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Identify the problem situation or negotiation.

Associate into your memory of the situation.


Take first position - your own viewpoint. Make an inventory of the present state in all
representational systems.
What do you see?
Where are you looking from?
What do you hear?
Whose voices do you hear and where do these voices come from?
What feelings do you have?
What are you mostly aware of?
Align third position.
Imagine yourself in third position to the problem situation. See yourself and the other people from the
outside.
When you take this position, make sure that you are equidistant from yourself and the other people
so you can get a good view of everyone. Third position does not "take sides".
In this position make sure you:
observe from eye level
hear your own voice and the other person's voice coming from where you see them
feel your voice coming from your throat area, not being "disembodied"
move any feelings that are not resourceful third position feelings to where they belong (probably first
position)
feel fully balanced on your feet
How does this change your experience?
Remember this balanced and resourceful third position. Anchor it so that you are able to return to it
easily.
Align first position.
Now imagine yourself in first position in the problem situation.
Check all your representational systems.
Look out through your own eyes.
Hear through your own ears.
Feel your own voice coming from the throat area.
Move any feelings that belong to second position to the right place.
What changes when you do this?
Revisit third position and notice any further changes.
Finish in first position.
Future pace and generalize to other problematic situations.
How might an unbalanced first or third position have contributed to other difficulties?
What will be different now?

MENTAL HEALTH AND SOCIAL WORK-COUNSELING SKILLS AND


TECHNIQUES
MHS 5400
SPRING 2008
Wednesday, 5-7:40 p.m., PC 422

Adriana McEachern Ph.D., LMHC, NCC, NCRC


Office: ZEB 213A
Identify the problem situation or negotiation.
Associate into your memory of the situation.
Take first position - your own viewpoint. Make an inventory of the present state in all
representational systems.
What do you see?
Where are you looking from?
What do you hear?
Whose voices do you hear and where do these voices come from?
What feelings do you have?
What are you mostly aware of?
Align third position.
Imagine yourself in third position to the problem situation. See yourself and the other people from the
outside.
When you take this position, make sure that you are equidistant from yourself and the other people
so you can get a good view of everyone. Third position does not "take sides".
In this position make sure you:
observe from eye level
hear your own voice and the other person's voice coming from where you see them
feel your voice coming from your throat area, not being "disembodied"
move any feelings that are not resourceful third position feelings to where they belong (probably first
position)
feel fully balanced on your feet
How does this change your experience?
Remember this balanced and resourceful third position. Anchor it so that you are able to return to it
easily.
Align first position.
Now imagine yourself in first position in the problem situation.
Check all your representational systems.
Look out through your own eyes.
Hear through your own ears.
Feel your own voice coming from the throat area.
Move any feelings that belong to second position to the right place.
What changes when you do this?
Revisit third position and notice any further changes.
Finish in first position.
Future pace and generalize to other problematic situations.
How might an unbalanced first or third position have contributed to other difficulties?
What
Phone: will be different now?
305-348-3391 E-mail:mceacher@fiu.edu

Office Hours: Monday 12:30-4:30 and Wednesday 3:30-4:30 by


appointment. Please email me or email or call my GA, Cecibel Geacoman at
348-3520 to schedule a time to speak w ith me. Ms. Geacoman can be reached
at Cecibel.Geacoman@fiu.edu or geacoman@fiu.edu
*****************************************************************

The College of Education Conceptual Framework


Identify the problem situation or negotiation.
Associate into your memory of the situation.
Take first position - your own viewpoint. Make an inventory of the present state in all
representational systems.
What do you see?
Where are you looking from?
What do you hear?
Whose voices do you hear and where do these voices come from?
What feelings do you have?
What are you mostly aware of?
Align third position.
Imagine yourself in third position to the problem situation. See yourself and the other people from the
outside.
When you take this position, make sure that you are equidistant from yourself and the other people
so you can get a good view of everyone. Third position does not "take sides".
In this position make sure you:
observe from eye level
hear your own voice and the other person's voice coming from where you see them
feel your voice coming from your throat area, not being "disembodied"
move any feelings that are not resourceful third position feelings to where they belong (probably first
position)
feel fully balanced on your feet
How does this change your experience?
Remember this balanced and resourceful third position. Anchor it so that you are able to return to it
easily.
Align first position.
Now imagine yourself in first position in the problem situation.
Check all your representational systems.
Look out through your own eyes.
Hear through your own ears.
Feel your own voice coming from the throat area.
Move any feelings that belong to second position to the right place.
What changes when you do this?
Revisit third position and notice any further changes.
Finish in first position.
Future pace and generalize to other problematic situations.
How might an unbalanced first or third position have contributed to other difficulties?
What will be different
Visionnow?and Mission of the College of Education
The desired future of the College of Education at Florida International
University is one in which candidates, faculty, and staff embrace the
shared experiences of a diverse, international, professional learning
community. ( Vision Statement of the Conceptual Framework of the
College of Education Revised 2007, p.1).

The mission of the College of Education includes a three-pronged approach. First, the
C o l l e g e i s c h a r g e d t o p r e p a r e p r o f e s s i o n a l s w ho h a v e t h e k n o w l ed g e , a b i l i t i e s , a n d
d i s p o s i t i o n s t o f a c i l i t a t e a n d e n h a n c e l e a r n i n g a n d d e v e l o p m e n t w it hi n d i v e r s e s e t t i n g s .
S e c o n d , t h e C o l l e g e m u s t p r o m o t e a n d f a c i l i t a t e t h e d i s c o v e r y, d e v e l o p m e n t ,
d o c u m e n t a t i o n , a s s e s s m e n t , a n d d i s s e m i n a t i o n o f k n ow le d g e r e l a t e d t o t e a c h i n g a n d
Identify the problem situation or negotiation.
Associate into your memory of the situation.
Take first position - your own viewpoint. Make an inventory of the present state in all
representational systems.
What do you see?
Where are you looking from?
What do you hear?
Whose voices do you hear and where do these voices come from?
What feelings do you have?
What are you mostly aware of?
Align third position.
Imagine yourself in third position to the problem situation. See yourself and the other people from the
outside.
When you take this position, make sure that you are equidistant from yourself and the other people
so you can get a good view of everyone. Third position does not "take sides".
In this position make sure you:
observe from eye level
hear your own voice and the other person's voice coming from where you see them
feel your voice coming from your throat area, not being "disembodied"
move any feelings that are not resourceful third position feelings to where they belong (probably first
position)
feel fully balanced on your feet
How does this change your experience?
Remember this balanced and resourceful third position. Anchor it so that you are able to return to it
easily.
Align first position.
Now imagine yourself in first position in the problem situation.
Check all your representational systems.
Look out through your own eyes.
Hear through your own ears.
Feel your own voice coming from the throat area.
Move any feelings that belong to second position to the right place.
What changes when you do this?
Revisit third position and notice any further changes.
Finish in first position.
Future pace and generalize to other problematic situations.
How might an unbalanced first or third position have contributed to other difficulties?
What
l e a r n iwill
n g .be
Thdifferent
e t h i r d now?
p a r t o f t h e C o l l e g e s m i s s i o n i s t o d e v e l o p p r o f e s s i o n a l p a r t n e r s h i p s
in the larger community that foster significant educational, social, economic and
political change.
C o n s i s t e n t w i th t h e i n s t i t u t i o n s r o l e o f p u b l i c , u r b a n , m u l t i c u l t u r a l r e s e a r c h
u n i v e r s i t y, t h e u n i t s m i s s i o n i s t o s e r v e t h e p o p u l a t i o n o f S o u t h e a s t F l o r i d a , t h e S t a t e ,
t h e N a t i o n a n d t h e i n t e r n a t i o n a l c o m m u n i t y b y i m p a r t i n g k n ow le d g e t h r o u g h e x c e l l e n t
t e a c h i n g , c r e a t i n g n ew k n o w l e d g e t h r o u g h r e s e a r c h , a n d f o s t e r i n g a n d n u r t u r i n g
creativity and its expression through service (Mission Statement of the College of
E d u c a t i o n C o n c e p t u a l F r a m ew o r k , 2 0 0 7 ) .
Identify the problem situation or negotiation.
Associate into your memory of the situation.
Take first position - your own viewpoint. Make an inventory of the present state in all
representational systems.
What do you see?
Where are you looking from?
What do you hear?
Whose voices do you hear and where do these voices come from?
What feelings do you have?
What are you mostly aware of?
Align third position.
Imagine yourself in third position to the problem situation. See yourself and the other people from the
outside.
When you take this position, make sure that you are equidistant from yourself and the other people
so you can get a good view of everyone. Third position does not "take sides".
In this position make sure you:
observe from eye level
hear your own voice and the other person's voice coming from where you see them
feel your voice coming from your throat area, not being "disembodied"
move any feelings that are not resourceful third position feelings to where they belong (probably first
position)
feel fully balanced on your feet
How does this change your experience?
Remember this balanced and resourceful third position. Anchor it so that you are able to return to it
easily.
Align first position.
Now imagine yourself in first position in the problem situation.
Check all your representational systems.
Look out through your own eyes.
Hear through your own ears.
Feel your own voice coming from the throat area.
Move any feelings that belong to second position to the right place.
What changes when you do this?
Revisit third position and notice any further changes.
Finish in first position.
Future pace and generalize to other problematic situations.
How might an unbalanced first or third position have contributed to other difficulties?
What will be different now? Student Learning Outcomes

T he three major outcomes become the lens through which each program
organizes learning experiences and contributes to the vision and aim of
the College of Education.
o Unit Content Outcome: Stewards of the Discipline
(Knowledge)
o Unit Process Outcome: Reflective Inquirer (Skills)
o Unit Dispositions Outcome: Mindful Educator (Dispositions)
Identify the problem situation or negotiation.
Associate into your memory of the situation.
Take first position - your own viewpoint. Make an inventory of the present state in all
representational systems.
What do you see?
Where are you looking from?
What do you hear?
Whose voices do you hear and where do these voices come from?
What feelings do you have?
What are you mostly aware of?
Align third position.
Imagine yourself in third position to the problem situation. See yourself and the other people from the
outside.
When you take this position, make sure that you are equidistant from yourself and the other people
so you can get a good view of everyone. Third position does not "take sides".
In this position make sure you:
observe from eye level
hear your own voice and the other person's voice coming from where you see them
feel your voice coming from your throat area, not being "disembodied"
move any feelings that are not resourceful third position feelings to where they belong (probably first
position)
feel fully balanced on your feet
How does this change your experience?
Remember this balanced and resourceful third position. Anchor it so that you are able to return to it
easily.
Align first position.
Now imagine yourself in first position in the problem situation.
Check all your representational systems.
Look out through your own eyes.
Hear through your own ears.
Feel your own voice coming from the throat area.
Move any feelings that belong to second position to the right place.
What changes when you do this?
Revisit third position and notice any further changes.
Finish in first position.
Future pace and generalize to other problematic situations.
How might an unbalanced first or third position have contributed to other difficulties?
What will be different now?
Course Description: Skills and techniques in counseling focusing on
competencies in relationship-building, interviewing, role-playing, simulation,
and micro-counseling.

