Since May 2005

PRESORT STANDARD
US POSTAGE PAID
CHARLESTON, SC
PERMIT NO 437
POSTAL PATRON

FREE

Volume 12 Issue 11
Sullivan’s Island

Isle of Palms

September 23, 2016
Goat Island • Dewees Island

Impact of
added hotel
considered
BY MIMI WOOD

ISLAND EYE NEWS STAFF WRITER

Racing against sunset

HUNDREDS TURNS OUT FOR NEW TURTLE TREK 5K

A
Wild Dunes Resort is exploring plans to build a new
150-room hotel near The Village complex.

C

oncern and frustration, particularly
over the potential for more tourists
and traffic, has been expressed
by Isle of Palms residents as news of a
proposed 150-room hotel at Wild Dunes
circulates around the island.
“We already have many more daily
beach goers searching for parking spaces,
and adversely contributing to the traffic
flow along Palm Boulevard,” lamented
Gail Jordan, a long-time resident. With
the additional traffic that comes from 150
more hotel rooms in Wild Dunes, “turning
right or left onto Palm Boulevard will
become even more dangerous.”
The proposed project is in the “very,
very preliminary stages,” according to City
Administrator Linda Tucker.
The new hotel would be be sited near
The Village complex in Wild Dunes on

crowd of runners and walkers headed out
along the Isle of Palms beach at the start at
the inaugural South Carolina Aquarium
Turtle Trek 5K. Held on Saturday, Sept. 10,
the sunset event included an after-party at
The Windjammer and raised an estimated
$53,000 for the South Carolina Aquarium Sea
Turtle Care Center. It also drew attention to
the aquarium’s plans for a new Zucker Family
Sea Turtle Recovery Exhibit, which will open in
spring 2017.
People traveled from as far as Myrtle Beach
to take part in the Turtle Trek, organizers said,
with 75 kids kicking things off with the Fun
Run and at least 425 adults joining in the 5K.
Below left, J.D. Daubs enjoys the finish after
coming in first overall in the 5K. Middle photo,
Jackson Zeron wins the Fun Run, then poses
at right with his brother Will, who came in
second.

5K RESULTS
Male 1st Place Winners
(by age group)
1-9: Brayden Bunt
10-19: Christopher Martin
20-29: Andrew Mitchell
30-39: William Payne
40-49: Mike Anderson
50-59: Doug Godley
60+ John Blanton
Women 1st Place Winners
(by age group)
1-9: Hannah Finley
10-19: Kitty Goldman
20-29: Olivia Bueno
30-39: Kara Gripin
40-49: Emily Carter
50-59: Melanie Jamrogowicz
60+: Dolores Carapano

OVERALL
WINNERS
Men's Division
1. JD Daubs
2. Ryan Griffin
3. Michael
Martin
Women's
Division
1. Blair Turnage
2. Jasmine
Smith
3. Ava EvansGodley

Hotel continues on page 4

INSIDE THE ISLAND EYE NEWS
TURTLE
CONNECTOR
JAM
RUN GUIDE
TIME
Pg 7
Pg 6

PHOTOS BY STEVE ROSAMILIA

CANTINA
OPENS
Pg 13

2

CIVIC

September 23, 2016

Message from the Mayor of Sullivan’s Island
“MOVING ON UP” TO A NEW TOWN HALL

Dear Island Neighbors,
Since the last appearance of this column, we’ve spent a little time
with Hermine and Julia. Neither one was much of a fun date, but if
this is as bad as it gets this hurricane season, I’ll be happy. Julia just
left with the writing of this update. Here’s hoping for nothing worse!
And speaking of things that might relate to flooding, we are saving
the best for last: possible very good news for your flood insurance
premiums! But first…
CUE UP THE THEME FOR “THE JEFFERSONS”
In just a few weeks, there will be scads of boxes eagerly packed at
our temporary Town Hall…if by “temporary” you mean more than five
years, and if by “Town Hall” you mean old, rundown trailers. We are
all looking forward to moving on up to the (south) east side of those
quarters, to the new Town Hall, the weekend of Oct. 8-9.
The building has been designed and built with value-engineering
in mind, in an effort to give our residents and taxpayers the best
building for their buck, focusing on durability and efficiency, and
putting the nicest touches where we greet the public. But be assured
that our dedicated and talented town staff will feel like they are now
serving you from “deeluxe” work spaces in the sky, compared to what
they have had to deal with heretofore.
The trailers were a necessary, albeit spartan and hurried, solution
to the need to vacate the former Town Hall building when it developed
mold and other problems. Since then, our committed staff members
have served our residents from these limited quarters that were never
designed for this purpose and that have been wearing out even as
they were used (think floor tiles popping up under your desk chair).
So when you encounter any of our town office staff and our police
force, please thank them for their commitment in the face of these
challenges.
And thanks to all of you for your patience in interacting with
our town offices and attending our town meetings in these humble
quarters. We really do have dedicated, patient and engaged citizens.
Here’s how the move should affect you: not much, as long as you

remember to head for the new
digs starting on Monday, Oct.
10. Trailers will be open as usual
the Friday before that. Phone
and computer services will be
transferred over the weekend, so
if you wish to send emails or voice
mails during that time, it may be
prudent to resend them Monday
or Tuesday. However, remember
that all police and fire calls are
handled by the Charleston County
Consolidated Dispatch Center, Pat O'Neil
and relayed to our first responders
via radio, so they will not be affected. As always, for emergencies call
911, and for non-emergency issues call 843-743-7200.
And in case you are curious, the mayor’s office will have the
same square footage it currently has: zero. But finally there will be
some modest conference room space to meet with citizens without
interruptions.
Stay tuned for word of our official ribbon-cutting once the trailers
are gone and the parking lot finished!
KEEPING STORM WATER OUT OF OUR SEWER SYSTEM
“Stormwater” and “wastewater” sound alike, and the differences
aren’t something we usually think about. But the former term refers
to the water that results from rain, tidal flooding and resulting rise in
groundwater, while the latter term indicates the stuff that goes down
our toilets, bathtubs, showers, sinks, etc.
You don’t want them to meet, and on a good day, they don’t. But
during a very rainy spell, they can. Heavy rain, tidal flooding and
resulting rising groundwater tables can invade sewer (wastewater)
mains, doubling or tripling the amount of liquid that the sewer plant
receives.
That’s a problem on many counts, and one that is shared with

www.islandeyenews.com

3

September 23, 2016

World Affairs Council to examine Brexit
STAFF REPORT

FOR ISLAND EYE NEWS

T

wo foreign policy experts
will discuss Great Britain’s
vote to leave the European
Union and its potential impact
on the U.S. in Charleston on
Oct. 3.
The talk, to be held at The
Citadel Alumni Center, kicks
off the World Affairs Council of
Charleston’s 2016-17 season.
Samuel
Wells,
a
South
Carolina native, is former
deputy director of the Woodrow
Wilson International Center for
Scholars in Washington, D.C.,
and founded its International
Security Studies Program. He
is a graduate of the University
of North Carolina and received

both master’s and Ph.D. degrees
from Harvard.
Sherrill Brown Wells is a
lecturer at George Washington
University, focusing on the
European Union. She is the
former editor of the Department
of State's American Foreign Policy
Current Documents series. A
graduate of Vassar College, she
received both master’s and Ph.D.
degrees from the London School
of Economics.
The World Affairs Council,
formerly the Charleston Foreign
Affairs Forum, was founded in
1980.
The nonprofit, nonpartisan
organization’s goal is to expand

Message continues from page 2
many, many municipalities across the country. Traditionally, the
solution has been to dig up the old, leaky pipes and replace them
with new pipes.
Greg Gress, our Water and Sewer Department manager, has
recently received national recognition for implementing a less
costly, less disruptive solution on Sullivan’s Island. A new issue
of the trade journal Trenchless Technology (http://bit.ly/SIWSGROUTPROJECT) highlights the town’s use of an alternative
technology, called “grouting,” which refers to injecting grout into the
leaking joints and defects from inside the sewer mains to keep the
stormwater and groundwater out. The equipment travels the interior
of the pipes, so little digging or pipe replacement is required unless
there are sections that are beyond grouting.
The first phase of our project sealed more than seven miles of sewer
mains with this technology. The result: The amount of stormwater
and groundwater getting into the sewer system was reduced by 46
percent!
FOUR WORDS YOU WOULDN’T EXPECT
Good news from FEMA. Our building official and flood plain
manager, Randy Robinson, has informed us that FEMA has released
preliminary new flood maps for public review. These are maps that
indicate which flood risk category any property is in. Randy says that
most island properties will find themselves in a lower-risk category
than they are currently in, meaning that in a year or so when the
maps take effect, their premiums should drop noticeably.
In the near future, FEMA will hold public meetings in the area
to present the maps to the community and to answer questions
concerning the maps and insurance rates. Access the preliminary
maps, flood plain news and resources through our town’s website
(http://bit.ly/SIFLOODPLAINNEWS).
And remember that about a year ago, thanks to Randy’s hard work,
the town’s overall community rating was moved to a more favorable
category, which resulted in a 20 percent reduction in premiums.
See you around the Island!

the knowledge of international
and world affairs to audiences
throughout the Lowcountry.
WACC holds six speaking
events
each
season.
Its
members represent a crosssection of local residents from
business, education and civic
backgrounds. It is a member
of the national World Affairs
Councils, which has some 100
branches in 40 states.
Series membership is $170
for two people living at the
same address and $100 for
an individual. A prospective
member can attend one meeting
as a guest for $20, which can be
applied toward the membership
fee.
No
pre-registration
is
required.
Meetings are at The Citadel
Alumni Center at 69 Hagood
Ave. at 6 p.m., with a reception
starting at 5:15 p.m.
The World Affairs Council
also sponsors Great Decisions
Groups in members’ homes,
using materials from the Foreign
Policy
Association.
It
also
sponsors an annual awards
program for students from the
local schools and The Citadel
who have expressed an interest
and have excelled in the study of
foreign affairs.
For more information, go to
waccharleston.org.

