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Behavioral Modeling Using Creo

Parametric

T3426-380-01

Course Objectives
In this course, you will learn how to:
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Applying the Behavioral Modeling process and concepts to your designs


Creating measurement analysis features
Creating relation, motion, Creo Simulate, and MS Excel analysis features
Creating user-defined analysis features
Conducting sensitivity analyses
Conducting feasibility and optimization studies
Design Project

Training Agenda
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Module 1: Introduction to the Behavioral Modeling Process

Module 2: Creating Measurement Features on Creo Parametric Models

Module 3: Creating Model Property Features on Creo Parametric Models

Module 4: Creating Analysis Features on Creo Parametric Models

Module 5: Creating User-Defined Analysis Features on Creo Parametric Models

Module 6: Conducting Design Studies and Optimizing Models

Module 7: Project

Module 1 : Introduction to the Behavioral Modeling


Process

Behavioral Modeling Using Creo Parametric

Objectives
After completing this module, you will be able to:
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Apply Behavioral Modeling processes and concepts to your designs.


Identify the different Behavioral Modeling analysis types.
Identify how Behavioral Modeling analysis differs from other Creo Parametric analyses.
Identify engineering problems that you can solve using Behavioral Modeling.

Behavioral Modeling Process


The Behavioral Modeling Process can be summarized in four high-level steps:

Figure 1 Creating the Design Model

Figure 3 Conducting Sensitivity Analyses on the


Model

Figure 2 Analyzing the Design Model

Figure 4 Conducting Design Studies on the Model

Identifying BMX Analysis Types


When analyzing the design model, there are five groups of tools that you may use.
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Measurement analysis features


Model property analysis features
Geometry analysis features
Analysis features
User-defined analysis features

Figure 1 Measuring Distance

Figure 2 Measuring Model Mass Properties

Figure 3 User-Defined Analysis

Identifying the Differences Between Creo


Parametric Analyses
Determining the type of analysis you need to perform is critical.
There are three types of analyses within Creo
Parametric:
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Creo Simulate Analysis


MDX/MDO Motion Analysis
Behavioral Modeling Analysis
Figure 1 Creo Simulate Structural and Thermal
Analysis

Figure 2 MDX/MDO Motion Analysis

Figure 3 Behavioral Modeling Analysis

Module 2 : Creating Measurement Features on Creo


Parametric Models

Behavioral Modeling Using Creo Parametric

Objectives
After completing this module, you will be able to:
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Describe the differences and similarities between the measurement analyses.


Measure distances.
Measure lengths.
Measure angles.
Measure area.
Measure diameter.

Comparing Creo Parametric Measurement


Analyses
Before learning about each individual measurement analysis, you must understand:
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Differences between the measurement


analyses.
Similarities between the measurement
analyses.

Figure 1 Creating Measurement Analyses

Figure 3 Analysis Parameters and Datum


Features
Figure 2 Analysis Feature Types

Measuring Distance
Distance analysis enables you to compute the distance between two selected entities.
You can select any type of entity, such as:
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Points and vertices.


Edges and curves.
Surfaces and planes.
Axes and coordinate systems.

Figure 1 Measuring Distance

Figure 3 Measuring Projected Distance


Figure 2 Parameters and Datums

Measuring Length
Length analysis enables you to compute the measurement of curves, edges, facet edges, and features.
There are two methods for selecting your length
references:
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Standard edge selection


Rule-based edge selection

Figure 1 Single Chain or Partial Loop

Figure 2 Tangent Chain or Tangent

Figure 3 Loop Chain or Completed Loop

Measuring Angles
Angle analysis enables you to compute the angle between two entities.
Using angle analysis, you can measure two types
of angles:
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True angle
Projected angle

Figure 1 Parameters

Figure 2 True Angle

Figure 3 Projected Angle (Zoomed)

Measuring Area
Area analysis enables you to compute the area of a surface, quilt, facet, or entire model.
Using area analysis, you can measure two types
of surface area:
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True surface area.


Projected surface area.

Figure 1 Surface Area Parameter

Figure 2 Measuring Surface Area

Figure 3 Projected Surface Area Parameter

Measuring Diameter
Diameter analysis enables you to compute the diameter of a cylindrical surface.
Using diameter analysis, you can measure any
part surface that has been created by:
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Revolving a sketched entity.


