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COLLOQUIA

LATINA.

ADAPTED TO THE

BEGINNERS' BOOKS

JONES, LEIGHTON,

AND COLLAR AND

DAN1ELL.

BY

BENJAMIN

L.

D'OOGE,

M.A.,

Professor of Latin and Greek, Michigan


State Normal School.

BOSTON JnIVERSITY
COLLEGE F LIBERAL ARTS
LIBRARY

BOSTON,
D. C.

U.S.A.,

HEATH & CO
CO., PUBLISHERS.
fc

1890.

c>^

Copyright, 1888, by

BENJAMIN

L.

D'OOGE.

PA

en
PREFACE.

This

book

little

tested

by actual

the outgrowth of

is

own

author in his

classes,

use.

Its

siasm at a time when

aim

It

twofold

is

first,

most needed

is

it

increased thoroughness.

methods pursued by the

and most of the dialogues have been


to inspire enthu-

second, to insure

has been the author's experience

that nothing arouses such an interest

and lends such an

exhila-

work with beginners as the moderate use of colloquial


The first year's work is arid enough from its very nature,

ration to
Latin.

and

it

is

very

difficult for

young pupils

to interest

in the abstract principles of language without

examples which have the

spirit

of reality and

themselves

abundant concrete
in

life

them.

oral use of simple Latin gives the desired inspiration,


results obtained thereby

expended

indeed,

it

more than compensate

for

The

and the

the

time

has been proved that a class will go

farther in the beginner's book, and do

better,

with this work

The more complete mastery of grammar and vocabulary makes this increase in the amount accomadded than without

it.

plished possible.
It

will

be granted that speaking Latin

thoroughness.

and accent,

to

It

is

make

tions as familiar as constant use can


is

sure to promote

pronunciation

give a large and ready vocabulary, to perfect

the knowledge of forms, and to

It

is

sure to bring exactness in

hoped that the

plish these ends.

the fundamental construc-

make them.

colloquia herein contained will

Though

accom-

specially fitted to but three begin-

Preface.

have been so carefully graded that they can

ners' books, they

be used to advantage

in

The

connection with any book.

obvi-

ous limitations of the book have proved an obstacle to the

to

The author

admit nothing doubtful or unidiomatic.

may

that he
tion,

and

made

Latin, but an earnest effort has been

excellence of the

feels

not have been altogether successful in this direc-

welcome any

will gladly

on whatever may

criticism

have escaped his vigilance.

The

notes aim to assist the acquirement of a vocabulary by

and

referring to English cognates

much grammatical

derivatives,

and

also contain

information epitomized or generalized to suit

the wants of a student at that stage of advancement.

edgment
lish

is

here

made

to

Abbotfs

Eng-

Idiom, 11 to Allen and GreenouglVs Grammar, and to Collar

and DanielPs "Beginner's Latin Book


statement taken from
*'

Acknowl-

" Latin Prose through

Glossarium

their

pages

Grammaticum," the

11

use

a few forms of

for

and

to

the

last

of which

for

was

the.

kindly

granted.
It

remains to express hearty thanks to

suggestions and

criticisms

especially to Prof.

H.

in

S. Frieze,

the

many

preparation of

LL.D. and

scholars

Prof. Elisha

Jones

of Michigan University; Dr. R. F. Leighton of Brooklyn;

Grant Daniell, Principal of Chauncy-Hall School, Boston

M. M. Fisher of the University of Missouri: and

for

book,

this

M.

Prof.

to L. C. Hull,

Classical Master of the Lawrenceville School, Lawrenceville, N.J.

and

J.

Mich.,

H. Drake, Principal of the High School, Battle Creek,

who rendered

valuable assistance by reading the proofs.

BENJAMIN
Michigan State Normal School,
June, 1888.

L.

D'OOGE.

INDEX COLLOQUIORUM.
PAGINA.
I.

Puella et Matrona

Dominus

Servus

et

III.

Ancilla et Cassius

9
10

IV.

Pater et Filius

12

II.

V. Nuntius
VI. Frater
VII.
VIII.

Patres

X.
XII.
XIII.

Simo

et

16

Chremes

Magister et Discipulus

Duo

et

21

Senatores, Flaccus et PIso

Discipulus

28

30

XV. Miles

et

et

Hercules

et CIvis

XVIII. Mater

...

Romanus

XVI. Clymene et Phaethon


XVII. Duae Puellae, Julia et
et FIlia

Errd, Vir Terribilis

et Nepos in Itinere
XXI. Magister et Discipulus
XXII. Duo Sodales, Nasica Enniusque
XXIII. Cyclops et Galatea

XXIV. Duo Gives AmericanI


XXV. Pater Filiusque et Amici
XXVI. Duo Fratres, Johannes et Henricus
XXVII. Cyclops et Ulysses
Laelius et Scipio de Lacedaemoniis

XXIX. Menippus et Charon


XXX. Dimea et Syrus

32
34
36

Tullia

XX. Avus

XXVIII.

24
26

Viatores, Smith et Jones

Magister

Duo

18
19

Amicus

Pater et Filius

XIV. Charon

XIX.

14

Sorocula

et

IX. Princeps
XI.

Imperator

et

3$

4
42
44
47

49
51

53

56
58
60

62

64
67

HINTS AND SUGGESTIONS.

i.

Read each sentence through

carefully several times until

you think you know its meaning but do not translate it into
English, for you must learn to read and understand Latin in the
natural order of its words and thoughts without an artificial rearrangement into the English order.
;

2. Go through an entire colloquium, as indicated above, before


you look up a single word. Remember that common sense is
When you have done
the best key to a correct translation.

that, use the vocabulary as a last resort.


3.

When

you have thoroughly mastered the meaning of a

colloquium by a direct appeal to the Latin, translate


English,

i.e.

into

it

good

idiomatic English, and not into that curious com-

bination of English words and

Latin constructions so often

heard in the class-room.


4.

Remember

termination.

that the significant part of a Latin

the possibilities of construction that a termination


5.

word

is its

Train yourself from the outset to grasp at once

may

all

involve.

colloquium should always be learned by heart on the

review.

The "Notes and Questions

accompanying each exerquestions which are


not answered directly or by reference should be answered by
your own powers of observation. Often you will be led to a
general rule by a natural inference from what you have just seen
in an individual case.
6.

cise

should be thoroughly studied.

'

The

ABBREVIATIONS.

A.

&

and Greenough's
Grammar.

G., Allen

Inf.,

Latin

J., Jones.

Act., Active,

compare.

cf., confer,

&

D., Collar & Daniell.


C.
Deriv., Derivative.

Infinitive.

lit., literally.

L., Leighton's Latin Lessons.


n., note.

Pass., Passive.

Ex., Exercise.

Pres., Present.

Eng\, English.

trans., translate, translation.

H., Harkness's Latin Grammar.


It is

N.B.

thought that the other abbreviations need no explanation.

At the head of each colloquium

are references to Jones's, Collar

and Leighton's beginners' books. The references to the two


former indicate after what lesson or article the colloquium may best be
taken. Where more than one reference to Leighton is given, the first is to
the lesson in etymology which should precede the colloquium ; those follow-

&

Daniell's,

ing in parenthesis are to the lessons teaching the required syntax. Since,
however, the notes are designed to clear up all syntactical difficulties, any
exercise may be successfully used after the requirements indicated by the
first reference have been met

COLLOQUIUM PRIMUM.
Lesson II

J.

li.

Lesson II

C.

& D.

28.

Puella et Matrona.
where

P.

is

Ub^es^Galba?
away

far

M.
P.

Galba, puella, 3 procul

Estne 4 in Italia?
no indeed

M. Minime
P.

est.

Ubi

est

at

Geneva

Genavae

vero,

Nonne 5

Genava?

M. Minime

est.

vero, in Helvetia

in provincia

Genava

which

P.

M.

est?

est.

leads

Estne via quae 8 ad Genavam ducit longa?

Via longa

est

what

P.

Romana 6

Quae

et

per angustias et

silvas ducit.

of inhabitants

lingua incolarum est?

my

M. Lingua

incolarum

in

memoria mea non

est.

NOTES AND QUESTIONS.


Learn thoroughly, in their connection, the meanings of
words translated in the exercise. The same word will be transI.

lated but once.

The

other words will be found in the vocabulary

of your beginners' Latin book, unless their significance

from similar English words.

is

obvious

Colloqina Latina.

8
2.

The

inflection of the present tense of the verb to be is

sum, I am.
he

sumus, we are.
you are.

es, thou art.


est,

estis,

sunt, they are.

is.

Note that the endings m,


and number of the verb.

mus, tis, nt, indicate the person


They take the place of our personal

s, t,

pronouns.

Observe the position of the vocative.


effect does the enclitic ne seem to have on the

3.

4.

What

character of the sentence


5.

What

the difference between

& G. 210, a, c.
Romana is an adjective

1, n. 1,

6.

is

ne and nonne?

H. 351,

A.

What

modifying provincia.

appears to be the position of the adjective in Latin as regards

its

noun?

Use your knowledge of geography.


When we say
Latin is often more exact than English.
The road to Geneva, we mean The road which leads to Ge7.
8.

Latin chooses the fuller form of expression, and there-

neva.

Via quae ad Genavam

fore says

relative clause is
9.

There

is

no word

in Latin

answering a question the verb

longa?

Is the

ducit.

implied in English

way

long?

it is

Rule

Whenever a

expressed in Latin.

meaning simply/^ or
usually repeated, e.g.

is

Hat, /I

In

no.

Estne via

But sometimes a strong


is used
Yes etiam, ita, factum,

is.

affirmative or negative particle, with or without the verb,

in

answer to a direct question

for

vero, sane, ita ver5, ita est, sane

quidem

for

No

non,

minime, minime vero, non quidem.

Answer

the following in Latin orally and with hooks closed

Nonne Genava
Nonne est
Romana?

Estne Galba domi 1 ?


colae

Genavae

in

Helvetia provincia

Italia?

at

home.

procul est?

Suntne

via per silvas?

in-

Estne

Colloquium Secundum,

COLLOQUIUM SECUNDUM.
J.

Domiims 1
halloa
!

2
Ubi equus meus

D.

In agro, domine, equus est.


~
is there
_ _
Estne 3 in agro copia frumentir*

S.

4
Sane, et copia aquae

S.

D. 51.

et Servus.

Heus, serve

D.

&

lesson V; I. Wesson VI, (LVI); C.

4-^

est

which

Z>.

est.

Estne aqua quae in agro

est,

bona

cold

Aqua

5.

bona

agri

D. Unde aqua

est et frlgida.

est ?

which
fluvio est qui per
river

Aqua ex

5.

7
D. Amatne equus

Equus

fluit.

fluvium qui per agrum fluit?


an(^

both

S.

agrum

et fluvium

amat

et silvas

quae in

ripis sunt.

NOTES AND QUESTIONS.


i.

Cf,

Eng. domineer.

Let this and the connection give you

the meaning.
exercise.
For meaning, cf. mea in the first
attach itself?
To what word in a sentence does ne usually
n.
Ex.
1,
9.
see
4. For meaning
Is there
bona is a predicate adjective modifying aqua.
5
think it
you
make
would
which
bona
anything about the form of
agro
?
with
than
rather
aqua
goes with

3.

Colio quia

io
6.

The

Latvia.

similarity of fluit to fluvio should give

Observe that the verb ends in


person and number? Cf. Ex. I, n.
ing.

7.

The

you the mean-

What does

t.

that

tell

inflection of the present tense of the verb to love

amo, I love.

amamus, we

am as,

amatis, you
amant, they

thou lovest.

amat, he

as to

2.

loves.

is

love.

love.
love.

What difference do you observe between the endings here used


and those of sum? Remember the above as the model for all
regular verbs in the present tense.
8.

What seems

Answer

Nonne

to

be the regular position of the verb?

the following in Latin orally and with books closed:


est colloquium

equus dominl in agro?


fluvius per

aqua

agrum

fluit?

frlgida in agro?
1

For form see H.

Suntne silvae

in ripis

A.

&

G. 40,

b.

fluvi

Amatne equus insulam 2 quae


51, 5;

secundum de domino et servo? Estne


Estne frumentum in agio?
Nonne

Cf.

Estne

in fluvio est?

Eng.

isle.

COLLOQUIUM TERTIUM.
J.

Lesson VIII; L. Lesson VII, (XLIX)

C.

&

D. 71 and rule 158.

maid-servant

Ancilla et Cassius.
door

C.

(Ante januam})

hail

Salve

Salve

who 2

A. Quis ante januam est?


true

C.

Cassius

sum, amicus probus dominl bom.

dominus domi?

Estne

1!

Colloquium Tcrtium.
garden

A. DomI dominus non


how

C.

A.
C.

est,

is

walking

sed in horto ambulat.

unfortunate

Me

miserum 8

Ita est,

et via

Ambulatne

Estne hortus procul?

longa est et ardua.

solus in horto an

cum

aliis?

Charles

Carolo 6 ambulat.

A.

Non

C.

Sine dubio hortus pulcher

solus sed

A. Sane,

et

rosarum plenus 7

est.

est.

rosas

amas?

Rubras rosas valde amo.


here

is

red

a rose

A. Eccam rosam rubram quae


(Rosa77i

est

ex domini horto

Cassio dat?)
I

C.

Nonne

exceedingly

red

C.

cum puero

Ago

thank you

good by

tibi gratias.

Vale

NOTES AND QUESTIONS.


Eng. January janitor
2. The Interrogative Pronoun in the three genders, nom. case,
is quis, quae, quid, when it is used as a noun
qui, quae,
quod when used as an adjective: e.g. quis est, who is it? but
qui vir est, what kind of a man is it?
3. Literally, wretched me!
4. What can you say about the answer to questions in Latin?
H. 18, 2, 1) A. & G. 19, c.
5. Where does the accent fall?
6. puero Carolo
these nouns are in the same case what is
1.

Cfi

their construction?

Does

this exercise contain a similar

one?

we may say either " full of" or " filled with " so
in Latin we have either plenus rosarum, full of'roses, or plenus
rosis, filled with roses, though the former mode of expression is
the usual Roman way of looking at it.
By what cases are <?/"and
7.

In English

with respectively expressed?

Colloquia Latum.

12

eccam rosam rubram

8.

lit.

The

Behold, a red rose I

accusative case usually follows exclamations.

Answer

What

used

for

the following in Latin orally and with books closed:

Trans. She gives a rose to Cassius.

9.

For the

the direct object?

case

Quid 1 Cassius vocat? 2


Ambulatne dominus in via?
Nonne ancilla Cassio rosam dat?

Estne Cassius

Quis ante januam est?

Nonne

amicus domini?
pulcher est?
1

is

indirect object?

quid, what.

hortus

vocat, from voco, I call.

COLLOQUIUM QUARTUM.
J.

Lesson XIII; t. Lesson XI, (LIII, LIV)

Pater et
my
F. Nonne, mi

pater,

Sane quidem, mi

&

D. 89.

me

fabulam mihi narrabis ?


to

P.

C.

Filius.
to

fill,

you

tibi

fabulam narrabo.

Amasne 3

de bello proelilsque 4 fabulas?


most of

F.

all

Maxime

indeed

vero, fabulas

de bello proelilsque amo.


who

therefore

P.

Ergo

fabulam parvam narrabo de viro qui 5

tibi

in

Grecian

bello

Graeco contra 6 Persiam


7

F.

Quis

P.

Vir Dieneces

erat

erat.

vir?

who 9
when

cum

et

in

Graecorum numero

erat.

Qui

had said

adversarius

10

in colloquio dixisset, "

Numerus telorum

Colloquium Quartinn.

13
shade

of our

10
10
10
nostrorum solem obscurabit," respondit, "In umbra ergo

pugnabimus."
F.

responsum

10

bonum clarumque

NOTES AND QUESTIONS.


1.

mi

is

the irregular vocative sing. masc. of the possessive

pronoun of the
2.

3.

mon

On
Do

first

person, raeus, a,

the form see

H.

51, 5

A.

um

&

(declined like bonus).

G. 40,

c.

not always translate this word by love.

Use your com-

sense.

que denotes more

intimate connection than et.


Observe that the Relative Pronoun has the same form as
It also has
the Interrogative used adjectively (see Ex. Ill, 2).
4.

5.

the same declension and agrees with

its

antecedent

m gender,

nwnber, and person.


6. Cf. Eng. contrary.
7. Is quis used as a noun or as an adjective?
8.

Inflected,

eras, thou wast.

eramus, we were.
eratis, you were.

erat, he was.

erant, they were.

eram, I was.

9.

10.

refers to Dieneces.
is
" Old Sol" obscure, respo?id, respotise.
adversary,
Eng.
Cf.

qui

the subject of respondit, and

Be prepared
books closed:

either to ask or to

Quis fabulam

filio

answer the following with

narrat? Narratne pater fabulas

tibi ?

Nonne

amat? Narratne pater fabulam


lono-am ? Nonne Dieneces vir bonus et probus est? Eratne numeQuid erat responsum Dienecis? 1
rus telorum magnus?
fllius fabulas de bello proelilsque

Genitive case.

Colloquia Latlna.

14

COLLOQUIUM QUINTUM.
J.

Wesson XVI;

!L.

et Imperator.

Nuntius
N.

Salve

Salve, imperator

&

Lesson XI, (LXIX); C.

J>.

103.

thou

Et tu

/.

N. In

castris

Ubi

/.

Ubi

salve, nuntl.

castra

fuisti?

Germanorum.

Germanorum sunt?

N. Castra Germanorum

trans

magnas ad ripam convocaverunt.

Rhenum
Bellum

sunt

et

magnum

in

copias
3

pop-

4
ulum Romanum comparabunt.
I

/.

am undone
Peril

Paucae 4 copiae meae sunt,

lum nostrum

et

magnum pencu-

Suntne Germanl soli?

est.

to
6
7
N. Non quidem f sed multi populi juvabant atque

arma
/.

et carros et

equos dabant.