Monday, September 26
Tree Commission
5 p.m.
2050-B Middle Street

Tuesday, October 4
Public Safety Committee
9 a.m.
1207 Palm Boulevard

Thursday, September 29
Water & Sewer Committee
8:30 a.m.
2050 Gull Drive

Jennifer Tuohy
managing editor
jennifer@luckydognews.com
Susan Hill Smith
managing editor
Swan Richards
senior graphic designer
Alejandro Ferreyros
graphic designer
Lori McGee 614.0901
advertising executive
Christian LeBlanc
social media
christian@luckydognews.com
Steve Rosamilia
photographer
Mimi Wood
staff writer

Submit your letters to the editor to:
info@luckydognews.com

Recycle - WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 28 - Recycle

Tuesday, September 27
City Council
6 p.m.
1207 Palm Boulevard

Lynn Pierotti
publisher
lynn@luckydognews.com

PUBLISHED BY
Lucky Dog Publishing
of South Carolina, LLC
P.O. Box 837
Sullivan’s Island, SC 29482
843-886-NEWS

CIVIC CALENDAR
Sullivan's Island
883.3198
www.sullivansisland-sc.com

Publisher of the
The Island Eye News
and The Island Connection

CONTRIBUTORS
Dawn Davis
Mary Pringle
Geoff Bennett
Wendy Sang
Krista Ritterhoff
Sarah Díaz
Sarah Kirk
Dimi Matouchev

Pat O’Neil
oneilp@sullivansisland-sc.com, 843-670 9266

Isle of Palms
886.6428
www.iop.net

Lucky Dog Publishing
o f SC, LL C

Monday, October 3
Planning Commission
Special meeting date
6 p.m.
2050-B Middle Street
Tuesday, October 4
Municipal Court*
5:30 p.m.
2050-B Middle Street

*Bench Trials will be at a temporary Town Hall facility located behind the Fire Station, next to the Stith
Park (2050 Middle Street). Contact SI Clerk of Court directly at 883-5734 (Maria LoRusso) for payments
or questions.

FUTURE DEADLINE:
SEPTEMBER 28 for
our OCTOBER 7 issue

The Island Eye News, a wholly owned
subsidiary of Lucky Dog Publishing of SC
LLC, is a free, independent newspaper
published every two weeks and is for and
about the Isle of Palms, Sullivan’s Island,
Goat Island and Dewees Island. Copies
are mailed free of charge to every active
mailbox in our coverage area and are also
available at area businesses. Contributions of information, pictures and articles
are welcomed and are used according to
space limitations and news value and cannot be returned except by special request.
Op-ed articles and letters to the editor do
not necessarily reflect the opinion of
Lucky Dog News, or its writers.
All advertising rates are listed at:
under “advertising”

www.islandeyenews.com

4
Hotel continues from cover
approximately 4.2 acres currently
occupied by the Wild Dunes
administrative offices and fitness
club.
However,
preliminary
discussions include the addition
of a new, dedicated resort guest
entrance off Palm Boulevard
that could help streamline Wild
Dunes traffic.
There
are
approximately
2,200 properties within Wild
Dunes, almost equally split
between single-family homes
and condominiums, according to
Dick Casey, Broker-in-Charge of
Wild Dunes Real Estate.
In addition to these existing
properties, “Wild Dunes has
vested rights to build a total
of 350 inn rooms, as stated in
the original PRD dating to the
1970’s,” said Jimmy Carroll,
Isle of Palms Council member.
Douglas Kerr, director of Isle of
Palms Building, Planning and
Zoning Department, verified this
number.
Presently, there are 147 rooms
in Wild Dunes classified as “inn
rooms” by the city.
The Boardwalk Inn, a AAA
Four Diamond hotel that is a
focal point of the resort, accounts
for 93 of the inn rooms in that
count.
To the right of The Boardwalk
Inn, and closer to Palmetto Drive
sit three buildings that make
up The Village complex. Each of
the 115 units in The Village are
individually, privately owned
condominiums; however, the

The Wild Dunes main gate currently handles resort guests and at peak check-in times
can cause traffic to backup on Palm Boulevard. The resort is talking about adding an
entrance just for resort traffic.
PHOTOS BY STEVE ROSAMILIA

complex functions much like a
hotel.
To wit most of The Village
properties
are
not
owneroccupied, and Wild Dunes
Property Management handles
the majority of the rentals.
Similar to an inn or hotel, there
is no minimum daily rental
requirement, such as a two or
three night stay; however, single
night availability is fairly limited.
Furthermore, Kerr explains
that 54 of those 115 condos
contain an adjacent “lock-off”
unit that is officially counted by
the city as an “inn” room. So,
while most Village floor plans
contain a living room, kitchen,
bedroom and bath, almost half
have an additional bedroom and
full bath, separated from the
primary space by a lockable door.
Based on the Wild Dunes
resort website, it's evident that
a lock-off unit can can be rented

independently from its attached
condo.
Therefore, the total official
count for existing inn rooms is
147, comprised of 93 rooms at
The Boardwalk Inn, and 54 lockoffs in The Village. But that is
still far below the 350 permitted
under the original PRD, now
called the Planned Development
District (PDD).
Integral to the proposed hotel is
the creation of an added entrance
into Wild Dunes, which would be
used primarily by resort guests.
Still speculative at this point,
one idea would limit access
through the existing main gate,
on Palm Boulevard at 46th,
to residents, and visitors with
previously issued passes. The
added Palm Boulevard entrance
would be located farther down,
to the northeast of the main
entrance, and would be used for
resort check-ins to rentals and

www.islandeyenews.com

September 23, 2016
the proposed hotel. This separate
resort entrance would facilitate
arrivals for resort guests, and
should help eliminate back-ups
on Palm Boulevard experienced
by residents and owners.
Preliminary plans suggest the
added entrance’s visitors gate
would be located well within the
resort grounds, so that potential
check-in back ups would occur
on Wild Dunes property, as
opposed to Palm Boulevard.
City officials are “constantly
mindful of retaining the original
charm of the Island,” stated
Tucker. “We try to maintain a
symbiotic relationship between
island residents and a healthy
tourism industry.”
Rental properties, including
inn
rooms,
“contribute
a
significant portion of the city’s
revenue. Large chunks, perhaps
as much as 50 percent, of the
accommodations tax and beach
preservation fee are generated
from rentals within Wild Dunes,”
Tucker continued. This revenue,
in turn, often benefits residents;
for example, property tax rates
for residents in 2016-17 will
remain the same for the second
consecutive year.
The City of Isle of Palms has
engaged the services of David
Stevens, Civil Site Environmental,
to oversee and advise the city on
the project. “David was involved
with the infrastructure of Wild
Dunes from very early on,” stated
Tucker. “He is intimately familiar
with the property.”

6

TURTLE REPORT

Turtle lovers invited to join end-of-season
party at Windjammer
BY MARY PRINGLE

O

nce again the Turtle Team
is ready to celebrate the end
of the nesting and hatching
season with a party, on Sept. 28,
to honor Jammer, our beloved
loggerhead turtle rescued on the
beach at The Windjammer in April
of 2011.
Held at The Windjammer with
wide support from businesses
and organizations, Jammin’ for
Jammer is now a tradition. The
good thing about it is that it
brings together so many in our
community but also has a positive
effect on sea turtle conservation
right here in our area.
For those of you who are not
familiar with Jammer’s story,
he washed ashore near death,
suffering from debilitated turtle
syndrome, and was taken to the
South Carolina Aquarium’s Turtle
Hospital. After receiving excellent
care there, he was released in May
of 2012 at the Isle of Palms County
Park, near where he was rescued.
The before and after photos
did not seem to show the same
loggerhead. The healthy, robust
sea turtle carried for release by Isle

FOR ISLAND EYE NEWS

Barb Gobien and Mary Pringle with the Turtle Quilt to be raffled at the party.