Extruding a sketched arc.
Extruding a sketched circle.
Round features.
Figure 1 Measuring Diameter

Figure 3 Measuring Diameter as a Specific Point


Figure 2 Parameter

Module 3 : Creating Model Property Features on Creo


Parametric Models

Behavioral Modeling Using Creo Parametric

Objectives
After completing this module, you will be able to:
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Describe the differences and similarities between model analyses.


Measure mass properties.
Measure cross-sectional mass properties.
Measure one-sided volume.
Measure pairs clearance.

Comparing Model Property Analyses


Before learning about each individual model property analysis, you must understand:
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Differences between the model property


analyses.
Similarities between the model property
analyses.

Figure 1 Measuring Mass Properties

Figure 2 Measuring One-Sided Volume

Figure 3 Measuring Pairs Clearance

Measuring Mass Properties


Mass properties analysis enables you to compute volume, surface area, density, mass, center of gravity, moment
of inertia, and other properties associated with the model.
The mass property values for your model depend on the
following:
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Model density or material


Suppress features
Simplified representations
Layered parts
Dimension bounds
Welds

Figure 2 Analyzing Mass Properties

Figure 1 Coordinate System at CG

Measuring X-Section Mass Properties


X-section mass properties analysis enables you to compute surface area, center of gravity, and other properties
associated with a models cross-section.
The x-section mass property values for your
model depend on the following:
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Suppress features
Simplified representations
Layered parts
Dimension bounds
Welds

Figure 1 Analyzing X-Section Mass Properties at


XSEC

Figure 2 Analyzing X-Section Mass Properties

Measuring One-Sided Volume


One-sided volume enables you to compute the volume of a model on one side of a designated plane.
One-sided volume values for your model depend
on the following:
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Suppressed features
Simplified representations
Layers

Figure 1 One-Sided Volume (Shell Feature)

Figure 2 Parameters

Figure 3 One-Sided Volume (Suppressed Shell


Feature)

Measuring Pairs Clearance


Pairs clearance enables you to compute the clearance distance or interference between two objects or entities
in a model.

Figure 2 Parameters and Datums


Figure 1 Analyzing Pairs Clearance

Figure 3 Analyzing Pairs for Interference


Figure 4 Detecting Interference

Module 4 : Creating Analysis Features on Creo


Parametric Models

Behavioral Modeling Using Creo Parametric

Objectives
After completing this module, you will be able to:
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Describe the differences and similarities between the analysis features.


Create a relation analysis feature.
Create a motion analysis feature.
Create a Creo Simulate analysis feature.
Create an MS Excel analysis feature.

Comparing Analysis Features


Before learning about each individual analysis feature, you must understand:
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Differences between analysis features.


Similarities between analysis features.

Figure 1 Motion Analysis

Figure 2 Analysis Feature Types

Figure 3 Analysis Parameters

Creating a Relation Analysis Feature


Relation analysis features enable you to create mathematical functions that capture the design intent between
model features.
Relation analysis is well suited to calculate values
based on other BMX parameter outputs.
Feature 1 Displaying Feature Parameters in the
Model Tree

Feature 2 Creating a Relation

Feature 3 Determining the Cooling Area

Creating a Motion Analysis Feature


Motion analysis enables you to run a Mechanism Design Extension (MDX) or Mechanism Dynamics Option (MDO)
analysis during regeneration.
The motion analysis feature enables you to
create:
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Top-level assembly feature parameters.


A graphical display of the motion envelope.

Figure 1 Configuring the Motion Analysis


Figure 2 Determining Cam Slip

Creating a Creo Simulate Analysis Feature


Mechanica analysis enables you to retrieve structural or thermal analysis measures as feature parameters.
All default measures, as well as custom
measures, can be created as parameters.

Figure 1 Determining Structural Stress


Figure 2 Configuring Mechanica Analysis

Creating an MS Excel Analysis Feature


Excel analysis enables you to use an external Microsoft Excel file to define the analysis to perform on a Creo
Parametric model.
Using Excel analysis, you can:
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Configure one or more inputs.


Specify one or more outputs as parameters.

Figure 1 MS Excel Workbook

Figure 2 Configuring the Excel Analysis

Creating an External Analysis Feature


External analysis enables you to create parameters and datum geometry based upon the results.
Some examples of external programs include:
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Computational Fluid Dynamics


Finite Element Analysis

Monitoring the Parameters of Analysis Features


Performance monitoring enables you to monitor the values of the parameters in the analysis features.