Course Goals/Purpose : This is an experiential course that provides the


opportunity for students to learn, experience, and practice the techniques and
skills used in a multicultural, developmental, intentional counseling approach.
The emphasis is on conducting intentional counseling interviews/sessions and on
the analysis and evaluation (self, peer, and instructor) of these. Students will
Identify the problem situation or negotiation.
Associate into your memory of the situation.
Take first position - your own viewpoint. Make an inventory of the present state in all
representational systems.
What do you see?
Where are you looking from?
What do you hear?
Whose voices do you hear and where do these voices come from?
What feelings do you have?
What are you mostly aware of?
Align third position.
Imagine yourself in third position to the problem situation. See yourself and the other people from the
outside.
When you take this position, make sure that you are equidistant from yourself and the other people
so you can get a good view of everyone. Third position does not "take sides".
In this position make sure you:
observe from eye level
hear your own voice and the other person's voice coming from where you see them
feel your voice coming from your throat area, not being "disembodied"
move any feelings that are not resourceful third position feelings to where they belong (probably first
position)
feel fully balanced on your feet
How does this change your experience?
Remember this balanced and resourceful third position. Anchor it so that you are able to return to it
easily.
Align first position.
Now imagine yourself in first position in the problem situation.
Check all your representational systems.
Look out through your own eyes.
Hear through your own ears.
Feel your own voice coming from the throat area.
Move any feelings that belong to second position to the right place.
What changes when you do this?
Revisit third position and notice any further changes.
Finish in first position.
Future pace and generalize to other problematic situations.
How might an unbalanced first or third position have contributed to other difficulties?
What will be different
also explore now? of the counseling process, factors affecting client change
the nature
and growth, counseling interventions, and personal and professional issues
related to counseling.

Course Objectives

1. To learn the basic facilitative, micro-counseling skills enabling students to


conduct an intentional counseling interview.
Identify the problem situation or negotiation.
Associate into your memory of the situation.
Take first position - your own viewpoint. Make an inventory of the present state in all
representational systems.
What do you see?
Where are you looking from?
What do you hear?
Whose voices do you hear and where do these voices come from?
What feelings do you have?
What are you mostly aware of?
Align third position.
Imagine yourself in third position to the problem situation. See yourself and the other people from the
outside.
When you take this position, make sure that you are equidistant from yourself and the other people
so you can get a good view of everyone. Third position does not "take sides".
In this position make sure you:
observe from eye level
hear your own voice and the other person's voice coming from where you see them
feel your voice coming from your throat area, not being "disembodied"
move any feelings that are not resourceful third position feelings to where they belong (probably first
position)
feel fully balanced on your feet
How does this change your experience?
Remember this balanced and resourceful third position. Anchor it so that you are able to return to it
easily.
Align first position.
Now imagine yourself in first position in the problem situation.
Check all your representational systems.
Look out through your own eyes.
Hear through your own ears.
Feel your own voice coming from the throat area.
Move any feelings that belong to second position to the right place.
What changes when you do this?
Revisit third position and notice any further changes.
Finish in first position.
Future pace and generalize to other problematic situations.
How might an unbalanced first or third position have contributed to other difficulties?
What
2. Towillexpose
be different now? to the nature, process, and dynamics of counseling with
students
emphasis on Ivey's (1988; 1993; 1999; 2003; 2007j) developmental, intentional
counseling approach.
3. To expose students to various counseling theories and approaches thus
enabling them to begin to develop their own natural styles of helping others.
4. To expose students to various counseling interventions that can be used when
working with clients.
5. To expose students to the importance of research in counseling.
Identify the problem situation or negotiation.
Associate into your memory of the situation.
Take first position - your own viewpoint. Make an inventory of the present state in all
representational systems.
What do you see?
Where are you looking from?
What do you hear?
Whose voices do you hear and where do these voices come from?
What feelings do you have?
What are you mostly aware of?
Align third position.
Imagine yourself in third position to the problem situation. See yourself and the other people from the
outside.
When you take this position, make sure that you are equidistant from yourself and the other people
so you can get a good view of everyone. Third position does not "take sides".
In this position make sure you:
observe from eye level
hear your own voice and the other person's voice coming from where you see them
feel your voice coming from your throat area, not being "disembodied"
move any feelings that are not resourceful third position feelings to where they belong (probably first
position)
feel fully balanced on your feet
How does this change your experience?
Remember this balanced and resourceful third position. Anchor it so that you are able to return to it
easily.
Align first position.
Now imagine yourself in first position in the problem situation.
Check all your representational systems.
Look out through your own eyes.
Hear through your own ears.
Feel your own voice coming from the throat area.
Move any feelings that belong to second position to the right place.
What changes when you do this?
Revisit third position and notice any further changes.
Finish in first position.
Future pace and generalize to other problematic situations.
How might an unbalanced first or third position have contributed to other difficulties?
What
6. Towillprovide
be different now?
opportunities for dialogue and reflection of personal values and
beliefs as they relate to students' future roles as professional
counselors/therapists.

Knowledge, Skills, and Dispositions

1. Students will have basic knowledge of, and be able to identify and engage in,
the basic skills of the counseling interview: listening, influencing, and
structuring an effective counseling session.
Identify the problem situation or negotiation.
Associate into your memory of the situation.
Take first position - your own viewpoint. Make an inventory of the present state in all
representational systems.
What do you see?
Where are you looking from?
What do you hear?
Whose voices do you hear and where do these voices come from?
What feelings do you have?
What are you mostly aware of?
Align third position.
Imagine yourself in third position to the problem situation. See yourself and the other people from the
outside.
When you take this position, make sure that you are equidistant from yourself and the other people
so you can get a good view of everyone. Third position does not "take sides".
In this position make sure you:
observe from eye level
hear your own voice and the other person's voice coming from where you see them
feel your voice coming from your throat area, not being "disembodied"
move any feelings that are not resourceful third position feelings to where they belong (probably first
position)
feel fully balanced on your feet
How does this change your experience?
Remember this balanced and resourceful third position. Anchor it so that you are able to return to it
easily.
Align first position.
Now imagine yourself in first position in the problem situation.
Check all your representational systems.
Look out through your own eyes.
Hear through your own ears.
Feel your own voice coming from the throat area.
Move any feelings that belong to second position to the right place.
What changes when you do this?
Revisit third position and notice any further changes.
Finish in first position.
Future pace and generalize to other problematic situations.
How might an unbalanced first or third position have contributed to other difficulties?
What will be different
2. Students now?
will be able to conduct full counseling interviews demonstrating the
listening and influencing skills. Students advancing to higher mastery levels
may be able to teach the skills to others.

3. Students will be able to analyze their videotaped counseling interviews and


be disposed to reflect on their personal, natural style of helping.

4. Students will have basic knowledge of the nature of the counseling process
and the factors that affect it.
Identify the problem situation or negotiation.
Associate into your memory of the situation.
Take first position - your own viewpoint. Make an inventory of the present state in all
representational systems.
What do you see?
Where are you looking from?
What do you hear?
Whose voices do you hear and where do these voices come from?
What feelings do you have?
What are you mostly aware of?
Align third position.
Imagine yourself in third position to the problem situation. See yourself and the other people from the
outside.
When you take this position, make sure that you are equidistant from yourself and the other people
so you can get a good view of everyone. Third position does not "take sides".
In this position make sure you:
observe from eye level
hear your own voice and the other person's voice coming from where you see them
feel your voice coming from your throat area, not being "disembodied"
move any feelings that are not resourceful third position feelings to where they belong (probably first
position)
feel fully balanced on your feet
How does this change your experience?
Remember this balanced and resourceful third position. Anchor it so that you are able to return to it
easily.
Align first position.
Now imagine yourself in first position in the problem situation.
Check all your representational systems.
Look out through your own eyes.
Hear through your own ears.
Feel your own voice coming from the throat area.
Move any feelings that belong to second position to the right place.
What changes when you do this?
Revisit third position and notice any further changes.
Finish in first position.
Future pace and generalize to other problematic situations.
How might an unbalanced first or third position have contributed to other difficulties?
What will be different
5. Students will be now?
disposed to apply the ACA and their specialization
disciplines Code of Ethics to their counseling interviews.

6. Students will be able to access current research information on issues of


importance in counseling and the counseling profession.

7. Students will be disposed to apply current research practices in their work


with clients.
Identify the problem situation or negotiation.
Associate into your memory of the situation.
Take first position - your own viewpoint. Make an inventory of the present state in all
representational systems.
What do you see?
Where are you looking from?
What do you hear?
Whose voices do you hear and where do these voices come from?
What feelings do you have?
What are you mostly aware of?
Align third position.
Imagine yourself in third position to the problem situation. See yourself and the other people from the
outside.
When you take this position, make sure that you are equidistant from yourself and the other people
so you can get a good view of everyone. Third position does not "take sides".
In this position make sure you:
observe from eye level
hear your own voice and the other person's voice coming from where you see them
feel your voice coming from your throat area, not being "disembodied"
move any feelings that are not resourceful third position feelings to where they belong (probably first
position)
feel fully balanced on your feet
How does this change your experience?
Remember this balanced and resourceful third position. Anchor it so that you are able to return to it
easily.
Align first position.
Now imagine yourself in first position in the problem situation.
Check all your representational systems.
Look out through your own eyes.
Hear through your own ears.
Feel your own voice coming from the throat area.
Move any feelings that belong to second position to the right place.
What changes when you do this?
Revisit third position and notice any further changes.
Finish in first position.
Future pace and generalize to other problematic situations.
How might an unbalanced first or third position have contributed to other difficulties?
What
CACREP will be Standards
different now?: This course meets CACREP Standards #K1 Professional
Identity; K5 Helping Relationships, K8a Importance of Research and Conducting
Research in the Counseling Profession

Florida Educators Accomplished Practices (FEAPS): Resulting from their


participation in this course students will demonstrate FEAPS # 2 Communication
and #3 Continuous Improvement on their required task assignment ( i.e., The
Counseling Interview Self Assessment and Reflection Form Part B of the
Final Videotape Counseling Interview) that will be uploaded onto the
Students Efolio when authorized by the Professor. Students will be authorized
Identify the problem situation or negotiation.
Associate into your memory of the situation.
Take first position - your own viewpoint. Make an inventory of the present state in all
representational systems.
What do you see?
Where are you looking from?
What do you hear?
Whose voices do you hear and where do these voices come from?
What feelings do you have?
What are you mostly aware of?
Align third position.
Imagine yourself in third position to the problem situation. See yourself and the other people from the
outside.
When you take this position, make sure that you are equidistant from yourself and the other people
so you can get a good view of everyone. Third position does not "take sides".
In this position make sure you:
observe from eye level
hear your own voice and the other person's voice coming from where you see them
feel your voice coming from your throat area, not being "disembodied"
move any feelings that are not resourceful third position feelings to where they belong (probably first
position)
feel fully balanced on your feet
How does this change your experience?
Remember this balanced and resourceful third position. Anchor it so that you are able to return to it
easily.
Align first position.
Now imagine yourself in first position in the problem situation.
Check all your representational systems.
Look out through your own eyes.
Hear through your own ears.
Feel your own voice coming from the throat area.
Move any feelings that belong to second position to the right place.
What changes when you do this?
Revisit third position and notice any further changes.
Finish in first position.
Future pace and generalize to other problematic situations.
How might an unbalanced first or third position have contributed to other difficulties?
What will be their
to upload different now? when they have attained a rating of Target or Acceptable
artifact
on the assignment task.