of Palms Fire Department Chief
Ann Graham and Windjammer coowner Bobby Ross was strong and
ready for a new chance at survival.
It is especially exciting for
the Turtle Team to be part of
the effort to raise funds for the

aquarium’s upcoming $5 million
Zucker Family Sea Turtle Recovery
exhibit, which will offer a learning
landscape focused on the rescue,
rehabilitation and release of sea
turtles.
This state-of-the-art facility will
combine the best medical care
with many special interactive
educational activities for children
and adults and is slated to open
in the spring of 2017. Being on the
southwest side of the main floor
of the building will make it much
more visible to the public, and
special two-way glass walls will
allow thousands of visitors to view
the turtles and their daily care
without any disruptions. Among
JAMMIN FOR JAMMER
• 7 to 10 p.m., Wednesday,
Sept. 28
• At The Windjammer,
Isle of Palms
• $20 donation requested at
door
• Includes live music, food,
cash bar, silent auction

www.islandeyenews.com

7

September 23, 2016

the impressive improvements are
an exercise pool and a CT scanner.
The party at The Windjammer
this year will be bigger and better
than ever thanks to our special
sponsors, The Island Eye News,
The Windjammer, and Allegra
Design Marketing and Print. We
are also grateful for the cash
donations of First Reliance Bank
and Greater Charleston Properties,
The Boulevard Company.
There is a $20 cover donation
to help raise money for the new
hospital and a cash bar. Live music
will be provided by Sweetgrass and
the Knuckleheads and “Fletch,”
our favorite giant turtle, will once
again come from Juno Beach,
Florida, to party with us.
We have been working on a
handmade quilt for which the
winning raffle ticket will be drawn
during the evening. You do not
need to be there to win. You can get
more information and buy tickets
for the quilt at bergwerfgraphics.
com.
The free food this year will be
better than ever from the best
restaurants on our two islands
and Mount Pleasant. They include
The Windjammer, Morgan Creek
Grill, The Boathouse, Acme
Lowcountry Kitchen, The Village
Bakery, Coconut Joe’s, Luke ‘n’
Ollie’s Pizzeria, Long Island Café,
Banana Cabana, Sea Biscuit Café,
Triangle Char & Bar, Saltworks
Dockside Deli, The Dinghy, Home
Team BBQ, Taco Mamacita, and
Harris Teeter.
An exciting silent auction will
include many works by local
artists, a brunch with NY Times
best-selling author Mary Alice
Monroe, and tickets to “The Late
Show with Stephen Colbert.”
So please make plans to bring
your friends and join us at The
Windjammer, at 10th Avenue and
Ocean Boulevard. You will have a
great time and help a very worthy
cause.
PHOTO BY BARBARA BERGWERF

Your guide to the 2016
IOP Connector Run
ANNUAL EVENT HAS RAISED MORE THAN
$1 MILLION FOR CHILDREN’S CHARITIES
BY SUSAN HILL SMITH

ISLAND EYE NEWS STAFF WRITER

N

ow in its 24th year, the 2016 IOP Connector Run is right around
the corner, scheduled for Oct. 1, at 8 a.m., when participants and
supporters will gather at the Isle of Palms Public Safety building
to start one of the biggest Lowcountry races of the fall.
WHAT IT’S ALL ABOUT
Through the years, the IOP Connector Run (ioprun.com) has raised
more than $1 million for the prevention of child abuse and neglect in the
Lowcountry. This year, the presenting sponsor is MAHLE. Benefitting
charities of the race include: HALOS, Windwood Farm & Family Services,
Lowcountry Orphan Relief, Carolina Youth & Development Center and
Dee Norton Lowcountry Children’s Center. Elizabeth Grantham of the
Isle of Palms Exchange Club will be grand marshal. Grantham was
sworn in as national exchange club president this summer.
REGISTRATION
If you register before Sunday, Sept. 25, cost is $35. After that point,
it’s $40 for all entries. You can sign up for the race one of three ways
• Register online at ioprun.com/register by Sept. 28 at midnight.
• Download, print and mail your registration form with payment.
• Register in person at packet pickup by bringing your completed
registration form along with payment.
Children do not need to be registered for the race if they are under
the age of 10 by the race date. But if you want your child to have a
time-chip, race-packet, T-shirt and race bag, the child will need to be
registered.
PACKET PICKUP
• Friday, Sept. 30, from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. at East Cooper Medical
Center, 2000 Hospital Dr, Mount Pleasant
• Race day, Saturday, Oct. 1, from 6 a.m. to 7:30 a.m. at Isle of
Palms Public Safety Building, 30 J.C. Long Blvd., Isle of Palms.

The post-race party includes an awards ceremony and entertainment for kids.

The 10K runners will continue the full length of the IOP Connector
just into Mount Pleasant before they turn-around near the entrance
to Seaside Farms, when they head back to join the party on J.C. Long
Boulevard.
AFTER-PARTY
Registration includes a party with food provided by Harris Teeter,
live music, a complimentary beer garden (for ages 21 and over with ID)
and kid’s entertainment. Awards will be given at 10 a.m. Prizes will be
awarded to the top three finishers in each age/gender group.
VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES
There are many ways to help, whether stuffing race packets in the
days leading up to the race, helping set up the course, giving directions
or cleaning up after the party. Go to ioprun.com/volunteer/ to sign up.

TRAFFIC AND PARKING
The Isle of Palms Connector closes at 7 on Saturday morning. To
get back and forth between Mount Pleasant and Isle of Palms, traffic
will have to go through Sullivan’s Island until the race is over and the
connector is re-opened.
Both paid parking and free parking will be available within walking
distance from the race start. Paid parking is available on Ocean
Boulevard and at the Isle of Palms County Park. When parking on
the side of residential roads, make sure all four tires are 4 feet off the
pavement to avoid tickets or towing.
RACE COURSE
Racers begin at the designated point on Palm Boulevard, continue on
Palm until turning left onto the Isle of Palms Connector at the light and
heading over the Intracoastal Waterway.
At the marked halfway point, the 5K runners and walkers will go
around the barriers and water stations and race to the finish back on
the Island on J.C. Long Boulevard.

www.islandeyenews.com

8

September 23, 2016

Coastal Art Maps releases South Carolina series
BY ADRIENNE WALKOWIAK
FOR ISLAND EYE NEWS

C

oastal
Art
Maps,
a
company that captures the
beauty of the East Coast
shoreline through hand-drawn
maps, this summer released its
“Sea Islands of South Carolina”
map series, the latest additions
to its collection. These three new
maps depict the beaches, towns
and historic landmarks that
span much of the 130 miles of
the South Carolina coastline.
Joseph S. Tarella, the talented
map-maker at Coastal Art Maps,
was able to expertly spotlight
the
iconic
historic
towns,
coastal
attractions,
islands
and waterways along the South
Carolina shore.
The first of the hand-drawn
maps in the new collection,
Daufuskie Island to Fripp Island,
depicts the areas from the Georgia
border to the town of Beaufort,
showcasing boot-shaped Hilton
Head, with quaint Harbour Town
Lighthouse as well as Port Royal’s
harbor and military bases, and
the bucolic town of Beaufort.
The second map, Edisto Island
to Isle of Palms, highlights areas
including Charleston as well
as Kiawah, Johns, James, and
Seabrook Islands. Charleston’s
historic beauty is featured, with

such notable locations as Battery
Promenade, Waterfront Park,
Charleston Harbor, and Fort
Sumter. Kiawah is depicted as
an oasis of untouched natural
beauty, with miles of pristine
beaches,
perfectly
preserved
maritime forests, sand dunes,
and marshes.
Finally, the third map, Capers
Island to Cat Island, highlights
Bulls, Murphy and Cape Islands.

This map portrays the stunning,
tranquil settings steeped in
history along the shore: classic
plantations,
white
sandy
beaches, rolling dunes, beautiful
parks such as Francis Marion
National Forest, and gorgeous
marinas. It also majestically
captures the untamed wilderness
of Bulls Island, with its Wildlife
Refuge and areas of uninhabited
beauty.

