a while
life is something hes always had a passion for so launching a new ven- since weve gone to bed with that ex-
ture made sense. Once it started, they tried to get in front of clients and cited energy, rather than going to bed
preach what they were about, as much as possible, he said. worrying about something.
Former managing director of Common Ventures, Damian Damjano-
vski, agreed. In April he stepped back from the agency he founded after The financial stuff
five years. Common Ventures was borne out of its founders frustrations Starting an agency isnt just a pas-
with the way things were at Ogilvy and the siloed way clients were ser- sion project. Theres a serious side

Founders story: The Hallway


Jules Hall founded the Hallway Along the way, he picked up seven years, invited Hall to take
in 2007 in a unique set of sponsorship from Jameson Irish over the account.
circumstances. The agency is now Whiskey which paid the running costs Working at the time at digital
a decade old and still going strong. and saw the brand conduct sampling agency NetX, Hall had ideas of setting
At around 45 people its not the activities around sailing events to get up an agency, and the approach from
biggest shop in town, but it has an the brand in hands. Over the course Pernod Ricard meant he could turn
established reputation, a strong of several years the relationship the idea into a reality with the global
business and a happy team. ramped up until owner Pernod Ricard drinks brand as its founding client.
A Brit, Hall was a competitive ended up as the headline sponsor of I adored the brand, he said.
rower before getting into sailing, the sailing events. I embraced the values, and the
in his days before advertising. After moving to Australia, Halls level of service they got [from the
Back in 2001, he bought a boat crew convinced Pernod Ricard agency] was exceptional.
with some friends, using a home to do the same here. In 2007, The Hallway gained notoriety in
improvement loan, and began the brand wasnt happy with its its first year, winning Gold Lions and
competing in races on the coast then agency and because of the being shortlisted for a Titanium at
between England and France. personal relationship over the past Cannes in its first 12 months.
Investigation

Damjanovski echoed this.


We talked to a whole bunch
Mr Glasses launched with of people and the best advice we
a live street art demo. got was from accountants, he
revealed. Its good to get out of
the bubble and talk to people who
arent in the business. You need
some pragmatists on board.
Hall agreed finding people who
know about the running of a busi-
ness is vital, and getting valued input
from people who have been around
the business block a few times. One
of his closest advisers was a former
CEO of an insurance company who
set up the backend of The Hallway
and stayed nine years, only leaving
the agency last year.
I got a lot of schooling on the
business side of things such as
staff and cost ratios, operations,
billings, tax. He was a wise busi-
nessman, Hall said. Never un-
derestimate the value of grey hair
he gave us a few clips around the
ear and was a guiding voice.

With a client, or without?


and the very real pressures of having to balance the books and keep the lights There are two ways to start out
on, without the security blanket of an owner or employer, hit home fast. with a founding client, or without.
Uglys Gary McCreadie said its a steep learning curve. After being
Starting your own There are pros and cons to both.
part of bigger, established agencies, when you launch a startup you find business sounds like If youre in the position where
yourself doing everything and wearing a number of hats all at once. Its the key to liberation you have a foundational client
important the founding leadership team has a balance of creative skills but its actually a ready to put work and revenue
as well as business acumen, he explained. Creativity can easily be di- massive commitment your way it means you can imme-
minished by the weight of business realities and not everyone that has diately start working with a little
the vision to start a creative agency is suited to it.
its like becoming a more security. But, there will still
Taking advice from as many people as possible is a good starting parent.Its the most be the need to win new business as
point. While other agency founders are a great source of knowledge and rewarding thing in well keep the revenue coming in.
advice in setting up your new venture, its vital to get advice from out- the world, but its One problem for small agen-
side advertising and media to provide a reality check. terrifying. cies is the need to keep the lights
The growth in the small business sector, and those looking to launch on and pay salaries often means
a startup is phenomenal, Collective Hub COO, Allan Fletcher told they fall into taking briefs and
AdNews. Entrepreneurship is increasingly important in this age. The work they didnt intend to, which
ability to imagine a different future and be able to adapt, free of the usual can quickly derail the vision the
corporate restraints, is going to be the difference between the individuals Jules Hall, founders set out with.
and businesses that thrive, and those which become obsolete. People are The Hallway CEO Were not looking for a lot of
beginning to recognise that, and increasingly they want to take their and founder clients, but youre defined by your
future into their own hands. clients, so were looking for the
Collective Hub is running is fifth Kick. Start. Smart. event in August, right ones, Klnhammer said.
which offers a series of panels and workshops designed to help anyone To avoid falling into that trap
get their small business or startup off the ground because there is so you need to do a lot of planning
much demand. upfront and know exactly when
While starting an agency might be considered going it alone, its im- you need to have a number of
portant not to take the alone apart literally. clients or reach a certain level of
When its your own business, its personal. You dont get to clock revenue.
off and forget it. Youll be thinking about cash flow and staffing in your While The Hallway launched
sleep. And those worries never go away, they scale with the business, with a major client already on
Fletcher said. board, Hall explained that either
You need a network. You cant work in a silo, it gets lonely being an way, you need someone to take a
entrepreneur. Whether its a fullon advisory board or some mates you re- leap of faith at some point to get
spect in the pub, ensure you have a range of views and experiences you can the ball rolling.
call upon for guidance and a different perspective.
www.adnews.com.au | June 2017 29

