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English and

Argentine
Forms of
Government
Subject: English
Professor: Clemente, Silvana
Student: Gonzalo Altera
Dependency: Rectorado/Principalship
Year: 2016

INDEX
INTRODUCTION
- England......................................................................................................3
- Argentina....................................................................................................4
DEVELOPMENT
- Differences.................................................................................................5
- Similarities..................................................................................................6
- Maximum Authorities..................................................................................7
- The Congress and the Parliament.............................................................8
CONCLUSIONS...........................................................................................9
BIBLIOGRAPHY.........................................................................................10

INTRODUCTION
ENGLAND
The England form of government is a Constitutional Monarchy which combines a
monarch head of state with a parliamentary system, although it is not self-dependent,
given it is politically bonded to the rest of the countries that form the United
Kingdom.
While many consider the England form of government a democracy, which it is in
practice, the Queen of England has many titular roles and is officially the head of
state, although in practice, she has little political power or influence. By law, the
Queen or King are the one in charge of declaring war and signing peace, and of
looking after the good decisions of the kingdom and taking care of international
politics.
The true influence and power in the England form of government comes from the
prime minister and the Parliament.
What in the UK is known as Government or Cabinet is the group of ministers that are
considered as Royal Counselors, and they are leaded by a Prime Minister, which is
named by the monarch, but postulates are offered by the party with the majority in
the House of Commons.

ARGENTINA
The government of Argentina, within the framework of a federal system, is a
presidential representative democratic republic. The President of Argentina is both
head of state and head of government. Executive power is exercised by the
President. Legislative power is vested in both the Executive and the National
Congress. The Judiciary is independent from the Executive and from the Legislature.
As a representative democracy, Argentina's government is founded on free and fair
elections. As a federal system, governance is not centralized but rather distributed to
provinces that hold power not allocated to the central government. Argentina has 23
provinces and one autonomous city, Buenos Aires. The three branches of
government perform separate but equally important functions, mainly writing, passing
and enforcing legislation and laws. They also control each other to guarantee the
decentralization of power.
The country possess a democratic regime and a presidential government system. We
can then say that when power is shared between central government and individual
states it is called as a Federal Republic.

DEVELOPMENT
DIFFERENCES
Primary Differences
We can easily notice some differences between these two forms of government:

Constitutional monarchy features a monarch who functions as the head of


state. In a democracy as in the Federal Republic, the head of state is

someone elected by the eligible citizens of the state.


In a constitutional monarchy, the monarch is sovereign. In a democracy, the

people remain sovereign.


In a constitutional monarchy, people pay no part in the political decision
making. Democracy is named the rule of the people as citizens are either

directly or indirectly involved in the decision making process.


In a democracy, head of state has the power to make most decisions. In a
constitutional monarchy, the head of state has limited powers.

Succession
Between the Federal Republic and the Constitutional Monarchy, we can see a big
difference in the succession of the maximum authority. While in England the crown is
inherited, in Argentina the president is elective.

Power
The power in England resides in the Parliament, while in Argentina the power resides
in the People and elected representatives like deputies and senators.

SIMILARITIES
Parliament
By looking at these forms of government, we can notice that they both have a
Parliament. The Constitutional Monarchy is a form of government in which a king or
queen are the head but the rules are made by a parliament.
We can see a Parliament in Argentina, though it is called "The Congress of the
Argentine Nation". It is the legislative branch of the government of Argentina. Its
composition is bicameral, constituted by a 72-seat Senate and a 257-seat Chamber
of Deputies.
In the England form of government, there are two houses: The House of Lords and
the House of Commons. The first is composed of 733 members who are appointed
by the Queen and is divided in the Lords Temporal and the Lords Spiritual, and the
House of Commons is composed of 659 members who are elected by the citizens.

Constitution
We can also see that there is a Constitution present in both forms of government:
The constitution of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is the
sum of laws and principles that make up the body politic of the United Kingdom. It
concerns both the relationship between the individual and the state, and the
functioning of the legislature, the executive and judiciary. Unlike many other nations,
the UK has no single constitutional document.
The Constitution of Argentina is one of the primary sources of existing law in
Argentina. Its first version was written in 1853 by a Constitutional Assembly gathered
in Santa Fe, and the doctrinal basis was taken in part from the United States
Constitution.

MAXIMUM AUTHORITIES
Argentina
In Argentina, the maximum authority is the President of Argentina (currently Mauricio
Macri, since December 10th) .
The president is both head of state and head of government of Argentina. Under the
national Constitution, the President is also the chief executive of the federal
government and Commander-in-Chief of the armed forces.
The other important authority would be the Supreme Court of Justice. It is the highest
court of law of the Argentine Republic, and functions as a last resort tribunal. Its
rulings cannot be appealed. It also decides on cases dealing with the interpretation of
the constitution (for example, it can overturn a law passed by Congress if it deems it
unconstitutional).
The members of the Supreme Court are appointed by the President with the
agreement of at least two thirds of the present Senate members in a session
convened for that purpose.
The president according to the current composition of the Supreme Court is Dr.
Ricardo Luis Lorenzetti.

England
England's politics are subject to the United Kingdom's since for a long time it belongs
to it. The UK's maximum authority is the British monarch, position now occupied by
Queen Isabel II, who must appeal to the Parliament to rule.
The highest authority of the executive branch is represented by the Prime Minister
who is elected by the monarch through a simple system. The candidate is nominated
by the party that represents the majority in the House of Commons. Currently this
position is occupied by David Cameron which represents an alliance between the
Liberal Party and the Conservative, since the Conservative Party had failed to get an
absolute majority in parliament.

THE CONGRESS AND THE PARLIAMENT


The Parliament
Parliament examines what the Government is doing, makes new laws, holds the
power to set taxes and debates the issues of the day. The House of Commons and
House of Lords each play an important role in Parliament's work.
The UK public elects 650 Members of Parliament (MPs) to represent their interests
and concerns in the House of Commons. MPs consider and propose new laws, and
can scrutinize government policies by asking ministers questions about current
issues either in the Commons Chamber or in Committees.

The Congress
The Argentine National Congress is bicameral, composed of the Senate and the
Chamber of Deputies.
The Congress is entitled to approve or reject every international treaty that Argentina
signs with other states or international organizations. When approved, the treaties
acquire priority over ordinary legislation. Declarations of war and the signing of
peace, as well as the mobilization of the national troops, within or without of the
Argentine territory must be allowed by the Congress.
The Congress is also in charge of setting taxes and customs, rules the Central Bank
of Argentina, manages internal and external debt payment, and the value of national
currency.

CONCLUSIONS
In today's world, there are various types of monarchy; they can be absolute or a
hybrid form, where the day-to-day operation of the state is handled by the
senate/parliament.
The British monarchy, especially after the Glorious Revolution, did have a Parliament
that was elected and that brought a great deal of democracy into the system. But
this is not true of all monarchies.
As for the Federal Republic, we can see that a division of power exists, but how the
power is divided is sometimes different between nations. Almost exclusively, national
defense is handled by the central government, but education and local infrastructure
typically belong to the more localized governments. A president or council usually
heads up the central government.

BIBLIOGRAPHY
Forma de Gobierno de Inglaterra
http://www.inglaterra.net/forma-de-gobierno-de-inglaterra/

Wikipedia.org - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Government_of_Argentina
England form of Government
http://www.england.mu/articles/england-form-government.html

GovernmentVS - http://www.governmentvs.com/en/
Casa Rosada Web - http://www.casarosada.gob.ar/nuestro-pais/organizacion
Parliament UK - https://www.parliament.uk/about/

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