We now
build
websites!
www.islandeyenews.com

“It’s been a true pleasure
capturing the beauty of the South
Carolina shoreline, rich with
history and resplendent against
the backdrop of the extensive
Lowcountry
landscape,”
explained artist Tarella, owner of
Coastal Art Maps.
Tarella started Coastal Art
Maps as a hobby. When he built
a house on Long Beach Island,
he couldn’t find any maps of the
area that he liked, so he created
his own. Friends and family
wanted their own versions, and
Tarella's labor-of-love company
evolved from there, leading him
to capture the beauty of the East
Coast shoreline from Cape Cod
to Key West through his handdrawn and painted artwork.
Tarella uses the time-honored
tools
of
pen-and-ink
and
watercolor washes, resulting in
an extraordinarily tactile quality
not easily achieved using more
modern, mechanical methods.
Each map represents a moment
when an ever-changing world is
briefly frozen in time.
For more information
coastalartmaps.com.

visit

10

September 23, 2016

Lowcountry
music
Isle of Palms Police
festival,
golf
tournament
Report - Aug 2016
JAM-ROCKERS MAKE A WEEKEND

08/01 – Burglary: Carolina
Boulevard. Victim reported
two rings stolen while she was
occupying the rental home.
08/03 – Vandalism: Carolina
Boulevard. Complainant
reported spray-painted damage
to the outdoor shower.
08/03 – Petit Larceny: J.C.
Long Boulevard. Complainant
reported the theft of a leak
detector from an underground
fuel storage tank.
08/04 – Grand Larceny: 41st
Avenue. Complainant reported
the theft of a large bank deposit
from the business.
08/04 – Fraud: 1400 block of
Palm Boulevard. Victim reported
the fraudulent use of her credit
card for online purchases.
08/06 – Vandalism: Highway
517, Isle of Palms Connector.
Complainant reported apparent
intentional damage to the
American flag displayed at that
location.
08/06 – Petit Larceny: Ocean
Boulevard. Victim reported the
theft of a bicycle from under the
home.
08/07 – Petit Larceny: 1300
Ocean Blvd., Sea Cabins.
Victim reported the theft of an
unsecured rental bicycle from
that location.
08/08 – Theft from Motor
Vehicle: Ocean Boulevard. A
hotel guest reported the theft
of the license plate from her
vehicle.
08/08 – Petit Larceny: 2200
block of Waterway Boulevard.
Complainant reported 2 bicycles
stolen from the front porch.
08/08 – Burglary: 24th Avenue

Victim reported forced entry into
the home, during which guns,
cash and jewelry were taken.
08/14 – Theft of Motor Vehicle:
1300 Ocean Blvd., Sea Cabins.
Victim reported the theft of a
golf cart from that location. The
vehicle had already been located
by an officer and promptly
returned.
08/14 – Vandalism: Ocean
Point. Several mailboxes and
posts were damaged/removed
from homes in the area.
08/20 – Petit Larceny: Ocean
Boulevard. Complainant
reported the theft of a surfboard
from the business.
08/29 – Petit Larceny: 41st
Avenue. Victim reported two
flags stolen from his boat.
08/29 Theft from Motor Vehicle:
Ocean Boulevard. Victim
reported prescription medication
stolen from her car parked at
this location.
08/30 – Domestic Violence:
Victim reported an assault
by his wife, who had fled the
scene. While officers
were on scene she
returned and was
arrested.
08/31 – Theft from
Motor Vehicle:
Ocean Boulevard.
Victim reported
his license plate
stolen while his
vehicle was parked
under the
hotel.

OUT OF CHUCKTOWN BALL
BY STAFF REPORT

FOR ISLAND EYE NEWS

P

rogressive
jam-rockers
Umphrey’s
McGee
will
host a two-day music
festival dubbed "Chucktown
Ball" this weekend, Sept. 2324, at Riverfront Park in North
Charleston. In addition, the
band will present the Chucktown
Ball Charity Golf Tournament on
Sunday, September 25, at the
Harbor Course at Wild Dunes.
Both
the
festival
and
tournament are benefits for the
MUSC Shawn Jenkins Children’s
Hospital.
Veterans of the touring and
festival
circuit,
Umphrey’s
McGee celebrates 18-plus years
of musical innovation, unique
fan engagement and worldclass live events. The band has
long been featured at festivals
such as Bonnaroo, The Hangout
Music Festival, and Lockn’,
while consistently selling out
some of the country’s finest
venues, including The Ryman
in Nashville, and Red Rocks
Amphitheatre in Colorado.

Now, bassist Ryan Stasik lives
in Mount Pleasant, percussionist
Andy Farag lives on Johns Island
and manager Vincent Iwinski
lives on Isle of Palms and has
an office on Sullivan’s Island,
making this event a hometown
party not to be missed.
Chucktown Ball is rapidly
evolving into a unique Umphrey’s
celebration with Riverfront Park
as a picturesque backdrop. Each
night, two sets of UM will be
preceded by very special guests:
Moon Taxi and Charlestonbased Dead 27s on Friday,
Sept. 23; and The Floozies,
Charleston’s Dangermuffin and
The Hip Abduction on Saturday,
Sept. 24. The event will also
feature local food, libations, and
vending, along with a umVIP
elevated concert experience and
travel packages.
For more information, tickets to
the festival, or to sign up for the
golf tournament, visit umphreys.
com.

September 23, 2016

11

Fort Moultrie Centennial Author Series

BRIAN MCENANY TO PRESENT BOOK ON WEST POINT CLASS OF 1862
BY DAWN DAVIS

FOR ISLAND EYE NEWS

F

ort Moultrie’s Centennial Author
Series will continue with author
Brian McEnany speaking about his
book “For Brotherhood and Duty: The
Civil War History of the West Point Class of
1862” at Fort Moultrie on Saturday, Sept.
24 at 1 p.m.
Following his talk, the author will be
available for signing copies of his book
which will be available for purchase.
In the book, McEnany follows West
Point cadets from their initiation, through
coursework, and onto the battlefield,
focusing on 12 Union and four Confederate
soldiers. Drawing heavily on primary
sources, McEnany presents a chronicle of
the young classmates, who became allies
and enemies during the largest conflict
ever undertaken on American soil. Three
of the cadets from South Carolina—Henry
S. Farley of Laurensville, James Hamilton
of Charleston and John R. Blocker of
Edgefield—resigned their commissions and
participated in the opening engagement of
the American Civil War when Confederate
forces fired onto Fort Sumter, occupied by
United States troops.
McEnany graduated from the United
States Military Academy with the class of
1962 and served in artillery assignments in

Germany, Korea, and the United States
and in combat in Vietnam. A retired
lieutenant colonel and operations
research analyst, he is the author of
several historical articles about West
Point during the Civil War.
He has personal connections to
Fort Sumter through his great-greatgrandfather, a member of the Engineer
Company at West Point who was
assigned to Fort Sumter by Special
Order 194, November 25, 1856. The
corporal and his family returned to
West Point in late 1858 after the birth
of the author’s great grandfather.
Fort Moultrie is located at 1214
Middle Street, Sullivan’s Island. The
site is administered by the National
Park Service as a unit of Fort Sumter
National Monument. Fort Moultrie
represents the history of seacoast
defense in the United States, from
the American Revolution to the end of
World War II. An entrance fee of $3
for adults and $1 for senior citizens
is charged for the park. For more, see
www.facebook.com/FtMoultrieNPS.

www.islandeyenews.com

You can now search properties in and around Charleston without giving your information.
No need to sign in. NO one is tracking you. NO one will contact you unless you generate the
conversation. Visit our new, updated website at sanddollarsc.com.

CHUCK
MIMMS

EDY
MIMMS

MEL
MILES

TROY
GANDEE

SARAH
VANBUREN CHURCH

CHAD
VINCENT

ELLIOTT
MIMMS

Call us today for all your Real Estate needs 843-530-8100
PICK YOUR
OWN COLORS
& FINISHES

2402 PALM BOULEVARD
Isle of Palms
6 bedroom/6.5 baths
$5,800,000

C ontact

MEL MILES
864.363.3049

Serving Sullivan's Island, Isle of Palms and Mt. Pleasant
Sullivans Island

843.530.8100

SanddollarSC.com

September 23, 2016

Mex 1 Coastal Cantina welcomes
islanders with tacos, margaritas

13

S P O T O N C E H A D S T O R I E D PA S T A S S TAT I O N 2 2 R E S TA U R A N T
BY SUSAN HILL SMITH

ISLAND EYE NEWS STAFF WRITER

M

ex 1 Coastal Cantina on Sullivan’s Island officially opened
this month, and is ready to serve up the Baja Mexican
food, fresh margaritas and chilled-out vibe that has made
its sister restaurant in West Ashley so popular.
The folks behind Mex 1 realize they have taken on a treasured
spot on the islands. For about three years, the location went by
the name Salt at Station 22, but anyone who has lived or visited
here for very long, remembers its history as simply Station 22,
which former Sullivan’s Island Mayor Marshall Stith owned and
operated for 25 years.
Partner Dave Lorenz says Stith has been “very supportive and
encouraging,” with the location’s shift to the coastal cantina
concept. “We are even in talks with him about him producing the
legendary Station 22 Coconut Cake for us to sell at Mex 1.”
Lorenz adds, “The overall acceptance from the locals has been
great and it's what we are striving to accomplish.”
His fellow partners are his wife, Chrissy, and Roddy Smith,
who lives in Mount Pleasant. The Lorenzes are longtime residents
of Isle of Palms, and Chrissy reports that they are “having a blast”
at the new location.
Mex 1 takes its name from the highway that runs down the Baja
Peninsula, and several of the choices include fish and shrimp.
Count on a creative selection of tacos, quesadillas, salads,
sandwiches and Baja bowls. And there’s a swirl of margarita
options, too, not to mention infused tequila.
Check out the full menu at Mex1Can.com. The Sullivan’s Island
location at 2205 Middle Street is open every day starting at 11 a.m.
Jerrah Kohn serves up some cocktails on opening night.

www.islandeyenews.com

PHOTOS BY STEVE ROSAMILIA

$14,000 STEM
education boost

EAST COOPER MEDICAL CENTER
COMMUNITY FUND GIVES GRANTS
TO SCHOOLS

T

he East Cooper Medical Center Community Fund gifted 14
East Cooper schools each with a $1,000 grant, on Sept.
15. Jason Alexander, CEO at East Cooper Medical Center,
presented a donation to each school’s principal in a ceremony
at the hospital. The donations are intended to be used for
STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics)
Education. Recipients include Sullivan's Island Elementary
School, Moultrie and Laing middle schools, and Wando High
School.