Secondary FEAPS that will be covered in this course include: FEAPS 5,


Diversity, 6 Ethics, 7 Human Development and Learning, and 10 Planning.
Methods of Delivery
The purpose and goals of this course will be delivered using the following
methods: Class lectures and discussions, assigned readings, role-playing, case
Identify the problem situation or negotiation.
Associate into your memory of the situation.
Take first position - your own viewpoint. Make an inventory of the present state in all
representational systems.
What do you see?
Where are you looking from?
What do you hear?
Whose voices do you hear and where do these voices come from?
What feelings do you have?
What are you mostly aware of?
Align third position.
Imagine yourself in third position to the problem situation. See yourself and the other people from the
outside.
When you take this position, make sure that you are equidistant from yourself and the other people
so you can get a good view of everyone. Third position does not "take sides".
In this position make sure you:
observe from eye level
hear your own voice and the other person's voice coming from where you see them
feel your voice coming from your throat area, not being "disembodied"
move any feelings that are not resourceful third position feelings to where they belong (probably first
position)
feel fully balanced on your feet
How does this change your experience?
Remember this balanced and resourceful third position. Anchor it so that you are able to return to it
easily.
Align first position.
Now imagine yourself in first position in the problem situation.
Check all your representational systems.
Look out through your own eyes.
Hear through your own ears.
Feel your own voice coming from the throat area.
Move any feelings that belong to second position to the right place.
What changes when you do this?
Revisit third position and notice any further changes.
Finish in first position.
Future pace and generalize to other problematic situations.
How might an unbalanced first or third position have contributed to other difficulties?
What will be videotaping,
analyzes, different now? audiovisual presentations, writing assignments and
papers, experiential activities, reading relevant research in the counseling
literature, and multiple-choice, short-answer and essay testing.

Assessment of Competencies, Skills, and Dispositions

Students' achievement of fundamental knowledge, competencies, skills, and


dispositions will be assessed based on the completion of the following course
requirements.
Identify the problem situation or negotiation.
Associate into your memory of the situation.
Take first position - your own viewpoint. Make an inventory of the present state in all
representational systems.
What do you see?
Where are you looking from?
What do you hear?
Whose voices do you hear and where do these voices come from?
What feelings do you have?
What are you mostly aware of?
Align third position.
Imagine yourself in third position to the problem situation. See yourself and the other people from the
outside.
When you take this position, make sure that you are equidistant from yourself and the other people
so you can get a good view of everyone. Third position does not "take sides".
In this position make sure you:
observe from eye level
hear your own voice and the other person's voice coming from where you see them
feel your voice coming from your throat area, not being "disembodied"
move any feelings that are not resourceful third position feelings to where they belong (probably first
position)
feel fully balanced on your feet
How does this change your experience?
Remember this balanced and resourceful third position. Anchor it so that you are able to return to it
easily.
Align first position.
Now imagine yourself in first position in the problem situation.
Check all your representational systems.
Look out through your own eyes.
Hear through your own ears.
Feel your own voice coming from the throat area.
Move any feelings that belong to second position to the right place.
What changes when you do this?
Revisit third position and notice any further changes.
Finish in first position.
Future pace and generalize to other problematic situations.
How might an unbalanced first or third position have contributed to other difficulties?
What will be different
1. Journal now?
Readings/Synopses: Students will (a) access 5 journal articles in
any of the American Counseling Association (ACA) journals (see
www.counseling.org, for a list of ACA journals) and on-line counseling and
psychological journals on any of the topics below or a topic of interest to the
student:

Topics
Counselor Vulnerability and Risk
Hardships of Counseling Practice
Therapy for Therapists
Identify the problem situation or negotiation.
Associate into your memory of the situation.
Take first position - your own viewpoint. Make an inventory of the present state in all
representational systems.
What do you see?
Where are you looking from?
What do you hear?
Whose voices do you hear and where do these voices come from?
What feelings do you have?
What are you mostly aware of?
Align third position.
Imagine yourself in third position to the problem situation. See yourself and the other people from the
outside.
When you take this position, make sure that you are equidistant from yourself and the other people
so you can get a good view of everyone. Third position does not "take sides".
In this position make sure you:
observe from eye level
hear your own voice and the other person's voice coming from where you see them
feel your voice coming from your throat area, not being "disembodied"
move any feelings that are not resourceful third position feelings to where they belong (probably first
position)
feel fully balanced on your feet
How does this change your experience?
Remember this balanced and resourceful third position. Anchor it so that you are able to return to it
easily.
Align first position.
Now imagine yourself in first position in the problem situation.
Check all your representational systems.
Look out through your own eyes.
Hear through your own ears.
Feel your own voice coming from the throat area.
Move any feelings that belong to second position to the right place.
What changes when you do this?
Revisit third position and notice any further changes.
Finish in first position.
Future pace and generalize to other problematic situations.
How might an unbalanced first or third position have contributed to other difficulties?
What will Managing
be different now?
Stress
Counselor Burnout and How to Avoid It
Dealing With Difficult Clients
Counselor Liability and How to Avoid Lawsuits
Professional Development and Counseling
The Counselor as Client Advocate
The Counselor as Community Change Agent
Professionalism and Counseling
Counselor Characteristics
Counseling Specializations
Identify the problem situation or negotiation.
Associate into your memory of the situation.
Take first position - your own viewpoint. Make an inventory of the present state in all
representational systems.
What do you see?
Where are you looking from?
What do you hear?
Whose voices do you hear and where do these voices come from?
What feelings do you have?
What are you mostly aware of?
Align third position.
Imagine yourself in third position to the problem situation. See yourself and the other people from the
outside.
When you take this position, make sure that you are equidistant from yourself and the other people
so you can get a good view of everyone. Third position does not "take sides".
In this position make sure you:
observe from eye level
hear your own voice and the other person's voice coming from where you see them
feel your voice coming from your throat area, not being "disembodied"
move any feelings that are not resourceful third position feelings to where they belong (probably first
position)
feel fully balanced on your feet
How does this change your experience?
Remember this balanced and resourceful third position. Anchor it so that you are able to return to it
easily.
Align first position.
Now imagine yourself in first position in the problem situation.
Check all your representational systems.
Look out through your own eyes.
Hear through your own ears.
Feel your own voice coming from the throat area.
Move any feelings that belong to second position to the right place.
What changes when you do this?
Revisit third position and notice any further changes.
Finish in first position.
Future pace and generalize to other problematic situations.
How might an unbalanced first or third position have contributed to other difficulties?
What will Legal
be different
andnow?
Ethical Issues
Difficulties in conducting research in counseling
Implications of conducting research in counseling
Counselor Reform
Counseling theories and applications
Counseling Health and Wellness
Counseling and spirituality

and (b) submit a one-page, double-spaced synopsis of the article in APA (5 t h


Ed) style, and (c) a one page double-spaced reflection of how they can apply
Identify the problem situation or negotiation.
Associate into your memory of the situation.
Take first position - your own viewpoint. Make an inventory of the present state in all
representational systems.
What do you see?
Where are you looking from?
What do you hear?
Whose voices do you hear and where do these voices come from?
What feelings do you have?
What are you mostly aware of?
Align third position.
Imagine yourself in third position to the problem situation. See yourself and the other people from the
outside.
When you take this position, make sure that you are equidistant from yourself and the other people
so you can get a good view of everyone. Third position does not "take sides".
In this position make sure you:
observe from eye level
hear your own voice and the other person's voice coming from where you see them
feel your voice coming from your throat area, not being "disembodied"
move any feelings that are not resourceful third position feelings to where they belong (probably first
position)
feel fully balanced on your feet
How does this change your experience?
Remember this balanced and resourceful third position. Anchor it so that you are able to return to it
easily.
Align first position.
Now imagine yourself in first position in the problem situation.
Check all your representational systems.
Look out through your own eyes.
Hear through your own ears.
Feel your own voice coming from the throat area.
Move any feelings that belong to second position to the right place.
What changes when you do this?
Revisit third position and notice any further changes.
Finish in first position.
Future pace and generalize to other problematic situations.
How might an unbalanced first or third position have contributed to other difficulties?
What will be different
the material now?
presented in the article to their future jobs as professional
counselors. Be sure to provide a reference of the article in APA style on the first
page. Check the latest revision of the APA Manual or the APA Library
Guidelines for APA writing style information. These sources must not be older
than 10 years (i.e., 1996-present) . Each journal synopsis is worth 2 points. This
assignment is worth 10% of the final grade.

2. Counseling Interviews and Assessments: Students will partner with each


other to complete these assignments. Each student will assume the role of the
Identify the problem situation or negotiation.
Associate into your memory of the situation.
Take first position - your own viewpoint. Make an inventory of the present state in all
representational systems.
What do you see?
Where are you looking from?
What do you hear?
Whose voices do you hear and where do these voices come from?
What feelings do you have?
What are you mostly aware of?
Align third position.
Imagine yourself in third position to the problem situation. See yourself and the other people from the
outside.
When you take this position, make sure that you are equidistant from yourself and the other people
so you can get a good view of everyone. Third position does not "take sides".
In this position make sure you:
observe from eye level
hear your own voice and the other person's voice coming from where you see them
feel your voice coming from your throat area, not being "disembodied"
move any feelings that are not resourceful third position feelings to where they belong (probably first
position)
feel fully balanced on your feet
How does this change your experience?
Remember this balanced and resourceful third position. Anchor it so that you are able to return to it
easily.
Align first position.
Now imagine yourself in first position in the problem situation.
Check all your representational systems.
Look out through your own eyes.
Hear through your own ears.
Feel your own voice coming from the throat area.
Move any feelings that belong to second position to the right place.
What changes when you do this?
Revisit third position and notice any further changes.
Finish in first position.
Future pace and generalize to other problematic situations.
How might an unbalanced first or third position have contributed to other difficulties?
What will be different
counselor now?
and the client in the interviews. The assignment entails the
following:

a. Completion of two videotaped counseling interviews wherein the counselor


demonstrates the facilitative, microskills and the intentional interview approach
to counseling.

b. Completion of the Counseling Interview Self Assessment and Reflections


that will include a double-space, typed transcription of 15 minutes of what
the student would consider to be the best demonstration of the skills required
Identify the problem situation or negotiation.
Associate into your memory of the situation.
Take first position - your own viewpoint. Make an inventory of the present state in all
representational systems.
What do you see?
Where are you looking from?
What do you hear?
Whose voices do you hear and where do these voices come from?
What feelings do you have?
What are you mostly aware of?
Align third position.
Imagine yourself in third position to the problem situation. See yourself and the other people from the
outside.
When you take this position, make sure that you are equidistant from yourself and the other people
so you can get a good view of everyone. Third position does not "take sides".
In this position make sure you:
observe from eye level
hear your own voice and the other person's voice coming from where you see them
feel your voice coming from your throat area, not being "disembodied"
move any feelings that are not resourceful third position feelings to where they belong (probably first
position)
feel fully balanced on your feet
How does this change your experience?
Remember this balanced and resourceful third position. Anchor it so that you are able to return to it
easily.
Align first position.
Now imagine yourself in first position in the problem situation.
Check all your representational systems.
Look out through your own eyes.
Hear through your own ears.
Feel your own voice coming from the throat area.
Move any feelings that belong to second position to the right place.
What changes when you do this?
Revisit third position and notice any further changes.
Finish in first position.
Future pace and generalize to other problematic situations.
How might an unbalanced first or third position have contributed to other difficulties?
What
in eachwill be different now?
interview. The transcription must contain verbatim the words spoken by
both the client and the counselor with the facilitative, microskills responses
made by counselor identified. Students must also identify the focus of the
responses each time it changes (e.g., focus on client, counselor, others,
contextual information etc.). The first videotape and assessment is worth
15% and the final one w ill be worth 25% for a total of 40% of the final
grade.