Lessons learned Founders story: Thinkerbell


Damjanovski is candid about
the lessons learned along the When Ferrier, Ingram and Couzens for at least one major brand, and there, Ferrier said: One of the most
way. One that Common Ventures left Cummins+Partners in February, it the scope of some of the projects interesting things about our model
learned in its early days was that was out of the blue for most people, theyre working on go beyond having a psychologist and two
being independent and different But what wasnt a surprise was that delivering creative executions creatives is we can start to think
wasnt enough. they were already formulating a plan and ads. about the problem holistically,
Any new business needs to for their own venture. Jim and Cuz are the most no matter where the problem
have a clear differentiator that Rumours swirled over what it lauded creatives in Australia lies, and apply a little magic. If
can be clearly articulated so that would be, what it would be called and Ive got my own reputation youre thinking about consumer
clients know what theyre getting and who else would be involved. in consumer psychology and experience you can add magic at
and have a reason to work with What has emerged is Thinkerbell, strategy. We have an interesting any point along that consumer
the agency. Nine months in, the promising to deliver what they combination of complementary journey. Plus were getting stretch
agency realised it didnt have a call measured magic. skill sets, explains Ferrier. into spaces that arent particularly
clear enough mission statement Ingram explains that the Lots of clients are facing in the agency landscape.
and needed to pivot its strategy. genesis of the agency came easily. incredibly complex marketing Like many founders they say
If you put all new agency The idea of doing something environments and within that the time was just right to up sticks
creds side by side, they all look together came about easily. We all there is lots of opportunity, and start something of their own,
the same, he said. New agencies looked at each other with the same but an increasing amount of and believe there is a real appetite
dont spend enough time on what twinkle in our eye, and we knew accountability is required. for something new with new
they stand for. Everyone thinks we were going to have some fun. The challenge for traditionally energy in Melbourne.
well go out and be different but Landing on Thinkerbell, and using structured agencies in that Couzens said: The three of
not about how they want to be dif- measured magic as our philosophy, environment is how they flex us are very creative people, and
ferent. Thats a trap thats easy to all that stuff came easily and and capitalise on emerging weve spent so much time building
fall into. early and its allowed us to set the opportunities. Being a new startup other peoples brands, but it just
Hall agreed. For him, its im- foundations for everything were in this environment is fantastic. felt like the time was right to
portant that any new agency spe- going to do. A lot of agencies Ive Measured magic, they say, create our own brand and use that
cialises in something, rather than worked at, you just dont get that reconciles the opportunities and to help clients.
being a jack of all trades. He said sense of a brand thats been built the need for accountability. Ingram Its been really humbling the
while there are relatively low bar- from the ground up. Literally every says its refreshing as a creative genuine interest in something
riers to entry for agencies all you decision we make we ask ourselves to be working on problem solving new. Weve felt that coming from
need is ideas its much harder to does that feel like Thinkerbell, and for clients beyond ad campaigns. clients, from peers and around the
succeed than it is to start out. does it have measured magic to Usually the measured side is market in general.
You start doing what you want it?, he said. the back end and the magic side Ingram added: Weve all come
to, but at some point you need more The agency began trading is the creativity. What were loving from some of the best agencies in
dollars [and take any work]. But, as in late May from offices on in what were doing is theres Australia, and learned lots of things
soon as you do that, youve solved Melbournes Chapel Street, and measurement in creativity and that work great, and lots of things
your shortterm cash issue, but re- already has some clients on the theres magic in data science, that we would do differently. Now
define your brand, Hall said. board. Although the trio wouldnt Ingram says. were starting from scratch using
Youve got to be the best at reveal who, or any project On Thinkerbells unique all the bit and pieces weve always
something; a client has to have a specifics, it is already working difference to other agencies out wanted to do.
reason to call you.
Something else Hall learned
was the importance of cementing
culture early on so that when the Ferrier, Ingram and Couzens
agency scales it remains strong. offer measured magic.
We left it too late to codify our
culture, he admitted. Culture
is guided by the founders as you
grow. When you get to the point
where youre not doing all the hir-
ing yourself it can be difficult to
hold on to, so, a few years later we
did that process and articulated
what we hold dear.
Damjanovski believes independ-
ent agencies go one of two ways
they become a cult of personal-
ity or a cult of process. If you want
longterm growth, he said, you need
the agency to be process driven,
because at some point the founders
will get burned out. That constrains
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multiscreen strategy.
Investigation www.adnews.com.au | June 2017 31

but with a twist. Meanwhile, The


Monkeys originated as Three Drunk
Beat your own drum. Monkeys a selfappointed descrip-
tor of its three founders. It evolved
to become The Monkeys, allegedly
after some potential clients strug-
gled with the drunk element. But,
would the agency be the same if it
were named Drape, Nowell, Green?
Theres a certain ego at play
with the namesake route, but its
tried and tested, and it doesnt
succumb to trends. Or, you can
find a name that describes the
company or a word that sums
up its values, or something that
just fits.
When picking the name for
their new venture, Jim Ingram
said Thinkerbell came quite
the agency if its success is built solely new agency going to differentiate, quickly. What they wanted was a
on them without transferring into a what persona is it going to have? So name they felt summed up their
broader process within the agency. whats in a name? philosophy of offering meas-
Having just left Common Ven- There are two ways to think ured magic.
tures, Damjanovski has no plans about it, Mr Glasses Chris Camp- We knew from the beginning
to start again immediately. He bell said. If you do good work, we werent going to call ourself
said never say never but if he your reputation will precede you Ingram, Ferrier and Couzens, for
were to start a new shop, he would and you can call the agency any- one because it would have created
do things very differently. thing. Reputation will supersede a shit- fight about whose name was
I was young and dumb [when any silly, clever or amazing name going to come first.
Common Ventures started]. Now, Id you come up with. To McCreadie, his agencys
focus attention more on being spe- But, the brand also gives name Ugly comes from the idea
cific, he said. Id learn how to hire, more exposure and you make a that beautiful things can come
how to set it up better and put pro- name for yourself by getting in from something ugly.
cesses and systems in place earlier. peoples faces.
Theres the traditional name A desk to call home
Build your own brand above the door approach which Whether you start out like Mad
Once youve made the decision bred all the classic agencies like Mens Sterling Cooper Draper Pryce
to launch an agency, you need to Ogilvy, Clemenger, DDB, and in a hotel room or like The Monkeys
know what story youre going to Saatchis (twice). The Hallway takes in a shared warehouse in Redfern,
tell the outside world. How is this its name from Jules Halls surname, or in a co-working space, youll need

Founders story: 72andSunny

72andSunny officially revealed its a Singapore shop in a few months


plans to launch a Sydney office in time where chief creative officer
late April, but it was two years in Johnny Tan will be based.
the making. This was to ensure that It will be hoping to succeed
when managing director Chris Kay where other global hotshops
actually set up shop, it was in the have failed to crack the
right market conditions, the right Australian market. Droga5
people were in place, and it had publicly faltered after growing
done its due diligence. too fast and taking on too many
Kay, who previously was big clients in its early days,
managing partner at BMF, spent the swamping itself.
last four years at 72andSunnys Los Kay said 72andSunny isnt
Angeles office. He was tapped to landing with a fully formed plan,
launch the APAC expansion in 2015 but is prepared to grow in ways
and has been laying the groundwork. that reflect the market and respond
The agencys offices in Sydneys to demands. It isnt claiming to
Woolloomooloo will be followed by have all the answers, he said.
www.adnews.com.au | June 2017 32