Miserum me

soli

circum castra aedificabo

sumus, sed tamen


8

et

murum 8

Fortasse del auxilium dabunt.

altum

copiam frumentl importabo. 8

perhaps

N. Et

them
iis

Ago

_
tibi gratias.

Vale.

tu vale, imperator.

NOTES AND QUESTIONS.


i

The

verbs nuntio and irapero should suggest the meaning

of these nouns.

Colloquium Quiutum.
2.

This

the perfect indicative of

is

What

&

inflected

fuimus,

ful,

A.

sum,

15

fuiati,

fuistis,

fuit,

fuerunt, or -ere.

are the two uses of the perfect tense?

See H. 471,

I, II

G. 279.

3.

in

4.

Cf.

is

here used, as often, in a hostile sense

Eng.

5.

See Ex.

6.

Cf.

7.

What

Eng. against.

pre/tare, ftauciiy.
I, n. 9.

Eng.
is

ad/// tor.

the force of

atque

as distinguished from et or

que?
8.

Cf.

Eng. mural,

Be prepared
books closed

edifice,

import.

either to ask or to

Ubi nuntius

fuerat?

answer the following with

Nonne German!

hostes 1 populo

Romano

Superaveruntne Roman! Germanos?

fuerunt?

Ubi German!
Germania? Num 2

Estne fluvius Rhenus in


pugnabunt? Quid amic! iis dabant ? Estne imperator in penculo?
Quid imperator circum castra aedificabit?
Quid est "Ago tibi gratias" Anglice 3 ? Quid est "good-by"

copias convocabant?

German!

sol!

Latme 4 ?
1

hostes = enemies.
Remember that just

not the
as

nonne

in

a question expects the answer yes,

so

num expects the

Nonne

vir

answer no;
Est.

bonus est ?

bonus

man good?
est

isn't good, is

e.g.

Is

Yes.

Non

he?

Num vir

est.

No.

Anglice = in English.
Latine = in Latin.

The man

Colloquia Latvia.

COLLOQUIUM SEXTUM.
J.

XIX

Lesson

L. Lesson XII, (I/VIII)

C.

&

. 134.

Frater et Sororcula. 1
to-day

school

S.

Fuistme in ludo, mi

F.

Sane

mea

fui,

Magister,

S.

frater,

sororcula.

suppose

credo, morosus

Numquam

F. Minime.

hodie?

erat.

morosus

est,

benlgnus semper, 4

nice
5
atque hodie fabulam gratam discipulis narravit.

indeed

Itane?

S.

Mihi, care

frater,

fabulam narra.

Fuitne de

leone ?

Minime vero

F.
claro
S.

Roman!

sed de Julio Caesare, popull

imperatore.

Nonne Caesar

bella proeliaque amavit ?


feared

F. Amavit
^S".

F.
erat,

neque Helvetios neque Germanos timebat. 7


malus

Sine dubio

fuit

Erravisti,

mea

vir.

sororcula;

sed bonus amicis.

to his foes

to be sure

hostibus

quidem

Multis et magnis proeliis

malus
Galliam

then

totam superavit, et deinde


S.

Haec

de leone.

interest

this

fabula

me non

delectat.

rather

Potius narra,

please

amabo

te,

Colloquium Scxtum.

De

est.

_ _ _._
leone postea narrabo.

too late

F. Sero

17
good-night

Optime

vale.

NOTES AND QUESTIONS.


1.

Diminutives are sometimes formed in Latin by adding


culum to noun stems, e.g. soror-cula.

cuius, cula, or
2.

Cf.

Eng. master.

morose, and the failing commonly, though I hope


suggest the correct translation.
falsely, attributed to teachers, will
words.
of
order
the
Observe
4.

The Eng.

3.

What

is the English derivative?


noun.
Notice that the adjective is here placed before the
to find other
Try
sense?
the
have
on
that
does
effect
What

5.

6.

cases.

Although

7.

of the

number

this verb is of the

st conj.

2d

conj., still

should enable you to

tell its

and

correctly.

That by means of which anything

8.

your knowledge

tense, person,

done

is

is

put in the

Ablative
ablative case without a preposition, called the
or Instrument.
9. amabo te

lit.

shall like

you = Eng.

please,

of Means

I pray.

taught to expect the verb, unless it is emphatic,


but observe from this colloquium, that the
last in the sentence
placed elsewhere.
frequently
are
sum
forms of

You have been

Be prepared
books closed:

either to ask or to

answer the following with

Nonne in ludo, ml
quds 1 est colloquium sextum?
Estne fabula,
Estne tuus 2 magister morosus?
Caesar? Da
fuit
Julius
Quis
quam 3 magister narrat, de leSne?
4
Galliam
Quis
Instrument!.
ablatlv5
de
regulam
mihi Anglice
Inter

amice, fulsti?

to tarn superavit ?

Quid
2

est "

tuus,

good night " Latlne ?

w hom.

ablatlvus Instrument! =

your.
ablative of

quam = which.

means or instrument.

Colio quia

Latma.

COLLOQUIUM SEPTIMUM.
Lesson XXII

J.

L,.

Lesson XIII,

(L.VI)

C.

&

D. 148.

Patres Simo et Cliremes.


why

Cur tam morosus

S.

es ?

because

Quod/ Simo,

C.

meus magnam curam mihi

filius

dat.

Estne puer tam malus ?

S.

Doleo.

C.

Et malus

troublesome

over him

et molestus est.

Auctoritatem in

eum

nul-

lam habeo.

Meus quoque 2

^.

filius,

cum pudore 3

narro, similis erat;

he was cured

sed miro

modo

heaven's

in

sanatus est.

name

rightly

Mehercle, mihi narra

C.

modum

amicum

recte

ambulabat

cum

numerum

spec-

s! te

appello. 4
S.

gladly

once

Libenter.

Forte

meus,

filius

qvK

of asses

pueris

alils,

mulierem

et

audaciae

Filius plenus

tavit.

asellorum

" Heus,

"

magnum

ml

fill

asellorum

exclamavit,

" Heus, mater

" mulier respondit. 7

Sanatus

by these hard

est his

duns verbis 8 puer meus.

NOTES AND QUESTIONS.


I.

C/.

Ex.

the

where the same word means which.

II,

part of speech

same form?

is

it

(Ex.

there?

What

Ill, n. 2.)

here?

What

third

Whav
use oi

Colloquium Octavum.
Notice the position.

2.

It

never stands

19
and

first

it

emphasizes

the preceding word.

Observe that

3.

the

this phrase,

This

question how.

When

is

and miro

not modified by an adjective

modo

below, answer

the Ablative of

called
it

requires

cum.

Manner.
Here we

have an instance of each construction.


4.

si te

objects

te

amicum
is

appello.

Notice that we have here two

the direct object, and

amicum, which

of te and refers to the same person,


case.
5.

used?
6.

See H. yj^,

audaciae.
Ex.
Cf.

is

predicated

of course, in the

is,

same

A. & G. 239, a.
In what case? What other case might be
1

Ill, n. 7.

Eng. exclaim.

7.

See Ex. IV,

8.

What

Be prepared
books closed:

n. 9.

the construction?

is

either

to ask or to

answer the following with

fllil curam magnam patribus saepe dant?


Dolesne?
regulam mihi de ablativo modi. 1 Ambulabatne filius solus?
Quid puer spectavit?
Quid puer exclamavit?
Quid mulier

Nonne

Da

Nonne verba puerum sanaverunt?

respondit?

Num

audaciae es?
1

modi, of manner.

COLLOQUIUM OCTAVUM.
J.

Lesson

XXV;

L. Lesson

XIV;

C.

&

X.

179.

Magister et Discipulus.

M. Quid

in penso,

mi

discipule, est?

review

D. Pensum

recognitio

declinationis tertiae est.

plenus

20

Colloqida

Latma.

how many
decllnationes 3 Latlnae sunt?

M. Quot
D.

Decllnationes quinque, 4 durissima

quod 6 tam multae regulae 7

M.

Ita sunt
I

D.

now

to the

M. Nunc ad

nam

tertia

dlligentia superabis.

defessus et abjectus

work

what

opus

sum.

gender

Quae de genere

D. Primum de genere masculino


o, or, os, er, et es,

est

weary

for

Ita spero,

autem

et exceptiones sunt.

tamen magna

hope

regulae sunt?

narrabo.

Nomina 9

in genetivo singular! crescunt,

si

10

in

sunt

11

generis masculini.
very well

M. Optime
D. Nomina

12

Nunc

exceptiones mihi narra.

in do et go,

si

habent terminationem

nomina

genetivo, atque abstracta et collectiva

inis in

in to generis

feminini sunt.
you remember well

well

M.

Narras probe

Bene memoria

tenes.

13

NOTES AND QUESTIONS.


There are apparently many new words

in this exercise.

Use

your knowledge of the subject discussed, and the similarity of


the Latin to the English.
i.

Used here

in the sense of lesson.

5.

Eng. recognition. How can that mean review?


Cf. Eng. declension.
We have had quintum see Ex. V.
Cf. Eng. durable. I/ardness= durability. Trans, hardest.

6.

See Ex. VII,

7.

Cf.

2.
3.

4.

Cf.

n. 1.

Eng. regular.

Colloquium Nonum.
8.

Cf.

9.

The

10.

Cf.

Eng.

dejected.

first

meaning

Eng.

increase.

is

name.

7101m

21

is

a name.

n. In Latin we often express possession by the verb


e.g. Urbs hostium est, The city

and the genitive case

This

{belongs to) the enemy.

is

sum
is

of

called the Predicate Genitive of

Possession.

Eng. optimist.
you hold well by memory:
See Ex. VI, n. 8.
of memoria?
12.

Cf.

13.

Lit.

Be prepared
books closed

either to ask

or to

What

is

the construction

answer the following with

Amasne declinati5nes? Quae


penso est?
Narra Anglice regulas de
Cur?
decllnatio durissima est?
singular!? Tenesne
ablativo
in
Quae est terminatio
genere.
1

Quid hodie

in

bene memoria?
1

which.

COLLOQUIUM NONUM.
J. Lesson

L. Lesson XIV, (XLIV, LIV,


D. 180, (293, 295, 400, 401).

XXVIII;
C.

&

I. VII)

Princeps et Amicus.
of this

P.

Nonne

A. Certe
lant.

est Cassius,

mi amice, dominus hujus urbis?

Cassium dominum * hujus urbis

elves appel-

Colloqtna Latvia.

22
then

2
Cives igitur longe errant, praeest enim urbi Orbilius.

P.

him

pray.

do not know

3
A. Itane? Quis tandem Orbilius est? Ego eum non novl.

only

Ego

P.

viro

tantum

fortuito

met

occurri.

Fabulamne

tibi

narrabo ?
indeed

A. Sane quidem amabo


yesterday

te.

city-walls

Heri extra moenia ambulabam per viam novam.

P.

A. Per viam novam Cassi?


P.

Ita fuit.

umbra

Defessus jam calore 6

Prope

occupabam.

fuit,

lapide

pulchramque

esse.

sedem, quae

in

in

me autem

vir alienus

said

alieno 8 dixi

Ego

fuit.

solis,

viam Cassi domini latam

At alienus respondit, "Via quidem


i

bona

est,

sed cur Cassium

dominum

appellas?

Ego enim,

he

non

iste,

sum dominus, quod ego

solus in urbe tota regnare

10

how

possum."

"

Quomodo? "

rogavi.

"

Ego sum

Orbilius

mag-

said he

ister ludi," inquit,

et

"

Ego

in pueris regno, pueri in matribus

matres in patribus regnant

ergo ego dominus urbis

sum

rather than

potius

quam

Cassius."

NOTES AND QUESTIONS.


This exercise involves some very important grammatical prinand should be studied with great care.

ciples,

Give the construction of these accusatives. What is the


i.
(Remember that a word is
emphatic word in the sentence?
made emphatic by being put out of its usual place.)

Colloquium Nonunt.

compounds of sum, except possum and absum,

All the

2.

23

take the dative as object.

We

3.

have learned that the personal endings of the Latin

verb take the place of the personal pronouns, but the latter are

expressed when

we wish

Try

emphasis or contrast.

to indicate

to explain their use in this exercise.


4. A few compound verbs, including oc-curro, follow the rule
given in note 2 for compounds of sum.
5.

Cf Eng. fortuitously.

6.

Cf.

7.

Cf.

8.

Indirect object of dixi.

9.

esse

Eng.
Eng.

perceiving,

is

caloric.

alien.

infinitive is

sum.

the present infinitive of

and the like,


put in

require the

the accusative.

All verbs of saying,

and the subject of the

inji?iitive,

This use arises from a

ence between the English and the Latin idiom.


say, "

said that the

way was broad

"
;

but in Latin

conjunction corresponding to that; hence

broad

The

subject of the infinitive

is

we

say, "

dixi viam latam esse," where

to be

regarded in the

we
we have no
said the way

to be is

an

infinitive.

put in the accusative because

it

instance as the object of the verb on which

first

the infinitive depends

is

differ-

In English

viam

is

the object of dixi

infinitive,

we have another,

hence, above,

as well as the subject of esse.


10.

Besides the above use of the

Verbs of inco7nplete
an English usage.
predication co?nplete their predicate with an infinitive, e.g. Possum regnare, / a?n able TO reign. Here / am able requires
another action of the same subject to complete its predicate, and

which corresponds

an

to

infinitive supplies this

want

in each language.

Colloquia Latina.

24

COLLOQUIUM DECIMUM.
J.

Lesson

XXXI

XXXIV,

L. Lesson

Duo

(I/VI)

C.

&

D. 199,

p. 34, n. 2.

Senatores, Flaccus et Piso.

F.

Te, Piso, in concilio heri non spectavi.

P.

Adesse 2 non poteram.

Quid mentes senatorum occu-

pavit ?
all

Novum

F.
animls

fuit.

P.

Itane?

Punicum

bellum

in

mentibus 3 omnibus

et

again

Estne iterum

F. Scipio

dicit

belli

periculum?

bellum certe appropinquare. 4

Carthago,
twenty

mighty

urbs

magna

to

tres

primo bello noa defessa, post

et valida,
renew

viginti

contest
5

annos redintegrare

certamen parat.

parati erunt pro patria pugnare.

Roman! quoque 6

Quis primus in concilio sententiam 8 rogabatur ?

P.

Erunt.

F.

Cato a consule

P.

Potesne sententiam ejus mihi narrare

primus suam sententiam rogabatur.


his

F. Per deos
I

you know

by the gods
!

nonne Catonis

nosti sententiam?

do not know.

astonished

P.

Ipse quidem nescio.

F.

Attonitus

Cur tandem

tu

tam

attonitus es?

this

you are ignorant of

tiam ignoras.

sum quod

tu senator

hanc claram sentenany

as often as

so often

Quoties Cato sententiam aliquam dat,

toties,

must be destroyed

in

extrema oratione,

dicit,

"Ergo delenda

est

Carthago."

Colloquium Decimum.

25

NOTES AND QUESTIONS.


1. We have now had tu, tibi, and te, the nominative, dative,
and accusative, respectively, of the pronoun of the second perDo you think te is emphatic here?
son.
2. Construction?
See Ex. IX, n. 10.
3. What is the difference between mens and animus?
See Ex. IX, n. 9.
4. Construction?
5.
Cf Eng. disintegrate, integer.

6.

See Ex. VII,

7.

Construction?

8.

Remember

n. 2.

that verbs which take two accusatives, one the

person, and the other the thing, retain the accusative of the thing
in the passive, the accusative of the person
ject

Act.

e.g.

opinion.

Catonem sententiam

Pass.

becoming the sub-

rogat,

He

Cato sententiam rogatur, Cato

asks Cato his


is

asked his

opinion.
9. Whenever the preposition by is followed by a proper
noun or a word meaning a person or persons, it is expressed by
a or ab and the ablative this is called the Ablative of Agent.
This construction must be carefully distinguished from the Ablative of Means, which does not refer to persons, and which omits
;

the preposition.

Be prepared
books closed:

Nonne

either to ask or to

Flaccum et Pisonem?
Quid mentem tuam occupat?

nostl senatores

concilio nonfuit?

thago?

Ouot

answer the following with

bella

Punica fuerunt?

paratus pro patria pugnare?

Cur Piso in
Ubi est CarQuis Scipio fuit?
Esne

Estne a consule in ablatlvd InNarra mihi regulam de


ablativo agentis Anglice aut Latine?
Quae fuit sententia Castrument!

tonis

an

in

ablativo

agentis?

Colloquia Latma.

26

COLLOQUIUM UNDECIMUM.
J.

Lesson

XXXV;

L. Lesson

XXXV

Pater

XXXVIII;

to

C.

&

D. 204, 298.

et Filius.

how
ft.

Me

P.

Cur, ml

F.

Quod, care

miserum

Quam

x
!

tam

fill,

defessus

sum

tristis es ?
to learn

sum.

pater,

quam me

lingua Latlna,

meum

pensum

turbas

discere

non pos-

4
!

book

Ad me 5

P.

Magister quidem

F.

Ubi pensum

librum tuum porta.


6

est?

verba deponentia conjugations

pri-

these
7
imperavit, sed haec sunt mihi enigma.
why
9
Nonne est villa regula?
P. Quid 8 enigma dicis?

mae

strange to say

Mirabile dictu, nulla regula

F.

O
Per deos

P.

est.
here

stupid

stulte puer, ubi ocull tui

this

Certe, sed hanc regulam


verbis

non

explicabo. 13

verbum

capitis

Ago

tibi,

pater, gratias.
_

habeo. Vero

iter

Nunc

appellatur."

intellego.

Exempli

non I am exhorted ; ergo hortor

F.

sed

understand

terminationem passivam r habet, sed Anglice


hort,

is

Eccam

"Verbum quod 12 formam passivam

significationem activam habet deponens

P. Paucis

sunt

which

the very rule

regulam ipsam 11

F.

10

est

gratia

14

hortor

significat

/ ex-

deponens verbum.

intellego,
wisdom

dolorem autem

quod ad sapientiam ducit durum

est.

Colloquium Undecimum.

27

NOTES AND QUESTIONS.


1.

See Ex.

2.

What

3.

Give construction.

4.

