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21ST CENTURY HIRING REPORT:

WOMEN IN TECH
HiringSolved Research Report: Exploring the state of women
in the workplace through the top 25 tech companies.

It seems that weve officially reached the future as we experience the nomination of our first
major-party female presidential candidate. Better late than never, right? Whats the bigger picture
here, though? How does this monumental stride translate to women in the workplace, especially
in Silicon Valley, which is still considered to be the old boys club?

Executive
Summary

Ever since Google released its employee demographic figures in mid 2014, other tech giants like
Yahoo and Twitter quickly followed suit, all revealing findings that tied into a similar message:
theres a diversity issue in the Valley that was previously on a dont ask, dont tell basis. Once
these stats became public, the genie was out of the bottle for good and it became all anyone
could talk about. Afterwards, most of these companies quickly announced public initiatives to
combat their employee diversity challenges, acknowledging the problem and ideally, offering a
solution. The question is, nearly two and a half years later, where are we now? Were these
resolutions to a very complex problem successful or is it still too soon to tell?
One thing is for certain. One-dimensional ways of hiring and sourcing talent are no longer fit for
purpose especially not at the scale and speed that American businesses need to be competitive.
There is a new level of scrutiny and a new level of corporate responsibility with regards to
workforce diversity and that requires new tools to make it happen. Enter artificial intelligence
and machine learning technology, which can singlehandedly gather, analyze and make billions of
data points about workforces, employees and candidates, as well as allow hiring teams to be both
strategic and efficient at addressing their corporations workforce diversity goals.
To understand where we are, compared to where weve been and where were going,
HiringSolved pulled figures for the top 25 Silicon Valley tech companies, determined by annual
revenue, using our own proprietary artificial intelligence software that identifies gender, ethnicity
and age based on public resumes and social profiles. What we found is that slowly but surely, the
average number of female employees at these organizations are on an upwards trajectory, with
Google, Netflix, Intuit, Ebay and Twitter leading the pack. Perhaps there was something to those
public diversity initiatives after all.
Shon Burton, Founder and CEO of HiringSolved

Methodology

Using HiringSolveds proprietary artificial intelligence/machine learning based system, we used


pattern recognition to pull the diversity figures of the top 25 tech companies in Silicon Valley,
determined by annual revenue. Recent developments in artificial neural networks have allowed
software to achieve human-like or better results in limited pattern recognition tasks. For example,
software can now reliably detect and classify objects in pictures and video with a high degree of
accuracy. Specifically, these software techniques compute a probability that the pattern (a certain
word in a sample of sound) is present in the data.
Our software is using this approach to accomplish diversity analysis. To analyze the diversity of a
candidate, we take what we know about a person, and push it through a pattern recognition
engine. This includes factors like resumes, social profiles, names, locations, social graph data and
more. Based on this data, the recognition engine computes a probability that a pattern is present.
For this research, we asked the recognition engine if the pattern (male for example) is present in
the given data. The benefit here is that we're looking at multiple data points for each person so
we're not relying on any one data point, but rather the combination.
*C-Suite statistics were processed differently that other statistics in this report. All statistics except
the C-suite were automatically generated using RAI and our Diversity Search technology. The Csuite statistics required a different approach. Each company defines the "C-Suite" or "Executive
Team" differently. Our diversity analysis technology was used in determining male/female
patterns in the C-suite, however, due to the large variance of titles and definitions of the C-suite,
human judgement was required to determine if a given title (for example Adobe does not list a
COO but has multiple General Managers) should be included in the C-suite statistics. Our
approach here was to look at how the companies themselves define their C-suite or Executive
Team in terms of title, then to use our technology to analyze the people in those titles. This is an
important distinction and a weakness of many current AI based systems. Unlike humans, the
intelligence of most AI systems are task specific but they are not generally intelligent enough to
think through large variables in patterns and consider context.