Off the bat, it was a startup be-


ing launched by Saatchi Sydney, but
the challenges [for a new network
office] arent that dissimilar to any
agency starting up, Rebelo said,
adding it was important not to just
replicate Sydney.
It was a little bit of luck, en-
trepreneurship and stars aligning.
We had an entrepreneurial begin-
ning, but it became strategically
important. We set up a mini full
service agency from the getgo,
The writings with the benefit that we had one
on the wall
P&L and could lean on the support
from Sydney.
Current MD of the Melbourne
shop, Mark Cochrane, came on
board about eight months after
somewhere to work from. Rent on office space will be one of the largest ex- the launch. As with any business,
penditures for any small business, so consider sharing space with another 10 things to do Rebelo said, getting the right lead-
agency that has spare desk space, or a shared working space with other ership is what forms the founda-
startups can offer a vibrant environment thats more than just a desk.
When it launched in Melbourne, Saatchi & Saatchi set up within Sapi- 1 Take the
leap.
tions of a worldclass agency.
Chris Campbell started experi-
ents offices, as parent company Publicis Groupe had recently acquired ential agency Mr Glasses six months
the digital business, while Ferrier et al set up in Melbournes Chapel
Street, saying they wanted to be where consumers are - not where other
2 Write a business plan what
are you going to be doing?
ago to complement his existing pro-
motions agency. He revealed that
agencies are. already having the existing compa-

When, where and why


3 Apply for an Australian
Company Number (ACN), a
Tax File Number (TFN) and an
ny allowed them to do research into
what where the gap was, and what
Sometimes its the right time, right place and the right people that come Australian Business Number kind of agency would fill it.
together to see a new agency open its doors. Ugly is not the first agency (ABN) you cant operate Following a soft launch in Sep-
started by its managing director Hazelle Klnhammer. She set up Anomaly without these. tember 2016, Mr Glasses hosted a
Amsterdam, and had been looking to return to Australia after 20 years launch party featuring live street
overseas. She was in discussions with M&C Saatchi about a role, which art painters, in May 2017 to get
didnt fit the bill. I like starting things, the rush and the ride of it, she said. 4 Come up with a name,
register it and the trademark in front of prospective clients to
Klnhammer was then introduced to McCreadie and Berthinussen this is your identity. show them what it could do. You
who had been discussing setting something up together, and they instant- only launch once, so we wanted to
ly clicked. The agency, which is financially backed by M&C Saatchi, but
not part of the group, is just weeks into the venture. 5 Buy the web domain
without a website, does you
agency even exist?
celebrate so people could experi-
ence it, he said.
There are commonalities around starting a new agency whether its in-
dependent or part of a network. 72andSunnys new Sydney and Singapore So, should you launch
shops take it to five. Its owned by investment house MDC Group which
means its pockets are slightly deeper, and it already has a list of global
6 Set up a business telco and
internetplanits goodtotalk. an agency?
If you answered yes to this one
clients it can tap into. But theres pressure to live up to and MD Chris Kay question, then you already know
is cautious in his approach.
Kay says the model 72andSunny takes here will adapt and flex with
7 Find an office space,
whether its your lounge
room, a shared space or you
the answer. But, do you like risk?
As the founder of your own
what the market needs and it isnt arriving guns blazing with the idea it lease premises, you need agency, you open yourself up to
can arrive a ready made success. While there is obvious hype around its somewhere to work. a huge amount of discomfort and
launch, Kay says its not a ta-dah agency. stress. Its your responsibility
Its about what does Australia need, not what can 72andSunny
bring. Id like us to learn and teach in this market. Were not coming to 8 Look into taxes the only
things certain in life are
death and taxes. Youll need to
to pay the bills and make things
happen. If that doesnt appeal,
eat anybodys lunch Id like to bring my own lunch, and bring some- and youre happier with a bit
thing additive and energising to the market, he says. arrange Goods and Services more security, then its probably
Being part of a group may ease some of the startup trauma, but there Tax (GST), and Pay As You Go not for you.
are still challenges. Saatchi & Saatchi set up its Melbourne office two (PAYG) withholding tax if you Damjanovski summed it up: If
years ago. CEO Michael Rebelo said it was always in his growth plan have people on the payroll. you like adventure and risk do
when he took on the top job in 2011. The timing was right in 2015. it. It you like security dont do it.
It won the pitch for Bank of Melbourne before it even had a Mel-
bourne operation, but setting up shop was one of the conditions. Just
9 The numbers get an
accountant. You need fire inside you and you
cant be afraid of failure. Dont do
weeks later, Saatchis Sydney client Toyota announced it was moving all its it as a side hustle thats halfar-
operations from Sydney to Melbourne, which meant another reason to staff
up in Victoria.
10 Get insured protect
yourself from risk. sed. Give it your full fucking focus
give it everything.
in partnership with 33

Why were giving our clients a


complimentary attribution solution
he sales and marketing mix has
T grown increasingly complex.
Truly understanding whats driv-
ing transactions across marketing
channels can make a significant
difference to the success of cam-
paigns, although attaining these
insights and a holistic view of the
marketing mix can be somewhat
problematic. However, there is one
tool that marketers have at their
disposal, and thats Attribution.
Not an industry event, or admit-
tedly a client meeting goes by with-
out discussing the true role mar-
keting channels play in a consumer
journey advertisers, agencies,
publishers, analysts, and the media
are trying to better understand it.
Adtech companies love to talk about
attribution, commission research
papers and discuss how it can
improve campaign performance when comparing Cadence attribut- spend. We conducted a study with
(theyre not wrong by the way), but
Anthony Capano, ed data against last-click data. the CMO Club and it revealed that
is anyone doing anything to help MD of Rakuten For another client, Rakuten 20% of CMOs are currently allo-
marketers utilise attribution? Marketing APAC Marketing utilised data insights cating budget via channel, whilst
Following our acquisition of from Cadence to encourage both 30% are allocation brand dollars
UK based attribution company DC shows how theyre engagement and clicks for Display separately from direct marketing
Storm, Rakuten Marketing have enabling marketers campaigns. When comparing last- dollars. Attribution gives insight
been working to developing a click with attributed performance into all marketing performance.
proprietary attribution tool, to be
to look beyond a Cadence proved a 40% higher aver- Using an attribution model to de-
made available and distributed to single channel and age-order-value (AOV) for convert- cipher budgets, provides marketers
all Rakuten Marketing clients, at no to see whats working ing journeys influenced by display, with an accurate view of channel
additional cost. compared with the retailers site and campaign performance, giv-
and whats not, average. Without a robust attribu- ing marketers a total view, and
Why are we giving our providing the power tion solution, the above mentioned allowing for successful campaign
attribution technology advertisers would not have had the optimisation.
Cadence to our clients?
to make strategic insight to make strategic optimisa- Through Cadence we are mak-
As the path to purchase becomes decisions that are tion decisions. ing it easy for brands to have a
more complex, attribution pro- more accurate, data- Further to this, Attribution is complete view of marketing perfor-
vides insight into how consumers what elevates good data to great mance. We are enabling marketers
are interacting with a brand. We driven and effective. data. Through analysing convert- to look beyond a single channel and
have been in beta testing with se- ing and non-converting consumers to see whats working and whats
lect clients for some months, and journeys, marketers are delivered not, and providing the power to
have been able to demonstrate insight into what is and isnt working. make strategic decisions that are
to brands the value of having a This data provides a greater under- more accurate, data-driven and ef-
complete view of the consumer standing of marketing efficiencies; fective. We want to make certain
journey, juxtaposed with a simple wasted ad-spend and consumer in- that our clients are armed with the
last-click wins model. For example, clinations; how different creative and complete information when mak-
one of our affiliate clients sought messaging work across networks; ing marketing decisions.
insight into the role its content and which channels are causing the All the buzz is well founded, and
publishers were having on the path highest bounce rate. This data may Im happy to say that we are putting
to purchase within the fuller con- reveal an opportunity to make quick some skin in the game, by provid-
text of the user journey. Through changes, which drive greater results. ing a complimentary solution to
attribution we determined a 115% A holistic view can then be used our clients, in order to help them
increase in content publisher ROI to assess budgets and marketing along this journey.
Creative Focus

