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Freeform Surfacing Using Creo

Parametric

T3425-380-01

Course Objectives
In this course, you will learn how to:
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Introduction to the Freestyle Surface Modeling Process


Creating Freestyle Surface Models
Introduction to the Style Surface Modeling Process
Understanding Style Surface Modeling Concepts
Creating Initial Style Curves
Developing Style Surface Models
Advanced Tools and Techniques for Defining Style Shapes
Creating Smooth Style Surface Models
Integrating Style and Parametric Features
Techniques for Creating Common Detailed Shapes
Creating Complex, High Quality Style Surface Models

Training Agenda
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Module 1: Introduction to the Freestyle Surface Modeling Process

Module 2: Creating Freestyle Surface Models

Module 3: Introduction to the Style Surface Modeling Process

Module 4: Understanding Style Surface Modeling Concepts

Module 5: Creating Initial Style Curves

Module 6: Developing Style Surface Models

Module 7: Advanced Tools and Techniques for Defining Style Shapes

Module 8: Creating Smooth Style Surface Models

Module 9: Integrating Style and Parametric Features

Module 10: Techniques for Creating Common Detailed Shapes

Module 11: Creating Complex, High Quality Style Surface Models

Module 1 : Introduction to the Freestyle Surface


Modeling Process

Freeform Surfacing Using Creo Parametric

Objectives
After completing this module, you will be able to:
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Understand and describe freestyle surface modeling.


Understand and describe the surface modeling paradigms used in Creo Parametric.
Understand and describe a typical Creo Parametric freestyle modeling process.

Introduction to Freeform Surface Modeling


Freeform surface modeling enables engineers to create highly precise and distinctly aesthetic product designs.
Freeform surface modeling is used for:
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Shapes with high curvature.


Sculpted shapes.
Shapes that are difficult to create using parametric
features.
Models requiring tangent or curvature continuity.
Figure 1 Motorcycle Helmet

Figure 2 Water Faucet

Figure 3 Hedge Trimmer

Understanding Surface Modeling Paradigms


You can use two different surface modeling paradigms within Creo Parametric.
Parametric Surface Modeling
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Dimensionally controlled
Engineering type features

Freeform Surface Modeling


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Driven by intuition and feel


Aesthetic requirements
Two available tools: Style and Freestyle

Figure 1 Inner Door Panel

Select either method, based on:


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Design input
Design intent
Designer's background

Figure 2 Outer Door Panel

Typical Freestyle Surface Modeling Process


The typical freestyle surface modeling process can be summarized in four steps:

Figure 1 Import an Image as a Reference

Figure 2 Insert a Primitive Shape

Figure 3 Manipulate the Primitive Shape

Figure 4 Add Creases and Other Features


to Complete the Model

Module 2 : Creating Freestyle Surface Models

Freeform Surfacing Using Creo Parametric

Objectives
After completing this module, you will be able to:
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Understand the Freestyle tool.


Understand Freestyle features.
Understand the Freestyle environment.
Create primitives.
Transform primitives.
Extrude freestyle edges and faces.
Split faces.
Split edges.
Connect freestyle surfaces.
Create creases.
Mirror freestyle surfaces.
Use trace sketches with freestyle surfaces.

Understanding the Freestyle Tool


Freestyle modeling provides tools for quickly and easily creating smooth and well-defined surface models.
Freestyle Tool
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Primitive shapes
Split edges and surfaces
Push and pull entities

Figure 1 Sphere Primitive

Figure 2 Edge Split into Four

Figure 3 Resulting Face Extruded

Understanding the Freestyle Environment


You use several elements of the Freestyle environment to create and manipulate freestyle surface models.
Freestyle Environment
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3-D drag handles


Circular menu
Freestyle ribbon
Selection filters

Figure 1 3-D Drag Handles

Figure 2 The Circular Menu

Figure 3 Freestyle Ribbon

Creating Primitives
Freestyle surface models begin with primitive shapes that are refined into the finished models.
Open Primitives:
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Circle
Subdivided Circle
Ring
Subdivided Ring
Square
Triangle

Closed Primitives:
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Sphere
Subdivided Sphere
Cylinder
Subdivided Cylinder
Torus
Subdivided Torus
Cube

Figure 1 Primitives Drop-Down Menu

Creating Primitives
Freestyle surface models begin with primitive shapes that are refined into the finished models. (cont'd.)