September 23, 2016

15

ON THE WATER

Try these tricks to optimize fall fishing
BY GEOFF BENNETT
FOR ISLAND EYE NEWS

T

he perfect storm that
makes fishing so great in
the fall is about to begin.
The combination of lower water
temperatures, tons of bait and
fewer fishermen on the water
makes for fantastic conditions.
The fact that cooler days will
make
fishing
much
more
pleasant doesn't hurt either.
Many different approaches
will work this time of year and
popping corks are a favorite.
An angler can catch so many
different types of fish: redfish,
trout, flounder, ladyfish, shark,
etc. I use a weighted popping cork
so I can increase the distance of
my cast. Then I put an 18- to 24inch fluorocarbon leader from the
cork to a size 1 circle hook. Mud
minnows, shrimp and artificial
shrimp all work well as baits.
When focusing on redfish, we
begin to use artificial lures as
fall approaches. Jerk shad lures
paired with flutter hooks are my
go-to option. Usually 4- to 5-inch
length, these lures imitate small
baitfish. Flutter hooks have
a weight on their shank that
produces really great action. Try

rate of retrieve until you find one
that works. Don’t be surprised if
every now and then a big redfish
takes a swipe.
Ladyfish, a personal favorite,
are more plentiful than any year
I can recall. We've spent many
charters watching ladyfish blow
up balls of bait heading toward
the boat. Toss a live mud minnow
or shrimp in their path and get
ready for some great action.
These acrobatic fish are very
entertaining as they fly through
the air. While these fish will fade
as the water cools, we should
still have a few more weeks of
activity.

See you on the water!  

flutter hooks in size 3/0 with a
1/8-ounce weight and lures in
natural hues like silver and grey.
For trout, the topwater bite has
been very strong first thing in the

morning. I’ve tried lots of options
but I overwhelmingly use Super
Spook Jr’s. My favorite colors
are black head/ chartreuse body
and silver shad. Alternate your

www.islandeyenews.com

Capt. Geoff Bennett operates
Charleston
Charter
Fishing
providing light tackle and fly
fishing
charters.
For
more
information, call 843-324-3332,
visit
charlestoncharterfishing.
com
or
email
captain@
charlestoncharterfishing.com.

16

HOW DOES YOUR GARDEN GROW?

September 23, 2016

Time to transition

CONSIDER SOME TWEAKS IN SEPTEMBER
BY WENDY SANG

FOR ISLAND EYE NEWS

If we don't change, we don't grow. cracks me up when they proudly
display pansies, snapdragons
If we don't grow, we aren't really
and ornamental cabbages not
living.
~ Gail Sheehy 
even two minutes after Labor
ransition is a funny thing. Day, even though our daily high
It's kind of uncomfortable, temperatures are still pushing 90
like being between shoe degrees. (This always seems to
sizes. The old shoes are too tight, roughly coincide with “pumpkinbut the new ones seem a little spiced” everything season.)
I know, it’s pretty tempting to
roomy. Most of us are creatures
of habit, and change doesn’t come run right out and buy a bunch of
easily. Meanwhile, life pays us no cool weather plants in an attempt
mind, marching off in a different to summon the fall temperatures
direction just as soon as we get by sheer force of will. But, don’t
do it! Just because the national
comfortable.
The same holds true in the chains are selling something
plant world. When it comes to our doesn’t mean it’s a good time to
yards and gardens, the only true plant it. It’s still way too hot for
constant is change—trees will pansies, violas and snapdragons,
grow bigger and throw shade on and planting them now will result
new areas, just as surely as the in them “bolting”—growing tall
neighborhood dogs will collectively and sparsely flowered—rather
decide that your hydrangeas are than remaining compact and
in desperate need of an “acidifier.” bushy and full of blooms.
So while we are all waiting
Whether the changes are big
or small, every garden benefits patiently for the temperatures
from an occasional tweak, and to dip even the tiniest bit, it's a
September is the perfect time to good time to take stock of what's
happening in your yard right now.
do it.
But, one caveat: It’s a good What did well for you this year?
idea to have a little patience this Which areas could use a little
time of year. Don’t take your cue improvement?
I try to give plants a couple of
from the big box stores. It always

T

seasons to prove themselves. If
they still don’t seem to be thriving,
I either move them to another spot,
or they get an all-expense-paid,
one-way ticket to the compost pile
(a decision usually based on how
much the plant in question set me
back). If you find you simply must
add some color or texture here or
there, choose plants that are more
forgiving of warm temperatures.
Crotons, begonias, marigolds,
asparagus ferns and petunias
would all be good choices to bridge
the gap between now and winter
annual season.
When it comes to gardening,
change is definitely a good thing,
so don't be afraid to switch it up.
Just remember, every transition
means a whole new beginning,
from pulling out your favorite
sweaters and boots to sending
your firstborn back to school in
Boston. (I'm fine. Really. Just
something in my eye, I guess.)
Change isn’t easy, and it can take
a toll on us, but here’s the thing:
We can't grow without it.
Wendy Sang is owner of
Garden Pixies. Find her online at
www.gardenpixies.com or call
843.822.1044.

www.islandeyenews.com

Bridge the seasonal gap with croton,
foxtail fern, penta, mum and lysimachia.

PHOTO BY WENDY SANG

G

Cruise fundraiser
to help children
STAFF REPORT

FOR ISLAND EYE NEWS

Lambs Elementary kids started their park visit via Liberty Square.

S

ave the date and buy your
tickets now for a sunset
cruise Friday, Oct. 21, to
Fort Sumter in support of Kids to
the Parks, an education outreach
program of the Fort Sumter –
Fort Moultrie Historical Trust.
The cruise departs at 5:30 p.m.
from Liberty Square in downtown
Charleston to Fort Sumter
National Monument. Tickets are
$100 per person, which includes
food and beverages served on
board with a cash bar also
available. Each ticket sold for
the fundraiser will send 10 kids
to the parks, according to event
organizers.
The event also allows you to
meet Civil War historians and
trust board members as National
Park Service staff lead behindthe-scenes
tours.
Students
from Charleston County School
District's arts program will
entertain as well.
The special evening culminates
with "War and Wardrobe,” a

presentation by Mary Hatcher
and Jean Hutchinson, who
use diaries of the time and
period clothing to examine the
hardships of wartime endured
on the homefront during the
Civil War.
The tour finishes with a
leisurely cruise of the harbor and
Charleston's twinkling lights.
The trust is the “friends
group” for Charleston's national
parks, including Fort Sumter,
Fort Moultrie and the Charles
Pinckney National Historic Site.
The
charitable
organization
is dedicated to preserving,
protecting and utilizing the parks
for the common good. It supports
the National Park Service with
privately-funded programs and
activities beyond the resources
of the NPS.
To purchase tickets for the
sunset cruise fundraiser, visit
www.fortsumtertrust.org

Is l a nd E y e C a l e nda r

September 23
ONGOING
Mondays
Memoir Writing Circle 
Every Monday at 10:30 a.m. 
Come, write and share your
stories.  CCPL Poe Branch
Library, 1921 I’on Avenue. 
843.883.3914. 

Tuesdays
Toddler Time Storytime
10:30 a.m. Join Mrs. Marie for
stories and songs. CCPL Poe
Branch Library, 1921 I’on Avenue.
843-883-3914.
Team Trivia
8 to 10 p.m., Home Team BBQ,
Sullivan’s Island

Thursdays
Mah Jongg Nights (adults) 
Every Thursday from 5:30 to 8
p.m.  Learn to play American
Mah Jongg. Join us for a couple
rounds or the whole evening.
CCPL Poe Branch Library, 1921
I’on Avenue. 843-883-3914. 
Fridays
VFW Post 3137 Steak Night
Open House Steak Night every
Friday, 6 p.m. Claim your steak
(we only do 30 each week), season
to your liking, then you have
until 8 p.m. to cook it yourself on
Ocean Deck grills.

Choice Ribeye, Baked Potato &
Salad, $15.

Saturdays
VFW Post 3137 Fish Fry
Every 3rd Sat. of each month
June through Oct. 2016. Whiting
fillets, hush puppies, tater tots,
cole slaw, baked beans and
desserts $8 plate. Proceeds go
to VFW and Veteran programs,
and local community and youth
programs.

Friday, September 23
Chucktown Ball Weekend
Two-day music festival with
Umphrey’s McGee Friday and
Saturday at Riverfront Park in
North Charleston. Followed by
Chucktown Ball Charity Golf
Tournament Sunday at the
Harbor Course at Wild Dunes.
For more information, festival
tickets, or to sign up for the golf
tournament, visit umphreys.com.

Saturday, Sept. 24
Crafternoon: Pokemon
Bookmarks
3 p.m. Show your Pokemon pride
on the pages of your favorite
book. CCPL Poe Branch Library,
1921 I’on Avenue. 843-883-3914.