This month, adland will descend But, the festival isnt all acco-
on the south of France for the lades and education. There are
Whats your best story annual Cannes Lions International
Festival of Creativity a weeklong
sponsored parties on sizeable
yachts populated by linenclad
from Cannes Lions? event that brings together the
industrys best and recognises the
execs, parties with private perfor-
mances by the likes of Ed Sheeran
very top shelf in creative talent. and, of course, thousands of bot-
Its the festival when the movers, There will be the usual adver- tles of ros waiting to be guzzled
tising celebrities, like WPP CEO Sir down by adlands thirstiest.
shakers and stars of the creative Martin Sorrell, Publicis Maurice From boating injuries to embar-
industry come together to celebrate Levy and Droga5 founder David rassing ones self in front of global
excellence. But, it isnt all award Droga on stage alongside real celeb- colleagues, AdNews asked Cannes
rities, from photgrapher Mario veterans to share their best ros
ceremonies and networking. Testino, hiphop star A$AP Rocky, induced stories from the festival
Demi Lovato and Fashion designer that stops the creative industry in
Alexander Wang. its tracks.
www.adnews.com.au | June 2017 35

Ive never kept any awards Ive won. Im not making a This story took place the first time I was in Cannes. It was
statement. Ive just never bothered to keep them safe back when Paul Reardon, Tom Martin and I had scored a
and lug them from country to country or office to office trip, compliments of the Sirens radio awards.
with me. They either end up left on the table on the night Halfway through the week, and already sleep
or given to someone who worked on the campaign the deprived, the three of us decided to recover by doing
following day. some casual tube riding behind a boat in the stunning
Although, there is one exception. harbour.
In 2013 in Cannes, I was having a leisurely dip off As we donned our life jackets, Paul inched his way
the Plage de la Croisette one morning when I stumped over to the captain of our boat Ren and whispered,
my toe on something sticking out I want to go fast Ren. I usually go 20, maybe 25km
of the sand. At first I thought it
I was having an hour ... bon, Ren replied. Reardon
was a rock. But, then it glim-
mered. Spa rk led. The shiny,
a leisurely dip
smiled, No, no. I want to go fast Ren.
Ren smiled back politely, but shook Today
golden object called out to me. his head. I take you maybe, 30km. Beyond
Before long, I was like an ever
off the Plage that is not wise. Today is a good day is NOT a
soslightly better looking Gollum to die Ren! Paul said, beaming with
from Lord Of The Rings clamour-
ing for his precious. de la Croisette encouragement. Ren sighed and started
the boat. Undeterred, Paul shouted to him
good day
What I dug out was a heavy
metallic statuette with the head and stubbed
again as he pulled away, Today is a good
day to die Ren!
to die!
of a majestic lion. Im not going to Tom and I were already atop the tubes on the sand.
tell you what happened to that Lion
for fear of incriminating myself
my toe on The boat took off, the ropes went taut, and we were sent
racing. So fast that, as we went over so much as a ripple,
and being banned from entering
Cannes, or France, ever again. Ill something we got air. Paul shouted again from his tube, Today is a
good day to die Ren! laughing wildly. I screamed back,
just leave this here instead.
sticking out Paul! Today is not a good day to die! Today is NOT a
good day to die!
Of course, we eventually fell off and bounced wildly
of the sand. along the surface. By the end, we stumbled away black
and blue. Massively fun, but utterly terrifying.
It glimmered. Afterwards, Ren told us that, despite his better judg-
ment, hed decided to give us what we wanted, flooring it
to over 40km/h. Cannes harbour is stunning. As it turns
out at high speed, its very, very solid.

W E S L E Y H A W E S J U L I A N S C H R E I B E R

Marcel ECD Cummins&Partners ECD


Creative Focus www.adnews.com.au | June 2017 36

Back in 2014, I was with a colleague Alex Carr, MD of It seems hard to believe that there are so many in our
Havas Sydney at the time, and a Crystal Palace tragic. industry who write off Cannes as an irrelevant rosfue-
We were invited for lunch with the guys from Finch. It led junket. It has become the annual whinge of those
was a blisteringly sunny day and we were ferried across who have never attended, dont value creativity, or have
on a dinghy to this 100-ft yacht. formed a superficial view of the festival based on the
Plied with copious amounts of wine and beer, we endless stream of party photos.
stayed far longer than we should have. It was well past
sundown when we got back to shore and we were due
I was an
In fact, the reality is that the Cannes
lunches and parties are just as impor-
at the Havas Caf for a Rio football World Cup event
with some very famous explayers, including World
tant as the awards ceremonies, exhibi-
tions, keynotes and workshops. Thats Australian
because its at these casual gettogeth-
I remember ers where the creativelyminded come
to talk about our industry for real.
at an Indian
suddenly People there are talking openly and
honestly in that good old fashioned
party in
becoming facetoface way. the south
A great time in Cannes Ill single out

sober as I saw was not with a glass of ros in hand,


but with a bottle of Kingfisher beer.
of France,
our global
We had scored invites to The Times
discussing
of India party, the highlight of the fes-
tival for the thousands of Indian dele-
CEO and CFO gates. Nestled on the beach between
the Facebook bash and The Shots
American
Cup winner Marcel Desailly, for
a talk about football, leadership staring at us. party, you could hear the Bollywood
DJ long before approach.
creative
and marketing. It was packed. We had to talk our way
in because, (A) we were late, and (B) we were sozzled.
I talked with the CCO responsi-
ble for his networks creative work
work. Pure
They put us at the back. We were quite loud, shout-
ing witty banter from the back. It came to the Q&A and
across the subcontinent. Who would
have thought there would be so many
Cannes.
eventually one of the guys on the stage pointed at Alex. issues in common with our local industry? I met an
I have a question for Marcel. Is it true that the biggest amazing Indian commercial director who had done a
disappointment in your career is that you never had the great American campaign.
chance to play for the mighty Crystal Palace? I was an Australian at an Indian party in the south of
It went very quiet. I remember suddenly becoming France, discussing American creative work - the night
sober as I saw our global CEO and CFO staring at us. After was pure Cannes and all the proof you need that bring-
what seemed a solid minute of silence, Marcel responded, ing people together to chat, eat, drink and celebrate
I love Palace and started laughing and then everyone creativity is something we should all do more of. The
did. Alex and I turned to each other and cheered and only lowlight of the party was my Bollywood dancing.
embraced like we had just scored the winning goal.