Figure 2 Sphere Primitive

Figure 3 Subdivided Sphere Primitive

Transforming Primitives
You can easily manipulate a Freestyle primitive by dragging, rotating, scaling, and deleting control mesh
elements.
Control mesh elements can be:
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Dragged
Rotated
Scaled
Deleted
Figure 1 Dragging a Face

Figure 2 Dragging with Increment Enabled

Figure 3 Scaling with Increment Enabled

Splitting Edges
The edges of the control mesh can be split to create new edges and surfaces.
Split control mesh edges create new surfaces.

Figure 1 Original Geometry

Figure 2 Edge Split into Three Entities

Splitting Faces
The surfaces of the control mesh can be split to create new edges and surfaces.
Split control mesh surfaces to create new surfaces.

Figure 1 Original Geometry

Figure 2 Surfaces Split

Creating Creases
Creases modify the transitions between selected edges and adjacent faces of the control mesh.
Two types of creases:
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Hard creases
Soft creases

Figure 1 Hard Crease

Figure 2 Soft Crease

Extruding Freestyle Surfaces


New faces can be added to the control mesh by extruding existing faces and border edges.
Extrude faces and border edges.
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Duplicates face.
Connects duplicate to original.
Results in new faces and edges.

Figure 1 Original Geometry

Figure 2 Top Surface Extruded

Figure 3 Surface Extruded and Dragged

Using Trace Sketches with Freestyle Surfaces


You can import an image into a model to create a trace sketch and then use the image as a visual reference
for creating freestyle geometry.
Importing an image to create a trace sketch:
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Apply the image to a plane.


Fit the image to your model.
Position the image in your model.
Manipulate the image visually.
Use the image as a visual reference when creating freestyle geometry.

Figure 1 Position and Fit the Image

Figure 2 Use Image as a Visual Reference

Mirroring Freestyle Features


You can mirror a control mesh by selecting its elements and projecting them onto a mirror plane.
You can mirror edges and faces.
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Toggle Dependant

option

Figure 1 Selecting Faces to Mirror

Figure 2 Mirrored Elements

Figure 3 Manipulating Mirror Manipulates


Both Sides

Connecting Freestyle Surfaces


You can connect mesh elements to create new faces.
Two connection types:
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Connect
Connect Mirror

Figure 1 Connecting Surfaces

Figure 2 Mirror Connect Icon in the Circular Menu

Figure 3 Mirror Connect

Module 3 : Introduction to the Style Surface Modeling


Process

Freeform Surfacing Using Creo Parametric

Objectives
After completing this module, you will be able to:
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Understand and describe style surface modeling.


Understand and describe how style and parametric modeling can be combined in a Creo
Parametric model.
Understand and describe a typical Creo Parametric style modeling process.

Combining Style and Parametric Modeling


You can create product shapes using a combination of style and parametric modeling.
Many product shapes are best created utilizing a
combination of:
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Parametric surface models with style curves


and surfaces.
Style surface models with parametric framework
and relations.

Figure 2 Smart Phone Model

Figure 1 Ring Model

Figure 3 Blower Model

Typical Style Modeling Process


The typical style modeling process can be summarized in four steps:

Figure 1 Creating a Design Framework

Figure 2 Creating Style Features

Figure 3 Blending Parametric and Style


Features

Figure 4 Refining the Design

Module 4 : Understanding Style Surface Modeling


Concepts

Freeform Surfacing Using Creo Parametric

Objectives
After completing this module, you will be able to:
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Understand the Style tool.


Understand Style features.
Understand datum features within the Style tool.
Understand the Style modeling environment.
Use Style tool shortcut menus.
Use Style tool keyboard-mouse combinations.
Understand the active plane concept.
Understand and use the Style tool 4-view layout.
Understand available Style tool preferences.

Understanding the Style Tool


The Style tool enables you to interactively manipulate curves and surfaces to easily create freeform design
models.
The Style Tool
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Dynamically interactive
Flexibility for changes
Conceptual designs
Figure 1 Flashlight Concept 1

Figure 2 Flashlight Concept 2

Figure 3 Flashlight Concept 3

Understanding Style Features


Use the Style tool to create style features that define your design.
Create Style Curve Features
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Shape visually.
Manipulate interactively.
Boundaries, sections, and trajectories.
Use for style or parametric features.

Create Style Surface Features


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Use style curves or other curves/edges.