Cf.

Ill, n. 3.

other meaning

may quam have

as an adverb?

Eng. perturb, disturb.

Would the dative be admissible?


6. What have you noticed about the position of this word?
7. Cf same word in English.
8. Remember cur and quid as the two common words meaning why.
quid has then the force of an adverb. What does it
mean as a pronoun?
5.

9.

10.

It dieit

The

means he

says,

what ought

diets to

possessive of the second person

is

mean?

tuus,

a,

um

(like

bonus).
11.

Cf. Ex. Ill, n. 8.

12.

quod

ending show
13.
14.

it

habet is a regular verb


person and number does the

the subject of habet.

is

of the second conjugation.

What

to be here?

Eng. explicate.
For what does the
Cf.

Be prepared
books closed

common

abbreviation e.g. stand?

either to ask or to

answer the following with

Esne defessus? Quid? Nonne tnstis es? Amasne linguam


Potesne
Putasne linguam Latinam duram esse?
Latlnam?
pensum tuum 1 discere? Quid est verbum deponens? Estne
regula in libro? Cur puer regulam non spectat? Potesne mih'i
regulam de verbis deponentibus Latine narrare?
1

your.

28

Colloquia Latvia.

COLLOQUIUM DUODECIMUM.
J.

Lesson XXXVIII;

Lesson XV, (LVIII);

!L.

C.

&

D. 204.

Magister et Discipulus.

M.

Quae, 1 mi discipule,

in

penso hodie tractantur 2 ?


especially

D. Multa

et difficilia

tractantur, praesertim adjectivorum

decllnatio.

M.

Estne pensum de decllnatione adjectivorum


cetera

lus, solus, totus, et

D. Non

M.

est,

D. Genera

M. Quid

multa genera sunt ?

tria sunt.

mihi narrare de genere primo potes ?

D. Genus primum

M. Quid

alius, nul-

sed de declinationis tertiae adjectivls.

Quam

Sane.

tres terminationes in

nominatlvo habet.

de genere secundo ?

this

D. Hoc duas

terminationes, et tertium genus

minationem habet.

Imam

well done

for

M. Optime ml

puer

quid

tibi

praemium dabo pro

penso ?

cellent!

of fun

if

you please

D.

Plus ludi 6

M.

Nihil, male, nisi plagas dabo.

si

placet et minus laboris, 6 magister.


a whipping

for

D. Ago

ter-

tibi gratias,

magister

joy

weep

gaudio 7 lacrimo.

ex-

29

Colloquium Duodecimiim.

NOTES AND QUESTIONS.


in

you have just been learning


This colloquium but repeats what
your grammar.
There the word is feminine nominative
See Ex. I.
1.
Translate
plural.
here it is neuter and the nominative

singular,

'

what

things.

The

meaning of tractare

first

handle, then to
Cf. Encr. tract

handle a

subject,

which means a

to drag, to

which means

manage,

to

to discuss, to treat.

treatise.

Adjectives are often used

3.

is

as

nouns,

especially

in

the

plural.

does the abbreviation etc. mean?


is usual to
When different clauses have the same verb, it
How in
clause.
last
the
verb but once, and that with

What

4
c

use the

En

Observe the case used

|
Llte al

case

Why
is it

do I weep?
Is there a

in?

Be prepared
books closed

Quae

in

after

plus and minus.

Translate

Then what does gaudio tell? What


preposition? Now make your rule.

either to ask or to

answer the following with

difficile? Nonneadpenso tractantur? Estne pensum


alius decllnare ? Quot
declinatio facilis est? Potesne

iectlvorum
adjectivorum sunt?

Unera

Quae

est

terminatiS in ablativo

TenesM memona
declinationis tertiae?
sin-ulari adjectivorum
parentes tibi plagas?
Dantne
causae?
ablativo
regulam de
Dantne magistri AmericanI

discipulis plagas?

Colloquia Latlna.

30

COLLOQUIUM TERTIUM DECIMUM.


J.

Lesson XLI

Duo

L. Lesson

XVII, (LV)

C.

&

D. 215.

Yiatores, 1 Smith et Jones.

S.

salve, viator.

J.

Et

tu salve, aliene.

S.

Mihi nomen

J.

Mihi nomen

Quod 3 nomen

est Smith.

Et

est tibi ?

tibi?

common
est Jones,

clarum nomen

commune 5

et

Esne Americanus?

multis hominibus.

English

S.

Ego quidem deorum

Minime.

benevolentia 6 Anglicus

sum.
J.

Esne ex urbe an ex agris?

S.

Ego ex Londinio maxima

y.

DI

in the

bom

world

orbis terrae 7 urbe sum.

majores 8 in America urbes

quam Londinium

habemus.
S.

J.

Mihi, male, falsa verba narras.

Minime

vero.

America habet montes

longiora, agros meliores,

altiores,

populum fortiorem quam

flumina

Anglia.
indeed

insult

S.

Tu

es

audax atque 9 non sine contumelia.

America fens tantum idonea 5


laetor

est

non hominibus.

quod Anglicus sum.


a fool

J.

Nam

Sine dubio, stultus semper sua

folly

stultitia laetatur.

hercle

Itaque

Colloquium Tertium Decimnm.


not at

the truth

S.

31
don't

all

Et vera dicere Americanus nequaquam potest.

Noll

England

rogare

Americanum sententiam de
an Englishman

Nor

J.

Anglia.

Neve Anglum de America.

NOTES AND QUESTIONS.


viator. The suffix tor, added to the stem of a verb or a root,
1
denotes the agent or doer, e.g. viare, to travel, viator, a traveller.
Ex. XII, n. 3.
2.
Cf. Ex. IX, n. 7
.

3.

Is this the substantive or adjective

4.

Lit.

What name

is to

you t

tion in expressions of naming,

form of the interrogative ?

This

and

It is

is

the regular construc-

sometimes used

in other

equus est mihi= equura habeo.


5. In English we say common to, and suitable for ; to and for
are signs of what case in Latin? hominibus and feris are in
what case ? From these examples make a general rule for the
cases expressing possession,

e.g.

case used after adjectives.

Eng. benevolence.

6.

For construction see Ex. XII,

7.

What

8.

Observe that many of the adjectives precede their nouns.

What
9.

is

n. 7.

Cf.

the literal translation?

does that signify?


et would not do so well here.

Be prepared
books closed

either to ask or to

Quod nomen

Tnsulam habitant?

you see any reason why?

answer the following with

Putasne tuum nomen clarum esse?


Quid? Nonne Angli

est tibi?

Estne benevolentia

Do

in ablatlvo agentis?

Nam

ullae urbes in patria tua majores sunt

igitur Americanus verba falsa narrat?


Quid est flumen orbis terrae longissimum ? Estne Anglia arnica
Americae? Estne solum 1 patriae carum tibi?

quam Londinium?

Nonne

1 soil.

Colloquia Latvia.

32

COLLOQUIUM QUARTUM DECIMUM.


J.

Lesson

XLIV

Lesson XVIII, (LIX)

!L.

Charon

et Hercules.

C.

&

D. 232, 313.

ferryman

Nunc plurimos annos 2

Ch.

Inferni

fluminis portitor

shades
5

et multas illustresque

by
6

umbras

my

ante hoc

mei hodie vident.

fui,

virorum rate 7 portavl; sed

such

numquam

boat

as

tempus talem
Heus, heus

vldi

virum qualem oculi

Quis tu es

quid 9 tu

et

of the Styx

living

vivus in Stygis ripis

H. Ego sum
meus

ambulas?

Hercules,

Maximum

est.
I

filius

opus

me

Alcmenae

Juppiter pater

trans aquas infernas

nunc

wish

vocat et volo te portare

10

me.
rumor

Ch.

Ego quidem

niintiat te

non portabo, Hercules, nam fama

te

esse virum

maxime

terribilem

n
;

te

igitur hor-

besides

reo et timeo.
vivos

12

Praeterea Pluto rex jussit

Stygem portare.

trans

H. At ego

amicis 13 non terribilis

te

pro amico habebo

sum

si

ad ripam ratem

autem me non

magnis lapidibus 7 ratem tuam delebo


tibi

et, si

however

as a friend

movebis,

me numquam

et

juvabis,

plagae meae, credo,

meliorem mentem dabunt.

Ch.

Per deos

certe ego miserrimus sum,

nam

si

te

non

Colloquium Quartum Decimum.


portabo, mihi plagas dabis, sed
timeo,

me miserum

H. Moneo
Ch.

si

te

33

portabo, Plutonem

periculum et

te vltare praesens

me

portare.

Portabo.

NOTES AND QUESTIONS.


1

Charon was the boatman who

Hercules having been

commanded

ferried souls across the Styx.


to bring

up from Hades the

three-headed dog Cerberus, must cross the river in Charon's


skiff.

2.

What

3.

Cf.

4.

See Ex. XIII,

5.

Cf.

case answers the question


Eng. infernal.

Eng.

The

7.

See Ex. VI,

is

immaterial, so the

8.

See Ex. XII.

9.

What

10.

1.

illustrious.

6.

soul

n.

How long?

Romans

called

it

a shadow.

n. 8.

In what case

other word means

is

hoc

there?

In what here?

why?

Construction?

12.

What are the two ways of comparing an adjective?


An adjective used as a noun. Eng. the living.

13.

See Ex. XIII,

1.

Be prepared
books closed

n. 5.

either to ask or to

answer the following with

Quot colloquia jam habuimus? Quod colloquium hodie habeQuis est Charon?
mus?
Fuitne umbrarum portitor multos

Num est Styx flumen


annos?
Quis locis Infernls praeest?
pulchrum? Nonne Hercules vir fortissimus fuit? Num reciisat 1
Charon Herculem portare?
Quid? Quid Pluto rex jusserat?
Habesne me pro amlco? Charonne virum denique portat?
1

recusare =

to refuse.

Colloquia Latlna.

34

COLLOQUIUM QUINTUM DECIMUM.


J.

XL VII

Lesson

L. Lesson

XIX

C.

&

I>.

351.

Miles et Civis Romanus.


C.

Quid, miles, de proelio nuntias?

M. Me miserum

vix 2

1
I

audeo vera narrare.


are

C.

Narra

celeriter.

Peril

you silent

Quid taces?

Quid est?

Quid

tremble.

trepidas ?

M. O Romam
letum
C.

est atque

Certe

infortunatam

maximam

calamitatem narras.

noster exercitus fortiter

M.

Imperium Romanum de-

victor est Hannibal.

Fortissime.

Nonne pugnavit

Multas horas

acriter

pugnabatur, 6 sed

denique nostri 7 impetus hostium diutius sustinere non pobacks

tuerunt et

omnes

8
terga dederunt.
I

C.

pray

HannibalTne, 9 obsecro, plures copiae fuerunt?

M. Minime, Romanis
militum acerrimo timore

fuerunt plures, sed animi


10

equitatus

C.

Quis equitatui praefuit?

M.

Maharbal,

C.

Ubi nunc

vir fortissimus, fuit

est exercitus

commoti

omnium

sunt.

dux.

Romanus ?
alas

M.

Exercitus

Romanus ?

Heu

exercitus

fuit.

Consul

Colloquium Quintum Decimum.

hominum

senatores, equites, multa


near Cannae

milia,

11

35

omnes

in

campo

dead

extends

qui ad Carinas patet mortui jacent.

what

C.

will

become of us

Juppiter, quid de nobis

fiet

NOTES AND QUESTIONS.


The battle of Cannae was fought 216 B.C., in which
Romans sustained the greatest defeat in their history.
What case do exclamations seem to require?
1.
2.

Adverbs regularly precede the

the verb, they are


3.

the

Which

How many

5.

Construction?

6.

Intransitive verbs,
Lit. //

when in the passive voice, are imperwas fought, translate freely they fought.

See Ex. XII, n. 3.


terga dare = to flee.

9.

See Ex. XIII,

n. 4.

10.

See Ex. XII,

11.

Note the idiom.

Be prepared

Num
Nonne

n. 7.

Many thousands of jnen.

either to ask or to

miles

atque seems

of the words in this sentence are emphatic?

8.

books closed

they follow

to the soldier?

4.

7.

When

made emphatic.

of the two statements connected by

more dreadful

sonal.

verb.

the

de

proelio

answer the following with

laetatur?

Audetne vera narrare?

Romanus ab Hannibale deletus est? Quis


Hannibal fuit? Ubi est Carthago? Nonne nostrl fortiter pugnabant? Cur animi Romanorum commovebantur?
Fuitne hoc
proelium magna calamitas? Quis fuit imperator peritissimus
apud Romanos? Nonne Hannibal in Italia multos annos mansit?
Quis fuit pater Hannibalis? Nonne Hamilcar fuit?
exercitus

Colloqiiia Latvia.

36

COLLOQUIUM SEXTUM DECIMUM.


J.

Lesson L; L. Lesson XX, XLIV, (LXIX)

Clymene

& D.

C.

256, 292, (384).

et Phaetlion.
breast

P.

Maximae
Quid

C.

curae,

est tibi,

auxilium dare

mea
mi

mater, pectus

Die

fill?

meum

tenent.

matri dolorem

et

fortasse tibi poterit.


do you know

to be silent

P.

tuum

Dicam, quod 4 diutius tacere non possum.

Nostine

of Jupiter

Epaphum,
Vero

C.

filium Jovis ?

Cur quaeris?

novi.
you

P.

Mane

will

very

hear

et tu audies.

Ille

est valde

superbus Jove 6

yields to

parente atque nemini 7 cedit.

Etenim

heri,

magna 8

dicens,

ego de patre meo, Phoebo, Sole clarissimo, gloriabar, sed

Epaphus, plenus

invidiae,

non

"Non

10

12

inani fefellit."

Ego pudore,

dolore, tacebam.
I

Mehercle

deas

et

tuus pater"

shame

has deceived

C.

11

"est Phoebus, et Clymene, mater tua, te stultum

inquit,

fabula

tulit.

cur non negavlsti?

Phoebum patrem tuum

swear

Juro per omnes deos

esse.
proofs

P.
tu,

Non

negare poteram.

Nulla pignora habeo.

Ergo

cara mater, da pignora mihi.


C.

Consilium melius mihi in animo

est.

Non

longus

Colloquium Sexturn Decimum.


labor

37

yon _

for

tibi,

Phaethon, est ad caelum

iter facere.

13

Si igitur

climb up

animum

habes, gradere, atque deus diel, tuus pater, fidem

these

tibi

de

P.

rebus dabit.

his

Faciam

et

mihi 14 del adsint. 15

NOTES AND QUESTIONS.


1.

quid est

tibi,

lit.

what

is to

you

= what

is

the matter

with you.
2.

A.

What

&G.

other verbs have this peculiar imperative?

4.

Give construction.
See Ex. VII.

3.

H. 238;

128, c.

5.

For declension, see H.

6.

How

7.

What

is

66, 3

A.

& G.

25.

cause expressed?
the case of this word

is

What

case does cedit take

as object?
8.

How

9.

What

is

10.

tulit

1 1

What

have on

its

this adjective

used?

case does plenus sometimes take?


is

the perfect of the verb fero.

effect

does the peculiar position of the negative

force?

12.

How

13.

The

do we express means?
infinitive clause

ad caelum

iter facere

is

the sub-

ject of est.
14.

For construction see Ex. IX,

15.

The

bility,

subjunctive

mode

is

n. 2.

the

mode

of doubt and possiMost things that are


and so it comes about that

while the indicative treats of facts.

doubtful or possible

lie in

the future,

We wish and pray


and which lies in the doubtful future
hence it follows that desires are expressed by the subjunctive,
del adsint, may the gods assist.
the subjunctive often refers to future time.

for that

which we hope

for

Colloquia Latina.

38

COLLOQUIUM SEPTIMUM DECIMUM.


J.

Lesson LIII; L. Lesson, XXI, (XLII, XLIII);

Duae

are

&

D. 298 to 310.

Puellae, Julia et Tullia.

whither

J. Quo,

C.

you hastening

Tullia, tarn celeriter properas

necessary

T.

mea

Doraura,

arnica,

me

contendere necesse

est.

what

Mea

mater

portas?

mihi mandavit. 11

sic

Quern librum manu tui

of Ovid

J.

Opera Ovidl.

Pensum hodie

fuit

de Orpheo

Eury-

et

Tu, credo, hanc fabulam saepissime audlvistl

dice.

funny

T.

Numquam

Ridiculane 3 est fabula?

audivl.

nay indeed _

whether

J.

Num

ridicula

sit

me

Immo

rogas?

vero tristissima

est,

finely

et

fabulam poeta eleganter


T.

narrat.

Narra mihi, obsecro,

si

poteris.

I will try

J.

Experiar.

Eurydice,

Orphei, ex gravi serpentis

11

puella

vulnere mortua erat.

acerbissimo affectus dolore, 5 etenim magis earn

T.

suos, vlvus earn

J.

because

quam

oculos

usque trans Stygem consecutus

Quid 6 earn consecutus


for this reason

Orpheus,

her

for

amabat

conjunx

pulcherrima,

est.

est?

he

Propterea quod 7 se earn

morte reducturum esse

demanded

speravit.

Itaque suam conjugem

caram

flagitavit

regerr*

Colloquium Septimum Decimum.

39

"Educ

Plutonem.

earn,"

inquit

Pluto,

"sed

you turn
flexeris

si

back

retro oculos tuos, amittes iterum earn."


anything

T.
J.

An

quid est etiam amplius

Orpheus,

miserrimus atque mfelicissimus, 11 motus

vir

desirous of seeing (her)

love

magno amore, 9

avidus videndi, oculos retro

flexit

et

Eury-

forever

dicen 10 suam in perpetuum amisit.

NOTES AND QUESTIONS.


1.

What

2.

quern

3.

-ne

words
4.

to

the subject of this verb?

is

portas cf. with a similar sentence in Ex. XI.


added to the verb, but may be added to other
make them emphatic.
is

usually

Principal parts experior,

of a verb

See H. 231,

Does

it?

is

A.

&

it

-Iri,

-pertus sum.

What

kind

have any forms of the active voice?