In the two (2) videotaped counseling interviews, students will be expected to


demonstrate the intentional interviewing approach and the counseling
Identify the problem situation or negotiation.
Associate into your memory of the situation.
Take first position - your own viewpoint. Make an inventory of the present state in all
representational systems.
What do you see?
Where are you looking from?
What do you hear?
Whose voices do you hear and where do these voices come from?
What feelings do you have?
What are you mostly aware of?
Align third position.
Imagine yourself in third position to the problem situation. See yourself and the other people from the
outside.
When you take this position, make sure that you are equidistant from yourself and the other people
so you can get a good view of everyone. Third position does not "take sides".
In this position make sure you:
observe from eye level
hear your own voice and the other person's voice coming from where you see them
feel your voice coming from your throat area, not being "disembodied"
move any feelings that are not resourceful third position feelings to where they belong (probably first
position)
feel fully balanced on your feet
How does this change your experience?
Remember this balanced and resourceful third position. Anchor it so that you are able to return to it
easily.
Align first position.
Now imagine yourself in first position in the problem situation.
Check all your representational systems.
Look out through your own eyes.
Hear through your own ears.
Feel your own voice coming from the throat area.
Move any feelings that belong to second position to the right place.
What changes when you do this?
Revisit third position and notice any further changes.
Finish in first position.
Future pace and generalize to other problematic situations.
How might an unbalanced first or third position have contributed to other difficulties?
What will be different
microskills. now?
The interviews must be spontaneous, non-rehearsed, and not
scripted. They must be conducted with another class member. Students are
responsible for purchasing and obtaining necessary materials and equipment.
Only standard VHS videotapes, VHS-C convertible cassettes, or DVDs w ill
be accepted.

The first videotaped interview should be 20-25 minutes in duration and in it,
the counselor will demonstrate the use of the facilitative model of
communication and the intentional counseling skills of the Basic Listening
Sequence (e.g., attending behavior, open and closed questions, encouragers,
Identify the problem situation or negotiation.
Associate into your memory of the situation.
Take first position - your own viewpoint. Make an inventory of the present state in all
representational systems.
What do you see?
Where are you looking from?
What do you hear?
Whose voices do you hear and where do these voices come from?
What feelings do you have?
What are you mostly aware of?
Align third position.
Imagine yourself in third position to the problem situation. See yourself and the other people from the
outside.
When you take this position, make sure that you are equidistant from yourself and the other people
so you can get a good view of everyone. Third position does not "take sides".
In this position make sure you:
observe from eye level
hear your own voice and the other person's voice coming from where you see them
feel your voice coming from your throat area, not being "disembodied"
move any feelings that are not resourceful third position feelings to where they belong (probably first
position)
feel fully balanced on your feet
How does this change your experience?
Remember this balanced and resourceful third position. Anchor it so that you are able to return to it
easily.
Align first position.
Now imagine yourself in first position in the problem situation.
Check all your representational systems.
Look out through your own eyes.
Hear through your own ears.
Feel your own voice coming from the throat area.
Move any feelings that belong to second position to the right place.
What changes when you do this?
Revisit third position and notice any further changes.
Finish in first position.
Future pace and generalize to other problematic situations.
How might an unbalanced first or third position have contributed to other difficulties?
What will be different
paraphrases, now?
clarification statements, reflections of feeling and content, and
summarizations). The qualitative conditions of counseling should be evident
throughout the interview, and the counselor should demonstrate cultural
sensitivity and intentionality.

The second videotaped interview should be 30-35 minutes in duration and in


it, the counselor will demonstrate the facilitative model, the Basic Listening
Sequence, the qualitative conditions of counseling, and the influencing skills as
appropriate (e.g., feedback, disclosure, confrontation, reflection of meaning,
Identify the problem situation or negotiation.
Associate into your memory of the situation.
Take first position - your own viewpoint. Make an inventory of the present state in all
representational systems.
What do you see?
Where are you looking from?
What do you hear?
Whose voices do you hear and where do these voices come from?
What feelings do you have?
What are you mostly aware of?
Align third position.
Imagine yourself in third position to the problem situation. See yourself and the other people from the
outside.
When you take this position, make sure that you are equidistant from yourself and the other people
so you can get a good view of everyone. Third position does not "take sides".
In this position make sure you:
observe from eye level
hear your own voice and the other person's voice coming from where you see them
feel your voice coming from your throat area, not being "disembodied"
move any feelings that are not resourceful third position feelings to where they belong (probably first
position)
feel fully balanced on your feet
How does this change your experience?
Remember this balanced and resourceful third position. Anchor it so that you are able to return to it
easily.
Align first position.
Now imagine yourself in first position in the problem situation.
Check all your representational systems.
Look out through your own eyes.
Hear through your own ears.
Feel your own voice coming from the throat area.
Move any feelings that belong to second position to the right place.
What changes when you do this?
Revisit third position and notice any further changes.
Finish in first position.
Future pace and generalize to other problematic situations.
How might an unbalanced first or third position have contributed to other difficulties?
What
logicalwill consequences,
be different now? directives). This final interview must have a brief-
solution and action-oriented focus (i.e., guide the client to action based on the
nature of the problem or decision that the client needs to make to bring about
change in his/her life or situation).

Informed Consent Form

Students will develop a consent form that will be signed by the client student-
partner and submitted along with the typescript, self-assessment form, and the
videotape. See Ivey (2007) for a Sample Practice Contract on p. 37.
Identify the problem situation or negotiation.
Associate into your memory of the situation.
Take first position - your own viewpoint. Make an inventory of the present state in all
representational systems.
What do you see?
Where are you looking from?
What do you hear?
Whose voices do you hear and where do these voices come from?
What feelings do you have?
What are you mostly aware of?
Align third position.
Imagine yourself in third position to the problem situation. See yourself and the other people from the
outside.
When you take this position, make sure that you are equidistant from yourself and the other people
so you can get a good view of everyone. Third position does not "take sides".
In this position make sure you:
observe from eye level
hear your own voice and the other person's voice coming from where you see them
feel your voice coming from your throat area, not being "disembodied"
move any feelings that are not resourceful third position feelings to where they belong (probably first
position)
feel fully balanced on your feet
How does this change your experience?
Remember this balanced and resourceful third position. Anchor it so that you are able to return to it
easily.
Align first position.
Now imagine yourself in first position in the problem situation.
Check all your representational systems.
Look out through your own eyes.
Hear through your own ears.
Feel your own voice coming from the throat area.
Move any feelings that belong to second position to the right place.
What changes when you do this?
Revisit third position and notice any further changes.
Finish in first position.
Future pace and generalize to other problematic situations.
How might an unbalanced first or third position have contributed to other difficulties?
What will be different now?
Self-Assessment and Reflection of Counseling Interviews

Students will complete a Self-assessment and Reflection of their counseling


interviews by using the "The Counseling Interview Self Assessment and
Reflection Forms (A & B) (see attached). Students should be descriptive,
thoughtful, and comprehensive in their assessments and reflections.

The Professor will review the tapes, self-assessments, and reflections and
provide feedback using these same forms as well as written comments on the
Identify the problem situation or negotiation.
Associate into your memory of the situation.
Take first position - your own viewpoint. Make an inventory of the present state in all
representational systems.
What do you see?
Where are you looking from?
What do you hear?
Whose voices do you hear and where do these voices come from?
What feelings do you have?
What are you mostly aware of?
Align third position.
Imagine yourself in third position to the problem situation. See yourself and the other people from the
outside.
When you take this position, make sure that you are equidistant from yourself and the other people
so you can get a good view of everyone. Third position does not "take sides".
In this position make sure you:
observe from eye level
hear your own voice and the other person's voice coming from where you see them
feel your voice coming from your throat area, not being "disembodied"
move any feelings that are not resourceful third position feelings to where they belong (probably first
position)
feel fully balanced on your feet
How does this change your experience?
Remember this balanced and resourceful third position. Anchor it so that you are able to return to it
easily.
Align first position.
Now imagine yourself in first position in the problem situation.
Check all your representational systems.
Look out through your own eyes.
Hear through your own ears.
Feel your own voice coming from the throat area.
Move any feelings that belong to second position to the right place.
What changes when you do this?
Revisit third position and notice any further changes.
Finish in first position.
Future pace and generalize to other problematic situations.
How might an unbalanced first or third position have contributed to other difficulties?
What
skills,willprocess,
be different now?
and nature of the client problem demonstrated. Students will be
assessed based on the following rubric scale:

Scoring Rubric: (See attached for specific criteria related to this rubric)
Skills and Self Assessment

(3) Target
(2) Acceptable
(1) Not Acceptable
Identify the problem situation or negotiation.
Associate into your memory of the situation.
Take first position - your own viewpoint. Make an inventory of the present state in all
representational systems.
What do you see?
Where are you looking from?
What do you hear?
Whose voices do you hear and where do these voices come from?
What feelings do you have?
What are you mostly aware of?
Align third position.
Imagine yourself in third position to the problem situation. See yourself and the other people from the
outside.
When you take this position, make sure that you are equidistant from yourself and the other people
so you can get a good view of everyone. Third position does not "take sides".
In this position make sure you:
observe from eye level
hear your own voice and the other person's voice coming from where you see them
feel your voice coming from your throat area, not being "disembodied"
move any feelings that are not resourceful third position feelings to where they belong (probably first
position)
feel fully balanced on your feet
How does this change your experience?
Remember this balanced and resourceful third position. Anchor it so that you are able to return to it
easily.
Align first position.
Now imagine yourself in first position in the problem situation.
Check all your representational systems.
Look out through your own eyes.
Hear through your own ears.
Feel your own voice coming from the throat area.
Move any feelings that belong to second position to the right place.
What changes when you do this?
Revisit third position and notice any further changes.
Finish in first position.
Future pace and generalize to other problematic situations.
How might an unbalanced first or third position have contributed to other difficulties?
What will bewhose
Students differentinterviews
now? are rated as Not acceptable must request a hour
conference with the Professor to review the videotape and the skills
demonstrated. The student may resubmit another videotaped interview for
further feedback from the Professor.