J A M E S W R I G H T J O N S K I N N E R

Havas Creative Group COO The Core Agency founder


and Red Agency CEO and creative partner
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The Big Question www.adnews.com.au | June 2017 39

IS THE FRENCH
ECLAIR AS
SWEET AS
IT LOOKS?
W O R D S B Y
R O S I E B A K E R

rance has had a law in place formally agree to uphold industry specifically mentions Dont bend
F since the 90s designed to en-
sure greater transparency, fewer
wide standards of ethics.
He stated at the time: The role
Would more
regulation and laws
the law dont go looking for
loopholes Be transparent and
kickbacks and rebates. It prevents of a media agency is clear. Its to similar to those in trustworthy.
agencies buying media in bulk in provide unbiased specialist advice AdNews has been asking around
advance and reselling it to clients on how to best navigate a complex France improve about views on more regulation as
later or acting as the principal. media world and to ensure clients media transparency a solution to some of the issues
The legislation, Loi Sapin, means get the best value and return for around transparency. But, its
agencies can only act as agents for their money.
in Australia? probably no surprise that while a
clients, and can only be paid by But, he noted there is bias com- And, would you lot of people have views on it, many
advertisers. Earlier this year it was ing from holding groups. welcome them? are reticent to share them on the
extended to cover digital media At present, too many media record, lest they overstep the mark
something it hadnt covered previ- agencies are opaque agents of the or say something out of sync with
ously. The law will come into effect media owner and holding group, the holding company or industry
next year. And its a big deal. Dawson asserted. It has to stop. body theyre part of.
In a column published online by Only one type of media agency Selfregulation shouldnt be
AdNews two months ago, shortly should exist and that is a transpar- taken for granted. It is constantly
after Bohemia was acquired by ent agent of the client. under attack from lobbying move-
M&C Saatchi, CEO Brett Dawson The broader industry is gov- ments, particularly around responsi-
suggested that more, not less reg- erned by selfregulation, which is ble advertising and placement of ads.
ulation should be welcomed in watched over by the AANA, ACMA But, if the industry wants to continue
Australia. and the Advertising Standards to be selfregulated it must demon-
Dawson, who has always hung Bureau. There is a voluntary code strate that it can be trusted and the
his hat on the tall tree of transpar- and behind the scenes there are system works to underpin a fair, sus-
ency, believes the AANAs contract gentlemens ag reements and tainable and competitive industry.
templates and guidelines should understandings. All members of Two leaders from independent
be adopted as standard. And the MFA agree to its constitution media agencies offered AdNews
that Australian agencies should and a code of behaviour, which their views.
www.adnews.com.au | June 2017 40

S T E P H E N W R I G H T DIRECTOR, PROGRAMMATIC MEDIA

he simple answer to the twopart question is an emphatic yes and So, the new law ensuring dis-
T yes. However, there are serious doubts being expressed in the
French media as to how effective the legislation will be when its intro-
closure will undoubtedly serve as
a deterrent, but whether this in
duced (in January 2018). itself will eradicate excessive mar-
The ultimate aim is to restore trust and eradicate the murky and gins and markups is a far more
The new law fraudulent practices in programmatic. So how does the new French complex issue.
law attempt to do this? Perhaps the biggest threat to
ensuring disclosure Step one is the separation of agency and trading desk, preventing multinationals from the legis-
will undoubtedly agencies from being both a buyer and a seller. No issue there in pro- lation is the protection around
serve as a deterrent, grammatic, in fact this is the very tactic the multinationals have used whistleblowers. With external
but whether this will to good effect to muddy the waters and hide murky practices. The detection of murky practices so
eradicate excessive vast majority of advertisers have contracts that provide no visibility of complex, a disgruntled insider is
prices at which the trading desk buys, they only know what the agency almost certainly the best chance
margins and mark oncharges to them. authorities would have of build-
ups is a far more Where the new law starts to bite is in requiring the agency to disclose ing a case that would stand up in
complex issue. relationships with the agency groups trading desk and any technology court.
providers in the digital supply chain beyond this. Further, it specifically Laws that enforce transparency
prevents the contracted agency to receive any rebates from the publisher. are welcome, but they arent the
Sounds great, but disclosing these relationships and preventing a whole solution. They are merely
rebate back to the agency doesnt in itself prevent overcharging. There a first step. It is only affirmative
are a multitude of ways in which multinationals can recoup funds and action by advertisers that will truly
add cost through the digital supply chain. reform the errant behaviours of the
And who is to be the judge of what constitutes a fair markup and mar- multinationals.
gin? To even begin to assess whether an advertiser is being overcharged Advertisers in France will need
would require full disclosure of all markups and margins across the to be careful not to get false com-
digital supply chain. fort from the new legislation.

SIMON RUTHERFORD CEO SLINGSHOT MEDIA

hanges to the French transparency laws are yet to come into effect so far that it is impossible for those
C for digital (January 2018), allowing agencies and other operators to
put the systems in place or to separate trading desks so that they can be-
agencies to make money.
And, for every media owner who
come compliant. At this stage, we have no real way of knowing whether would welcome such legislation and
the changes are a good thing or not, because we havent seen the impact. new levels of transparency, there is
I dont want to work Would more regulation and laws improve media transparency in a media owner willing to cut their
in an industry that Australia? Perhaps they would, but is it too late to adopt these laws here? throat to get business in the door and
is heavily regulated, Would those less transparent agencies/operators either block the change offer an incentive to do so.
or just find other ways to get around the laws? For most people, the fear of loss is
but it might be the
As far as digital is concerned, its less about that fact that agencies are greater than the desire for gain. The
kick in the pants the using internal trading desks and more about the undisclosed margins industry might gain a whole lot by
industry needs. they are making. And how little of a clients money actually goes towards moving to a more transparent regu-
buying digital media. lated model, however, there are too
I dont particularly want to work in an industry that is heavily regulated, many people who have too much to
but I fear there are too many competing agendas for us to get to agreement lose to let that happen, so it wont.
on a way forward, so it might be the kick in the pants the industry needs. Market forces will have to dic-
The bigger question however is: Is it likely to happen? The answer tate the outcome, so clients, agen-
to that is no! cies and media owners should vote
The Australian marketplace is a deregulated marketplace; market with their feet, or at least those
forces dictate the outcomes. Yes, there are agencies benefitting from the who care enough about transpar-
lack of legislation. Equally, there are clients screwing agency costs down ency should.
The future of customer experience www.adnews.com.au | June 2017 41