G. 135,

a, c.

How

would you translate

amatus? How expertus?


5.

For construction, see Ex. XII,

6.

See Ex. XI,

7.

See Ex. VII,

n. 7.

n. 8.

n.

1.

What is the construction? See Ex. X, n. 8.


Plutonem, putting the verb
sentence conjugem
8.

Give the
in the per-

fect indicative passive.


9.

amore:

construction?

10.

Accusative case.

1 1

Cf.

Eng. maiidate, serpent,

infelicity.

supposed that you have now enough command


of Latin to ask and answer questions of your own invention.
The Latin questions are therefore omitted from this point.

N.B.

It is

Colloquia Latlna.

40

COLLOQUIUM DUODEVICESIMUM.
J.

Lesson L.VI

XXII, flLVI, LIX)


334 to 336.

L. Lesson

Mater
F.

ejus in librls

C.

& I>.

315,

et Filia.

mater cara, Socrates

Quis,

mels saepissime 3

Nomen quidem

fuit?

vldi,

sed tamen nihil de viro

himself

ipso novi.

M.

Socrates,

Habuitne

F.

filia

mea, philosophus 12 sapientissimus

Romae domicilium?
5

fuit.

12

renowned

M. Romam numquam
6

quae

in

Graecia

elves praecepta

F.

est,

9 " 12

venit, sed

multos annos 8 incolebat atque

docuit

ibi

philosophiae.

philosophus, discipulos sine dubio habebat.


of
whom
Ita vero, multi clarlque, ex quibus Xenophon atque

Si fuit

M.

him

to

Plato fuerunt, discipuli

ever

erant.

ei

quomodo

F.

At tune aliquando audibecame

of Socrates

visti

Athenls/ urbe praeclara

Socratis discipulus fieret

Numquam,

sed

ita

cupio.
as the story goes

listen

M.

Percipe, quaero, diligenter. 12 Forte, ut

phon, puer nobilissimus

obvium
staff

Xenophon ?

tulit.

10

et

modestissimus,

Socrates,

magna

12

fama

Xeno-

est,

philosopho sese

admiratione

12

motus,

stop

baculum extendens 12 "Consiste, mi puer," inquit "et

plainly

clare

Colloquium Duodevicesimitm.

41

mihi die unde emere cibum necessariaque 12 omnia homiinstantly

nibus 11

iterum rogavit
no

Socrates

liceat?"

puerum

"Unde homines

statim

respondentem

virtutem acquirere possunt?"

answer having been given

Nullo

response
you

dato,

"Sequere me," inquit philosophus,

will learn

"atque tu disces."

NOTES AND QUESTIONS.


1.

2.

quidem. What do you notice about its position?


The place in which. N.B.
Every relation of place,

in, to, or from

viz.,

proper case,
excepting when we use names of towns and the words domus
and rus, which omit the preposition.
3. How are adverbs formed from adjectives?
which, requires a preposition with

its

4.

Decline

5.

Latin once had a special case to express the case in which,

filia.

which has now disappeared except in the


the first and second declensions, where it
still remains, assuming the form of the genitive singular.
Its
use even here, however, is limited to names of towns and the
Roma, being
locatives domi, ruri, kuml, militiae, and belli.
of the first declension and in the singular number, has therefore a locative, Romae = at Rome, in form like the genitive
called the locative,

singular

number of

singular.

do we omit the preposition before Romam and use


Graecia?
7. Athenis is the name of a town, and of the first declension,
but it has no locative because it is plural (Athenae, -arum).
6.

it

Why

before

Cf

n. 5.

8.

9.

It

What
What

therefore follows n.

2.

case answers the question

How long?

verbs take two accusatives?

Colio quia

42

obvium

sese

io.

mon

tulit

lit.

idiom meaning simply

Latina.

bore himself over against, a com-

to meet,

and followed by the

dative',

hence philosopho.
11.

The verb

12.

C/.

liceat governs the dative.

Eng. philosopher, domicile, precepts,

diligently, modesty

admiration, extending, necessaries.

COLLOQUIUM UNDEVICESIMUM.
J.

Lesson I.IX

L. Lesson

XXV;

&

C.

D. 315.

Erro, 1 Vir Terribilis.


{Erro, vir

terribilis,

10

qui,

ante aedificium splendidum

stat,

knocks

januam pulsat. 10
lam

Matrdna pulsatwnem

intus audiens ancil-

vocat.)

M.

Quis,

januam

ancilla,

Tune 3 eum 4 ex

pulsat?

window

fenestra videre potes

to see clearly

A.

Cernere eum, matrona, ego non possum.


come

M.

stupid

Age, quid

est,

linger

inepta? 10 Quidcessas? Januam

quam 8

open_

celerrime aperl

jam domum, 5
{Ancilla

magna

nam dominus quidem, conjunx 10 meus,

as

think

ut opinor, Athenis revertit.

exit

et

brein

voce auditur.)

tempoi-e

damans ad 6 januam

A. Procul, male, procul concede, 7 aut

away

plagas accipies.

faciam?

Abl, inquam,

Quid agam?

ah,

abl

hinc

me

Ei mihi,

quid

Colloquium Undevicesimum.

43

what arc you doing (lit. what will you do)

Quid

(damans).

M.

fenestra videns.)

Quid de nobis

I rejoice

te

M. Me

10

patior.

Me

miseram

quod

Salve, matrona,

Athenas profectus

E. Dolesne?

In

Estne dominus domi an run?

felicem video, gaudeo.

mo

fiet

(ingreduns magna andacia).

E.

est erro

Nobis dei adsint, obsecro,

jam eum audio.

atrio

(Errdnem ex

Quid fades?

est?

Doleo eum non adesse.

est.

Ego quidem absentiam

ejus

10
Atcanis! Ubi canis est? Facitne

aequo

ani-

quoque

iste

Athenas ?

iter

M.

Hie, hercle, domi

est.

Age

quam 8

celerrime

canem

let in

immitte, ancilla.

E.

(cum summo timbre).


I

must hasten

est.

Ha,

ha,

(sola).

_
\_&xit erro.
l_

Statim maturandum

M.

Excusa me, obsecro, matrona.

off

optime

Canis, animal Infelicissi-

ago

mum,

9
abhinc duos annos mortuus

est.

NOTES AND QUESTIONS.


I.

Erro, a tramp.

to
Cf. Latin erro, are,

wander, English

trr
2.

We

may now begin

The form

januam

to parse the simpler

for nouns, taking

est

nomen

januam

in Latin.

words

as a model,

is

as follows

dechdeclinationis primae, basis est janua,

janua, janua januae,


natiS janua, januae, januae, januam,
januls,
in genere fieminlno,
januae,
januas,
januarum, januis,
tertia, in casu accusativo, obpersona
in
singular!,
in numcro
;

Colio quia

44

jectum verb! pulsat, secundum


casu accusativo

tivl in

Grammaticum" you
3.

When

Ex. IX,
4.

will

regulam

By

est.

are personal

Objectum verb! transi" Glossarium

the help of the

soon acquire facility in this work.


pronouns used in the nominative?

See

n. 3.

is,

ea, id,

is

the weakest of the demonstratives, and

est used to take the place of the

which

Latina.

is

often-

pronoun of the third person sui,

always reflexive.

is

domum?

5.

Why

not

6.

ad

often used to express nearness or proximity.

7.

Cf.

8.

quam

is

ad

cedo and discedo.


celerrime

quam

adds strength to a superlative

trans, as quickly as possible.


9. The time since an event is usually expressed by ante or
abhinc with the accusative or ablative.
10.

Cf.

Eng.

terrible,

pulsate,

inapt,

conjugal,

equanimity

',

canine.
1

secundum =

according

to.

COLLOQUIUM VICESIMUM.
J.

Lesson LXII; L. Lesson XXVII;

Avus

et

Nepos

A. Age, age, obsecro,

raedari,

C.

&

D. 315.

in Itinere.

driver

incita

maturandum

est.

Celeriu?

equos tuos.

N. Putasne,

ave, nos tardiores


what time

is it

futuros esse?

according to

A. Ita timeo.

Hora quota

N. Nunc hora 2

fere tertia est.

est

ex horologio 2 tuo?

Estne

statio

procul?

Vicesimum.

Colloquium

45

William

A.

right there

Gulielme,

Fellciter,

est

ilia

Sed eccam 9

proxima.

of the carriage

it is

ipsam

Nonne

illam ex fenestra raedae vides ?


iron

N.

vehicula 2 in via ferrea stant et emittit 3

Jam

Certe.

dense
2
crebras vaporis nubes locomotus.

here

we

are

A. Ecce nos

Impedimenta, raedari, ubi sunt?

trunk

R. Altera 4

cista,

domine,

in

carro,

altera

jam

quam

celerrime et

in

sta-

tione est.
run

Tu

A. Bene narras.

curre, Gulielme,

tickets

duas tesseras erne usque ad Bostoniam,

ego impedimenta

meanwhile

interim curabo.
soon

N. {niox
tuta?

revert ens).

Ecce

tesseras!

Impedlmentane

A. Tuta omnia

quidam ea

in vehiculo deposuit.

bell

let

propera, tintinnabulum audio.

Age,

us get aboard

Conscendamus.

here

N. Mehercle, quanta multitudo


ave.

Num

omnes

hi

Eccam 9 sedem vacuam,

Bostoniam proficiscuntur?

A. Minime vero, mi puer,

alii

aliam

10

in

urbem

iter faciunt.

N. Abestne Bostonia longe ?


where

A. Circiter milia passuum ducenta abest.


the world

umbrella

gentium

N.

in

Sed ubinam

est

Me

meum umbraculum?

miserum,

in statione id reliqui
would that

A. Quid audio?
there

sime,

illlc

esses

In statione?

Utinam

tu quoque, pes-

Colloquia Latina.

46

NOTES AND QUESTIONS.


Tardiores,

1.

quently.
in gradu

too late-, the

comparative has this force

com para tivo,

fre-

tardiores est adjectivum


comparatio tardus, tardior, tardissimus,

Parse adjectives as follows

basis tardius, decllnatio, tardior, tardius, tardioris, tardiori,

genere masculino, in numero plurali, in casu accusativo,

etc., in

cum pronomine 116s concordans, secundum regulam Adjectivum


cum nomine in genere et numero et ca.su concordat.
:

Eng. incite, horologe, hour, vehicle, vapor, chest.


mitto means I send, what does Imitto signify?
How does alter differ from alius in meaning?
Names of towns take ad to express emphasis or

2.

Cf.

3.

If

4.
5.

sense of towards, in the direction

of, in

in the

the vicinity of.

6.

What

7.

est and sunt are often omitted in lively discourse.

8.

conscendamus

case do exclamations require?

see

Ex. XVI,

n.

15;

so,

too,

esses

below.

Ecce

9.

is

often contracted with a following demonstrative,

giving such forms as

When

etc.

eccam = ecce

earn,

eccum ecce eum,

the verb in the clause following

the copula, Latin

is

and puts the whole expression in the accusative e.g.


Eng. Here is an empty seat = Lat. Eccam sedem vacuam =
Ex. XI, Eccam
lit. Behold it I an empty seat.
Cf. Ex. Ill, n. 8
regulam ipsam.
urbem a common idiom trans, some to one city,
10. alii
omits

it

and

others to another.

sion just one-half.

The idiom abridges

the English expres-

Colloquium

Vicesimum Primiim.

47

COLLOQUIUM VICESIMUM PRIMUM.


J.

Lesson LXV; L. Lesson XLIV, (LVIII)


408 and 413.

C.

&

D. 327, articles

Magister et Discipulus.

M.

Quae, discipule, in penso hodie tractantur?

D, Ah
I

magister,

dolor!

est

mihi quod pensum non

have learned

didicl.

M. Quid

non, male

D. Certe habeo.

Num habes

ullam 2 excusationem

puer

Gulielmus,

13

mihi amicissimus,

the weather being fine

domo

sereno, 3

caelo

at

my

pervenit, 4

hodie

profectus

et

dies

sane

house

paucos apud

me

manebit.

13

Illo

autem praesente,

ego studere non poteram.


I shall

M.

have

to

ac de Cicerone,

D.

excuse you

Tibi ignoscendum.

Libenter,

si tibi

nam

At hac hora 7

alio

modo 8 utamur

placet, inter nos 9 colloquamur.

iste

me semper maxima

admiratione 13

ability

Quanta potestas

movet.
quentia

in eo,

quanta

facultas,

quanta elo-

13
!

on which account

M. Bene
admlrari. 13

quamobrem hunc minime

dicis,

Paucis
I

ante diebus 10

read than which

illud

satis

possum

opusculum u " De

surely

Amicitia " iterum legl quo nihil profecto melius esse potest.
hitherto

D. Adhuc ego quidem tantum


scripsit

amplius?

orationes ejus vldl.

Quid

Co Ilo quia Latma.

48

of writing

M.

Ille

omnia scrlbendi genera conatus

fessus rebus adversis, consolationem

multos de hac re

scripsit

D.

Turn, credo, "

M.

Ita

fuit.

Id

De

13

est, et

senex,

12

de-

philosophiae petivit et

libros.

Amlcitia " scriptum

est.

opusculum plenum sapientiae prae-

est

for the

young

ceptorumque praesertim juvenibus optimorum.


how much

D. QuantI Cicero

M.

ipse amlcitiam aestimat?

13

Audi, mi puer, et tene memoria haec oratoris verba


more

delightful

" Nihil a dls immortalibus melius habemus, nihil jucundius 13

quam

amlcitiam."

NOTES AND QUESTIONS.


didicT

1.

is

in the perfect indicative active of

disco.

Cf.

discipulus.
2. Rule: The indefinite pronouns quisquam and ullus are
used in negative and comparative sentences, and in interrogative

sentences expecting a negative answer.


3. caelo serSno, lit. the sky being clear, a noun and adjective
in the ablative absolute.

may

What

stand in that construction?

exercise

What

other instance in this

Parse verbs as follows

4.

other combinations of words

tione quarta

pervenit

est

verbum

in conjuga-

partes principalis pervenio, -ire, -veni,

-ventum

bases sunt perveni, perven, pervent Tnflexio pervenl, pervenlsti, pervenit, pervenimus, pervenistis, pervenerunt,
;

-ere

in voce activa, in

modd

indicatlvo, in tempore perfecto, in

numero singulari, cum subjecto Gulielmus


concordans, secundum regulam Verbum cum subjecto in persona et in numero concordat.

persona

tertia, in

Vicesimum Secundum.

Colloquium
5.

So

apud

also

t, se,

nos,

etc.,

meaning

at the

49
house of a

person.
6.

of

praesente, the ablative singular of the present

participle

praesum.
7.
8.

9.

10.

What case is used


Cf Ex. VII, n. 3.

See H. 448, n. A.
See Ex. XIX, n. 9.
;

n. See Ex. VI,


12.

13.

with

&

utamur?

G.

153, inter.

n. 1.

senex, an appositive often equals a temporal clause.


Cf. Eng. excuse, remain, admiration, eloquence, admire

consolation, estimate, jocund.

COLLOQUIUM VICESIMUM SECUNDUM.


LXVIII;

J. Lesson

Duo

L. Lesson

XL VI,

(LVIII); C.

&

D. 333.

Sodales, 1 Nasica Enniusque.

domum

{Nasica forte

poetae Enrit profectus"1

Januam

puis at.)

N. Aperi

Aperi

Ancilla {intus)

N. Ennium

Quis pulsat ? Quid

videre,

vis ?

tuum dominum,

void.

Estne

iste

domi ? 3
Ancilla.

Domi non

est.

Veni

alio die.

perceived

{Nasica, qui sensit illam domini jussu id dixisse, tamen

cum

silentio

12

concedit.

cae se contulit.)

Proximo

die

Ennius domum Nasi-

Colio quia

5<D

E.

bone

Aperi,

Latina.

Nonne me

audis

Quid

N. {caput ex fenestra
Quid

istlc

superiore exserit.)

fades ?

Noli,

Enni

12
obsecro, januam frangere.

lame

anger

E. {cum

salve,

break in

to

there

cessas ?

thrusts out

Quid non aperis?

ira).

Jam

claudus, hercle,
by pounding

manu 7 sum duas 8 januam inimicam

altera

Tu

At minime hoc feram.


rime.

to get

celer-

E.

12

Nonne

{attonitus).

are beside yourself

es

apud

te.

N. Minime
ancillae

optime

Quid tandem

intus vis?

colloqul volo.

N. Mecum ?

nam

quam

angry

IrascI,

E. Tecum

non

vero, inquam, aperi

N. Noli

you

per horas pulsando.

10

Per

vides, inepte,

deos

me non dom!

esse ?

Tu non domi?

Certe

AmisistTne

vero, sed tu,

mentem?

tuae dicentl te

autem mihi non credis

ipsi.

Enni,

homo impudens

domi non

Abi n Veni

12

esse credidi

es,

tu

alio die.

NOTES AND QUESTIONS.


1.

Boon companions, bosom friends

profectus active or passive? Why?


What words are like it?
4. What case answers the question when t
5. illam refers to ancilla.
6. noli frangere (cf Ex. XIII, noli rogare), lit. be unwilling
Prohibition is best exRule
to break in = don't break in.
pressed by the imperative of nolo with the present i)ifnitive.
2.

Is

3.

In what case?

BOSTON UNIVERSITY
COIXE6E OF LIBERAL ARTS
LIBRARY
Vicesimum Tertium.

Colloquium

manu =

claudus altera

7.

respect

is

lame

In what case

he lame?

is

in

51

one hand.

manu?

In what

Now make

your

rule for specification.


8.

duas agrees with what?

9.

Parse adverbs as follows

Why

in that position?

Celerrime

est

adverbium modi,

ex adjectivo celer comparatio celeriter, celerius, celerrime;


in gradu superlatlvo, et verbum aperi limitat, secundum regu;

lam

Adverbia verba,

ancillae

10.

et adjectlva, et adverbia alia limitant.

object of credidi.

is

See H. 385,

II

A.

&

G.

227.
1

abi, from ab-eo.

12.