Students who obtain Target and Acceptable Competencies will receive the total
number of points (15 for the first interview, and 25 for the second interview) for
the assignment if all parts of the assignment have been completed accurately.
Points may be deducted for incomplete assignments. Students with assignments
that are Not Acceptable will be deducted a minimum of 5 points and will be able
Identify the problem situation or negotiation.
Associate into your memory of the situation.
Take first position - your own viewpoint. Make an inventory of the present state in all
representational systems.
What do you see?
Where are you looking from?
What do you hear?
Whose voices do you hear and where do these voices come from?
What feelings do you have?
What are you mostly aware of?
Align third position.
Imagine yourself in third position to the problem situation. See yourself and the other people from the
outside.
When you take this position, make sure that you are equidistant from yourself and the other people
so you can get a good view of everyone. Third position does not "take sides".
In this position make sure you:
observe from eye level
hear your own voice and the other person's voice coming from where you see them
feel your voice coming from your throat area, not being "disembodied"
move any feelings that are not resourceful third position feelings to where they belong (probably first
position)
feel fully balanced on your feet
How does this change your experience?
Remember this balanced and resourceful third position. Anchor it so that you are able to return to it
easily.
Align first position.
Now imagine yourself in first position in the problem situation.
Check all your representational systems.
Look out through your own eyes.
Hear through your own ears.
Feel your own voice coming from the throat area.
Move any feelings that belong to second position to the right place.
What changes when you do this?
Revisit third position and notice any further changes.
Finish in first position.
Future pace and generalize to other problematic situations.
How might an unbalanced first or third position have contributed to other difficulties?
What
to earnwill only
be different now?
a maximum of 10 or 20 points upon reaching acceptable
competency. Students will have one opportunity to redo the assignment and to
reach acceptable competency.

Uploading the Efolio Artifact


When students complete the Efolio task assignment that has been graded by
the Professor, they will receive authorization to upload the task as an
artifact onto their Efolio. Students will be authorized to upload their
artifact when they have achieved Target or Acceptable Competency on the
task.
Identify the problem situation or negotiation.
Associate into your memory of the situation.
Take first position - your own viewpoint. Make an inventory of the present state in all
representational systems.
What do you see?
Where are you looking from?
What do you hear?
Whose voices do you hear and where do these voices come from?
What feelings do you have?
What are you mostly aware of?
Align third position.
Imagine yourself in third position to the problem situation. See yourself and the other people from the
outside.
When you take this position, make sure that you are equidistant from yourself and the other people
so you can get a good view of everyone. Third position does not "take sides".
In this position make sure you:
observe from eye level
hear your own voice and the other person's voice coming from where you see them
feel your voice coming from your throat area, not being "disembodied"
move any feelings that are not resourceful third position feelings to where they belong (probably first
position)
feel fully balanced on your feet
How does this change your experience?
Remember this balanced and resourceful third position. Anchor it so that you are able to return to it
easily.
Align first position.
Now imagine yourself in first position in the problem situation.
Check all your representational systems.
Look out through your own eyes.
Hear through your own ears.
Feel your own voice coming from the throat area.
Move any feelings that belong to second position to the right place.
What changes when you do this?
Revisit third position and notice any further changes.
Finish in first position.
Future pace and generalize to other problematic situations.
How might an unbalanced first or third position have contributed to other difficulties?
What will be different now?
The artifact that students will upload onto their Efolios will be the Final
Tape Self Assesment and Reflection Form Part B (FEAPS Artifact).

Students whose tasks are deemed Not Acceptable by the Professor will not be
authorized to upload and will receive an I (Incomplete) for the course if
they fail to complete the task to acceptable competency by the day of the
final exam. Students will have two semesters to remediate their assignments
to acceptable competency and thus be authorized to upload their artifacts.
Students who fail to upload target and acceptable assignments will also
Identify the problem situation or negotiation.
Associate into your memory of the situation.
Take first position - your own viewpoint. Make an inventory of the present state in all
representational systems.
What do you see?
Where are you looking from?
What do you hear?
Whose voices do you hear and where do these voices come from?
What feelings do you have?
What are you mostly aware of?
Align third position.
Imagine yourself in third position to the problem situation. See yourself and the other people from the
outside.
When you take this position, make sure that you are equidistant from yourself and the other people
so you can get a good view of everyone. Third position does not "take sides".
In this position make sure you:
observe from eye level
hear your own voice and the other person's voice coming from where you see them
feel your voice coming from your throat area, not being "disembodied"
move any feelings that are not resourceful third position feelings to where they belong (probably first
position)
feel fully balanced on your feet
How does this change your experience?
Remember this balanced and resourceful third position. Anchor it so that you are able to return to it
easily.
Align first position.
Now imagine yourself in first position in the problem situation.
Check all your representational systems.
Look out through your own eyes.
Hear through your own ears.
Feel your own voice coming from the throat area.
Move any feelings that belong to second position to the right place.
What changes when you do this?
Revisit third position and notice any further changes.
Finish in first position.
Future pace and generalize to other problematic situations.
How might an unbalanced first or third position have contributed to other difficulties?
What
receivewill be
andifferent
I innow?the course and will have two semesters to upload their
artifacts. All incompletes will revert to an F after tw o semesters and
students w ill no longer have the option of remediating their tasks or
uploading their artifacts.

Confidentiality and Ethics Information


Students are bound by the ACA 2005 Code of ethical standards to abide by
confidentiality with respect to any material or issues brought forth by any
members of the class during any role-playing or practice interview sessions
conducted throughout any portions of this class. Students should seek verbal as
Identify the problem situation or negotiation.
Associate into your memory of the situation.
Take first position - your own viewpoint. Make an inventory of the present state in all
representational systems.
What do you see?
Where are you looking from?
What do you hear?
Whose voices do you hear and where do these voices come from?
What feelings do you have?
What are you mostly aware of?
Align third position.
Imagine yourself in third position to the problem situation. See yourself and the other people from the
outside.
When you take this position, make sure that you are equidistant from yourself and the other people
so you can get a good view of everyone. Third position does not "take sides".
In this position make sure you:
observe from eye level
hear your own voice and the other person's voice coming from where you see them
feel your voice coming from your throat area, not being "disembodied"
move any feelings that are not resourceful third position feelings to where they belong (probably first
position)
feel fully balanced on your feet
How does this change your experience?
Remember this balanced and resourceful third position. Anchor it so that you are able to return to it
easily.
Align first position.
Now imagine yourself in first position in the problem situation.
Check all your representational systems.
Look out through your own eyes.
Hear through your own ears.
Feel your own voice coming from the throat area.
Move any feelings that belong to second position to the right place.
What changes when you do this?
Revisit third position and notice any further changes.
Finish in first position.
Future pace and generalize to other problematic situations.
How might an unbalanced first or third position have contributed to other difficulties?
What
well will be different
as written now?
permission of the student client before conducting the videotaped
interviews.

Students have the right and personal responsibility to only share or disclose
issues and information with which they feel comfortable. If at any time during
the interview a student feels discomfort or is unable to continue, he or she can
request the right to stop the videotape or not engage in the role-played session.
However, if a student finds him or her self very uncomfortable with the nature
and activities required by this course as well as the counseling practice and
issues one must face, he or she may prefer to drop this course. When selecting a
Identify the problem situation or negotiation.
Associate into your memory of the situation.
Take first position - your own viewpoint. Make an inventory of the present state in all
representational systems.
What do you see?
Where are you looking from?
What do you hear?
Whose voices do you hear and where do these voices come from?
What feelings do you have?
What are you mostly aware of?
Align third position.
Imagine yourself in third position to the problem situation. See yourself and the other people from the
outside.
When you take this position, make sure that you are equidistant from yourself and the other people
so you can get a good view of everyone. Third position does not "take sides".
In this position make sure you:
observe from eye level
hear your own voice and the other person's voice coming from where you see them
feel your voice coming from your throat area, not being "disembodied"
move any feelings that are not resourceful third position feelings to where they belong (probably first
position)
feel fully balanced on your feet
How does this change your experience?
Remember this balanced and resourceful third position. Anchor it so that you are able to return to it
easily.
Align first position.
Now imagine yourself in first position in the problem situation.
Check all your representational systems.
Look out through your own eyes.
Hear through your own ears.
Feel your own voice coming from the throat area.
Move any feelings that belong to second position to the right place.
What changes when you do this?
Revisit third position and notice any further changes.
Finish in first position.
Future pace and generalize to other problematic situations.
How might an unbalanced first or third position have contributed to other difficulties?
What
partnerwill with
be different
whom now?
to conduct the interviews, it is best to choose someone you
do not know.

3. Progress Tests: Completion of 2 Progress Tests that will consist of multiple


choice, short answer and essay questions. Each exam is worth 25% of the final
grade for a total of 50% of the final grade.

4. Experiential Class Activities and Attendance:


Practice Sessions A substantial portion of many classes will be devoted to
simulated or practice counseling sessions in which students will rotate among
Identify the problem situation or negotiation.
Associate into your memory of the situation.
Take first position - your own viewpoint. Make an inventory of the present state in all
representational systems.
What do you see?
Where are you looking from?
What do you hear?
Whose voices do you hear and where do these voices come from?
What feelings do you have?
What are you mostly aware of?
Align third position.
Imagine yourself in third position to the problem situation. See yourself and the other people from the
outside.
When you take this position, make sure that you are equidistant from yourself and the other people
so you can get a good view of everyone. Third position does not "take sides".
In this position make sure you:
observe from eye level
hear your own voice and the other person's voice coming from where you see them
feel your voice coming from your throat area, not being "disembodied"
move any feelings that are not resourceful third position feelings to where they belong (probably first
position)
feel fully balanced on your feet
How does this change your experience?
Remember this balanced and resourceful third position. Anchor it so that you are able to return to it
easily.
Align first position.
Now imagine yourself in first position in the problem situation.
Check all your representational systems.
Look out through your own eyes.
Hear through your own ears.
Feel your own voice coming from the throat area.
Move any feelings that belong to second position to the right place.
What changes when you do this?
Revisit third position and notice any further changes.
Finish in first position.
Future pace and generalize to other problematic situations.
How might an unbalanced first or third position have contributed to other difficulties?
What will be different
the following now?
three roles: counselor, client, and observer. These sessions may be
audio-taped and/or observed by the professor. Some of the ideal characteristics
of each role include:

Counselor: This role calls for practice and demonstration of skills learned
in assigned readings and class discussions. A student in this role should
exhibit genuineness, openness, empathy and congruence; engagement with
the process, person and task; willingness to take risks in the spirit of
learning; and acceptance of positive feedback and constructive criticism.
Identify the problem situation or negotiation.
Associate into your memory of the situation.
Take first position - your own viewpoint. Make an inventory of the present state in all
representational systems.
What do you see?
Where are you looking from?
What do you hear?
Whose voices do you hear and where do these voices come from?
What feelings do you have?
What are you mostly aware of?
Align third position.
Imagine yourself in third position to the problem situation. See yourself and the other people from the
outside.
When you take this position, make sure that you are equidistant from yourself and the other people
so you can get a good view of everyone. Third position does not "take sides".
In this position make sure you:
observe from eye level
hear your own voice and the other person's voice coming from where you see them
feel your voice coming from your throat area, not being "disembodied"
move any feelings that are not resourceful third position feelings to where they belong (probably first
position)
feel fully balanced on your feet
How does this change your experience?
Remember this balanced and resourceful third position. Anchor it so that you are able to return to it
easily.
Align first position.
Now imagine yourself in first position in the problem situation.
Check all your representational systems.
Look out through your own eyes.
Hear through your own ears.
Feel your own voice coming from the throat area.
Move any feelings that belong to second position to the right place.
What changes when you do this?
Revisit third position and notice any further changes.
Finish in first position.
Future pace and generalize to other problematic situations.
How might an unbalanced first or third position have contributed to other difficulties?
What will be different now?
Client: A student in this role should exhibit genuineness, openness and a
present orientation. In the role of client, students are asked to draw upon
real life experiences, the content of which is totally within the students
discretion. Students should take responsibility for determining and
monitoring the level of self-disclosure that they contribute to the learning
experience. Students may also choose to role play the part of client,
with the understanding that such simulation may detract from the realism
and quality of the learning experience. Also in this role, students will be
expected to provide feedback to the individual in the counselor role.
Identify the problem situation or negotiation.
Associate into your memory of the situation.
Take first position - your own viewpoint. Make an inventory of the present state in all
representational systems.
What do you see?
Where are you looking from?
What do you hear?
Whose voices do you hear and where do these voices come from?
What feelings do you have?
What are you mostly aware of?
Align third position.
Imagine yourself in third position to the problem situation. See yourself and the other people from the
outside.
When you take this position, make sure that you are equidistant from yourself and the other people
so you can get a good view of everyone. Third position does not "take sides".
In this position make sure you:
observe from eye level
hear your own voice and the other person's voice coming from where you see them
feel your voice coming from your throat area, not being "disembodied"
move any feelings that are not resourceful third position feelings to where they belong (probably first
position)
feel fully balanced on your feet
How does this change your experience?
Remember this balanced and resourceful third position. Anchor it so that you are able to return to it
easily.
Align first position.
Now imagine yourself in first position in the problem situation.
Check all your representational systems.
Look out through your own eyes.
Hear through your own ears.
Feel your own voice coming from the throat area.
Move any feelings that belong to second position to the right place.
What changes when you do this?
Revisit third position and notice any further changes.
Finish in first position.
Future pace and generalize to other problematic situations.
How might an unbalanced first or third position have contributed to other difficulties?
What will be different now?
Observer: This role calls for close attention to the process occurring
between the counselor and the client and an ability to relate what occurs
in the practice session to the learned material. It also calls for a
development of the ability to give constructive feedback. The person in
this role will take notes and complete an observation form to be used as
feedback for the Counselor. (CACREP Standards 2b, 2c, 3c, 3d, 5a, &
5b; FEAPs 2, 3, 7, & 10)

Students are expected to attend class and participate in these practice activities.
Excused absences must be valid and approved by the Professor prior to the
Identify the problem situation or negotiation.
Associate into your memory of the situation.
Take first position - your own viewpoint. Make an inventory of the present state in all
representational systems.
What do you see?
Where are you looking from?
What do you hear?
Whose voices do you hear and where do these voices come from?
What feelings do you have?
What are you mostly aware of?
Align third position.
Imagine yourself in third position to the problem situation. See yourself and the other people from the
outside.
When you take this position, make sure that you are equidistant from yourself and the other people
so you can get a good view of everyone. Third position does not "take sides".
In this position make sure you:
observe from eye level
hear your own voice and the other person's voice coming from where you see them
feel your voice coming from your throat area, not being "disembodied"
move any feelings that are not resourceful third position feelings to where they belong (probably first
position)
feel fully balanced on your feet
How does this change your experience?
Remember this balanced and resourceful third position. Anchor it so that you are able to return to it
easily.
Align first position.
Now imagine yourself in first position in the problem situation.
Check all your representational systems.
Look out through your own eyes.
Hear through your own ears.
Feel your own voice coming from the throat area.
Move any feelings that belong to second position to the right place.
What changes when you do this?
Revisit third position and notice any further changes.
Finish in first position.
Future pace and generalize to other problematic situations.
How might an unbalanced first or third position have contributed to other difficulties?
What will beIn
absence. different now?of an emergency absence, the student should notify the
the case
Professor as soon as possible following the absence. The Professor reserves the
right to ask for written documentation of the reason for the absence.

Standards of Academic Conduct

Graduate counseling students should observe high standards of academic conduct, ethics, and
integrity as stated in the Student Handbook. No student shall engage in any form of fraudulent,
deceitful, dishonest, or unfair conduct with respect to examinations, papers, presentations, or
other academic endeavor. The consequences of this conduct will result in academic sanctions
Identify the problem situation or negotiation.
Associate into your memory of the situation.
Take first position - your own viewpoint. Make an inventory of the present state in all
representational systems.
What do you see?
Where are you looking from?
What do you hear?
Whose voices do you hear and where do these voices come from?
What feelings do you have?
What are you mostly aware of?
Align third position.
Imagine yourself in third position to the problem situation. See yourself and the other people from the
outside.
When you take this position, make sure that you are equidistant from yourself and the other people
so you can get a good view of everyone. Third position does not "take sides".
In this position make sure you:
observe from eye level
hear your own voice and the other person's voice coming from where you see them
feel your voice coming from your throat area, not being "disembodied"
move any feelings that are not resourceful third position feelings to where they belong (probably first
position)
feel fully balanced on your feet
How does this change your experience?
Remember this balanced and resourceful third position. Anchor it so that you are able to return to it
easily.
Align first position.
Now imagine yourself in first position in the problem situation.
Check all your representational systems.
Look out through your own eyes.
Hear through your own ears.
Feel your own voice coming from the throat area.
Move any feelings that belong to second position to the right place.
What changes when you do this?
Revisit third position and notice any further changes.
Finish in first position.
Future pace and generalize to other problematic situations.
How might an unbalanced first or third position have contributed to other difficulties?
What
againstwillthe
bestudent
differentinnow?
violation. Any questions or issues concerning the honor code should be
brought to the professors attention immediately. Please review the Student Handbook for the full
Code of Academic Integrity and/or refer to the website
http://www.fiu.edu/~dwyere/academicintegrity.html

Code of Decorum

The Department of Educational and Psychological Studies has developed a


Professional Code of Decorum. It can be found on the department's web site,
Identify the problem situation or negotiation.
Associate into your memory of the situation.
Take first position - your own viewpoint. Make an inventory of the present state in all
representational systems.
What do you see?
Where are you looking from?
What do you hear?
Whose voices do you hear and where do these voices come from?
What feelings do you have?
What are you mostly aware of?
Align third position.
Imagine yourself in third position to the problem situation. See yourself and the other people from the
outside.
When you take this position, make sure that you are equidistant from yourself and the other people
so you can get a good view of everyone. Third position does not "take sides".
In this position make sure you:
observe from eye level
hear your own voice and the other person's voice coming from where you see them
feel your voice coming from your throat area, not being "disembodied"
move any feelings that are not resourceful third position feelings to where they belong (probably first
position)
feel fully balanced on your feet
How does this change your experience?
Remember this balanced and resourceful third position. Anchor it so that you are able to return to it
easily.
Align first position.
Now imagine yourself in first position in the problem situation.
Check all your representational systems.
Look out through your own eyes.
Hear through your own ears.
Feel your own voice coming from the throat area.
Move any feelings that belong to second position to the right place.
What changes when you do this?
Revisit third position and notice any further changes.
Finish in first position.
Future pace and generalize to other problematic situations.
How might an unbalanced first or third position have contributed to other difficulties?
What will be different now?
http://www.fiu.edu/~edpsy/code.htm. All students taking courses in this
department are expected to meet the expectations outlined in this Code.

Final Grades

Grades will be assigned based on the following distribution:

100 - 95 = A (4.00 gradepoints) Excellent; superior


94 - 90 = A- (3.67 gradepoints) Very Good
89 - 85 = B+ (3.33 gradepoints) With merit; good
Identify the problem situation or negotiation.
Associate into your memory of the situation.
Take first position - your own viewpoint. Make an inventory of the present state in all
representational systems.
What do you see?
Where are you looking from?
What do you hear?
Whose voices do you hear and where do these voices come from?
What feelings do you have?
What are you mostly aware of?
Align third position.
Imagine yourself in third position to the problem situation. See yourself and the other people from the
outside.
When you take this position, make sure that you are equidistant from yourself and the other people
so you can get a good view of everyone. Third position does not "take sides".
In this position make sure you:
observe from eye level
hear your own voice and the other person's voice coming from where you see them
feel your voice coming from your throat area, not being "disembodied"
move any feelings that are not resourceful third position feelings to where they belong (probably first
position)
feel fully balanced on your feet
How does this change your experience?
Remember this balanced and resourceful third position. Anchor it so that you are able to return to it
easily.
Align first position.
Now imagine yourself in first position in the problem situation.
Check all your representational systems.
Look out through your own eyes.
Hear through your own ears.
Feel your own voice coming from the throat area.
Move any feelings that belong to second position to the right place.
What changes when you do this?
Revisit third position and notice any further changes.
Finish in first position.
Future pace and generalize to other problematic situations.
How might an unbalanced first or third position have contributed to other difficulties?
What will84 be -different
80 = Bnow?
(3.00 gradepoints) Good
79 - 75 = B- (2.67 gradepoints) Above-satisfactory
74 - 70 = C+ (2.33 gradepoints) Above-satisfactory
69 - 65 = C (2.00 gradepoints) Satisfactory; minimum
64 - 60 = C- (1.67 gradepoints) graduate competency
59 - 55 = D+ (1.33 gradepoints) Unsatisfactory
54 - 50 = D (1.00 gradepoints) Unsatisfactory
49 - 45 = D- ( .67 gradepoints) Unsatisfactory
44 Below = F (0.00 gradepoints) Failure
Identify the problem situation or negotiation.
Associate into your memory of the situation.
Take first position - your own viewpoint. Make an inventory of the present state in all
representational systems.
What do you see?
Where are you looking from?
What do you hear?
Whose voices do you hear and where do these voices come from?
What feelings do you have?
What are you mostly aware of?
Align third position.
Imagine yourself in third position to the problem situation. See yourself and the other people from the
outside.
When you take this position, make sure that you are equidistant from yourself and the other people
so you can get a good view of everyone. Third position does not "take sides".
In this position make sure you:
observe from eye level
hear your own voice and the other person's voice coming from where you see them
feel your voice coming from your throat area, not being "disembodied"
move any feelings that are not resourceful third position feelings to where they belong (probably first
position)
feel fully balanced on your feet
How does this change your experience?
Remember this balanced and resourceful third position. Anchor it so that you are able to return to it
easily.
Align first position.
Now imagine yourself in first position in the problem situation.
Check all your representational systems.
Look out through your own eyes.
Hear through your own ears.
Feel your own voice coming from the throat area.
Move any feelings that belong to second position to the right place.
What changes when you do this?
Revisit third position and notice any further changes.
Finish in first position.
Future pace and generalize to other problematic situations.
How might an unbalanced first or third position have contributed to other difficulties?
What will be different
Required Textbooks now?