Figure 2 Style Curves

Figure 1 Shape Visually

Figure 3 Style Surfaces

Understanding Datum Features within Style


You can create datum planes internal or external to the style feature.
Datum Features
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Axes
Points
Curves
Planes

Internal Datum Planes


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Internal to the style feature


Visible only in the style feature

Figure 2 Style Feature Closed

Figure 1 Creating Internal Datum Planes

Figure 3 While Editing Style Feature

Understanding the Style Modeling Environment


Creo Parametric provides a special modeling environment for creating style features.
Modeling Interface
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Style tab
Tool groups
Shortcut menus
Shortcut keys
Style tree

Views and Orientation


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View layouts
Active plane
View orientations

Style Tab

Figure 1 Style Environment

Using Style Tool Shortcut Menus


There are several context-sensitive shortcut menus available within the Style tool.

Using Style Tool Key Combinations


There are several keyboard-mouse combinations available within the Style tool.
Selections
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Double-click: Edit Definition


CTRL+ALT: Lock horizontal or vertical drag.
CTRL: Copy and move by dragging.
CTRL+SHIFT: Move by dragging.

Curve Create/Edit
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Surface Create/Edit
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CTRL: Add curves to selection.


SHIFT: Add curve to chain.

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SHIFT: Snap to geometry.


ALT: Move normal.
SHIFT+ALT: Extend point.
CTRL+ALT: Lock horizontal and vertical
drag.
ALT: Drag tangent length.
CTRL+ALT: Drag tangent angle.

Understanding Active Planes


Points on a style curve are projected onto the active plane.
The Active Style Plane
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Default active plane


Setting active plane
Internal active plane

Figure 1 Default Active Plane

Figure 2 Set Active Plane

Figure 3 Internal Active Plane

Understanding the Style Tool 4-View Layout


In the Style tool, you can display a model in a single or 4-view layout.
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4-view layout
Resize
Switching
Style orientations
Active plane
Zooming

Figure 1 4-View Layout

Understanding Style Preferences


Preferences for display, curvature plots, and surface mesh can be defined in the Styling Preferences dialog box.
Styling preferences:
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Surface
Default Connections
Connection Icon Scale

Grid
Display Grid
Spacing

Auto Regenerate
Curves
Surfaces
Shaded Surfaces

Surface Mesh
On
Off
Off When Shaded
Quality

Figure 1 Styling Preferences

Module 5 : Creating Initial Style Curves

Freeform Surfacing Using Creo Parametric

Objectives
After completing this module, you will be able to:
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Understand style curves.


Create basic style curves.
Create style curves as circles and arcs.
Manipulate style point locations.
Connect curves using soft points.
Manipulate soft points.
Define endpoint tangency.
Define soft endpoint tangency.
Edit curves by splitting, combining, and extending.
Create radial path planar curves.
Modify curves in the 4-view layout.

Understanding Style Curves


You can use freeform style curves to create both parametric and style features.
Uses of Style Curves
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Freeform surface boundaries


Parametric feature references
Sections and trajectories

Figure 1 Surface Boundaries

Figure 2 Trajectory

Figure 3 Section Reference

Creating Basic Style Curves


Style curves are splines that are interactively drawn and shaped within the Style tool.
Defining a Curves Shape
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Internal points
Tangent control at endpoints

Basic Style Curve Types


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Free Curve
Planar Curve
Curve on Surface

Figure 2 Planar Style Curve

Figure 1 Three Internal Points

Figure 3 Endpoints with Tangent Control

Creating Style Curves as Circles or Arcs


Create circle and arc geometry within the Style tool.
Shapes
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Circles
Arcs

Options
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Free/Planar
Radius value

Figure 1 Sketched Circle and Resulting Spline

Resulting Curve
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Spline curve
Edit the curve

Figure 2 Circle to Create Recess

Figure 3 Sketched Arc and Resulting Spline

Manipulating Style Point Locations


Manipulate the location of a curve's style points using a number of methods.
Methods for Manipulating Point Locations
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Dragging points
Manipulating numerically
Adjusting incrementally
Using control points

Display Curves before Edits

Figure 2 Dragging Multiple Points

Figure 1 Dragging a Single Point

Figure 3 Dragging Control Points

Connecting Curves Using Soft Points


You can connect a curve to existing geometry by snapping one or more of its points to that geometry.
Constrained Point Types
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Soft points
Fixed points

Snapping Methods
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Use SHIFT
Activate snapping
Lock to point

Figure 2 Soft Endpoints

Figure 1 Fixed on Vertex, Soft on Edge

Figure 3 Fixed Endpoints

Manipulating Soft Points


When you edit the location of a soft point, it moves along the entity to which it is attached.
Locating Soft Points
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Length
Length Ratio
Parameter
Offset from Plane
Lock to Point