Eng.

C/.

silence,

fracture, irascible, impttdent.

COLLOQUIUM VICESIMUM TERTIUM.


J.

Lesson I.XXI

t. Lesson XLVIII, (IIV)


423-436).

C.

&

D. 345, (415,

Cyclops et Galatea. 1
C.

Heu

Heu

Ubinam gentium

es,

Galatea,

meae

sweetheart

mea

deliciae,

semper,
gis,

me

vita?

vlso,

Te

videre quid

maxima

fugis

me

puella pulcherrima,

Jam, Galatea, amabo

te,

tuum pulcherrimum caput


G.

ternum

celeritate?

ardentl

veni,

et

tolle.

petere

non

cessas

12

licet?

Nonne

Quid
intelle-

amore captum esse?

jam tandem

alto ex

mari

me

ae-

{quae sese nunc ostendit).


12

non mihi

12

Cur, Cyclops,

Numquam, numquam

te

Colloquia Latlna.

52

quidem amatura sum, 6 neque mihi 7 persuadere potes neque


looks

tua fades, hercle, mihi ferenda

est.

C.

pura

lately

me

certe ego

vidl,

mea forma

novl

mihi

me

nuper enim, ubi

maxime

aqua

in

Specta quantus

placuit.

heaven

sim

Juppiter ipse, qui in caelo

hoc corpus

regnat,

non major quam

est.

G. At tamen
alter oculus tibi,

oculus tantum alter

tibi

antequam me

11

10

quamobrem

est,

obtineas, obtinendus est.

mock

my

nam

Noll illudere, 12 Galatea,

C.
of

hair

looks

beard

you

for

barbam longam
tibi

comb

cut off with a scythe

recidi

tibi

atque munera 12 quoque

falce,

habeo.

G. Munera dicis?
goat

Parva

Erravisti.

et facilia sine

dubio sunt

ilia,

miserum,

mea

of pigeons

pair

columbarum.

fortasse capra vel par

C.

with a rake

Quotidie capillos 12 rigidos rastro pecto, et heri

faciei est.

domi

mihi nunc cura maxima

stiff

Ego

tibi

habeo.

Me

fools

puella iterum fugit

Ita

me

quotidie

fallit.

Ei mihi

NOTES AND QUESTIONS.


This colloquium represents a dialogue between the Cyclops,

1.

a great one-eyed giant, and the sea-nymph Galatea, with

he

is

madly

2.

licet
object
3.

Trans.
is

is

whom

in love.

Why is

impersonal,

it

not permitted to

its

mihi.

See Ex. XXI, n.

3.

subject

is

me

to see you ?

te videre, and

its

The verb
indirect

Vicesimum Quartum.

Colloquium

53

See Ex. VI, n. 9.


are imperatives.
veni, and also tolle below,
how
sum. Where is it made, and

a.
c

is it trans-

amatura

6.

lated

Why?
In what case is mini?
What is the construe*
ferendaest. Where is it made?
by me t See Ex. X,
translate
usually
we
do
How
tion of mini?
7

n. 9.
9.

10.

11.
12.

Cf same
Cf. Ex.

word, Ex. XXI.

XXII,

n. 7.

See note 8, above.


Cf. Eng. ardent,

cease,

eternally,

,,

cavitary,

de-lude,

re-munerate.

COLLOQUIUM VICESIMUM QUARTUM.


J.

wesson I.XXIV; I. Wesson

Duo
Pnmus.

Salve,

At

amice

veni, obsecro,

P.

Vero ac

libenter.

5.

Minime

vidi

mamVhaee

(O, LXT)

&

I>.

363, (384).

Cives American!.

Quo

&aritf. Ettu salve!


sum.

I.V,

is?

librariam iturus

^^

mecum.

Vidistine hodie acta diurna?


punishment
_

nam quldam

ex sacSio

Ego ad tabernam

meo

di supplicium

clam" eripuit.

de eo su-

Quid, obsecro,

any news

rogas

Estne aliquid novi?

Europa

vero,

me

judice,

magis magisque avida

belli

Co Ilo quia Latma.

54
videtur
sibus

S.

P.
causa,

vereor

igitur

ne bellum

maximum

paucis in men-

audiamus.

Cur

Itane?

ita

judicas?

Multis de causis.
6

Primum omnes

gentes, alia alia ex

bellum exspectant, et omnibus copiae paene innuincitement

merabiles sunt, quae solae, ut opinor,

magno incitamento

sunt bello. 7
S.

Existimasne autem omnes inter sese

gentes pugnatu-

ras esse?
Russia

P.

according to

Sarmatia,

my

opinion indeed

sententia, 9 ut

mea quidem

Austria

Noricum

operam dabit; 10 etenim Alexander, Norico


Constantinopole potlturum

11

sperat.

Ne hoc

vincat, 4

victo, se
fiat,

12

urbe

Germania

treaty

auxilium ex foedere Norico dabit et deinde aggredietur Ger-

maniam
S.

Gallia.

Vera

dicis

at

Gulielmus imperator, ut

ama

est,

causas

belli toilet.

P.

Cupit sed non poterit, ergo ipse imperavlt ut elves

oppida omnia mumrent atque


nes suas statim reverterentur.
S.

Nonne

P.

Difficile est

S.

Dis

est

Germania

perveniet.

ad

legio-

validior Gallia?

sententiam de hac re dicere.

immortalibus

Americani sumus.

legati, qui abessent,

13

gratias

Numquam

agamus 1 propterea quod

nostram ad patriam bellum

Colloquium

Vicesimum Quartum.

55

NOTES AND QUESTIONS.


XVI, n. 15.
For construction, see Ex.
H.
3; A. & G. 216, 3see
397.
For construction,
absolute lit. / bang judge =

me

3.

judice

^tTereor ne

ablative

audiamns.

Q>

Rule

All verbs whose action

clause mthut
be followed by an object
to the future may
verbs are those s.gmfySuch
purpose.
ne), denoting
please, strive, urge, or
command, exhort, persuade,

rets

(iZve

"f

to ask,

fea

['

when is expressed by the


panels in mensibus. Time
which by the ablative with m.
ablative, time within

simple
6.

Cf

Ex.

XX,

n. 10.

inoitamento, bello.

Two

datives.

Cf inter n5s, Ex. XXI.


with?
What case expresses in accordance
= will strive.
operamdabit: ^x. will bestow exertion
mfhutive active.
future
the
from
is often omitted

T2

8.

q
,o

eL

negative purpose clause.

iT
t

; fmperavit

munirent atque

reverterentur.

subjunctive
Observe that the imperfect
in

is

See

here used

"c^seeontoy)

imperavit
use tht leading verb
English as well asm
is observed in
tense
of
Sequence
tense.
Sconquer the
fights that he may
Latinhe
that
fought

He
principal tenses
vineat is

/He

na ; rSgem
corner

kmg-Pu

- Pngnavit

the king

tenses.
historical (secondary)

nt regem vinceret

Colloqttia Latvia.

56

COLLOQUIUM VICESIMUM QUINTUM.


Lesson LXXVII;

J.

Lesson LXI, (LXVI)

I,.

and

(384

&

C.

D. 371,

385).

Pater Fiiiusque et Amid.


stop

Heu

P.
tibi

Heu

Siste

Heu me miserum

Siste

Heu

Quid fades

meum

caput

Quid

est

Obsecro,

rascal

amlci, repellite

Quare

F.
plagas

tibi

11

hunc scelestum.

Tace,

dedi.

11

Tantum

carissime?

pater

clamas,

ita

inquam, tace

Si

non

tres

tacebis,

multo plus accipies.

A. Heus

puer

tii,

Nonne deos

Dasne

plagas, pessime,

vereris? 11
deservedly

F. Certe vereor
hie

tuo patri?

huncce 2

quidem me puerum

tarn en merito

was beating

verberabam,

nam

parvum saepissime verberabat.


beatings

Numquam, ml

At

melior
ravl.

liberos suos verberare, et te, ut

potero.

livisci

P.

verberationum 5 veterum ob-

pater, istarum

patris

fieres,

est,

ml

fill,

minime autem quia

Nisi te amavissem,

id

id mihi erat dulce, verbe-

non fecissem.
unmindful

F.

Ego, crede mihi,

tui beneficl

minime immemor sum

equally

nunc ver5 ego

te

amo

pariter, et pariter volo te fieri melio-

Vicesimum Quintum.

Colloquium

ut aiunt

rem; itaque "Similia,"


profecto verberandus

Neque verba

P.

Quid

es.

57

"similibus curantur."

Tu

aliud vis ?

male, neque plagae mihi placent.

tua,

Per deos, amici, quid mihi faciendum est?

A. Utinam
fiet, si licet

11

te

monere possemus

ut puerl ita loquantur

Quid hercle de nobis

10
!

NOTES AND QUESTIONS.


1.

Trans. If you

are

Often, as here, a present

not quiet.

Latin, with greater

indicative in English has a future force.

uses

exactness,

the

future

in

such cases

tacebis,

e.g.

not

taces.
2.

huncce. When ce is added to a demonstrative,


niece vir = the vulgar this here man.

it

adds

emphasis,
3.

4.

See Ex. XXI, n. 12.


istarum, the demonstrative of the second person.

Trans.

those beatings of yours.

case follows verbs of remembering and forgetting ?

5.

What

6.

patris.

The

predicate genitive

is

the most

common

with

sum.
7.

In desires and conditions the present subjunctive refers to


and expresses possibility of fulfilment the imperfect

future time

subjunctive, that which

is

not true

now;

the pluperfect, that

Apply the

which was not true in time past.

rule to this sen-

tence.
8.

Construction?

9.

This

known

is

See H. 399,

the regular

I,

A.

&

G. 218, a.

way of introducing a proverb

saying.

10.

What

11.

Cf.

is

Eng.

the subject of the impersonal verb licet?


repel, tacit, re-verence, license.

or well-

Latma.

Colloqiiia

58

COLLOQUIUM VICESIMUM SEXTUM.


J.

Lesson

Duo

LXXX

LXII

I* Lesson

Johannes

Fratres,

&

C.

D. 378.

et Henricus.

out of doors

J.

Age, age, Henrice


day

mecum

Foris

hodie venl.

Intus

day

after

domique diem ex

quamquam

die,

non

robusto 12 cor-

es

pore, 2 manes.

H. Vero ac
possem

Quotldie exire multo mallem, 3

libenter.

sed aliud ex

alio

me

si

At quo tandem

prohibet.

iturus es ?

Eamus, 6

J.

si vis,

ad

fluraen.

Quam

dulce est 7 in

umbra

pleasant

grata sedere et

H. Bene

murmur 12 aquarum

Quam

narras.

audire

serenum

12

caelum

Quam

bright

fulgens 12 sol
is

"Et nunc omnis

ager,

nunc omnis

12

most beautiful

are green

Nunc

bearing

parturit arbos

frondent silvae, nunc formosissimus annus."


a lot

y.

Mehercle, ml

frater,

scripsisti istos versiculos

12

tu

vim

scis Latin!

Tune

ipse

?
talent

H. Utinam possem
imo eos
J.

scripsit.

Quid?

Vergilius, poeta

Ecce flumen video.

Amo?

Sed

scis

ille

sunt

illi

cui pecunia

12

proverbium 12

deest."

ingenio 2

Amasne
illud

money
9

Heu, heu

'

12

raax-

navigare 12 ?

"Omnia

de-

Vicesitnum Sex turn.

Colloquium
how much

does

H. QuantI 10

a boat

cost

it

constat

59

to hire

cymbam conducere?

sesterces

J.

Quinque

10

sestertils

H. Propterea quod
Est

accepi.

igitur

At quare rogas ?

constat.

cum

litteras

cymbam

mihi in animo
will

pecunia

domo

hodie

conducere, sed

be angry

timeo ne pater mihi Irascatur.


J.

Ego minime

timeo,

quotldie exercitatione

quam
H.

I2

nam

pater semper hortatur ut nos

utamur.

Quid melius

esse

potest

navigare?
Ita est ut dicis
to

Eccam cymbam. 11

ergo navigemus.

row

tiller

Utrum mavis remigare an clavum tenere?


J.

Tu primum,

deinde ego remigabo.

NOTES AND QUESTIONS.


quamquam

1.

By what mode

2.

robusto corpore.

is

describing a person, place, or


3.

What

tense

is

followed?

A noun with
tiling, is

and what

this,

is

cum?

etsi?

an adjective or a genitive,
put in the ablative case.
force in a conditional

its

sentence ?
4.

Trans.

One thing

and see Ex. XX,


5.

How

6.

See Ex. XVI,

7.

est.

8.

ille often

9.

Cf.

Translate

translated literally?

What

n. 15

diem ex

die above,

is its

also Ex.

subject

XXV,

eundum

est.

n. 7.

has the force of well-known or illustrious, and

then generally follows

10.

after another.

n. 10.

See Ex. IX,

its

it

noun.

n. 2.

Definite price

is

regularly expressed

by the

ablative

the genitives tanti, quanti, pliiris, minoris, are used

bu\
after

Colio quia

6o

Latvia.

verbs of selling and buying; and magni, pluris, pluriml, parvi,

minoris, minimi, tanti, quanti, nihili, are used


estimation,
1

1.

and

See Ex.

12.

Cf.

after verbs

of

after est, signifying it is worth.

Ex. XX, n. 9.
murmur serene,

Ill, n. 8

Eng. robust,

re-fulgent, arbor, verses,

genius, navigate, proverb, pecuniary, exercise.

COLLOQUIUM VICESIMUM SEPTIMUM.


LXXXIII;

J. Lesson

L,.

Lesson L.XIV; C.

&

D. 398.

Cyclops et Ulixes. 1
(magna

C.

Heus, aliene

voce).

Quis tandem tu es?

merchant

Unde
U.

Utrum mercator

venisti?

{cum fortni dine)

cum

Graecus Troja
C.

Ubi

socils

Minime

an plrata?

plrata,

domine, sed heros

meis doraum 2 navigo.

navem tuam

igitur

es

reliqulstl?

craft

U.

(cum dolo)

Heu, heu

nullam navem habemus


arose

nam

tanta tempestas

dum ad hanc Insulam

navigamus 3 coorta

wrecked

est ut nos,

nave

fracta, soli

superessemus.

C.

At mihi ostende quid tua manu teneas 4 ?

U.

Eccum, 5

wine

Cyclops, vinum

antlquissimum

dulcissi-

drink

mumque.

Pota, domine, ut sentias quae in nave nostra

precious things

pretiosa fuerint. 4

Colloquium
Ha,

(qui potaf).

C.

Vicesitnum Scptimum.
ha, ha, mehercle,

hoc vinum

dis

im-

vines

mortalibus

idoneum

Cum

est.

vites

plurimae in

his terrls

such

tamen nequaquam

sint,

quod noraen

tibi sit?

At die mihi

ferunt nectar.

tale

No-man

Homines me Neminem nominant, Cyclops, cum 8 hoc

U.

me

petas.
to

Neminem

C.

igitur plus vlnl

pour

Audlsne?

fundere jubeo.

Audio, Cyclops, et hoc vinum, obsecro,

U.

sit

meum

_g' ft

tibi

Nonne

donum.

tu vis mihi pro

dono meo quidquam

to return

referre ?
jolly

Procul dubio; ego enim

C.
feclstl,

pro amlco habeo.

te,

Qua de

quia 10

me

tarn festlvum

causa omnes prius socios

I will eat

tuos

edam quam

11

te interficiam.

drunk goes

(Cyclops ebrius

it

Hoc

esto

meum donum.

to sleep

dormitum.)

NOTES AND QUESTIONS.


1.

Ulysses, the Grecian hero, on his

way home from

of Troy, visits the island of the Cyclops.

the siege

Ulysses, succeeding in

getting the monster drunk, puts out his solitary eye, and thus

escapes with his companions.


2.

See Ex. XVIII,

3.

What mode

force does
4.

quid

it
.

n. 2.

follows

dum

give to the present?


.

teneas.

An

in the sense of while,

H. 467, 4; A.

indirect question.

&

and what

G. 276,

e.

Indirect ques-

tions are usually the subject or the object of a verb,

and are com-

Colloquia Latvia.

62

monly introduced by the interrogative pronoun or by cur, why ?


num, whether? ubi, where? quo, whither? unde, whence?
quot, how many ?
5. See Ex. XX, n. 9.
6.

What

7.

cum

cum

case follows
.

sint.

idoneus ?

concessive clause.

The

conjunction

used to introduce causal, concessive, and temporal clauses,


and usually takes the subjunctive, excepting in a temporal clause
referring to present or future time.
is

8.

9.

sit.

See above.

desire.

When is quia followed by the subjunctive?


ante quam and priusquam are followed by

10.

11.

tive

causal clause.

except

when

the action has actually

the subjunc-

commenced or

is

com-

mencing.

COLLOQUIUM VICESIMUM OCTAVUM.


J.

Lesson

LXXXVI

L. Lesson

LXVIII

C.

&

D. 429.

Laelius et Scipio de Lacedaemoniis. 1


13
Lacedaemonios antlquos, 13 Scipio, ut
L. Satis admirari

elves

et mllites,

non possum.

Paene vero antiquis 13 Ro-

surpass

manis 3 antecellunt.
S.

111!

tione.

vero, ut dicis, Laell,

maxima

digni sunt admira-

13
5
Praesertim ut mllites eos laudo.

Pleni

omnes

historians

sunt
tutis.

libri,
6

plenae rerum scriptorum voces clarae eorum

vir-

Vlcesimutn Octdvum.

Colloquium
Z.

Bene

narras, verba

63

autem tua fabulam de moenibus


recall

Lacedaemonils

memoriam

in

tus est facillimum

Hostis forte gloria-

reducunt.

urbem Lacedaemonem 7 expugnare

modo

rum, 8 propterea quod nullo

ilia

mimiretur.

futu-

Quidam

Lacedaemonius, hoc audito, respondit urbem suam moenia


that cannot be stormed,

namely

habere inexpugnabilia, videlicet, decern milia militum quorum


a brick

quisque esset
S.