Experience architects
of the new marketing
ccentures remit has evolved complemented with content and departments. There are teams for
A in line with the challenges
and changes its seeing for mar-
rich creative to bring it to life for
a brand.
media, marketing, planning, cre-
ative and more, with each often
keters. Marketing isnt just cam- The always on customer is working on different KPIs and mea-
paigns but an end-to-end experi- looking to interact with your brand suring success differently.
ence. It requires different skills any time, anywhere. So, how mar- Ive found this is another road-
and a different mindset to survive keting has evolved into what we block to getting the whole experi-
in this new marketing world. call new marketing, is that its all ence and journey thinking right.
Ir w in Lim, Accenture about relevance, the right time and You need to pull them together to
Interactive Marketing Services the right price point. For me it is do Experience Marketing, he says.
Lead for Australia and New all about putting together the right Once you get teams committed
Zealand, brings to bear 20 years experience. If I were to sum it up, to shared metrics and how they
experience in digital and mar- big brands and big products are all measure those outcomes it starts
keting transformation. His remit about the experience. to make more sense. One way
has expanded to incorporate Experience is very differ- Accenture has found to demon-
all aspects of digital marketing, ent from products and services, strate that Experience Marketing
personalisation and emerging and traditional brand commu- and joined up thinking works
technologies such as artificial nication. So new marketing is particularly to larger organi-
intelligence and machine learn- really around this thing that I sations that have more complex
ing, which are becoming a bigger Technology and call Experience Marketing with structures is to start with a niche
part of the new marketing world data have created a capital E and M. Focussing on project where the approach can be
brands are facing. tech is not enough, great content put to work on a smaller scale and
New technologies offer a world
a new, silo-less is not enough, or just having the used as a proof point.
of possibilities, but it can be con- world for marketers. data is not enough. Today it is all Lim talks about experience
fronting so its important to take a Accentures about how you blend these things architects as the pin holding this
step back, says Lim together. How good you are at all together. Accenture Interactive
Theres a whole bunch of lim- Irwin Lim has coined blending these things together has built a team of these people
itations with technology when it the new paradigm will dictate how well you play in with the right skills, who are able
comes to the marketing perspec- this new space. to see the big picture but are also
tive. Take Artificial Intelligence
Experience It starts from designing inter- comfortable operating at the micro
(AI). I think a lot of peoples notion Marketing as it actions around the whole experi- level.
about what AI is, is what the indus- blends creativity, ence, not just a campaign around Its not so much about having
try calls strong AI, so things like a brand strategy for the year. What a 100-person team of experience
C3PO from Star Wars, that kind tech, content and does that mean for the customer architects, but having the capabil-
of AI. Versus what the reality is. data to touch people journey? It goes beyond commu- ity and people who are fluent in
A very good recent example is nications, to what people call the data, technology, creativity and
Facebook chat bots, he explains.
at every step of moments of truth. marketing.
A lot of what people are their customer It s not a n ea sy t h i ng to These individuals become
already interacting with is whats journey. And new achieve and often means a huge re a l ly i mp or t a nt i n put t i ng
termed weak AI. Its AI focussed shift in the mindset of an organ- things together, Lim says. You
on a specific use case, like recog- marketers need isation. To Lim, it needs input need to bring all these different
nising an image or knowing what to be experience from technology operations and a ways of thinking and different
product you will likely buy, for customer development mindset, cultures together. To get that
example this kind of cool stuff
architects, fluent in open to continuously optimising mentality you have to have indi-
is happening right now. The most all the disciplines. the experience, tweaking it and viduals in the business who have
exciting thing for me is the modu- adapting. these skillsets, who are f luent
larisation and commoditisation of If you put all of those together and comfortable and know how
these things because once it has it starts to sound quite different to put things together.
gotten to that level of ease of use from a brands traditional strategy,
and adoption thats when it can campaign, measure mentality. Sponsored by
really drive value for business. From there it comes down to
Lim is clear that tech and breaking down the silos within an
data are not enough. It has to be organisation or within marketing
www.adnews.com.au | June 2017 42

June 2017

E D I T O R I A L

Editor Online editor


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Ad tech 101 www.adnews.com.au | June 2017 45

In a nutshell

Artificial Intelligence (AI):


AI relates to the intelligence
that is shown by computers.
As algorithms become
increasingly sophisticated
they can react and and adapt
to changes far better and
slicker than ever before.
What is... The concept of computer

THE AI REVOLUTION
intelligence relates to
how machines learn
through interaction with
their environment how
to best achieve a goal.

Why the rise in AI? The role of data in AI


Artificial intelligence (AI) is far more When you layer or integrate data sets, such as first or third par-
than a buzzword. In a world where ty data, within AI, the increasingly sophisticated AI algorithms
marketers are continually pushing absorb that new-found knowledge and can not only respond to
for better consumer personalisation changes better, but can alsocreatechanges in real-time. AI
and solid marketing ROIs, AI helps machines work best if they are given lots of data that helps them
by giving that high degree of preci- understand what criteria achieves the goal. The AI machine can
sion and micro-targeting thats not learn from that data and be better at predicting how to get to
The next steps:
possible for humans. The rise of this the goal.
1. Understand where and
term across the media and marketing
how AI can help move a
landscape can be attributed to the in- AI in a media landscape: marketing strategy forward
creasing improvements in technology While AI stands for artificial intelligence many say theres noth-
2. Have a clearly defined
and smarter algorithms that are sync- ing artificial about it. Oracle Marketing Cloud thinks of AI as
use case, goals and know
ing in with higher quality data sets. adaptive intelligence. It says when you have the analytics layer
how to track them
AI removes the need to spend re- for AI, this intersection of human judgement and machine au-
3. Lose the fear that
sources on lower level processes tomation creates a far more personalised and relevant experi-
you will loose control of
which can be handled by a machine. ence for consumers, on behalf of brands. AI learning uses first
marketing processes
It helps the marketer as it can analyse and third party data to make the best recommendation possible
data patterns and deliver results not in real time after each new click all with the aim of driving
humanly possible. Think of AI as a a sale. When it works (e.g. a sale is made) it will remember you Sponsored by
Rubiks cube on steroids, says Ora- and what your hot button was, so that when it encounters anoth-
cle Marketing Cloud regional director er visitor who looks and behaves like you, it knows what to do
Will Griffith. sooner in the journey, increasing the likelihood of another sale.
Meet the Team

N ews Digital Networks Australia (News DNA) was born out of

NEWS DNA: the recognition that brands have shifted from advertising in
individual titles to buying audiences.
Brands are less interested in one siloed campaign in sites like

THE RETURN OF taste.com.au or Vogue.com.au. Instead, they want to target con-


sumer segments, such as food or fashion, across a range of News
Corps titles, which is where News DNA aims to excel.