Figure 2 Soft Point Located by Offset from Plane

Figure 1 Editing Location by Length or Length Ratio

Figure 3 Soft Point Moves as Reference


Plane Moves

Defining Endpoint Tangency


The length and direction of endpoint tangency influences a curve's shape.
Editing Tangents
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Direct manipulation
Tangent tab

Constraining Tangents
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Natural
Free
Fix Angle
Horizontal
Vertical
Normal
Align

Figure 1 Tangent Handle with Default Tangency

Figure 2 Drag Tangent Handle to Edit Tangency

Defining Soft Endpoint Tangency


The length and direction of endpoint tangency influences a curve's shape.
Tangent Constraints
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Tangent
Symmetric
Curvature

Draft Tangent Constraint


Figure 1 Tangent Constraint

Figure 2 Curvature Constraint

Figure 3 Draft Tangent

Editing Curves
Edit curves by moving, adding, or removing the style points that define them or, by splitting, combining,
or extending the curve.
Moving Points
Adding and Deleting Points
Splitting and Combining Curves
Extending Curves
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Free
Tangent
Curvature

Figure 2 Curve Split at Added Point

Figure 1 Point Added

Figure 3 Split and Extended Free

Creating Radial Path Planar Curves


You can create curves on soft planes. Soft planes are active planes located normal to a selected curve.
Positioning the Soft Plane
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Length Ratio
Length
Parameter
Offset from Plane
Lock to Point

Figure 2 Edited Position of Soft Plane

Figure 1 Normal to Parent Curve at Point

Figure 3 Curve on Soft Plane

Using the 4-View Layout to Modify Curves


You can use the 4-view layout to create and modify curves.
Using 4-View Layout
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Create 3-D curves.


Manipulate curves.
See edits in all views.

Figure 1 Editing in a 4-View Layout

Analyzing Curves
Analyze curves to ensure that your finished model meets the styling requirements of your product.
Analyzing Curvature
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Curvature plots
Using curvature plots
Analyze shape.
Analyze quality.

Plot settings

Figure 1 Curvature Plot

Figure 2 3-D Analysis in the 4-View Layout

Module 6 : Developing Style Surface Models

Freeform Surfacing Using Creo Parametric

Objectives
After completing this module, you will be able to:
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Understand style surfaces.


Create boundary surfaces.
Create loft surfaces.
Use multiple curves as a single boundary.
Create a blend surface using a radial option.
Create a blend surface using a uniform option.
Use surfaces to define curves.
Create a curve on surface type curve.
Intersect surfaces to create a curve on surface.
Create a curve from surface.
Manipulate curve on surface type curves.
Trim a surface in the Style tool.

Understanding Style Surfaces


Create complex and high-curvature surface geometry using the interactive Style tool.
Types of Surfaces
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Boundary surfaces
Loft surfaces
Blend surfaces
Composite surfaces
Figure 1 Boundary Surface

Figure 2 Loft Surface

Figure 3 Blend Surface

Creating Boundary Surfaces


Create style surfaces referencing three- and four-sided boundaries.
Boundary Surfaces
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Triangle: Three boundary surfaces


Rectangle: Four boundary surfaces

Figure 1 Three Boundary Surface

Figure 2 Four Boundary Surface

Creating Loft Surfaces


A loft surface references non-intersecting curves that flow in the same direction.
Loft Surfaces
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Reference non-intersecting curves.


Curves flow in same direction.

Figure 1 Loft Curves

Figure 2 Loft Surface

Using Multiple Curves as a Single Boundary


You can create style surfaces using more than one curve as a single boundary.
Multiple Segments Boundaries
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Press SHIFT to select.


Joined using tangent or curvature.
Results in a composite surface.

Figure 1 Select Multiple Curves

Figure 2 Tangent or Curvature Continuity

Figure 3 Composite Surface

Creating a Blend Surface Using the Radial Option


Use the Radial option to control the shape of a blended surface.

Figure 1 With Radial Option

Figure 2 With Radial Option Top View

Figure 3 Without Radial Option

Figure 4 Without Radial Option Top View

Creating a Blend Surface Using the Uniform


Option
Use the Uniform option to control the shape of a blended surface.