Centennial Author Series
1 p.m. Fort Moultrie’s series will
continue with Brian McEnany
speaking about his book “For
Brotherhood and Duty: The Civil
War History of the West Point
Class of 1862.” Following his talk,
the author will sign copies of his
book.

Wednesday, September
28
Jammin’ for Jammer
7 to 10 p.m., annual Islands
Turtle Team fundraiser at The
Windjammer, on IOP’s Front
Beach. Come out for a night of
food, fun, live music and a silent
auction. $20 donation requested
at door. Includes live music,
food, cash bar, silent auction.
Bergwerfgraphics.com.

Tennis author visits
5:30 p.m., author Judy Fogarty
will sign her new book, “Breaking
and Holding” at Buxton Books,
2-A Cumberland Street,
Charleston. Fogarty sets much
of her novel in around the
Charleston area, particularly
Kiawah Island. Her appearance
coincides with the $10,000 Pro
Circuit Tennis Tournament at
the LTP Tennis Club in Mount
Pleasant.

Aging Gracefully:
Healthy Hearing
10:30 a.m. Learn what causes
changes in hearing, and discover
strategies for coping with hearing
loss. CCPL Poe Branch Library,
1921 I’on Avenue. 843-883-3914.

Saturday, October 1
Isle of Palms Connector Run
and Walk for the Child
Beginning at 8 a.m. at the IOP
Public Safety Building and
continuing to the IOP Connector,
this 5K and 10K fundraising event
helps abused children. Ioprun.
com. (See race guide, page 7).

843-225-7427 x 1 (CATERING)

Junior Naturalist: Plants and
People
10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Meets at:
Palmetto Islands County Park.
Ages 8-12. Fee: $12 or $10 for
Charleston County residents.
Discover plant anatomy, diversity,
and cool uses of local plants.
Attend six of nine programs
to become a certified Junior
Naturalist. Adult chaperones
welcome. Pre-registration
with Charleston County Parks
and Recreation required.
Call 843-795- 4386 or visit
charlestoncountyparks.com to
register. Course # 47005.

Thursday, September 29 Monday, October 3

Friday, September 30

pen
Now O

DIY Crafts with Ms. Grace
10 a.m. Ms. Grace helps young
hands create fun paper and
felt projects. CCPL Poe Branch
Library, 1921 I’on Avenue. 843883-3914.

World Affairs Council of
Charleston
5:15 p.m., reception followed by
6 p.m. discussion by two foreign
policy experts on Great Britain’s
vote to leave European Union.
Held at Citadel Alumni Center,
69 Hagood Ave., Charleston.
Kicks off 2016-17 season. Series
membership: $170 for two people
at same address, $100 for an
individual. Prospective member
can attend one meeting as a
guest for $20. No pre-registration
required.
Mount Pleasant Artists Guild
6:30 p.m. social, 7 p.m.
meeting. Susanne Frenzel
speaks this month. Meetings
held first Monday of each
month, September through
May, at Mount Pleasant City
Hall, 100 Ann Edwards Lane.
New members welcome.
For more information see
mtpleasantartistsguild.com.

Thursday, October 6
10th Annual Nuovo Cinema
Italiano Film Festival
Runs Oct. 6-9 at the Sottile
Theatre, 44 George St,
Charleston. Celebrates

contemporary Italian cinema
and culture with film screenings,
conversations with directors and
special events. Includes variety
of films from potential Oscar
contenders and comedies to
award-winning documentaries.
Famous screenwriter and
director Massimo Guadioso will
be special guest. Tickets, $8
via College of Charleston online
Marketplace, or at box office one
hour before each film screening.
nuovocinemaitaliano.com

Saturday, October 8
STAR Therapy Dogs
Share a book with a furry friend.
CCPL Poe Branch Library, 1921
I’on Avenue. 843-883-3914.

Monday, October 10
Basketball sign-ups
Isle of Palms Recreation
Department starts registration
for youth basketball for Isle of
Palms and Sullivan’s Island
residents. Others can register
starting Oct. 17. Practices start
in December. 843-886-8294, iop.
net/ recreation.

Wednesday, October 12
Fire Prevention Celebration
Look for a late afternoon SI/
IOP parade of engines headed
to an evening celebration at the
Sullivan’s Island Fire House,
2050 Middle St.

Thursday, October 13
Charleston Style Exchange
Public shopping days Oct. 1315 at Holiday Inn, 250 Johnnie
Dodds Blvd, Mount Pleasant.
Semi-annual upscale women’s
consignment sale event. Free
admission. Consignors can earn
65-75 percent of their total sales,
get a VIP shopping pass, and
help out East Cooper Community
Outreach.Times vary by day.
CharlestonStyleExchange.com.

October 31
Friday October 14
Community showing of “E.T.”
7 p.m., Isle of Palms Exchange
Club to host free showing of
the beloved 1980s movie on a
projector screen at the club,
located at 201 Palm Blvd., Isle of
Palms, as it launches Classics
on the Creek - a new annual
event. Refreshments, candy,
and fresh popcorn available for
purchase. Bring your own lawn/
beach chair. Seating will not be
provided.

Saturday, October 15
Beach Lovers Book Club:
“Hamilton” the musical
10:30 a.m., CCPL Poe Branch
Library, 1921 I’on Avenue, 843883-3914. Contact Connie
at darlingc@ccpl.org to join
discussion mailing list, receive
a bibliography and suggested
readings.

Tuesday, October 18
Lecture on “Race in America”
6:30 p.m., College of Charleston
TD Arena, 301 Meeting St.
Heralded journalist and author
Ta-Nehisi Coates talks on “A
Deeper Black: Race in America.”
Free event, open to public.
Registration through rsji.
eventbrite.com recommended, not
required. Doors open at 5 p.m..
Security check prior to entrance.
Discounted parking, $5 per
vehicle, with vouchers given from
the lobby of the TD Arena for
George Street, Wentworth and St.
Philip garages.

Friday, October 21
Ghostly Tide Tales
6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Are you brave
enough? Join us on the beach
and listen to local haunting
stories as you sit by an open
camp fire. Meet at 28th Ave
Beach Access. Bring Chair,
blanket, flashlight and friends.
Free. Offered by Isle of Palms
Recreation Department, 843-8868294, iop.net/recreation.

Sunset cruise to Fort Sumter
Departs 5:30 p.m. from Liberty
Square in downtown Charleston
to Fort Sumter National
Monument. $100 per person.
Includes food and beverages,
historical presentations. Cash bar
also available. Supports Kids to
the Parks, an education outreach
program of the Fort Sumter – Fort
Moultrie Historical Trust. Visit
www.fortsumtertrust.org.

Saturday, October 22
65th Annual COKSM
Fall Bazaar
10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Christ Our King
- Stella Maris School presents the
65th Annual Fall Bazaar, a day of
fun for the whole family featuring
games, prizes, confetti eggs, face
painting, jump castles, cake
booth, entertainment, crafts,
book fair, Halloween costumes.
Free admission. Tickets available
for purchase for games and food.
Parking available behind the
school, 1183 Russell Dr., Mount
Pleasant. For more information
visit Bazaar.COKSM.com.

Saturday, Oct. 22
Dogtoberfest at Kiawah Island
1-5 p.m., Freshfields Village.
10th annual Dogtoberfest:

Dogs, Dine and Wine Pet Expo.
Event brings together pet rescue
organizations from around
Lowcountry. Meet-and-greets
with local rescue groups, annual
wine tasting, craft beer, food, live
entertainment, blessing of the
animals, pet costume contest 3
p.m. Free admission. Flat fee for
wine tasting. Pay per purchase
for beer, food. Like Dogtoberfest
on Facebook. Contact
dogtoberfest@kica.us or 843768-3875 with questions. Hosted
by Kiawah Island Community
Association.

Thursday, October 27
​P umpkin Painting
4 p.m. Ages 5 to 14 years paint
pumpkins with staff at the Isle
of Palms Recreation Center. $
​ 5.
All materials provided. Register
through rec by Wednesday, Oct.
19., 843-886-8294, iop.net/
recreation.

Monday, October 31
Halloween Carnival at IOP Rec
5-7 p.m. free activities and
candy at Isle of Palms Recreation
Department, 28th Avenue.
Costume Contest starts at 5:30
p.m. sharp. iop.net/recreation.