Ivey, A. E., & Ivey, M. B. (2007). Intentional interviewing and counseling:


Facilitating client development in a multicultural society (6 t h ed.).
Pacific Grove, CA: Brooks/Cole.

Kottler, J. A. (1993). On being a therapist (3rd ed.) . San Francisco, CA:


Jossey- Bass.

Recommended Textbooks and Materials


Identify the problem situation or negotiation.
Associate into your memory of the situation.
Take first position - your own viewpoint. Make an inventory of the present state in all
representational systems.
What do you see?
Where are you looking from?
What do you hear?
Whose voices do you hear and where do these voices come from?
What feelings do you have?
What are you mostly aware of?
Align third position.
Imagine yourself in third position to the problem situation. See yourself and the other people from the
outside.
When you take this position, make sure that you are equidistant from yourself and the other people
so you can get a good view of everyone. Third position does not "take sides".
In this position make sure you:
observe from eye level
hear your own voice and the other person's voice coming from where you see them
feel your voice coming from your throat area, not being "disembodied"
move any feelings that are not resourceful third position feelings to where they belong (probably first
position)
feel fully balanced on your feet
How does this change your experience?
Remember this balanced and resourceful third position. Anchor it so that you are able to return to it
easily.
Align first position.
Now imagine yourself in first position in the problem situation.
Check all your representational systems.
Look out through your own eyes.
Hear through your own ears.
Feel your own voice coming from the throat area.
Move any feelings that belong to second position to the right place.
What changes when you do this?
Revisit third position and notice any further changes.
Finish in first position.
Future pace and generalize to other problematic situations.
How might an unbalanced first or third position have contributed to other difficulties?
What will be different now?
Corey, G. (2005). Theory and practice of counseling and psychotherapy (7 t h
ed.). Belmont: CA: Brooks/Cole.
Sklare, G. B. (2005). Brief counseling that works: A solution-focused approach
for counselors and administrators (2 n d ed.). Thousand Oaks: CA: Corwin
Press.
American Counseling Association (ACA) (2005). Code of ethics and
standards of practice. Alexandria, VA: ACA.
National Rehabilitation Counseling Association (NRCA) (January 1, 2002).
Identify the problem situation or negotiation.
Associate into your memory of the situation.
Take first position - your own viewpoint. Make an inventory of the present state in all
representational systems.
What do you see?
Where are you looking from?
What do you hear?
Whose voices do you hear and where do these voices come from?
What feelings do you have?
What are you mostly aware of?
Align third position.
Imagine yourself in third position to the problem situation. See yourself and the other people from the
outside.
When you take this position, make sure that you are equidistant from yourself and the other people
so you can get a good view of everyone. Third position does not "take sides".
In this position make sure you:
observe from eye level
hear your own voice and the other person's voice coming from where you see them
feel your voice coming from your throat area, not being "disembodied"
move any feelings that are not resourceful third position feelings to where they belong (probably first
position)
feel fully balanced on your feet
How does this change your experience?
Remember this balanced and resourceful third position. Anchor it so that you are able to return to it
easily.
Align first position.
Now imagine yourself in first position in the problem situation.
Check all your representational systems.
Look out through your own eyes.
Hear through your own ears.
Feel your own voice coming from the throat area.
Move any feelings that belong to second position to the right place.
What changes when you do this?
Revisit third position and notice any further changes.
Finish in first position.
Future pace and generalize to other problematic situations.
How might an unbalanced first or third position have contributed to other difficulties?
What willCode
be different now?
of Professional Ethics for Rehabilitation Counselors . Rowling
Meadows: IL.
American School Counseling Association (ASCA) (June 25, 1998). Ethical
standards for school counselors. Alexandria, VA: ASCA.

ASSIGNMENT & EXAMINATION DUE DATES

Journal Sypnosis: Due 1/23, 2/13, 3/12, 4/2, 4/9


Counseling Interview I: Tape, Typescript, Consent, & Assessment &
Reflections: Due 2/27
Identify the problem situation or negotiation.
Associate into your memory of the situation.
Take first position - your own viewpoint. Make an inventory of the present state in all
representational systems.
What do you see?
Where are you looking from?
What do you hear?
Whose voices do you hear and where do these voices come from?
What feelings do you have?
What are you mostly aware of?
Align third position.
Imagine yourself in third position to the problem situation. See yourself and the other people from the
outside.
When you take this position, make sure that you are equidistant from yourself and the other people
so you can get a good view of everyone. Third position does not "take sides".
In this position make sure you:
observe from eye level
hear your own voice and the other person's voice coming from where you see them
feel your voice coming from your throat area, not being "disembodied"
move any feelings that are not resourceful third position feelings to where they belong (probably first
position)
feel fully balanced on your feet
How does this change your experience?
Remember this balanced and resourceful third position. Anchor it so that you are able to return to it
easily.
Align first position.
Now imagine yourself in first position in the problem situation.
Check all your representational systems.
Look out through your own eyes.
Hear through your own ears.
Feel your own voice coming from the throat area.
Move any feelings that belong to second position to the right place.
What changes when you do this?
Revisit third position and notice any further changes.
Finish in first position.
Future pace and generalize to other problematic situations.
How might an unbalanced first or third position have contributed to other difficulties?
What will be different now?
Counseling Interview II: Tape, Typescript, Consent & Assessment &
Reflections: Due 4/2
Progress Tests: 2/20 and 3/26

Late Penalty: Half a grade may be deducted for each week an assignment is
submitted past the due date. Assignments that are not typed will not be accepted.

** S t udent s wit h ph ys i c al or ot her im pai rm ent s that necessi t at e speci al ci rcum st ances or
devi ces i n t he cl assroom or when t aki ng ex am i nat i ons, shoul d consul t wi t h t he P rofessor
re gardi n g thei r speci al needs and accom m odat i ons. The Offi ce of Di sabi li t y S ervi ces for
Identify the problem situation or negotiation.
Associate into your memory of the situation.
Take first position - your own viewpoint. Make an inventory of the present state in all
representational systems.
What do you see?
Where are you looking from?
What do you hear?
Whose voices do you hear and where do these voices come from?
What feelings do you have?
What are you mostly aware of?
Align third position.
Imagine yourself in third position to the problem situation. See yourself and the other people from the
outside.
When you take this position, make sure that you are equidistant from yourself and the other people
so you can get a good view of everyone. Third position does not "take sides".
In this position make sure you:
observe from eye level
hear your own voice and the other person's voice coming from where you see them
feel your voice coming from your throat area, not being "disembodied"
move any feelings that are not resourceful third position feelings to where they belong (probably first
position)
feel fully balanced on your feet
How does this change your experience?
Remember this balanced and resourceful third position. Anchor it so that you are able to return to it
easily.
Align first position.
Now imagine yourself in first position in the problem situation.
Check all your representational systems.
Look out through your own eyes.
Hear through your own ears.
Feel your own voice coming from the throat area.
Move any feelings that belong to second position to the right place.
What changes when you do this?
Revisit third position and notice any further changes.
Finish in first position.
Future pace and generalize to other problematic situations.
How might an unbalanced first or third position have contributed to other difficulties?
What wills be
S t udent different
offers now?
a vari et y of servi ces t o assi st st udent s needi ng such accom m odat i ons. For
assi st ance, cont act GC 225, UP (348- 3532) or UC 260, NM (940- 5813).
Course Schedule and Reading Assignments

1/9 Course Introduction and Getting Acquainted


Review of Syllabus; What is Counseling? How Did Counseling
Evolve? Research in Counseling; the Microskills Approach
(CACREP Standard K1a, b; K5g, K8a; FEAPS 2, 3, 10) Ivey, Before
You Start & Chap. 1; Kottler, Chap. 1

1/16 Ethics, Multicultural Competence and Wellness


Ivey, Chap. 2; Kottler Chap 2 (CACREP Standard K1b, d, e, f, g, h;
K5a, b, Standards for School Counseling Programs A; FEAPS 2, 5,
6).

1/23 Attending Behavior & Skills; Multicultural Issues in Attending


Questions: Opening Communication; Multicultural Issues in
Questioning; Ivey: Chap 3 & 4; Kottler: Chap.3
(CACREP Standard K1b, d, e, f, g, h; K5a, b; FEAPS 2, 3, 5, 7, 10).
Journal Synopsis Due

1/30 Client Observation Skills; Ivey: Chap 5 (CACREP Standard K5b)


Encouraging, Paraphrasing and Summarizing: Ivey, Chap 6
Focusing the Narrative, Ivey, Chap. 9

2/6 Reflection of Feeling, Ivey Chap. 7 (CACREP Standard K5b;


FEAPS 2, 7, 10); Kottler Chap. 4

2/13 Empathy and Reflection of Feeling continued, Ivey: Chap.7;


Kottler, Chap.5; Journal Synopsis Due

2/20 Progress Test I (Ivey, Chapters 1 6, Lecture Notes,


Kottler, Chapters 1 4)
Conducting An Interview Using the Basic Listening Sequence
Ivey: Chap. 8; Kottler, Chap. 6 (CACREP Standard K5b; FEAPS 2,
3, 7, & 10)

2/27 The Influencing Skills/Confrontation/Focusing the Interview


Ivey, Chap.9. 10; Kottler, Chap.7; (CACREP Standard 2d, 5a, 5b,
5c & 5g; FEAPS 2, 3, 7, 10)
Counseling Interview I: Tape, Consent, Typescript, Self
Assessment and Reflections Due
3/5 The Influencing Skills of Reflection of Meaning, Positive
Reframing Self-Disclosure, Interpretation,
Feedback & Directives, Ivey, Chap. 11 & 12; Kottler, Chap. 8
(CACREP Standard K 5b, c; FEAPS 2, 7, 10)

3/12 The Influencing Skills Continued; A Brief Introduction to


Counseling TheoriesPerson-Centered, Behavioral, Cognitive,
Brief Solution Focused Counseling; Kottler Review Class Exercise
Handouts; Kottler, Chap. 9 (CACREP Standard K5b; FEAPS 2, 3, 7,
10) Journal Synopsis Due

3/19 Spring Break No Class

3/26 Progress Test II (Professor attending ACA International


Conference, test will be proctored by GA)
Ivey: Chapters 7- 12; Kottler, Chapters 5-9; All Class Lecture
Notes from Ivey, Videos and any Handouts distributed in class.