Ha,

ha,

later.

bene dictum

esse

quendam militem

cum

aliquis dixisset

Audlvl autem in

isto exercitu

qui claudus esset altero pede.

non

bello

10

idoneum

se

esse, respondit

proelium commissurum esse ut pugnaret, minime

se

curreret.

L.

Ille,

ut

13

responsum excellens

111!

quidem fuerunt

ver-

boasting
11

bis

paucis multisque factls et jactatione parva

virtute.

tur

12

Agis etiam, rex Spartanus, ut fama

elves

suos

numquam

quaesivisse

magnaque

fert,

gloriaba-

quot essent hostes

sed ubi essent.

NOTES AND QUESTIONS.


1.

The

ancient Lacedaemonians or Spartans were the most

famous soldiers of Greece.


in apposition with Lacedaemonios.
2. elves, milites
see Ex. IX, n. 4.
construction,
For
3.
:

4.

See Ex. XXVII,

5.

milites, in apposition with eos.

n. 6.

Colloquia Latina.

64
virtutis

6.

8.

main principles of indirect discourse.

trate the

turn

see Ex. Ill, n. 7.

Lacedaemon, the city of the Spartans.


futurum (esse). This colloquium is designed

7.

if

to

illus-

you can

the indirect into direct discourse.

all

9.

See

Why

Would

the subjunctive?

it

be retained in direct

discourse?

Ex. XIII,

10.

Cf

11.

Cf. Ex.

12.

gloriabatur.

13.

Cf.

n. 5.

XXVI,

n. 2.

What

is

the force of the imperfect tense?

Eng. admire, antique, laud, current.

COLLOQUIUM VICESIMUM NONUM.


J. Lesson

LXXXIX;

L,.

Lesson

Menippus

LXXV;

C.

&

J>.

et Charon. 1
having landed

(Menippus,
debat quern

436.

delay

Charontis cymba egressus, sine mora disci-

Charon cum Ira

revocat).
fare

C/i.

Revertere,

pay

pessime, revertere, inquam, ac vecturam solve tuam.

M.

Iterum

atque

iterum

clama,

Charon,

si

hoc

tibi

placeat.
transported

Ch. Redl, solve, audlsne ?

M. Numquam
ferendl

Ch.

Trans Stygem

transtuli te.

me quidem obolum 2 sumes mei

causa.

Quid hercle non?

trans-

Vicesimum No?ium.

Colloquium

M.

65

Propterea quod non ullum habeo.

obolum non habeat

be

can't

it

Num

Quid?

Ch.

fieri

potest ut quisquam

sit

qui

unum

or not

M.

Nescio utrum

tam pauper

alius

sit

Egomet'

necne.

nullum habeo.

Sed

Ch.

M. Et

in

ego

flumen tamen
tibi

te jaciam, nisi statim solves.

meo

caput baculo

frangam,

nisi

statim

tacebis.
foe

Te

Ch.

minime ego.

liberabo

M. At quomodo
Nonne

Ch.

M. Ego

scis

accipies ?

Stygem obolo dando transeundam

sciens

quod non habeo

id

habeo

esse.

Estne necesse hoc plus

nihil.

a thousand times

quam

millies audias.

Tu autem

Ch.

M. Jam

primus sine obolo

vecturam auxilium

bilge-water

ego

sentinam

et
I

was

tibi

dando

solvi;

unus,

mirabile

etenim

bailing out

exhauriebam

et

dictu,

was laughing

viatorum ridebam.

Omnes

alii

flebant.
I will

Ch.

transieris.

Tamen haec

exchange

obolo non mutabo. 7

Da

vecturam.

otherwise

Fieri aliter

M. Non

non

potest.

Ch.

manu

Nonne audls?

dare possum.

by deceiving

Fallendone

to

te

escape

elapsurum

tua ostende.

M. Hoc

tua

minime

refert.

sperabas?

Quid teneas

Colloquia Latlna.

66

did

rascal

Ubinam gentium,

Ch.

Mer. Nonne, obsecro,

you

find

Mercuri, hunc scelestum invenisti?

Est Menippus phi-

nosti istum?

losophic, qui nihil curat.

Ch.

M.

Si

pessime, capiam
my good fellow
capias, 'optime \ sed

iterum

Sane,

si

te,

me quidem numquam

twice

Vale.

bis capies.

NOTES AND QUESTIONS.


1. This colloquium represents a scene in the lower world,
between Charon and Menippus, the Cynic philosopher, who
refuses to pay the former for ferrying him across the Styx.
2. The obol was a Greek coin worth about three and a half
The custom was to put one in the mouth of the dead to
cents.

pay Charon.

in mind
a. That the gerund
either alone or with an
3.

b.

Keep

is

a verbal notin, and

may

therefore stand

object.

That the gerundive

is

a participle used adjectively, agreeing

with a substantive in gender, number, and case.


c. That the gerundive with its substantive may be used for

any gerund with a substantive.


d. That the gerund with a direct object is commonly used
only in the genitive case and in the ablative without a preposition.
4.
5.

6.

In other cases the gerundive

met added

to personal

is

preferred.

pronouns makes them emphatic.

sciens, participle with concessive force.


Subject clause of result with ut omitted, as

necesse

is

usual after

est.

I will

7.

Trans.

8.

Trans. That

translation

not take this in exchange for the obol.


is

none of your business.

What

is

the literal

Colloquium Tricesimum.

67

COLLOQUIUM TRICESIMUM.
Deraea et Syrus. 1
together

De.

Peril

Ctesiphonem audivi

una

f Ilium

fuisse in illo

mischief

malo cum Aeschino.

haec vera sunt, persuasit

Si

el

ille

profligate

impurus,

Sed eccum, Syrum

scio.

satis

ubi fllius

sit

jam sciam.

ex hoc

Ire video,

but yet

company

of

AtquI hercle hie de

illo

grege

est,

to be questioning

et

si

me eum

Non ostendam

quaeritare senserit
id

me

scelestus dlcet.

velle.
I

Ehem Demea,

Sy.

numquam

te

had noticed

haud aspexeram

how goes it with you


quid agitur ?

Vestram non possum

De. Quid agitur?

mlrari

satis

conduct

rationem.
to

Sy.

clean

ceteros purga,

fish

aqua ludere

when

permit

sinito

congrum istum maximum

Pisces
meanwhile

eel

Dromo 3

to play

in

speak plainly

Est hercle inepta, ne dolo dicam, 2 absurda.

it

will be

tantisper

boned

ubi ego rediero exossabitur

prius

nolo.

De.
Sy.

haec scelera

Mihi quidem haud placent, et saepe clamo.

salsamenta, Stephanio, 3 fac

De.

Fratris

Haec

are freshened

salted fish

me

pulchre macerentur.
I am disgusted with
I am ashamed of
pigetque. 5
pudet
quidem

Colloquia Latvia.

68
too

much

Nimium

Sy.

Demea, (non, quia praesens

inter vos,
there

hoc dico) pernimium

is

interest.

ades,

howsoever great

a difference

Tu, quantuscumque es/

nonsense

nihil nisi sapientia es, ille est

ilium

tuum haec

somniura.

Num

sineres 8 vero

facere ?

Nonne

De. Sinerem ilium?

sex totis

mensibus prius

detected

olfecissem,

quam

quidquam coepisset?

ille

At eum

vldisti

hodie?
long

think likely

Tuumne

Sy.

Arbitror istum aliquid run jam-

filium?

since

dudum

agere.

De. Scisne
Sy.

satis

hunc

Oh, egomet eum

De. Optime

est

ibi esse ?

proficiscl vidi.

verebar ne hie esset.

NOTES AND QUESTIONS.


This colloquium is taken, with some changes, from a scene
Adelphoe of Terence. Demea, the sternest
of fathers, believes his son Ctesipho, who is a scapegrace, to be a
1.

in the third act of the

model of

virtue

profligate.

their pranks,
ters,

who

but Aeschinus, his brother's son, a worthless

Syrus, a slave, the


is

engaged

are within.

young men's chief

assistant in all

in preparing a feast for his

Demea

young mas-

appears in search of Ctesipho, and

laments to Syrus the wickedness of Aeschinus. The cunning


slave falls in with what Demea says, and finally sends him off to
the country out of Ctesipho's way.
2.

ne dolo dicam

a parenthetical

not speak with deceit.


3

1
.

Names

of other servants.

clause-

Lit.

that

I may

Colloquium Trlcesimum.

7.

See H. 499^ 2 A. & G. 331/ rem.


See H.49> in A. & G. 221, d.
pernimium, an emphatic form of nimium
Trans, freely, *v*ry W# ofyou.

8.

SeeH.

4.
5.

6.

486," II;

A.

&

G. 311,.

69

VOCABULARY.
The number

refers to the exercise in

abeo, 4, -ii, -itum.


abhinc, adv. 19.

avidus,

baculum,

aeternum, adv. 23.


ago
3, egi, actum,
age

19,

bis,
tibi

Anglus,

in-

antecello, 3.

1.

ardens, -ntis.
asellus,

-i,

m.

13.

atqui, conj.
-i,

-i,

M.

19.

f.

15.

23.

me

21,

30.

30.

19.

et cetera 12.

20.

clam, adv. 24.


clamo, 1. damans 19.
18.
clarus, -a, -um.
claudus, -a, -um. 22.
clavus,

23.
7.

16.

19.

cista, -ae, f.

28.

19.

Cannae, -arum,

ceteri, -ae, -a.

13.

13.

30.
n.

9.

m. and f.

-is,

cesso, 1.

aspicid, 3, -spexi, -spectum.

atrium,

21, 23.

capra, -ae, f. 23.


Carolus, -i, m. 3.
cedo, 3, cessi, cessum.
cerno, 3, crevi, cretum.

apud, prep. w. ace. apud


apud te non es 22.
arbitror,

29.

N.

-1,

capillus,

17.

m.

24.

bene memoria tenes 8.

calor, -5ris, m.

canis,

29.

-1,

18.

23.

num. adv.

caelum,

ut aiunt 25.

def. pron. 10, aliquid novl 24.

Anglice, adv. 5.
Anglicus, -a, -um.

n.

f.

gra-

aliquando, adv. 18.


aliquis, -qua, -quid (-quod),

ambulo, 1. 3.
amor, -oris, m.
Anglia, -ae, f.

10.

17.

bellicdsus, -a, -um.

quid agitur 30.

aio, defective verb,

aliter, adv.

-1,

barba, -ae,
bene, adv.

agd,

tias 3,

-um.

-a,

24.

21.

1.

used and translated.

is

attonitus, -a, -um.

abi 19.

actum, -1, N. acta diurna


adhuc, adv. 21.
admiratio, -onis, f. 21.
admiror, 1. 21.
aestimo,

which the word

-I,

m.

26.

columba, -ae, f.
communis, -e.
comparo, 1. 5.
conducd,

23.
13.

3, -duxi,

-ductum.

26.

Vocabulary.

72

ego, pers. pron. miserum me 3,


congrus, -i, m. 30.
mihi 4, me judice 24, egomet 29.
conjunx, -jugis, m. and F. 19.
cSnscendS, 3, -scendl, -scensum. egredior, 3, egressus sum. 29.
ei, interj.

20.

cSnsistS, 3,

-stiti,

cSnsSlatiS, -Snis,

cSnstS,

-stitum.

-statum.

1, -stiti,

creber, -bra, -brum.

crescS,

eo, 4.

20.
22, credo

cur, adv.

cymba,

dormitum

it

erg5, conj.

et, conj.

7.

20.

4.

19.

et

see

17.

is.

excellens, -entis.

defessus,

-a,

-um.

deinde, adv.
delecto,

excusatiS, -onis,

8.

exemplum,

6.

delenda

Carthago 10.
deliciae, -arum, f.
23.
dicS, 3, dixi, dictum.
4,

and

dies, -el, m.

F.

diligenter, adv.

diurnus,

-a,

dolus,

-1,

M.

-i,

nullo

re-

3, -tendi,

dicam

facies,

F.

1.

30.

-a,

ex-

27.
11, 20.

27.

29.
21.

f.

falsum.

16, 23,

fallendo 29.

fama,

F.

-ae, F.

fenestra, -ae,

23.
14, ut

fama

f.

19.

ferreus, -a, -um.

20.

festivus, -a, -um.

edo, 3, edi, esum.

22.

-tentum.

-um.

facultas, -tatis,

falx, -cis,

27.

3,

7.

23.

-ei, f.

fallo, 3, fefelli,

18.

dormio, 4. it dormitum 27.


duco, 3, duxi, ductum. 1.
durus, -a, -um. 7.

ecce, interj.

tendens 18.

facinorSsus,

18.

ebrius, -a, -um,

29.

30.

9, 30.

11, 18, 21.

27, ne dolo

n.

-haustum

24.

domicilium, -1, n.
domus, -us (domi),

donum,

26.

f.

4, -hausi,

1.

extendd,

datum,

sponso dato.

exhaurio,
exosso,

18.

-um.

dedi,

1,

est

21.

28.

n.

-i,

experior, 4, -pertus sum.


explico, 1.
11.
diem ex die 26. exsero, 3, -serui, -sertum.

disco, 3, didici,
do,

28.
f.

exercitatio, -onis,

6.

1.

deleS, 2, -evi, -etum.

et cetera 12.

et 2,

etenim, conj.

eum,

26.

-ae, f.

20.

23.

sum.

est, see

8.

curr5, 3, cucurri, cursum.

29.

17.

erro, -onis, m.

6.

crevi, cretum.

3,

19.

eloquentia, -ae, f. 21.


emittS, 3, -misi, -missum.

26.

27.

-ditum.

3, -didi,

(parenthetical)

mihi

ei

elabor, 3, elapsus sum.

eleganter, adv.

21.

f.

coorior, 4, -ortus sum.

credo,

18.

fiS,

fieri,

nobis
fieri

27.

factus sum.

fiet

15,

potest 29.

est 18.

fieret

quid de
18,

num

Vocabulary.
flagitd, 1.

17.

flexum.

fieeto, 3, flexi,

fluvius,

m.

-1,

-a,

-um.

illic,

fractum.

fregi,

frlgidus, -a, -um.

22

27.

gavisus sum.

gaudium, -1, n.
Genava, -ae, F.

Genavae

-oris.

(loca-

genus, -eris, n. 8.
16.
gradior, 3, gressus sum.
Graecus, -a, -um. 4.
gratia, -ae, f. ago tibi gratias

f.

ineptus,

-um.

-a,

-um.

-a,

grex, -gis, M.

Gulielmus,

infernus,

3.

-1,

m.

herl, adv.

hoc

hodie, adv.

honestus,

-a,

hora, -ae,

F.

ingredior,

3,

horologium,

14.

26.

n.

ingressus sum.
-e.

inquit 9,

insulam

F.

2.

interim, adv.

20.

est 20.

-fui.

30.

invenio, 4, -veni, -ventum.

29.

-um, intensive pron.

10.

22.

irascor, 3, iratus sum.


is, ea, id, dem. pron.
7, 9,

27.

20.

intersum, -esse,

ira, -ae, f.

6.

11.

inter nos 21.

interfici5, 3, -feci, -fectum.

ipse, -a,

14, his 16.

n.

24.

defective verb,

inter, prep. w. ace.

-um, 28.
hora quota

19,

28.

intellego, 3, -lexi, -lectum.

13.

-i,

28.

22.

20.

9.

hoc

19.
-e.

-um.

-a,
-i,

inquam,

15.
heu, interj.
heus, interj. 2.
hie, haec, hoc, dem. pron. haec 6,
his 7, hujus 9, hanc 10, haec II,

12,

eum

17.

ingenium,

insula, -ae,
hercle, interj.

in

i.

innumerabilis,

6, 26.

30.

19.

vero 17.

20.

incola, -ae,

infelix, -icis.

20.

F.

missum.

immo

inexpugnabilis,

gens, -entis,

23.

25.

3, misi,

adv.

incito, 1.

19.

12.

1.

gratus,

immitto,

21.

20.

impudens, -entis. 22.


impurus, -a, -um. 30.
in, prep. w. ace. and abl.
7, in populum 5.
incitamentum, -i, n. 24.

2.

frondeo, 2. 26.
fulgens, -entis. 26.
fundo, 3, fudi, fusum.

tive)

-notum.

3, -novi,

adv.

immd,

2,

9.

10.

immemor,

9.

26, 27.

gaudeo,

5, 6.

F.

illudo, 3, -lusi, -lusum.

7.

3,

3.

M. and

1.

ignosco,

26.

5.

fortuito, adv.

frango,

-is,

ignoro,

fortasse, adv.
forte, adv.

-1,

hostis,

igitur, adv.

24.

26.

foris, adv.

m.

hortus,

2.

foedus, -eris, N.

formosus,

17.

22, 26.
iis

5,

ejus 10, earn 17, ei 18.

eum

Vocabulary.

74
iste, -a, -ud,
istie, adv.

ita, adv.

dem. pron.

mercator,

9.

-oris,

merito, adv.

22.

meus,

ita-ne 6.

iterum, adv.

-um, poss. adj. pron.


mi 4, mea quidem sen-

-a,

mea

10.

m. 27.

25.

I,

tentia 24.
f.

28.

mihi, see ego.

adv.

30.

millies, adv. 29.

jactatio, -onis,

jam-dudum,
janua,

-ae, f.

jocularis,

3.

17.

-e.

jucundus, -a, -um. jucundius


judex, -icis, M. me judice 24.
Juppiter, Jovis, m.
juro,

16.

16.

1.

juvenis,

juvo,

21.

21.

-e.

1.

5.

Lacedaemon, -onis, f. 28.


Lacedaemonius, -a, -um. 28.
lacrimo,

Latine, adv.
laudd,

macero, 1. 30.
magister, -tri, m.

8.

conj.

8.

19.

4.

f.

24.

26.

1.

nec-ne, conj.

24.

nequaquam,

30.

nescio, 4.

nimium,

17.

29.

adv.

13.

10.

neve, conj.
9.

malum, -i, n. 30.


mando, 1. 17.
maned, 2, mansi, mansum.

tenes

29.