20

September 23, 2016

Lego creatures take
over the Aquarium

Feathered visitors
on Sullivan’s
BY SARAH DÍAZ

BY KRISTA RITTERHOFF

FOR ISLAND EYE NEWS

FOR ISLAND EYE NEWS

T

he same bricks that have helped build amazing childhood
memories for years are now helping the South Carolina Aquarium
build its newest innovative guest experience. With the help of
beloved LEGO® bricks, the Aquarium unveiled BRICKSAlive recently
throughout the second floor. This exciting installation was created
with more than 250,000 LEGO® bricks used to form a collection of
twelve life-sized, one-of-a-kind animal sculptures, highlighting some
of the amazing creatures that call South Carolina home.
The colorful collection features an 8-foot dolphin, a sea turtle, a bald
eagle, a river otter and more—all constructed by dedicated members
of the Aquarium staff. The Aquarium is the perfect backdrop for this
collection, as guests can admire these amazing structures next to the
real animals that inspired them and learn what makes each animal
special, unique and important to protect.
Guests will also will be inspired to leave their own mark on the
experience through a special interactive building station that allows
them to make their own LEGO® creation and place it on a coral reef
sculpture, creating an original art piece that keeps growing.
The ultimate goal of BricksALIVE is to foster a love for the ocean
and its creatures through play, in the hopes that those who enjoy the
experience leave with a desire to help with the conservation of these
animals. LEGO® bricks have long taken us on adventures and pushed
us to use our imagination to build and create, an imagination we can
all use to come together and protect and conserve.
BricksALIVE is open to visitors of all ages and is included in the regular
price of general admission or membership. For more information, visit
scaquarium.org or call (843) 577-FISH (3474). End your summer on a
strong note and come enjoy these amazing masterpieces made from
everyone’s favorite LEGO® bricks. (LEGO® is a trademark of the LEGO
Group, which does not sponsor, authorize or endorse this content.)

T

he fall 2016 bird banding
season on Sullivan’s Island
has officially begun.
Scientists
from
Audubon
South Carolina are studying
the neotropical migrants in the
protected land around Station
16. Since fall 2015, the scientists
have banded over 1,000 birds
from 59 different species—right
here on Sullivan’s Island.
Bird banding helps biologists
learn
more
about
species
diversity,
migration
routes,
site fidelity and longevity.
The scientists have banded
everything
from
hawks
to
warblers to nightjars, and are
setting up mist nets in a variety
of habitats this season.
The species of birds that
frequent the maritime forest
vary from those that spend their
time foraging in the scrubland
or
wetlands.
Woodpeckers,
thrushes, and chickadees are
often banded in the maritime
forest, while a higher number
of warblers are banded in the
scrubland.
Many migratory birds are
stopping in the protected land

Despite its name, the northern waterthrush
is a wood warbler, not a thrush.

to rest and refuel. The northern
waterthrush pictured here is
found in South Carolina only
during migration. Its name is
misleading, since it is actually a
wood warbler and not a thrush.
The bird banding crew always
welcomes visitors who are
interested in learning more about
bird banding and bird migration.
You can contact Sarah Díaz at
sullivansislandbirds@gmail.com
for more information.

September 23, 2016

Painter shares island memories from long ago

21

D R . R I C H A R D “ D U K E ” H A G E R T Y G R E W U P W I T H “ T H E P O I N T ” A S H I S P L AY G R O U N D
BY SARAH KIRK

I

FOR ISLAND EYE NEWS

t seems like anyone who has
lived on Sullivan’s Island for
long knows, or has at least
heard of, Dr. Richard “Duke”
Hagerty.
The retired plastic surgeon and
accomplished Charleston artist
recently came to the island to
reminisce at the invitation Battery
Gadsden Cultural Center, which
co-sponsored his Sept. 15 visit at
the Fort Moultrie Visitor Center
with the National Parks Service.
“Dr. Hagerty and his family
have a strong history on
Sullivan’s
Island,”
explains
Battery Gadsden Cultural Center
h Treasurer Carlsen Huey. “His
parents owned The Point, over 10
acres at the western edge of the
island, which was their weekend
playground for over 50 years.”
Richard “Duke” Hagerty says the time
The property, which was Dr.
he spent exploring Sullivan’s Island as a
purchased by Hagerty’s father child influenced him as an artist.
in 1958, has now been sold and
PHOTO BY STEVE ROSAMILIA
completely developed, but the
Hagertys are fondly remembered the Hagerty children. “The only
by those who once spent summers living quarters on the [Hagerty]
and weekends playing, fishing, property were an old haunted
swimming and camping out on train car and a bomb shelter that
the shores of Sullivan’s Island.
flooded whenever it rained. That
“I grew up in downtown seemed just fine to all of them
Charleston,” says Hagerty. He and those of us who visited.”
“never actually lived on Sullivan’s
Hagerty was selected to give
Island,” but says, “it was a a talk because he embodies the
strong influence on me, and was mission of the cultural center
certainly a lucky place to have to preserve oral history and
spent some of [my] childhood.” promote art on Sullivan’s Island.
He remembers, “As kids we Tobin explains, “The Hagerty
played football there and once family was a huge part of this
even had a small zoo of animals island and left quite a footprint
and birds.”
in many people’s lives. Now that
One Sullivan’s Island memory the end of the island has been
stands out for Hagerty. “We completely
developed,
many
kids used to have very animated
berry fights on the old bridge,
The Battery Gadsden
and played in the forts before
Cultural Center’s monthly
they were boarded up. The black
tunnels seemed to go forever.”
series of Sullivan’s Island
It is stories like these that
talks continues on Thursday
the Battery Gadsden Cultural
Oct. 20 at 6 p.m. with
Center aims to preserve, as they
author and pirate expert
are integral to the history of
Christopher Downey.
Sullivan’s Island.
Location to be announced.
Adele Tobin, Battery Gadsden
Check batterygadsden.com
Cultural Center vice president,
for updates.
reminisces about growing up with

people will never know what it
was, without hearing the stories
that the Hagerty family loves to
share.”
Hagerty’s artwork has been
selected for Piccolo Spoleto
posters, and has been the
subject of several solo and group
exhibitions. He first started
practicing art while in medical
school, but he credits his time on
Sullivan’s Island with influencing
him as an artist. “Sullivan’s Island
is where I got my first exposure to
nature—ocean, waves, dolphins
and more,” he says. He was also
impressed by the island’s history,
including “Poe, Osceola and Civil
War figures.”
There are many other factors
and figures that influence his
art as well, including quantum
physics
and
existentialist
philosopher Søren Kierkegaard.
Many other ideas for compositions
have come to him in his dreams.
He says his artistic process begins
with “lots of doodling and playing
with shapes, and then [adding] a
little more color. This can go over
a course of several months.”
Hagerty
credits
his
wife
Barbara, a poet and writer, with
being his muse. “I knew I was
going to marry her when I was
14. And usually those things end

up in disaster!” he chuckles.
Hagerty hesitates to disclose
the meaning or symbolism behind
most of his works. He prefers
to let his audience define the
paintings. “A successful painting
is one that draws the viewer in.
Once I’ve got the viewer in, then
the viewer makes his or her own
interpretation and has a unique
experience with that piece.”
He’s also not sentimental when
it comes to his art. “Once I’m done
with a piece of work, I’m done,
I’m gone. And I don’t get attached
to them.” He says he is fortunate
to have several collectors who
support his work.
Hagerty sees the artistic process
as a type of communication. “The
fun thing is to see other people
look at the art, and it will fire a
neuron that’s unique to them,
and [they will] come up with their
unique experience.”
Hagerty
has
released
a
hardcover catalog of his works
entitled “American Surrealist:
The Art of Richard Hagerty” with
over 175 color reproductions. It
is available on Amazon and at
evepostbooks.com. A copy is also
available at the Poe Library on
Sullivan’s Island.

Acme Lowcountry Kitchen
Specializing in local and
sustainable seafood. All Altantic
Ocean sourced Seafood. $$-$$$
886-FISH (3474)
31 JC Long Blvd, Isle of Palms
Banana Cabana
A casual menu suits its beachfront
setting. Nibbles like peel and eat
shrimp and nachos alongside
heartier platters of seafood. $-$$
886-4361
www.thebananacabana.com
1130 Ocean Blvd, Isle of Palms

your island hair salon

843-883-9101

2205 Middle St, Sullivan's Island

island eats
tap, spacious side porch, and live
music. $-$$
242-8310
www.dinghyiop.com
8 JC Long Blvd, Isle of Palms

Dunleavy’s Irish Pub
The islands’ only Irish Pub.
Famous burgers, Irish fare, favorite
locals hangout for over 20 years.
$$
883-9646
www.dunleavysonsullivans.com
2213 Middle St, Sullivan’s Island

Beard Cat’s
Gelato made from locally sourced
ingredients, and coffee shop that
sits below Obstinate Daughter. $
416-5020
www.beardcatsweetshop.com
2063 Middle St, Sullivan’s Island

High Thyme
A small island bistro, with a wide
range of dishes, from seafood,
tapas on Tuesday, and a Sunday
brunch. $$-$$$
883-3536
www.highthymecuisine.com
2213 Middle St, Sullivan’s Island

Ben & Jerry’s
Enjoy an array of ice cream flavors,
from Chocolate Therapy, to Peach
Cobbler on Isle of Palms’ Front
Beach. $
886-6314
www.benandjerrys.com
1009 Ocean Blvd, Isle of Palms

Home Team BBQ
Not limited to barbeque, this
casual eatery also serves salads,
wraps, tacos, and quesadillas,
Sunday Brunch. $$
883-3131
www.teamteambbq.com
2209 Middle St, Sullivan’s Island

The Boathouse
Fresh, local seafood, and
phenomenal sunset views from
the upper deck on Breach Inlet.
$$-$$$
886.8000
www.boathouserestaurants.com
101 Palm Blvd, Isle of Palms