THE PREMIUM The main reason we needed to launch News DNA as a sepa-
rate network was to reconfigure the way we organised our port-
folio. We used to do it through brands, which works in traditional
media, but in the digital media world, clients are buying audi-

PUBLISHER ences, News Corps chief digital officer Nicole Sheffield said.
News DNA allows advertisers to target 24 segments, from car
and home buyers, to tradespeople. For instance, if a brand wants
to target a food audience the advertising solution goes beyond
taste.com.au, with News DNA offering up a broad selection, from
Concerns over fake news, brand safety news.com.au to GQ.
and transparency are priming the return With News DNA, we are starting with a blank sheet of paper.
We already had the products, the websites and the data in place,
of the premium publisher that can offer a Sheffield said. But, we were able to organise them in a better
safe and quality environment for brands. way to deliver outcomes for clients. This also meant sharing best
Poised to rake in the dollars, News DNA practice across the network, of what worked.
In less than 12 months, Sheffield has held three different job
has revolutionised News Corps digital titles within News Corp, from CEO of NewsLifeMedia looking after
offering. And its only nine months in to its its print magazines, to MD of the business new digital arm News
Digital Networks Australia (DNA), and now her latest position as
aggressive threeyear plan. News Corps chief digital officer.
As Sheffield has continued to rise up the ranks of News Corp,
she hasnt dropped any of her former duties, rather just expanded
her role to include new remits.
W O R D S B Y We are definitely ticking the boxes with New DNA. Its a
L I N D S A Y B E N N E T T three-year plan and its aggressive, but so far its tracking well,
she said. My team is brilliant. They are people who have been
galvanised to deliver not just revenue or traffic growth, but
engagement to clients. Its not just about experiencing us once
its about return revenue.
While Sheffield is kicking goals, she recognises the challenges
facing News DNA and the wider media industry, including fake
news, brand safety and transparency. Although some may believe
all digital media is tainted by YouTubes recent boycott crisis,
Sheffield is adamant that not all digital is created equal.
I dont think weve been fairly compensated for the quality
of our network, but the times are changing. News Corp is in a
prime position following the brand safety issues because were-
Nicole Sheffield focused on delivering premium audiences in trusted environ-
powering premium ments, she said.
publishers
Im very excited by the return of the premium publisher
because Ive been nagging on for years about the value of our
audience. And now people are starting to want to understand it.
With an unassailable passion for content and women, Sheffield
has also driven the launch of News DNAs womens network,
Whimn.com.au, which she revealed is exceeding expectations.
Ive learnt a lot from setting up News DNA and Whimn and
collaborating with the rest of News Corp in doing so. But, Im
the most proud of my team and what theyve delivered in a very
short time, she said.
The biggest opportunity and the biggest thing an organisa-
tion has to get right are its people, and the definition of success.
It doesnt matter if youre a TV network, magazine, digital net-
work or creating a new operating model, the right people will
make it work.
www.adnews.com.au | June 2017 47

S I M O N S M I T H E X E C U T I V E D I R E C T O R O F C O N T E N T M A R K E T I N G

What is your previous experience in How have you settled into your Why did you return to News?
the industry? new position? It feels like Ive come home as this
I guess you could say that Im A bit like a duck to water, I feel like is my third time back to News Corp
definitely a media junkie. Its been Ive come home and the support Australia. Someone once said to me,
a part of my entire working life Ive had from the business has been you dont work for companies, you
since cutting my teeth doing work awesome. work for people and to have the
experience in radio at the ripe old opportunity to work with Nicole
age of 16. I have lived and breathed What is the biggest challenge you Sheffield, and at such an exciting
this industry every day since. Ive face in your role? time with News DNA, was a no
been extremely lucky to have had a Like any big business, there are brainer. To see the vision that she
diverse range of experience across complexities around structures, has for the business, and the team
commercial, editorial, marketing processes and operating models that she has assembled, Im just
and events and adio, publishing, to navigate through. But, to be thrilled to be part of that.
magazines, TV and digital. While honest the opportunities completely
these have been different roles outweigh any of the challenges.
across many of Australias biggest Theres no doubt the entire media and
media companies the one thing in marketing industry faces a variety of
common is that at the end of the different challenges and Im looking
day its all about using content to forward to helping our commercial
connect with audiences and that is partners find the right solutions to
what I love about this industry. their content marketing needs.
Meet the Team

F I O N A N I L S S O N F O O D D I R E C T O R

What does your role involve? involves a lot of taste testing (and How is FoodCorp tracking
All things food. I look after the luckily Im pretty good at this). since its launch?
News DNA food branded assets We have had amazing feedback
and in my FoodCorp role I look What is the biggest challenge you from the market which really
more broadly across the whole face in your role? appreciates they can now easily
of News at how we leverage We are in the middle of a perfect access commercial solutions
and scale our vast food storm where the consumer and across trusted food audiences
offerings. This involves advertiser demand for food related and environments in one place.
the development of new content and marketing solutions Weve simplified things so that if
products and services to is absolutely booming. Across you are buying a food audience
evolve our food ecosystem our FoodCorp network we have youre not just buying taste.
even further. A big focus Australias biggest food media com.au now, but can buy across
is making sure we really brands, talent pool and food all of FoodCorp. This is much
know our audiences. audiences and we generate huge broader than our food brands.
This is so we can amounts of data. We are perfectly It includes all of our mastheads
connect with them positioned to capitalise on so many and news.com.au, which all have
across our network opportunities that are constantly strong food related content and
in a way that adds presenting themselves. So, a key offerings. Our FoodCorp team
value every minute, challenge for my role is to make sure have been developing some
every hour, every day that everyone is very clear on what exciting enhanced products and
and create commercial success looks like and to focus only commercial opportunities that
opportunities off the on the initiatives that will deliver the were rolling out over the coming
back of this that deliver greatest value for our consumers and months, so watch this space.
for our clients. My role also advertisers, which is not always easy.