1.

necesse, indecl. adj.

7.

ludo, 3, lusi, lusum.


ludus, -i, m. 6, 12.

me, see ego.


mehercle. 7.
memoria, -ae,

23.

26.

ne dol5 dicam 30.


necessaria, -drum, n. 18.

librarius, -a, -um.

adv.

munera

-uris, N.

3.

ne, conj.

11.

libenter, adv.

maxime,

murmur,

navig5,

21.

29.

1.

mox, adv. 20.


munus, -eris, n.

natio, -5nis,

liber, -bri, m.

maturS,

-a, -um.
me miserum
modestus, -a, -um. 18.
moenia, -um, n. 9.
molestus, -a, -um. 7.
mora, -ae, f. 29.
mortuus, -a, -um. 15.

miser,

nam,

5.

lego, 3, legi, lectum.


libero, 1.

mirabile dictu 11.

-e.

28.

28.

1.

1.

mirabilis,

muto,

12.

1.

later, -eris, m.

minime, adv.

13.

adv.

30.

nixus sum.

nitor, 3, nisus or

nolo, nolle, nolui.


21.

n5men,

-inis, n.

n5n, adv.

Noricum,

8.

non vero
-i,

n.

13.

24.

nosc5, 3, novi, notum.


novisti 10, 16, novi 23.
f.

24.

13.

bene memoria noster, -tra, -trum.


novus, -a, -um. 24.

4.

nosti =;

Vocabulary.
num,

num

conj.

interrog.

fieri

75

pirata, -ae,

f.

27.

piscis, -is, m.

potest 29.

nunc, adv.
nuper, adv.

placeo, 2.

8.

12.

plaga, -ae,

23.

30.

12.

F.

portitor, -oris, m.
Dbolus,

m.

-1,

obsecro,

poto,

29.

1.

potius, adv.

15.

obtined, 2, -tinui, -tentum.

obvium

obvius, -a, -urn.

29.

se fert

occurro,

-cursum.

3, -curri,

omnis,

-e.

10.

1.

19.

opinor,

optime, adv. 6, 8,
optimus, -a, -um.
opus,

-eris, n.

opusculum,
orbis,

-is,

Ovidius,

12.

14.

29.

probus,

Ovidi

n.

18.

-um.

-a,

-a,

-um.

18.

8.

21.

propero, 1. 17.
propterea, adv.

7.

probe

3.

1.

profecto, adv.

21.

orbis terrae 13.

m.

praeclarus,

-i,

procul, adv.

N.

-i,

-i,

9.

30.

8.

m.

6.

praeceptum,

praesens, -entis, adj. 21.


praesertim, adv. 12.
14.
praeterea, adv.
pretiosus, -a, -um. 27.
pro amico
12.
pr5, prep. w. abl.

18.

olfacio, 3, -feci, -factum.

14.

27.

1.

17.

proverbium, -i, n. 26.


pudet, 2, puduit (puditum est)
par,

30.

23.

-is.

pariter, adv.

25.
26.

parturio, 4.
pate5, 2,

-ui,

pauci, -ae,

pauper,

(pexui),

-i,

quaerito.
qualis,

16.

26.

f.

n.

pexum

23.

pectus, -oris, n.

pensum,

1.

16.

19, 22.

30.

29.

-eris, adj.

3,

pecunia, -ae,

1.

5.

pexi
(pectitum).

pectd,

-oris, m.

pulso,

purgd,

15.

-a.

pudor,

8.

1,

30.

14.

-e.

quam, adv.
quamobrem,

rel. 9,

quantus,

-um.

-a,

interrog. II.

adv. 21.
21, 26.

18.
percipid, 3, -cepi, -ceptum.
pereo, 4, -ivi (-ii), -itum. 5.

quantuscumque, -tacumque, -tumcumque. 30.

pernimium,

qui, quae, quod,

adv.

30.

perpetuus, -a, -um. 17.


18.
philosophus, -i, m.
piget, 2, piguit (pigitum est)
pignus,

-oris, n.

16.

I,

quae, qui

ex quibus 18,
.

30

quidem, adv.
quinque, num.

rel.

pron.

quod
quo 21.

2,

6, 9.

adj.

8.

quae

II, qui 4,

Vocabulary.

76

quis (qui), quae, quid (quod), salsamentum,


(a) interrog. pron. quae I, quis salved, 2,
II, quid sand, 1.
7.
3, quid 3, quae 8, quid
de nobis

fiet

quern

15,

17,

quid

n.

-1,

30.

sapientia, -ae,

salve 3.

ii.

f.

(b) Sarmatia, -ae, f.


quid agitur 30.
24.
quid 17.
scelestus, -a, -um.
indef pron.
25.
quisnam, emphatic form of quis. scrlbd, 3, scripsi, scriptum.
est tibi

16,

quidnam
qud, adv.

quod,

quomodo,
quoque,

quotus,

28.

7.

adv.

-a,

sententia, -ae,

9.

conj.

quot, indecl.
quoties, adv.

adj.

sentina, -ae,

8.

f.

-um. quota hora

est 20.

serenus,

-um.

-a,

sero, adv.

ratio, -5nis,

silentium,

recido,

1.

-cisum.

23.

8.

f.

10.

1.

3, -duxi,

-ductum.

refert, -ferre, -tulit.

28.
27.

n.

-i,

retro, adv.

17.

res, rei, f.

rerum

responsum,

-i,

25.

SScrates,

m.

-is,

n.

somnium,
1.

n.

-i,

18.

statio, -onis, f.

13.

stultus, -a, -um.

sum,

11, 13.

f.

supplicium,

esse, fui.
-i,

14.

se 17.
1.

n.

24,

3.

taberna, -ae,
24.

20.

f.

robustus, -a, -um.


ruber, -bra, -brum.
M.

30.

8, 29.

sui, reflex, pron.

-i,

22.

24.

rideo, 2, risi, risum.


29.
rigidus, -a, -um.
23.
26.

F.

solvo, 3, solvi, solutum.

Styx, Stygis,

4.

25.

18.

15.

stultitia, -ae,
scriptor 28.

30.

statum.

statim, adv.

repello, 3, -pull, -pulsum.

sacculus,

22.

sistS, 3, stiti,

sperS,

29.

26.

1.

12.

solum, -i, n.
solum, adv.

refero, -ferre -tuli, -latum.

remigo,

17.

26.

sodalis, -is, m. and

7.

14.

redintegro,

reduco,

conj.

f.

m.

-i,

sino, 3, sivi, situm.

rec5gnitio, -onis,

recus5,

si,

14.

3, -cidi,

recte, adv.

sestertius,

30.

22, 27.

21.

6.

serpens, -entis,

-is, F.

29.

sensum.

sentio, 4, sensi,

10.

f.

mea quidem

f.

sententia 24.

7.

raeda, -ae, f. 20.


raedarius, -1. 20.
rastrum, -1, n. 23.
ratis,

scriptor rerum

scriptor, -oris, m.

17.

conj.

scri-

bendi 21.

24.

taceo,

2.

f.

15, 16.

24.

29.

Vocabulary.
talis, -e.

una, adv.

7.

tandem, adv.
tantum, adv.

30.

niemoria tenes
-1,

n.

tessera, -ae,

timeo,

tentum.
8.

tintinnabulum,
tracts, 1.

-1,

-tuli,

26.

f.

amabo

tu 5,

1.

turn, adv.

turbo,
tuus,

1.

vacuus,

-a,

te 6, te 7, tibi 16.

ubinam,

3.

-um. 10.
vapor, -oris, m. 20.
vectura, -ae, f. 29.
vehiculum, -i, n. 20.
verberatid, -onis, f.
verbero, 1. 25.
-a,

verum,
verus,

adv.
-a,

vinum,
11.

26.

30.
13.

-i,

n.

13.

28.
27.

26.
27.

vivd, 3, vixi, victum.


ubinam gentium 20, vivus, -a, -um. 14.
void, velle, volui,

23-

umbra,

m.

-um.

vis, vis, F.

-ae, f.

25.

11.

1,
-i,

videlicet, adv.

11.

adv.

20.

viator, -oris, m.

17.

1.

fama

3, 16.

vitis, -is, F.

ubi, adv.

ut

20.

-um.

-latum. 29. ver5, adv.


versiculus,

tibi 3, tibi 4,

15.

-um.

-a,

22.

-a, -urn.

tu, tui, pers. pron.

trepidd,

20.

n.

12.

transfers, -ferre,

Troja, -ae.

6.

10.

tranquillus,

conj.

vale5, 2.

toties, adv.

utinam,

validus,

20.

2, -ui,

ut aiunt 25,

valde, adv.

19.
f.

20.

bene

15.

terribilis, -e.

n.

-1,

30.

18.

9, 13.

tenui,

2,

tergum,

ut, adv.

9.

tantisper, adv.

teneo,

umbraculum,

14, 27.

tarn, adv.

77

4, 14.

18.

14c

est

GLOSSARIUM GRAMMATICUM.

ablative, ablativus,

-I,

M.

(of in-

strument) instrument!; (of agent)


(of

agentis;

comparison, comparatio,

compound, compositus,

-onis, F.

separations;

(of

de-

-a,

-a,

-is,

-um.

-um.

F.;

con-

-a,

-um;

ditio, -onis, F.

conditional, hypotheticus,

scription) qualitatis.

absolute, absolutus,

condition, hypothesis,

-um.

-a,

manner) modi; (of concessive, concessivus,

specification) respectus; (of sep-

aration)

conditionalis, -e.

conjugation, conjugatio, -onis, F.


conjunction, conjunctio, -onis, F.
consonant, littera cdnsonans, -antis,
or consonans, -antis, F.
adjective, adjectivum, -i, N.
construction, constructio, -onis, F.
adverb, adverbium, -i, N.
conversation, colloquium, -I, n.
agent, agens, -entis, M.
agree, congruo, 3; w. abb; con- correct, adj., rectus, -a, -um.
correct, v., corrigo, 3; emendo, I.
cordo, 1.
-us, m.
accusative, accusativus,
active, activus, -a, -um.

accent, accentus,

agreement, concordatio,

-i,

M.

-onis, F.

alphabet, alphabetum, -i, N.


answer, n., responsum, -i, N.
answer, v., responded, 2.
antecedent, antecedens, -entis, N.
apposition, appositio, -onis, F.;
(be in) appono, 3.

correctly, recti.

dative, dativus,

-i, M.
declension, declinatio, -onis,

decline, declino,

declinable, declinabilis,
defective, defectivus,

degree, gradus,
cardinal, cardinalis,

-e.

clause, clausula, -ae,

F.

or appellative, appella-

tivus, -a,

-um.

comparative, comparativus, -a, -um.


1

From

Collar

-us,

-e.

-a,

-um.

m.

demonstrative, demonstrativus,

-a,

-um.

case, casus, -us, m.

common

F.

1.

deponent, deponens,
derive, traho,

3.

description

(abl.

-entis.

of),

-atis, F.

and Daniell's " Beginner's Book," by permission.

qualitas,

Glossarium Grammaticum.

8o

determinative, defmitus,
difference, discrimen,

-a,

-um.

diminutive, deminutivum, -I, n.


diphthong, diphthongus, -i, m.
direct, directus, -a, -um; rectus,

liquus,

-a,

infinitive,
-a,

-um.

modus

finitivus,

F.

-i,

infinitivus or in-

M.
-i,

N.

interjection, interjectio, -onis,

f.

interrogative, interrogativus,

I.

-I,

M.

distributive, distributive,

-a,

dissyllable, dissyllabus,

end, v., desino, 3.


English, Anglicus,

-a,

-um. intransitive, intransitivus,


lus, -a, -um.
Latin, Latinus,

-um.

Latin

English (in), Anglice.


etymology, etymologia,
example, exemplum, -I,

(for)

ut; exempli causa,


exception, exceptio, -onis,

N.

-i,

v.,

limito,

I.

-a,

locative, locativus,

formation, formatio,
-i,

long, longus,
-a,

M.

-um; productus,

-um.

n.

-i,

manner, modus,

-i,

M.

masculine, masculinus,

mean, signific5, I.
meaning, significatio,

-eris, N.

genitive, genetivus,

-a,

-um.
-i,

-onis, F.

future perfect, futurum exactum.

gender, genus,

-um.

anoma-

-um.

-a,

liquid, liquidus,

feminine, femininus, -a, -um.


finite, finltus, -a, -um.

-a,

letter, littera, -ae, F.

limit,
F.

-e;

(in), Latine.

lesson, pensum,

-ae, f.

n.;

-a,

-um.
irregular, irregularis,

future, futurum,

-e.

-um; ob-

-a,

instrument, instrumentum,

-um.
discourse, oratio, -onis,
discuss, tract5,

indeclinable, indecllnabilis,
indirect, indi rectus,

-inis, N.

M.

-a,

-um.

-onis, F.

mistake, n., error, -oris, m.


gerund, gerundium, -i, n.
mistake, v., erro, 1.
-i,
N.
gerundivum,
gerundive,
monosyllable, monosyllabum,
govern, rego; pass, of jungo or
N.
conjungo, foil, by cum w. abl.
mood, modus, -i, M.
F.
grammatica,
-ae,
grammar,
mute, mutus, -a, -um.

-i,

imperative, modus imperativus or


imperativus,

-i,

-1,

impersonal, impersonalis,
increase, cresco,

indicative,

negative, negativus, -a, -um.


neuter, neuter, -tra, -trum.
nominative, nominativus, -i, M.

M.

imperfect, imperfectum,

N.

-e.

noun, n5men,

3.

modus

M., or indicativus,

indicativus,
-i,

M.

-i,

-inis,

N.

numeral, numeralis,

-e.

tivum,

-i,

N.

substau

Glossarium
object, objectum,

sibilant, sibilus,

N.

-i,

ordinal, ordinalis,

Gram viaticum.

sound, sonus,

paradigm, parndigma,
particle, particula, -ae,

-i,

passive, passivus,

-um.

-a,
-i,

subject, subjectum,

N.

-e.

-i,

N.
-e.

positive, positivus,

-a,

-um.

-i,

pronoun, pronomen,

F.

syntax, syntaxis,

-is, F.

-a,

-e.

teacher, praeceptor,

-inis, N.

gister, -tri, M.;

-um.

tense, tempus,

-oris,

quantity, quantitas, -atis, f.


question, interrogatio, -onis,
reflexive, reciprocus,

-a,

-um;

treat
re-

-um.

regular, regularis,

-e.

relative, relativus,

-a,

remember, memoria

-i,

-onis, F.

-a,

-um.

tracto,

-um.

voice, vox, vocis,


teneo.

vowel,

littera

vocalis,

-is,

1.

n.

vocabulary,vocabularium,
vocative, vocativus, -i, m.

review, recognosco, 3; (lesson)


pensum recognoscendum.
root, radix,

(= discuss),

verb, verbum,

ma-

-oris, n.

transitive, transitivus,
f.

M.

magistra, -ae, F.

termination, terminatio,

flexivus, -a,

M.

substantive, substantivum, -i, N.


substantively, substantive,
superlative, superlativus, -a, -um.
supine, supinum, -i, n.

-entis, N.

principal, principalis,

proper, proprius,

N.

syllable, syllaba, -ae, F.

preposition, praepositio, -onis,

present, praesens,

-i,

M., or subjunctivus,

-i,

phrase, phiasis, -is, f.


pluperfect, plusquamperfectum,
plural, pluralis,

M.

subjunctive, modus subjunctivus,

-ae, F.

personal, personalis,

-us,

oratio.

stem, basis, -is, F.


study, n., studiutn, -i, N.
study, v., studeo, 2.

-um.

-a,

-e.

m.

speech (part of),

N.

F.

partitive, partitivus,

-i,

specification, respectus,

N.

-atis,

participle, participium,

person, persona,

-um.

-a,

singular, singularis,

-e.

perfect, perfectum,

81

f.

-i,

genus,

vocalis,

-is,

n.

-eris, N.
f.,

or

F.

-icis, F.

wish, optatio,

rule, regula, -ae, f.

-onis, F.

word, verbum,
school, schola,

-i,

-ae, F.

sentence, sententia, -ae, F.


separation, separationis.
sequence, consecutio, -onis,
short, brevis, -e; correptus,

F.
-a,

-i,

N.;

vox, vocis,

vocabulum,

F.

yes, certe, certissime; vero; ita

est,

verb of question

re-

ita

-um.

N.;

sunt;

peated.

ANNOUNCEMENTS,

Modern Languages,
Heatlis

Series of

TO supply
decade,

Texts.

demand for improved text-books, growing


immense advance in modern language study during the

the increasing

out of the

last

Modem Language

we have planned

to

publish a series of Texts, selected

and edited by the most eminent scholars, and

carefully

graded

to

meet

the wants of different classes of students.

This series

commonly read

will

in

embrace such classics in these languages as are


American colleges and schools, with some others

that are well adapted for such use, but are not

now

available for lack

of suitable editions.

The

editions will be

and handy volumes,

handsomely printed and neatly bound,

In each grade sufficient variety will be offered for students of


All

in

cheap

suitable for the class-room or for private reading.


all

ages.

the bocks will represent, in their respective grades, the latest

progress of scholarship and the best results of experience in teaching.


For description of books already published, see our special circulars
or descriptive catalogue.

For

fuller description of

books

in preparation, see

succeeding pages

of this announcement.

The following list comprises books already published


or now in preparation. Those printed in italics fire in
preparation. It is our purpose to extend this list, and
to make it so complete in the number and character of
the books, that teachers may safely apply to us for new
material in every part of their work; and any hints
from teachers as to books needed, or improvements on
those already published, will be gratefully received.

MODERN LANGUAGES.
CLASSIFIED LIST OF BOOKS.
(From

the nature of the case the following classification can be only

very general j the place for a given work depending on the age and

and

Present attainments of the student

ELEMENTARY. For
notes and vocabulary

earliest

method of

the

study; with

instruction.)

full

grammatical

German.

i.

First

Professor Faulhaber.

Year Preparatory Course.

Beginner's

German Reader.

Joynes.

Grimm's Marchen.