Figure 1 Without Uniform Option

Figure 2 Without Uniform Option Front View

Figure 3 With Uniform Option

Figure 4 With Uniform Option Front View

Creating N-Sided Surfaces


The N-Sided surface option enables you to create a boundary surface from more than four boundaries.
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Shape is dependent upon the boundaries.


Boundary conditions:
Free
Tangent
Normal

Figure 1 Original Curve Boundaries

Figure 2 Selecting Boundaries

Figure 3 Completed N-Sided Surface

Using Surfaces to Define Curves


You can use several methods to create curves using surfaces as references.
Creation Methods
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Curve on Surface option


Drop Curve
COS By Intersect
Curve from Surface
Free Curve
Curve on Surface

Figure 2 COS By Intersect

Figure 1 The Drop Curve

Figure 3 Curve from Surface

Creating a Curve on Surface Type Curve


Create a curve directly on a surface or by projecting an existing curve onto a surface.
Curve on Surface
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Create using Curve on Surface


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Project an existing curve onto a surface using Drop Curve

Figure 1 Using the Curve on Surface Option

Figure 2 Dropping a Curve onto a Surface

Intersecting to Create a Curve on Surface


You can create curve on surface type curves by intersecting surfaces as well as datum planes.
Intersecting References
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Create a curve on surface at the intersection of two surfaces.


Create a curve on surface at the intersection of a surface and a datum plane.

Figure 1 Intersecting Surfaces

Figure 2 Intersecting a Plane and Surface

Creating a Curve Using Curve from Surface


You can create a free or curve on surface type curve from a parallel isoline of a surface.
Creating a Curve from Surface
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Select a location on the surface.


Drag or specify a relative value to position the curve.
Free Curve
or Curve on Surface
From a single surface patch.

Figure 1 Select to Locate

type curves.

Figure 2 Cannot Cross Surface Patches

Manipulating Curve on Surface Type Curves


You can manipulate curve on surface type curves by editing the curve or its parent surfaces.
Manipulating a Curve on Surface
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Edit point locations.


Edit the parent surface.

Across Surface Patches


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Drop Curve

COS By Intersect

Unlink from Surface


Figure 1 Manipulating the Curve on Surface

Figure 2 Reference Surfaces

Figure 3 Unlinked from Surface

Trimming Surfaces in the Style Tool


You can use the Style tool to trim surfaces using curves on the surface.
Surface Trim
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Surface Collector
Curve Collector
Delete Collector

Figure 1 Trim using a Dropped Curve

Figure 2 Trim using a Curve on Surface

Figure 3 Completed Style Feature

Module 7 : Advanced Tools and Techniques for


Defining Style Shapes

Freeform Surfacing Using Creo Parametric

Objectives
After completing this module, you will be able to:
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Manipulate a surface shape using internal curves.


Copy and move curves.
Copy curves proportionally.
Offset curves.
Modify curve shapes proportionally.
Unlink style curves from references.
Make curves planar between endpoints.
Use surfaces to define curves.
Edit style surfaces.
Resolve failed style geometry.
Use references from design models.
Use imported 3-D data.

Manipulating Shapes Using Internal Curves


You can manipulate the shape of a surface by adding internal curves to the surface definition.
Adding Internal Curves
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Can be added in both directions.


Any number can be added.
Can connect to opposite boundaries.

Rules for Adding Internal Curves


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Cannot attach to adjacent boundaries.


Curves in two directions must connect to
each other.
Curves attached to the same boundary
cannot intersect within boundaries.
Cannot intersect the boundary more than
once.
Cannot add COS type curves.

Figure 1 Without Internal Curve Control

Figure 2 With Internal Curve Control

Copying and Moving Curves


Translate, rotate, and scale curves using the Copy and Move tools.
Marquee
Rotation Jack
Copy and Move Curves
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Translate
Rotate
Scale
Figure 1 Translate by Dragging the Marquee

Figure 2 Moving a 3-D Curve

Figure 3 Scale by Dragging the Marquee

Copying Curves Proportionally


You can create proportional copies of single curves and their linked parent curves using the Copy Proportional
tool.
Copy Proportional
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Linked
Unlinked

Conditions and Limitations


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Free and planar


Soft points
Fixed points
Linked copies
Unlinked copies

Figure 2 Edit After Copy

Figure 1 Unlinked Proportional Copy

Figure 3 Linked Proportional Copy

Offsetting Curves
Create style curves using the Curve Offset tool.
Offset Curve
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Direction reference
Normal
Value
Editing
Figure 1 Curve Offset Normal to Plane