Island Ice Frozen Yogurt
All organic frozen yogurt, with
gluten free and vegan options.
Toppings are all natural or organic.
Local coffee and teas. $
885-7079
www.islandiceyogurt.com
1515 C Palm Blvd, Isle of Palms

Coconut Joe’s &
Island Joe’s Coffee
Spectacular views of the Atlantic
on the rooftop bar and live music
every night during the summer.
$-$$. Island Joe’s next door
featuring coffee and ice cream. $
886-0046
www.coconutjoes.biz
1120 Ocean Blvd, Isle of Palms

Long Island Café
Come in for lunch, dinner, or
Sunday brunch and enjoy all your
favorite seafood, plus so much
more at this island favorite. $$-$$$
886-8809
www.longislandcafesc.com
1515-A Palm Blvd, Isle of Palms

The Co-Op
A gourmet deli specializing in
breakfast and lunch sandwiches
as well as local coffee. Enjoy
pantry staples including beer
and wine along with locally made
products and house made take
and go meals. Open 7 days a week.
Delivery available. $
882-8088
www.thecoopsi.com
2019 Middle St, Sullivan's Island
The Dinghy
Laid back Key West Vibe, great
food options, unique beers on

Morgan Creek Grill
Relax with a front row seat on
the Intracoastal Waterway while
enjoying fresh seafood and
southern hospitality. $$
886-8980
www.morgancreekgrill.com
8040 1st Ave, Isle of Palms
The Obstinate Daughter
Restaurant serving contemporary
Southern cuisine, pizza & pasta in
a rustic, coastal-inspired space.
$$-$$$
416-5020
www.theobstinatedaughter.com
2063 Middle St, Isle of Palms

Pizza Hut
Now serving Isle of Palms in the
Harris Teeter shopping center.
Deliver right to your door or get
carryout. $
886-5759
www.order.pizzahut.com
1515 Palm Blvd, Isle of Palms
Poe’s Tavern
Famous for their gourmet burgers
and chicken sandwiches, this Poeinspired eatery also features great
deals on fresh fish tacos. $$
883-0083
www.longislandcafesc.com
2210 Middle St, Sullivan’s Island
Refuge
Enjoy morning coffee with fresh
bagels and pastries from the coffee
bar and dinner or lunch at the
restaurant along with signature
cocktails.
www.therefugeiop.com
1517 Palm Blvd., Isle of Palms
Saltworks Dockside Deli
Located inside the Isle of Palms
Marina Market, come enjoy
breakfast, smoothies, and
sandwiches. $-$$
883-3355
www.saltworkscc.com
50 41st Ave, Isle of Palms
Sullivan’s
Grab a casual dinner of fried
flounder or crab cakes in a cozy
atmosphere as well as lunch on the
weekends. $$
883-3222
www.saltstation22.com
2019 Middle St, Sullivan’s Island
Taco Mamacita
Enjoy made from scratch ‘Tex
Mex’ soups, salads, tacos, and
enchiladas, and quench your
thirst with one of several specialty
margaritas. $$
789-4107
www.tacomamacita.com
2213-B Middle St, Sullivan’s Island
Windjammer
Lively spot with a bar menu, a
deck overlooking the water, and
beach volleyball court out back.$$$
886-8596
www.the-windjammer.com
1008 Ocean Blvd, Isle of Palms

off-island eats

Bacco
Regional Italian restaurant
featuring fresh pastas, fior di latte
mozzarella and Neapolitan style
pizzas from the wood burning oven.
$$$
843.884.6969
www.baccocharleston.com
976 Houston Northcutt Blvd., Mt.
Pleasant
Bistro Toulouse
Classic French cuisine, fine wines
and creative cocktails. Menu
highlights include Crepes, Mussels,
Cassoulet, Bouillabaisse, Cheese
& Charcuterie and house made
Desserts. $$$
843.216.3434
www.bistrotoulouse.com
1220 Ben Sawyer Blvd,
Mt. Pleasant

Eggs Up Grill
Relaxed chain serving a menu of
breakfast, burgers & sandwiches in
a colorful setting. $-$$
388-3654
www.eggsupgrill.com
2664 Highway 17 North,
Mt. Pleasant
Sawyers
True to the low country, Sawyer's
On The Boulevard is surrounded
by beautiful Oak trees and done in
reclaimed wood on the inside with
copper tiles topping the bar area.
Local fresh shrimp and fish tacos
are a favorite here as well as some
of Charleston's best music 5 nights
a week. $$
843.388.5270
www.sawyersotb.com
1528 Ben Sawyer Blvd,
Mt. Pleasant

Stack’s Coastal Kitchen
Join us for lunch, where we
offer fresh soup, salads, and
sandwiches. Enjoy dinner in a
casual bistro-style setting, nice
selection and outdoor seating. $$
388-6968
www.stackscoastalkitchen.com
1440 Ben Sawyer Blvd,
Mt. Pleasant
The Wine Bar
Wine, unique variety of 40 +
cheeses and charcuterie meats
from around the world., chocolate,
bon-bons. $$
849-5185
www.thewinebarmtp.com
664 Long Point Rd, Mt. Pleasant

September 23, 2016

FINANCIAL FOCUS

23

Election worries? Vote for smart
investment moves
BY DIMI MATOUCHEV
FOR ISLAND EYE NEWS

T

he presidential election is little more than a month away. Like
all elections, this one has generated considerable interest, and,
as a citizen, you may well be following it closely. But as an
investor, how much should you be concerned about the outcome?
Probably not as much as you might think. Historically, the
financial markets have done well – and done poorly – under
both Democratic and Republican administrations. Also,
many factors affecting investment performance have little or
nothing to do with the occupant of the White House. Consequently,
no one can claim, with any certainty, that one candidate is going to
be “better for the markets” than another one.
Still, this isn’t to say that any given presidential administration
will have no effect at all on investors. For example, a president could
propose changes to the laws governing investments, and if Congress
passes those laws, investors could be affected.
But in looking at the broader picture, there’s not much evidence
that a particular president is going to affect the overall return of your
investment portfolio. As mentioned above,
many factors – corporate earnings,
interest rates, foreign affairs, even
natural disasters – can and
will influence the financial
markets. But in evaluating a
president’s potential effect
on your investments, you
also need to consider
something
else:
Our
political system does not
readily
accommodate
radical restructuring of
any kind. So it’s difficult for
any president to implement
huge policy shifts – and
that’s actually good for the
financial markets, which, by
their nature, dislike uncertainty,
chaos and big changes.

Breac h Inlet Tide Char t
Date

High Tide

Sep 23
Sep 24
Sep 25
Sep 26
Sep 27
Sep 28
Sep 29
Sep 30
Oct 1
Oct 2
Oct 3
Oct 4
Oct 5
Oct 6

1:48am/2:22pm
2:52am/3:26pm
3:56am/4:27pm
4:55am/5:23pm
5:50am/6:13pm
6:41am/6:59pm
7:27am/7:40pm
8:09am/8:20pm
8:49am/8:57pm
9:27am/9:34pm
10:04am/10:10pm
10:41am/10:46pm
11:18 am/11:23pm
11:58am

Low Tide
7:45am/8:37pm
8:48am/9:41pm
9:51am/10:40pm
10:51am/11:34pm
11:46am
12:23am/12:37pm
1:08am/1:24pm
1:49am/2:08pm
2:27am/2:49pm
3:03am/3:29pm
3:37am/4:08pm
4:10am/4:47pm
4:44am/5:27pm
5:20am/6:10pm

Hurricanes, storms etc., are NOT included in the
predictions. Tidal current direction changes and tide time
predictions can be very different. Tide predictions are
PREDICTIONS; they can be wrong so use common sense.

Source: www.saltwatertides.com

The bottom line? From your viewpoint as an investor, don’t worry
too much about what happens in November. Instead, follow these
investment strategies:
• Stay invested. If you stop investing when the market is down
in an effort to cut your losses, you may miss the opportunity to
participate in the next rally – and the early stages of a rally are
typically when the biggest gains occur.
• Diversify. By spreading your dollars among an array of
investments, such as stocks, bonds and other investments, you
can help reduce the possibility of your portfolio taking a big hit
if a market downturn primarily affected just one type of financial
asset. Keep in mind though, that diversification can’t guarantee
profits or protect against all losses.
• Stay within your risk tolerance. Investing always involves
risk, but you’ll probably be more successful (and less stressed
out) if you don’t stray beyond your individual risk tolerance. At
the same time, if you invest too conservatively, you might not
achieve the growth potential you need to reach your goals. So
you will need to strike an appropriate balance.
• Forget about chasing “hot” stocks. Many so-called “experts”
encourage people to invest in today’s “hot” stocks. But by the
time you hear about them, these stocks – if they were ever “hot” to
begin with – have probably already cooled off. More importantly,
they might not have been suitable for your needs, anyway. In any
case, there’s really no “short cut” to investment success.
Elections – and even presidents – come and go. But when you
“vote” for solid investment moves, you can help yourself make
progress toward your financial goals.
This article was written by Edward Jones for use by your local
Edward Jones Financial Advisor.