Van

German Reader.
Preparatory Book of German
German Conversation.

Deutsch.

Colloquial

Prose.

der Smissen.

Boisen.

Meissner.

French.

2.

Preparatory French Reader.

Super.

Familiar Fables in French.

Joynes.

Spanish.

3.

Practical

Method

in

INTERMEDIATE. With

II.
X.

Ybarra.

Spanish.

notes

German.

(a)

Eisy prose

for first year classes, or for rapid reading in the

second year.
Leander'sTraumereien.

Professor
"

Krammacher's Parabeln.

Van

Daell.

Harrison.

"

Storm's Immensee.

"

Van

Hauff's Der Zwerg Nase {no notes).

"

Grandgent.

Onkel und Nichte

"

Faulhaber.

Novelletten-Bibliothek. (2 independent vols.)

"

Bernhardt.

Hoffmann's Historische Erzahlungen.

"

Beresford-Webb.

Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves {no notes).

"

Grandgent.

Hauff's

Das Kalte Herz

{with vocalndary).

{notes in preparation).

der Smissen.

MODERN LANGUAGES.
idvanced.

MODERN LANGUAGES.
1

Souvestre's Confessions d un Ouvrier.

Sept Grands Auteurs du

XIX/

Professor Super.

Siecle.

Revolutions of Modern France.

Mo?'ceaux Choisis de Mine, de

Stae'l.

Voltaire's Prose.

Moliere's

Le Bourgeois Gentilhomme.

Moliere's Le Medecin malgre

lui.

Moliere's Le Tartuffe.
III.

ADVANCED. For

higher reading in college or university,

with notes explanatory and critical

MODERN LANGUAGES.
3.

Spanish.
Cervantes'

Don

Quijote de la

Mancha
Professor Todd.
"
Lang.

{with vocabulary).
Calderorfs
4.

La Vida

es

Sueho.

Italian.

"

Boccaccio's Decamerone.

GRAMMATICAL. Herein

IV.

Elliott.

made to supworking grammars which shall


of modern scholarship, and at the same
the attempt will be

ply the long-felt desideratum of

represent the best results

time meet the wants of teachers and pupils of every grade, up


to the highest classes in colleges

1.

and universities

German.
Joynes-Meissner German Grammar.

Short German Grammar.

Selections for

German
2.

German Composition.

at Sight.

Professor Joynes.
"

Harris.

"

Labbitt.

French.
French Grammar.

3.

Edgren.

Italian.
Italian

V.

Grammar.

Grandgent.

HISTORIES OF LITERATURE.
Deutsche Liter aturgeschichte.

Primer of French Literature.

VI.

Sheldon.

"

Professor Wenckebach.
"

Warren.

DICTIONARIES.
Heath's
"

New German
"

French

Dictionary.

"

Elizabeth Weir.

Professor Roubaud.

GERMAN.

Grimms Marchen,
And

Schiller's Der Taucher. Edited, with English Notes, Vocabulary, and a


Grammatical Appendix, by W. H. Van der Smissen, Lecturer on German in
University College, Toronto.
202 pages.
Cloth.
Price by mail, 80 cents.

Introduction price, 75 cents.


" Aschenputtel," " Rotkappchen," " Dornroschen," " Der treue
The tales are
Johannes," " Briiderchen und Schwesterchen," '' Konig Drosselbart," " Sneewittchen," "Hans im Gliick."
:

simplicity of diction and thought


THEderscharming
for beginners
read.
them peculiarly

in these tales ren-

Such

to

fit

colloquial-

isms and idioms, as are found here in great abundance, are indispensable to the student of the language and should be acquired early.

The Notes

are very

full,

and

in

them more

attention than usual

is

paid to the very important subject of the construction of se?itences,


a subject frequently neglected or postponed until the pupil begins
translating from English into

German.

The vocabulary has been prepared with unusual


about the pronunciation of
properly marked.

The Appendix
trated

The

which

care.

Words,

there could be any doubt, are

principal parts of the verbs are given in full.

contains full sets of the most concise rules

(illus-

by examples) for the construction of German sentences, and

for the declension of adjectives.

The Tales
Taucher

is,

are printed in the

Roman

character.

German

however, presented in the

Schiller's

type,

Der

so that the

student may not lose all recollection of this character. This fine
specimen of ballad literature will afford the pupil the needed opportunity of becoming more or less familiar with poetical and higher
forms of diction and construction, as the Tales familiarize him with
colloquial and common forms, and will thus extend his knowledge of
the uses of words and of the language in general.

The Special Circular on

this book

shows that it has received in

all

parts of this country the hearty appreciation to which its ?nerits entitle it.
The circular gives also a list of schools that use it in pre*
ference to other editions.

H. C. G. Brandt, Prof, of German,


James A. Harrison, Prof, of Mod.
Hamilton Coll. I like it so much that I Langs. Was/i'n and Lee Univ. : I think
,

shall try
tion.

it

with

my

next beginning sec-

so well of the book, that

adopted

it

have already

with a class of twenty-seven.

French.

Compendious French Grammar.


In two independent parts, Introductory and Advanced, by A. Iljalmar Edgren,
Professor of Modern Languages and Sanscrit in the University of Nebraska,
author of English and Sanscrit grammars, etc. Cloth. Price of Part I, 35 cents.
Mailing price of complete book, #1.25. Introduction price, 1.12.

THIS

Grammar was prepared

with general reference to the needs

American schools and colleges.


Its limit is determined
by the average time devoted to French in such institutions, and its
method, by practical as well as critical aims.
The First Part is devoted to such a brief, practical introduction
to the French language as will make the learner familiar with its first
essentials and enable him to begin reading with profit in half a term,
of our

or even less time.

It

contains only 66 pages, exercises included.

The Second Part contains a methodical presentation of French


etymology, syntax (with exercises at the end of the book), and versification, as well as a brief sketch of the relation of French to the

Romance element
of

modern

in English.

In the formation of rules the results

philological research have always, as far as practicable,

An abundant collection of examples, arranged


been considered.
in columns, have been introduced to illustrate the rules of Syntax.
To aid the Latin student especially and quicken philological investigation, each chapter is preceded, parenthetically and unobtrusively, by
a brief historical survey of the subject under consideration.
Two
sizes of type have been consistently used to denote what should be
studied in a first course, and what be left for a second, or be used for
reference only.
The Second Part, contains about 300 pages.
The
portion in heavy type is calculated to furnish work accessory to
reading for about a term and a half.
J. A. Harrison, Prof, of Mod. Langs.,
Chas. P. Otis, Late Prof, of GerWashington and Lee Univ., Va.: I have man, Mass. Inst. Tech., Boston, Mass.
subjected the Edgren's French Grammar Prof. Edgren is a superior scholar and
to a careful examination and must say that teacher.
I have no hesitation in saying
'

I like it.
It is, in my opinion, an excellent that he is eminently qualified for the work
work, practical, well developed and concise. of preparing a French Grammar.

FRENCH.

Modemes, Volume I

Historiettes
An

and explanatory notes,


L. D., Professor of French in
Introduction
Price by mail, 65 cents.

Reader with etymological,


and annotated by C. Fontaine, B.

intermediate

selected

43

Washington, D. C.

160 pages.

Cloth.

historical

L.,

price, 60 cents.

THIRTEEN

and unusually interesting

short, pure

stories, for early

As they were all first published in 1887, they are emmodern French. In his choice of selections the author was

reading.
phatically

ever influenced by a desire to produce such as dealt with the everyday occurances of life, thus affording teachers as well as students the

The

best material for varied topics of conversation.

and are well calculated to lead the student


spirit and idioms of the French language.

full

Alcee Fortier,
Univ.,

Tulcuie

of French,
Orleans: J'ai lu

Prof,

New

votre livre avec beaucoup de plaisir, votre


d' histoires est tres-bien fait, et

choix

tacherai de trouver

dans

mon

moyen de m' en

cours.

"William Price,
Trinity

Coll.,

Prof,

C:

American

happy

of French,

They

admirably the wants, as


of

je

servir

fulfil

shall use

notes are very

knowledge of the

them next

year.

have seen

nothing of the kind so good for


pose.

like the

my

pur-

book better and better

every day.

Charles F. Kroeh, Prof, of Mod.


Langs., Stevens Inst. Tech., Hoboken, N.
f.

The

" Historiettes

Modernes " are

gems.

conceive them,

classes in French.

selection of matter

most

and

to a

which

It is
I

the

so par-

Jules Luquiens, Assoc. Prof, of


Mod. Langs., Mass. Inst. Tech. : I have
nothing but good to say of these volumes;

ticularly like in the Historiettes.

the binding and typography alone give the

J.

H. Westcott,

Princeton,

Coll.,

N. J.

Prof, of French,
:

The

Historiettes

Modemes please me very much. We want


a great deal more of this living -French
prose, small unities, as distinguished from
extracts.

W. T. Colville, Prof, of Mod. Langs.,


Kenyon

Coll.,

Ohio:

am

using them

now

desire of opening

and using them; and,

considered in their intrinsic value, they are


of

undoubted excellence.

Delphin Duval, Prof of French,


Smith Coll., Northampton, Mass.: I like
the book very much the stories are short
and interesting.
;

Historiettes Modernes,

Volume II

intermediate Reader with etymological, historical and explanatory notes,


and annotated by C. Fontaine, B. L., L. D., Professor of French in
Washington, D. C. 000 pages. Cloth. Price by mail, 65 cents. Introduction
price, 60 cents.

An

selected

HE

purpose and plan of

T ume

I.

this

volume

is

the

same

as that of Vol-

FKENC1L

4-

Lc Atari de Mme. de

Solange.

By Emile Souvestre.
Super, Ph.

Edited, with biographical sketch and notes, by 0. B.


D., Professor in Dickinson College, Pa. Paper. 59 pages.
Price,

15 cents.

THIS

is

a fascinating story, by one of the most charming of French

and well suited to the class-room.


It has an historical
background, the scene being laid in Paris just at the beginning of the
French Revolution, and the notes are intended not only to explain
any difficulties that may occur in the text, but also to throw light on
writers,

the historical allusions.


The language is so simple that it can be
read by pupils who*have had only a little experience in reading
French.
It is well adapted for a first text after leaving the Reader,

or would be suitable for sight reading in any college class.

Lamartine s yeanne

d Arc.

Edited, with introduction and foot-notes, by Albert Barrere, Professor in


the Royal Military Academy, Woolwich, England.
156 pages. Paper. Introduction price, 30 cents.

A SIMPLE
thor's

and touching

story,

own words, "kun

"plus semblable," to quote the aude la Bible, qu' a une page du

recit

monde nouveau."
This edition of Lamartine's
intermediate reading.
the

life

The

tale

from history

is

suitable for early

introduction contains a brief outline of

and character of Lamartine, and the foot-notes are designed


though judicious and direct help to the beginner.

to give abundant,

Adolphe Conn, Asst. Prof, of The American, Philadelphia: There


French, Harvard Univ.: You may like are not many better books for a beto hear that one of your new publications, ginner in French, as the story itself has a
Lamartine's Jeanne d'Arc, has been put well sustained and perennial interest, is
by us on the list of books to be used in told here very simply and beautifully, and
the French of Lamartine is always pure
French 4.
and classic.
O. B. Super, Prof, of Mod. Langs.,
The Critic Delightful and romantic
Dicki7ison Coll., Pa.: I like it and shall
:

find use for

it

in

my

classes.

historical reading.

It is a

story full of

and of color, written


J. A. Harrison, Prof,
of Mod. with the harmony and grace natural to
Langs., Washington and Lee Univ, Lex- Lamartine and most acceptable to our
repertory of school-texts.
ington, Va: A new and excellent text.
soul, of passion, of stir


GERMAN.

26

Heine s Die Harzreise.


Edited, with Notes, by Dr. A. N. van Daell, Professor of Modern Lan*
guages, Mass. Institute of Technology. 82 pages. Paper. 25 cents.

school-edition

Die

of

Harzreise,

which has

been

ered Heine's brightest work, has long been desired.

thor's poetry is in part accessible, but

great

and

this

consid-

The

au-

remark applies to a

many German writers his prose-works are unknown in our


And yet, whatever may be the merits and attractions of

schools.

its prose
and surely
any one entirely ignorant of prose works cannot be said to have fairly
completed even the elementary stages of study.*
and the Harzreise is no exception
Heine's works generally
contain some words, sentences, or passages which are not suited to
the young; but it is possible in many cases to take away objectionable
words without mutilating the thought. Sentences and passages have
been omitted whenever it has been deemed best. The editor has not
allowed himself any other liberties with the text, and believes that the
advantage which is offered students of becoming acquainted with
Heine's mingling of satire and poetry is a sufficient justification for
the publication of this somewhat incomplete text. The notes refer
only to such words or expressions as cannot readily be found in the

poetry, a language ought to be studied mainly in

dictionaries in general use.

Wm. H. Carpenter, Prof, of Ger- Univ. of Oregon : I am very much pleased


man, Columbia College, N. Y.: The text with it and shall use it in my classes.
has been judiciously selected and
calculated for class-room use.
series thus far is very

is

well

Your

little

A. F. Young, Teacher

admirably done.

H.

S.

White, Prof

nell Univ.,
diffuse

of German, Corwelcome every attempt to

a knowledge

of

Heine's

of German,

Charlestoum High School, Boston, Mass.:

prose,

which contains the most lucid exhibition


of the possibilities of German style which
that language affords.

am

glad to see

it

has been introduced

books authorized by the


Boston School Committee. It is a charm-

into the

list

of

ing book.

Chas. F. Kroeh, Prof of Modern


Lang., Stevens Inst, of Technology, Hoboken, N. J. It is one of the brightest speci:

Robert Baird, Prof

of

German,

Northwestern Univ., Evanston,


shall try to find a place for

man work some

it

in

III.:

my

Ger-

time during the year.

John Straub, Prof

of

German,

German

prose, and both teachers


and students are under obligations to you
and Dr. Van Daell for rendering it accessible in this inexpensive form with judi-

mens

of

cious notes

and expurgations.

GERMAN.

German Reader for Beginners


School and College. By Prof. Edward S. Joynes, LL. D., South Carolina
Editor of the Joynes-Meissner German Grammar.
University.
Cloth. 290
Price by mail, $1.00 Introduction price, 90 cents.
pages.
in

distinctive features of
THE
ductory, simple and

Reader aie:

this

brief.

all

ordinary forms of reading.

2.

3.

1.

It is fully

It is

It is

purely intro-

representative,

for

adapted to the needs of all

Beginners.
First:

easy texts

The fact is recognised that, with the many complete and


now accessible, the scope of a Reader has become purely

elementary, and only introductory to independent reading.

This view

has determined the extent of the book, less than 300 pages, and the
character of the selections. Difficult pieces are excluded altogether,

and

literary criticism, history etc., are left for later study.

Second: The effort is made to familiarize the student with easy


German, in all the forms in which he may be called upon to read the
language in German and Roman type, and in Schrift; and in the
new and the old orthography, enough of each being given for practice, while German type, in the new orthography will predominate.
:

Third: The several parts are arranged for successive grades.


first is interlinear^ for earliest reading, almost with the beginning
The second embraces familiar and easy prose fables,
of the grammar.
stories, etc., with copious notes; the third, short and easy poems, explained with special reference to peculiarities of practical form the
fourth, light and entertaining prose, for rapid reading
and the fifth,

The

a selection of a few of the best letters, with several easy examples


in Schrift.

may

begin with Part

I or II, and the whole book may be


one term in college, or at most, in one year in school.
The notes and vocabulary have been wrought with extreme care,
and in the light of large experience in teaching. All the help thought
to be needed by beginners is given, but no more.
The book may be used with any German Grammar.

Classes

accomplished

in

O. Seidensticker, Prof, of German


Calvin Thomas, Prof, of Germanic
and Lits. Univ. of Mich.: I am Lang, and Lit., Univ. of Pa. A super-

Langs,

convinced that you have

Reader there
of

my

is

made

in the market.

assistants will use

it.

the best
All three

ior book, excellently adapted for the object intended.

care

It

is

prepared with great


I expect to

and sound judgment.

introduce

it.

GERMAN.

!8

German

Conversation.

Practical Lessons to accompany all German Grammars.


By A. L. Meissner,
Ph. D., Professor of Modern Languages in Queen's College, Belfast, Ireland
author
of
German
Grammar.
original
Joynes-Meissner
260 pages. Cloth. Introduction price, 75 cents.
Price by mail, 85 cents.
is not a phrase book, nor a method book of any style, but a
scheme of rational conversation, based on the elementary knowldge of grammar, and following the natural development of thought
and language. Exercises in reading, memorizing, dictation and conversation are combined with a skill and tact worthy of Dr. Meissner's

rHIS

*-

The materials are neither trivial nor abstruse,


mean of true conversation, covering a wide range

eminent reputation.
but hit the happy

of important and practical topics.

The book is not only,


German Grammars," but
struction.

on

No book

as its title declares, "


is

Companion
method

equally adapted to every

of equal ability

to all

of in-

and merit has ever been offered

this subject.

Onkel itnd Nichte.


An

original

story.

By Oscar Faulhap.er,

Exeter Academy, N. H.

64

pages.

Cloth.

Professor of German, Phillips


Price,

by mail, 18 cents.

Intro-

duction price, 15 cents.

THIS

story

is

a picture of

German

life in its

variety, describing the

features of different classes of political, civil and military soci-

The military life bears on the historical period of Napoleon I.


The book touches upon the education of youth in that period, upon

ety.

national festivals, social life, travel, customs, traditions, and art as


found in the galleries, with glimpses of German history, and references to other historical events. Words of foreign origin, unless
thoroughly incorporated in the language, have been carefully avoided
the purity of the Saxon or Germanic idiom is maintained; the construction is not too complicated, and the style, changing from descrip;

tive to narrative, will afford the student excellent drill in translation

or in reading at sight, and will secure a rich and varied vocabulary,

a matter of prime importance to the students wishing to thoroughly

appreciate the spirit of

German

literature.

Date Due

BOSTON UNIVERSITY

1719 02753 7564