4/2 Theories continued with Skill Integration; Conducting an Interview


Using the Listening and Influencing Skills
Ivey: Chap. 13; (CACREP Standard K5b; FEAPS 2, 3, 7, & 10)
Journal Synopsis Due;
(CACREP Standard K5b, c; FEAPS 2, 3, 7, & 10); Counseling
Interview II: Tape, Consent, Typescript, & Self Assessment and
Reflections Due

4/9 Developing an Individual Counseling Style; Ivey: Chap. 14


Teaching the Microskills (CACREP 2dm 5am 5b, 5c, 5g; FEAPS 2,
7, & 10)
Course Evaluations
Journal Synopsis Due

4/16 Catching and Wrapping it up! Review of Videotapes and Final


Reflections

Students w ith Target and Acceptable Artifacts must complete all


uploading of artifacts onto Efolio. Last date to upload
authorized artifacts w ithout receiving a grade of Incomplete is
April 24.
MHS 5400, COUNSELING SKILLS & TECHNIQUES
SCORING RUBRIC CRITERIA FOR COUNSELING INTERVIEWS

TARGET
FEAPS 2: Communication
Counseling becomes additive in their communication in that the counselor is adding something
be yond an interchangeable response. Attending and influencing skills are used in combination
with the many qualities of empathy (concreteness, i mme diac y, genuineness, positive regard) to
provide a more effective and facilitative level of counseling. The Counselor is communicating
with intentionall y and de monstrates a repertoire of accurate paraphrase and/or reflection of
feeling state ments. Patterns of move me nt s ynchrony and move ment complementarit y often are
manifested.
The counselor adds a mild interpretation or a probing question or interpretation that not onl y
catches the major meanings of the client but also adds something new to facilitate growth and
exploration.

FEAPS 3: Continuous Improvement


The Counselor is able to reflect in depth on their individual counseling st yl e, counseling problem
and process, and the skills and interventions used to bring about client change and action. The
Counselor is able to assess their counseling st yle and perfor mance with depth, clarit y, and
accurac y and make recomme ndations for i mprovements in future counseling sessions and
interviews. The Counselor can cite several exa mples of responses ma de in the interview that need
i mprovement and suggest alternative responses that would have been more helpful and
facilitative to the client. The Counselor is able to reflect on the impact of the knowledge, skills,
and dispositions learned in this assignment on their future work as counselors and on wa ys these
can be applied in their work with future clients.

ACCEPTABLE
Considered by experts the mini ma l level for counseling and facilitative communication.
Responses are interchangeable with what the client is sa yi ng. An interchangeable response is
best exemplified by an accurate reflection of feeling, paraphrase, or summa r y that catches the
essence of what the client has said. Open and closed questions are used to obtain infor mation and
the clients perspective on the issue or proble m being addressed. A self-disclosure or feedback
responses that aid client responding are other exa mples of acceptable competenc y.

FEAPS 3: Continuous Improvement


The Counselor is able to adequatel y reflect on their individual counseling st yle, the counseling
proble m and process, and the skills and interventions used to bring about client change and
action. The Counselor is able to assess their counseling st yle and performance with with clarit y,
thoughtfulness, and accurac y and make recomme ndations for improve me nts in future counseling
sessions and interviews. The counselor can cite one or two exa mples of responses ma de in the
interview that need improvement and suggest alternative responses that would have been more
helpful and facilitative to the client.
NOT ACCEPTABLE
At first glance, the session appears to be moving nor mall y. However, on deeper anal ysis, one
sees that the counselor/therapist is detracting slightl y from what the client has been
communicating. The paraphrase is close, but still misses the client's meaning. Much of our dail y
conversation fits this pattern. As a result of the interaction, the client is not damaged and has
been listened to minimall y, but counselor responses take awa y from what the client sa ys or
minimizes statements.
The counselor/therapist ma y be implicitl y and subtl y destructive, even though overtl y tr ying to
be helpful. At its worst point, the counselor/therapist is overtl y destructive to the interviewing
process. He/she fails to attend (sharp body shifts, major topic jumps) in a wa y that sharpl y
disrupts client flow or attacks the client or discounts information.

FEAPS 3: Continuous Improvement


The Counselor failed to adequatel y communicate their reflections and reactions to their
individual counseling st yl e, the counseling proble m and process, and the skills and interventions
used to bring about client change. The Counselor failed to adequatel y assess their counseling
st yl e and perfor mance with clarit y, thoughtfulness, and accurac y and ma ke recommendations for
i mprovements in future counseling sessions and interviews. The counselor cited no examples of
responses made in the interview that needed improve me nt and/or failed to suggest alternative
responses that would have been more helpful and facilitative to the client.
Some pieces on the communication criteria have been adapted from Carkhuff (1969) in Ivey,
(1993, pp. 27 - 28) and the Empathy Rating Scale (EPS)
MHS 5400
COUNSELING INTERVIEW
SELF ASSESSMENT AND REFLECTION FORM
PART A

Students Name:_____________________________________________

Session #:___________ Date:_________

Directions : Please place a 1" (Evident), 0" (Not Evident), or NA before each
evaluative item. 1" indicates the behavior or skill is evident ; 0" indicates that it is not
evident. NA indicates the behavior or skill was not applicable or the rater is not able to
evaluate the item.

____1. The client chosen for this counseling interview is currently enrolled in the
counseling course.
____2. The counselor secured the clients permission to tape the counseling
interview.
____3. Both the client and counselor can be seen and/or heard on the tape.
____4. The counseling interview lasted the required amount of time.
____5. The counselor sounded genuinely interested and concerned in the clients
issues/concerns/problems.
____6. The counselor appeared to be able to establish rapport effectively with the
client.
____7. The counselor appeared to be relatively relaxed and natural as the counseling
interview progressed.
____8. The client appeared to be relatively relaxed with the counselor as the
counseling interview progressed.
____9. The counselor appeared to maintain a composed, steady, demeanor during the
counseling interview.
____10. The client appeared comfortable to express thoughts and feelings with the
counselor.
____11. The counselor kept the counseling interview flowing and moving effectively.
____12. The counselor kept effective focus on the clients issues and concerns.
____13. Appropriate attending behavior (eye contact, forward body position, etc.) was
demonstrated by the counselor.
____14. The counselor attempted to move the client toward active behavior.
____15. It appeared that the counselor was able to conduct a counseling session that
was of benefit to the client.
MHS 5400
CO UNS E LI NG I NTE RVI EW
S E LF AS S E S S ME NT AN D RE FLE CTI O NS FO RM
PART B

Na me: __ __ __ __ __ _ __ __ _ __ __ __ _ __ __ _ Se ss i on Da te: __ __ __ __ _ __ __ _ __ __ __ _ __ _

Cl i e nts I ni ti al s: __ __ __ _ __ __ __ S es si on Le ngth: __ __ __ __ __ _ __

S es si on Numbe r w ith Cli e nt: _ __ __ __ _ __

1. Ba ck ground I nforma ti on (clie n t de scrip t ion , de mo gra p h ics, p re se n t in g issue o r co n ce rn ):

2. S es si on Note s (W ha t wa s yo u r go a l f o r th e se ssio n? Ho w we re yo u at t em pt in g t o
a cco mp lish t h is goa l? W hat ha pp en e d in th e se ssio n? An y b eh a vio ra l o b se rva t io n s? ):

3. Communi c a ti on Mic rosk i l ls (W ha t m icro skills we re pre do m in a nt ly u sed in t h is se ssio n?


W ere t he se a pp ro p riat e to th e t im in g a nd issu e s be in g d iscu sse d?

4. Conc e ptua li za ti on (Co u n se lo r's in te rp re t at io n o f wh a t wa s ha pp en in g wit h th e clie n t ,


h yp o th e se s con ce rn in g p ossib le t re a tm en t ap p ro a che s):
A sse ssm en t Fo rm , B 2

5 . Couns e l or's re a c ti on to se ss i on (YO UR t ho u ght s a nd f e elin gs a bo ut wh a t ha pp en ed in


t he se ssio n , wh a t we n t we ll (o r d id n t go we ll) in t he se ssio n , an d wh y):

Lay Counseling Safety


OVERVIEW
Now more than ever, church leaders recognize that the local church must serve as a safe
place for spiritual care and biblical guidance. This download will help church leaders
manage the legal and ethical risks that arise in lay counseling and other spiritual care
ministries. These include abiding by state mental health licensing laws, protecting
confidential information, reporting child abuse, and guarding against sexual misconduct.

CONTENTS Creating a Safe Ministry Environment


Overview | Develop policies and procedures that protect everyone involved.
by John L. Sandy

Developing a Lay Counseling Ministry


Assessment | Have you considered these details?
from Brotherhood Mutual Insurance Company

Take a Proactive Approach to Managing Legal Risks


How To | Screen workers, write a lay counseling policy, and train counselors
by John L. Sandy

When Lay Counseling Isn't Enough


How To | Learn how to make a referral.
by Randy Christian

Problems and Solutions


For Pastors | Anticipate the challenges of lay counseling and learn how you can overcome
them.
by Gary R. Collins

Maintaining a Balance
For Lay Counselors | A self-check for your own psychological health.
by Jim Smith
Why Your Church Needs Counseling Policies
The Legal Side | One case illustrates why you need to be proactive in your counseling
procedures.
by Richard Hammar

Lay Counseling at Work: Grace Baptist Church


It's True | Members use their spiritual gifts to help hurting people.
from Brotherhood Mutual Insurance Company

Resource Center
Leader's Guide | Quick tips and recommended resources.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
Pages: 24

6 . W ha t c ounse l or w oul d ha ve done di ffe re ntl y and w hy : (W hat a re so me d iff eren t


cou n se lin g skills, re spo n se s, a nd in t e rve n t ion s t ha t yo u m igh t ha ve u se d in st ea d an d wh y.

7 . How does thi s as si gnme nt re l a te to yo ur future w ork a s a c ounse l or? I n othe r w ords ,
how (c i te e xa mple s ) w i ll yo u be abl e to us e and a ppl y the know l edge , sk i ll s , a nd
di s pos i ti ons le a rne d i n this a ss i gnme nt in your future w ork as a c ouns e l or (s c hool ,
me nta l he al th, or re ha bi li ta ti on)?
8 . Ra te yo ur ove ra l l pe rforma nc e i n thi s se ss i on ba s e d on the c ri te ri a de li ne a te d i n the
a tta c he d s cori ng rubric :

O n Targe t__ __ __ _ Ac c e pta bl e _ __ _ __ __ _ _

Not Ac c e pta bl e , nee ds cons i de ra ble i mprove me nt_ _ __ __ _ __ __

W hy di d yo u c hoos e to ra te your pe rforma nce a t this l e ve l ?

9 . W ha t a ddi ti ona l s upe rvi s i on a nd fee dba ck do yo u fe el you ne e d from the P rofe ss or on
thi s as si gnme nt?