Figure 1 Performance Monitor

Statistical Design Study


Before learning about each individual analysis feature, you must understand:
The following table lists the available types of statistical distributions, the equations that they use,
and the parameters they generate:
Exponential

Lognormal

: rate

: mean
: standard
deviation

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Normal

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Uniform

Weibull

: mean
: standard
deviation

No parameters

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: scale
k : shape

Module 5 : Creating User-Defined Analysis Features


on Creo Parametric Models

Behavioral Modeling Using Creo Parametric

Objectives
After completing this module, you will be able to:
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Describe how UDA differs from other BMX analysis types.


Create field points.
Create a construction group.
Create a UDA feature.

Introduction to User-Defined Analysis Features


You must understand how user-defined analysis (UDA) is different from other BMX analysis types.
The UDA process can be summarized in three
steps:
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Determine the domain.


Create a construction group.
Execute a UDA.

Figure 1 User-Defined Analysis Process

Creating Field Points


A field point is a special datum point used exclusively to define the geometric domain of a user-defined analysis
(UDA).
Field point characteristics:
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Placed on curves, edges, surfaces, or quilt


geometry.
Free to move anywhere on geometry's
domain.
Must be the first feature in a UDA.

Figure 1 Field Point on a Part

Figure 2 Field Point along a Curve


Figure 3 Field Point on a Surface

Creating a Construction Group


A construction group is a local group that contains a set of features that you create with the purpose of making a
particular measurement.
There are two methods for creating construction
groups:
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Without field points.


With field points.

Figure 1 Construction Group Sketch Entities

Figure 2 Construction Group in the Model Tree

Creating User-Defined Analysis Features


User-defined analyses (UDAs) enable you to create measurements and analysis features beyond the capabilities
of the analyses in the Creo Parametric Analysis menu.
When creating a UDA, you have several options to
configure:
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Type and Definition


Computation Settings
Results and Saved Analyses
Figure 4 User-Defined Analysis Results

Figure 1 Define Resolution by Quality with Slide Bar

Figure 2 Define Resolution by Setting the Number of Points

Figure 3 Define Resolution by Setting the Distance between


Two Adjacent Points in the Model Units

Figure 5 User-Defined Analysis Results


Legend

Module 6 : Conducting Design Studies and Optimizing


Models

Behavioral Modeling Using Creo Parametric

Objectives
After completing this module, you will be able to:
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Describe the similarities and differences between the design studies.


Translate design specifications into Creo Parametric terminology.
Perform a sensitivity analysis.
Perform a feasibility design study.
Perform an optimization design study.

Comparing Design Studies


Before learning about each individual analysis feature, you must understand:
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Differences between the design studies.


Similarities between the design studies.

Figure 1 Sensitivity Analysis Results

Figure 2 Model Prior to Feasibility Study

Figure 3 Model After Feasibility Study

Translating Design Specifications


You must be able to translate design specifications into Creo Parametric terminology.
The following are Creo Parametric terms for feasibility studies.
Feasibility Terms

Design Constraint
Model must contain exact volume.

Volume = 7.51

Gap between two edges must be greater than


a specified value.

Distance > 140

Center of gravity must be aligned with axis of


rotation.

Distance = 0

The following are Creo Parametric terms for optimization studies.


Design Goal

Optimization Terms

Lightest

Minimize Mass

Fastest

Maximize Velocity

Least Material

Minimize Volume

Least Cost

Minimize Cost or Mass

Performing Sensitivity Analysis


Sensitivity analysis enables you to analyze how measured quantities or parameters change as a model dimension
or parameter is varied within a specified range.
Sensitivity analysis enables you to determine how
changes will impact your design.

Figure 1 Selecting a Dimension for Analysis

Figure 2 Sensitivity of Center of Gravity to a Varying


Dimension
Figure 3 Sensitivity Analysis Window

Performing Feasibility Design Studies


Feasibility design studies enable you to search for solutions within a range of dimensions that satisfy your
design constraints.
You can determine the most desirable result
based upon your design constraints.

Figure 1 Model After Feasibility Study

Figure 2 Feasibility Design Study

Performing Optimization Design Studies


Optimization design studies enable you to search for a solution to an objective.
Optimization design studies also enable you to optimize your models based upon your design goals.

Figure 1 Part Model

Figure 2 Optimized Part

Figure 4 Optimization of Area and Angle


Figure 3 Optimization/Feasibility Window

Module 7 : Project

Behavioral Modeling Using Creo Parametric

Objectives
After completing this module, you will be able to:
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Create a model mass property analysis feature.


Create a distance analysis feature.
Execute a sensitivity analysis.
Execute a feasibility design study.
Create an optimized part model.