Companies
Analyzed

Adobe
Agilent Technologies

Lockheed Martin
Netflix

Apple
Applied Materials

NVIDIA
Oracle

Cisco
eBay

Salesforce.com
Sanmina-SCI

Electronic Arts
Facebook

Tesla
Twitter

Google
HP Enterprises

Uber
VMware

Juniper Networks
Intel

Western Digital
Yahoo

Intuit

TOP 5 MOST DIVERSE

Female

The 2016 Overall


Female Diversity
Average

Twitter

24.3

75.7

eBay

25.8

74.2

Intuit

26.7

73.3

27

73

19.6%

Google

Netflix

33

67

TOP 5 LEAST DIVERSE

Female

Intel

13.8

86.2

Juniper

13.7

86.3

Applied Mat

13.5

86.5

Western Dig

13.2

86.8

NVIDIA

8.3

Male

91.7

Male

TOP 5 MOST DIVERSE

The 2015 Overall


Female Diversity
Average

18.4%

Yahoo

22

88

Twitter

23.5

86.5

eBay

25.8

84.2

Intuit

26.4

83.6

Netflix

26.7

83.3

TOP 5 LEAST DIVERSE


Oracle

13.8

86.2

Intel/Juniper

13.4

86.6

Intel

13.4

86.6

Applied Mat

13.2

86.8

Western Dig

12.8

87.2

NVIDIA

7.6

92.4

Female

Male

Female

Male

20.6

16.3

18.5

22.9

13.2

16.1

22

22.3

16.2

20.7

20.5

23.5

24.3

19.1
15.5
13.8

26.7

27

26.4

21.8
18.8

13.8

18.1

18.3

33

26.7

20.9
19.2

13.8
13.4

21.4
18.9

13.8
13.4

25.8

21.6

17.4
14.9

25.8

20.5

21

20.4

16.2

12.8

8.3
7.6

13.5
13.2

19.5
19.3

2015-16 Comparison: Overall Female Representation


2016
2015

TOP 5 BEST

The 2016 Average


Female C-Suite
Representation

20.3%
*C-Suite statistics were processed differently that other statistics in this
report. All statistics except the C-suite were automatically generated using
RAI and our Diversity Search technology. The C-suite statistics required a
different approach. Each company defines the "C-Suite" or "Executive
Team" differently. Our diversity analysis technology was used in
determining male/female patterns in the C-suite, however, due to the large
variance of titles and definitions of the C-suite, human judgement was
required to determine if a given title (for example Adobe does not list a COO
but has multiple General Managers) should be included in the C-suite
statistics. Our approach here was to look at how the companies themselves
define their C-suite or Executive Team in terms of title, then to use our
technology to analyze the people in those titles. This is an important
distinction and a weakness of many current AI based systems. Unlike
humans, the intelligence of most AI systems are task specific but they are not
generally intelligent enough to think through large variables in patterns and
consider context.

Female

Twitter

28.5

Yahoo

31.2

68.8

33.3

66.7

Nvidia/Intuit
Salesforce

71.5

36.3

Cisco

63.7

42.8

57.2

TOP 5 WORST
Vmware
Applied Materials / Netflix
Juniper

Male

14.2
11.1

Female
85.8
88.9

4.7

95.3

Tesla

100

Sanmina

100

Male

33.3

95.3

100

100

68.8

83.4

85.8

80

71.5

63.7

73.4

66.7

88.9

83.4

66.7

82.4

83.4

75

80

Female

31.2

16.6

14.2

20

28.5

36.3

26.6

11.1

16.6

4.7

33.3

17.6

16.6

25

20

76.2

81.9

88.9

84.3

78.6

77.8

42.8
57.2

23.8

18.1

11.1

15.7

21.4

22.2

2016 Female C-Suite Representation

Male

TOP 5 BEST

The 2015 Average


Female New Hires

18.5%

Intuit

25.3

74.7

Netflix

26.6

73.4

eBay

26.8

73.6

Twitter

29.1

70.9

Google

30.2

69.8

TOP 5 WORST
Cisco

13.7

86.5

Applied Mat

13.6

86.4

EA

13.2

86.8

13

87

Intel
NVIDIA

7.2

92.8

Female

Male

Female

Male

TOP 5 BEST

The 2014 Average


Female New Hires

18.9%

Intuit

25.6

74.4

eBay

25.8

74.2

Agilent

25.9

74.1

Google

29.4

Netflix

34.4

Female

Male

65.6

EA

13.9

86.1

Tesla/Vmware

13.3

86.7

Applied Mat

12.5

87.5

Juniper

11.8

88.2

4.8

Male

70.6

TOP 5 WORST

NVIDIA

Female

95.2

2015
30.2
29.4

29.1
20.6

26.8
25.8

26.6
34.4

25.3
25.6

21
20

20.8
20.5

19.4
15.5

18.7
19.9

18.2
11.8

18
20.4

17.5
20.6

17.3
13.3

17.2
21.7

17.1
18

16.6
25.9

16.1
15.9

15.9
15

15.1
24.5

14.8
13.3

13.7
16.1

13.6
12.5

13.2
13.9

13
14.7

7.2
4.8

2014-15 Female New Hires Comparison

2014

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