Figure 2 COS Offset on Surface Reference

Figure 3 Curve Offset Parallel to Plane

Modifying Curve Shapes Proportionally


You can apply proportional updates to curves in order to see predictable results when you make modifications
to referenced geometry.
Proportional Update
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Using Proportional Update


Planning for proportional update

Figure 1 Original Curve

Figure 2 With Proportional Update

Figure 3 Without Proportional Update

Unlinking Style Curves


You can unlink style curves from the geometry that they reference.
Unlink Points from References
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Soft points
Fixed points

Unlink Curves from Surfaces


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Curve on Surface
Drop Curve

COS By Intersect

Figure 2 Soft Points

Figure 1 Unlinked Fixed Point

Figure 3 Unlinked Soft Points

Making Curves Planar Between Endpoints


You can make free curves planar between their endpoints.
Planar on Endpoints Option
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Internal points cannot be constrained.


Endpoints cannot have tangent constraint.

Figure 1 Free Curve

Figure 2 Free Curve Planar on Endpoints

Editing Style Surfaces


You can change the shape of a style surface by altering the surface type, boundary curves, or internal curves.
Editing Methods
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Edit the defining curves.


Add/remove internal curves.
Change surface type.

Figure 1 Two-Point Internal Curve

Figure 2 Five-Point Internal Curve

Resolving Failed Style Geometry


You can resolve failed style features using the Resolve tool for style features.
Resolve Tool for Style Features
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Failed and blocked features.


Access to other style tools not restricted.
Cannot close style feature without resolving
failed features.

Modify Parent/Child Relationships

Figure 1 Resolve Dialog Box for Style

Using References from Design Models


You can design freeform surface models with references to design models.
Design References
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Skeleton models
Framework
Curve references
Surface references

Figure 1 Exploded View of Style Geometry


Referencing Design Geometry

Figure 2 Curve Endpoints Referencing


Skeleton Geometry

Using Imported 3-D Data


Reference imported curve, surface, and point data to create style features.
Imported 3-D Data
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Imported curves
Imported surfaces
Scan curves
Faceted geometry
Figure 1 COS Created on Imported Surface

Figure 2 Style Surface from COS

Figure 3 Completed Design

Module 8 : Creating Smooth Style Surface Models

Freeform Surfacing Using Creo Parametric

Objectives
After completing this module, you will be able to:
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Understand curvature and its effect on curves and surfaces.


Connect style curves.
Understand style curve connection levels.
Manipulate curve connections.
Connect style surfaces.
Understand surface connection order.
Analyze continuity of a style surface design.
Use the Curvature Analysis tool.
Use Visual Mirror with Curvature Analysis.
Use the Shaded Curvature Analysis tool.
Use the Dihedral Angle Analysis tool.
Use the Reflection Analysis tool.

Understanding Curvature
Curvature is an important measurement for determining the quality of a style surface.
Curvature = 1/Radius
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Smaller radius = Higher curvature


Larger radius = Lower curvature

Curvature Facts
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Curvature of a straight line = 0.


Curvature of an arc is constant.
Curvature of a spline changes constantly.

Figure 1 Curvature Display 1/Radius

Figure 2 Undesirable Acceleration and


Inflection in Curvature

Figure 3 Change in Curvature Shown


in a Reflection Analysis

Using the Curvature Analysis Tool


You can use the curvature analysis tool to analyze curvature of a curve or surface.
Curvature Plot
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Analyze curve or surface smoothness.


Analyze curve or surface continuity.

Figure 1 Connected without Continuity

Figure 2 Connected with Tangent Continuity

Figure 3 Connected with Curvature Continuity

Using Visual Mirror with a Curvature Analysis


Visual mirror provides the ability to mirror the model on screen without mirroring any actual geometry.
Visual Mirror displays:
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Surface and curve curvature analysis


Shaded curvature analysis
Reflection analysis

Figure 1 Original Curve with Curvature Analysis

Figure 2 Curvature Analysis Mirrored

Figure 3 Curvature Adjusted to a Smooth Transition

Manipulating Surface Boundary Connections


The shape of a surface is influenced by the boundary curve and surface connections applied to it.
Surface Connections
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Normal to Plane
Draft
Position (C0)
Tangent (C1)
Curvature (C2)
Figure 1 C0, Position

Figure 2 C1, Tangent

Figure 3 C2, Curvature

Understanding Surface Connection Order


When creating multiple style surfaces, the latest surface is always a follower of the previous surface.
Connecting Surfaces
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Latest surface is a follower of previous leader surface.