J U L I A N D E L A N Y M A N A G I N G D I R E C T O R N E W S . C O M . A U A N D K I D S P O T . C O M . A U

Whats the most exciting thing ranked by Nielsen as the largest to mature and the data
about working in this industry? news site in Australia in April were able to see in 2017
Theres almost always a solution 2013. We had a goal to deliver provides a very high level
to a problem. The hard work that that result, with plenty of people of accountability. As
leads to a successful measurable thinking it was either not possible publishers and brands
outcome is what makes digital or would take longer to achieve. get to see an even more
the place to be in media. Working Our teams work best when granular view of what
through change in some theres a quantifiable goal and the consumers are doing,
industries might be confronting, objective to be number one was a and how they interact
but in digital media, evolution blessing Ill forever be thankful for. with products, new
(and sometimes revolution) is information must
simply an expectation. Whats the biggest change surely evolve digital
for publishing you see coming expectation,
Whats been your proudest in the future? strategy and
moment at News? Measurement. The measurement associated
The first time news.com.au was of digital audience continues tactical delivery.
www.adnews.com.au | June 2017 49

C A M E R O N K I N G , D I G I T A L C O M M E R C I A L D I R E C T O R

What are News DNAs values? filled with incredible, innovative and
To me, bringing together our digital colourful characters.
product, content, analytics and
commercial functions into one team Whats been your proudest moment
makes us more responsive to some at News?
of the challenges and opportunities The proudest achievement was
we face. I think there are two helping launch News Connect,
values that are really important in powered by Quantium, our data and
doing that effectively. First, theres targeted advertising business. We
always investment for a good had a great team, some phenomenal
idea, and second, deliver on your partners and a really exciting new
commitments. opportunity to announce. Seeing that
business continue to go from strength
Whats the most exciting thing about to strength has been really rewarding.
working in this industry?
The most exciting, and perhaps also What does your role involve?
the most terrifying, thing is that what Im digital commercial director so
works for an audience or a brand today I get to work on some of the most
may be completely different tomorrow. exciting issues and hobby horses in
Pace of change is exciting and ongoing digital media and marketing; data,
and you have to get used to that. I programmatic, native or mobile
also love the relationships built in the marketing. I get to work with a
industry. Working in the luxury, fashion phenomenal team that helps plan,
and lifestyle media sector, you may develop and execute amazing digital
not think it, but its very collegiate, one campaigns every day.

N I C K S M I T H , P R E S T I G E A N D L I F E S T Y L E D I R E C T O R

What is your previous brands across prestige such achievements have been the
experience in the industry? as Vogue, GQ, Vogue Living scale of the experiential
Its been a little over and Buro 24/7, and our homes business weve been
20 years now. I started working brands. Lately Ive been working allowed to invest in and
in insights and strategy during across the prestige assets of our grow. Vogue Fashions
uni. I think my first project was business and we will be bringing Night Out and Vogue Online
doing focus groups, I then moved the News Prestige Network Shopping Night, GQ Men
into marketing, then editorial, of to market shortly, which will of the Year, or even the
which, GQ Australia was and still deliver innovation and an recent Vogue Codes, which
is very much a highlight. Now in a incredible suite of products and supports the promotion of
publisher role, I can bring all that services to prestige advertisers. women in the technology
experience together across all sector, are platforms Im
platforms. Whats been your proudest proud of. News is also
moment at News? attracting great people
What does your role involve? Ive had quite a few to be and, if I look at my brand
Primarily, my role involves honest. At News, theres leaders, we dont only
driving growth of the brands for is a lot of trust given to have the best operators
the lifestyle division of News, category custodians to drive in Australia, but I think
which includes some formidable business. Some of the great the world.
Reality Check www.adnews.com.au | June 2017 50

Brand: Menulog
Ad: Less Talk More Eat
with Jeff Goldblum
Agency: Y&R Sydney

Name: Sally Thompson Name: Tom Dazos Name: Elle Martin


Silence is Goldblum in Occupation: Florist Occupation: Student Occupation: Retail assistant
Menulogs Less Talk Age: 41 Age: 19 Age: 26
More Eat campaign. I love Jeff Goldblum, I feel like These ads are great, I love how How funny are these ads! Jeff
hes the new George Clooney; weird and uncomfortable he and Goldblum just oozes sex appeal
In the ad series, the everyones just getting more and everyone else is. Chances are he I reckon. Huge win for Menulog
Jurassic Park star more obsessed with him. I really like had never even heard of Menulog getting him to be in the ads Im
the ads, but it could just be because before this. There is a massive flaw super impressed. I like Menulog
shmoozes people Im a bit of a Goldblum fan. Im not in the ad concept though who still as a brand, but Im more likely
attempting to order one to order food that often but uses a phone to order dinner? Id say to use Foodora not for any
food delivery over the when I do I actually use Menulog thats my only problem with the ads, reason in particular I think I just
so maybe Im the target audience, I seriously cant remember the last downloaded it first. I like the
phone, and instead in which case theyre doing it time me or any of my mates picked awkwardness of it all, it feels kind
encourages them right. The ads are really funny, I up a home phone and ordered of cosy in a weird way. I might
could watch a whole series of him food. I like Menulog as a brand, I feel even start using the app now that I
to use Menulogs interrupting different situations. I like theyre trying to connect with know Jeff Goldblum is associated
app. But are the dont really have a problem with a younger audience which again with it. In saying that, it is strange
people buying what famous Americans representing brings me back to my question, what seeing American celebrities in
Australian brands. In this day and young person uses a phone to call up Australian ads, theres heaps of
Goldblum is selling? age I feel like celebrities are kind restaurants in the first place? I have well loved Aussies they couldve
of universal, I dont see him as seen some pop-ups from Menulog used, so I dont really see why
specifically American, I just find him around Sydney in the last few months hes in it, but then again Im not
an attractive actor. so theyre definitely on my radar. complaining.
Introducing WPP AUNZ

WPP AUNZ is the leading marketing communications services


group in Australia and New Zealand. No other group comes close
to our scale and breadth of capability comprising 5,500 people
working across more than 80 companies in over 170 offices.

For our clients, our companies and our people, WPP AUNZ offers
the opportunity to be part of something bigger bringing together
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of working Connected Know-How and its how we are driving
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Our global muscle coupled with local smarts means we are able
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are transforming our clients businesses.

With WPP AUNZ youre in great company.


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NAVIGATE THE
LANDSCAPE

2017

AGENCY MAP
Connected Know-How is how we are
driving WPPs core strategy of horizontality
throughout the group. Smart ways of
working together, to share knowledge and
use this knowledge to benefit our clients
and to help grow their brands and business.

To find out more please contact:


Rob Currie, Chief Business Director
Phone. +61 409 712 829
Email. Rob.Currie@wppaunz.com
WPPAUNZ.COM
PP_AUNZ
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