Connection influence is applied to the follower surface.

Figure 1 Arrows Pointing to Follower

Figure 2 Pink Surface is Now Also a Leader

Analyzing Continuity of Style Designs


Analyze the continuity of curves and surfaces to ensure a high quality style design.
Analyzing Curvature
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Curvature
Dihedral Angle
Sections
Shaded Curvature
Reflection
Figure 1 Curvature Analysis

Figure 2 Shaded Curvature Plot

Figure 3 Reflection Analysis

Using the Shaded Curvature Analysis Tool


You can use the shaded curvature analysis tool to graphically display a surface curvature.
Shaded Curvature
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Gaussian
Maximum
Mean
Section

Figure 1 Connected without Continuity

Figure 2 Connected with Tangent Continuity

Figure 3 Connected with Curvature Continuity

Using the Reflection Analysis Tool


You can use the reflection analysis tool to graphically identify inconsistencies in curvature.
Reflection Analysis
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Lights
Angle
Spacing
Width

Figure 1 Connected without Continuity

Figure 2 Connected with Tangent Continuity

Figure 3 Connected with Curvature Continuity

Using the Dihedral Angle Analysis Tool


You can use the dihedral angle analysis tool to measure the angle between the tangents of adjoining surfaces.
Dihedral Angle
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Analyze angle between tangents.


Check for continuity.

Figure 1 Without Continuity

Figure 2 With Tangent Continuity

Figure 3 With Continuous Continuity

Module 9 : Integrating Style and Parametric Features

Freeform Surfacing Using Creo Parametric

Objectives
After completing this module, you will be able to:
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Understand parallel modeling.


Use surfaces to define solid geometry.
Export curve parameters for modification.
Reference a parametric framework.
Manipulate style geometry using editing tools.

Understanding Parallel Modeling


Parallel modeling is the term used to describe the integration of style and parametric features within a design.
Integrating Style Features with Parametric
Features
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Parametric framework
Style curves and surfaces
Adding dimensional control to style features
Apply solid modeling options

Figure 1 A Style Feature Referencing


a Parametric Curve

Figure 2 Exported Style Dimensions, Edited


Outside of Style

Figure 3 Solid Surface Defined by Style Surface

Using Style Surfaces to Define Solid Geometry


You can use style surfaces to define or manipulate solid geometry.
Using Style Surfaces to Define Solid Geometry
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Depth reference
Solidify
Thicken
Replace

Figure 1 Thicken

Figure 2 Replace Portion (Patch)

Figure 3 Replace Surface

Exporting Curve Parameters for Modification


You can export the parameters of a style curve so that they can be modified outside of the style environment.
You can export the following style curve parameters:
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Soft point locations


Endpoint tangents
Offset value of a curve on surface
Radial plane location

Figure 1 Plane Offset Dimension

Figure 2 Additional Exported Dimensions

Referencing a Parametric Framework


You can reference a framework of parametric features to define and control style features.
Framework Geometry Examples
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n
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Sketched curves
Datum features
Solid geometry
Parametric surfaces
Figure 1 Controlling Sketched Curves

Figure 2 Controlling Datum Plane

Figure 3 After Framework is Modified

Manipulating Style Geometry Using Editing Tools


You can use various editing tools to manipulate a style geometry.
Typical Surface Editing Tools
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Pattern
Mirror
Merge
Offset
Copy

Figure 2 Mirrored Style Feature

Figure 1 Patterned Style Feature

Figure 3 Merged Style Feature

Module 10 : Techniques for Creating Common


Detailed Shapes

Freeform Surfacing Using Creo Parametric

Objectives
After completing this module, you will be able to:
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n
n
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Create
Create
Create
Create
Create

common detailed shapes.


scoops or bulges using intersecting surfaces.
scoops or bulges with definite boundaries.
scoops or bulges with blurred boundaries.
split surface geometry.

Creating Common Detailed Shapes


You can use the Style tool to create detailed shapes commonly found in styled designs.
Creating Detailed Features
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Scoops
Bulges
Split or tearing geometry

Modeling Techniques
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Surface to surface intersections


Using curve on surface type curves
Blurred boundaries
Definite boundaries

Figure 2 Intersecting Surface Bulge

Figure 1 Definite Boundary Scoop

Figure 3 Scoop Using Curve on Surface

Creating Scoops or Bulges Using Intersecting


Surfaces
You can intersect surfaces to add scoop or bulge geometry details to a model.
Surface to Surface Intersection
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n

Merge intersecting surfaces.


Blend the intersection.

Figure 1 Two Surface Features

Figure 2 Blended Intersection

Figure 3 The Surface Merge

Creating Scoops or Bulges with Definite


Boundaries
You can use scoop or bulge geometry with definite boundaries to add detailed shape to a model.
Creation Technique
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Create upper and lower surfaces.


Create curve on surface curves on both
surfaces.
Trim the surfaces as required.
Create defining cross-boundary curves.
Create two boundary surfaces.

Figure 1 Defined Cross-Boundaries

Figure 2 Two Four-Boundary Surfaces

Figure 3 Dropped Curves Trimmed Surfaces

Creating Scoops or Bulges with Blurred


Boundaries
You can use scoop or bulge geometry with blurred boundaries to add detailed shape to a model.
Creation Techniques
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n
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n

Curve on surface boundaries


Internal curves
Style surface
Tangent condition control
Figure 1 Tangent Condition Control

Figure 2 Scoop Geometry

Figure 3 Solidify to Remove Material

Creating Split Surface Geometry


You can add detailed shapes to your model using a split surface feature.
Creation Technique
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Create four curve on surface type curves


on the main surface.
Trim the main surface.
Create a free curve above or below the
main surface.
Create one surface, using the free curve
as a boundary.
Create another surface, also using the
free curve as a boundary.

Figure 2 Split Surface Geometry

Figure 1 Free Curve Below Surface

Figure 3 Position Connections

Module 11 : Creating Complex, High Quality Style


Surface Models

Freeform Surfacing Using Creo Parametric

Objectives
After completing this module, you will be able to:
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Understand singularity in triangular surfaces.


Reparameterize surfaces.
Understand the benefits of creating four-boundary surfaces.
Use the overbuild technique.
Use the create boundaries technique.
Use the void boundary technique.
Create a four-boundary rounded shape.
Create a triangular shape using four boundaries.

Understanding Singularity in Triangular Surfaces


You can position the singularity point of a triangular surface to enable surface connections and control surface
quality.
Point of Singularity
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The vertex opposite the natural boundary.


Displayed isolines converge to the point of
singularity.
Edit the position of the singularity on the
References tab.
Figure 1 Isolines Converge to Singularity

Figure 2 Singularity at Shared Boundaries

Figure 3 Singularity at Opposite Corners

Reparameterizing a Surface
You can add reparam curves to a surface in order to refine its shape.
Three options for adding reparam
curves:
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Add Reparam Curve


Add U Reparam Curve
Add V Reparam Curve

Figure 1 Reparam Curves Change Isoline Directions

Understanding Four-Boundary Surfaces


Four-boundary surfaces are often required to create high-quality surfaces.
Four-Boundary Surfaces
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High quality
Flexibility

Creation Techniques
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Overbuild
Create boundary
Void boundary

Figure 2 Void Boundary Technique

Figure 1 Overbuild Technique

Figure 3 Create Boundary Technique

Using the Overbuild Technique


You can create a high quality, four-boundary surface larger than required and then trim it to the required shape
after completion.

Figure 1 Overbuilt Four-Boundary Surface

Figure 2 Mirrored Surface

Figure 3 Finished Design

Figure 4 Merged Surface

Using the Create Boundaries Technique


You can create new boundaries to form a series of four-boundary curve networks.

Figure 1 Two Sets of Three-Boundary Surfaces

Figure 2 Create One Four-Boundary Network

Figure 3 Four-Boundary Surfaces

Figure 4 A Second Four-Boundary Network

Using the Void Boundary Technique


You can trim away part of a surface, leaving a four-boundary void that you can use to create a high quality
four-boundary surface.

Figure 1 Dropped Curve

Figure 2 Trimmed Surface

Figure 3 Final, High Quality Surface

Figure 4 New Four-Boundary Surface

Creating a Four-Boundary Rounded Shape


You can add curves and trim back the surface to create a four-boundary rounded shape.

Figure 1 Create Curve on Surface Curves

Figure 3 Four-Boundary Surface

Figure 2 Trim Using Curve on Surface Curves

Figure 4 Four Boundaries after Trim

Creating a Triangular Shape Using Four


Boundaries
You can create a temporary construction surface and use it to create a triangular surface using four boundaries.

Figure 2 Construction Surface and Boundaries


Figure 1 Triangular Shape Curves

Figure 3 Trimmed Construction Surface

Figure 4 New Four-Boundary Shape