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GENERAL

DICTIONARY
OF

THE

LANGUAGE.

ENGLISH
One

main

TO

QUO
LANTUR

MINUS

QUAM

IS

FERENDI

NISI

ORATORI

CORRHET.

COMES;

ET

QU/E

plainand

permanent

PREFIXED

GRAMMAR.

ARTEM

HANC

QUI

SOLA,

OMNI

TENUEM

JUCUNDA

JECERIT,
SENIBUS,
PLUS

GENERE,

STUDIORUM

CAVIL-

JEJUNAM

AC

FIDELITER

PUERIS,

NECESSARIA
VEL

UT

FUNDAMENTA

FUTURO

M.

A.

SHERIDAN,

THOMAS

SUNT

QUJE.

SUPERSTRUXERIS,
TORUM

WHICH

RHETORICAL

By

PRONUNCIATION.

of

STANDARD

eftablifh

Objectof which, isj to

QUICQUID

DULCIS

SECRE-

HABET

OPERIS,

OSTENTATIONIS.

QUINCT.

L.

I.

LONDON:
PRINTED

FOR

J. DODSLEV,
AND

J. WILKIE,

C,

PAEL-MALL;
St.

PAULs

MDCCLXXX.

DILLY,

CHURCH-YARD.

IN

THE

POULTRY;

C.

4.

PREFACE.

all the

OF

ftitution,with
of

other;

any

as

fimpleftprinciples,and
which

refpedlsit exceeds

any.

With

regard

in the

and

arifes from

the

even

upon

it

Hebrew

of

examining

be

fpeech ;

by individuals,or focieties,towards

fimple of
great;

difficulty

nothing

as

has

of teaching

right method

the
la

are

all this apparent

But

ment
attain-

upon

moft

the

any
con-

known.

obftacles

the

regulating our

and

it is built

to

tongue,

our

eafy of

language yet

any

at

and

nature

moft

the

fuppofed

infuperablc.

things almoft

its

that

appear,

hitherto

from
be

to

rules, of

feweft

the

arrive

impradlicable
Yet

moft

be the

to
to

as

ought

it would

pronunciationof

the

to

of

done, either

been

hitherto

examination

governed by

it

fpeakiiigit.

grammatical part,

negled

utter

our

general look

writing or

upon

indeed

prefentftate

in

the

regard to

world, the Englifliis fuppofed

in the

foreignersin

either
perfccftion,

of

degree

known

languages

difficult; and

it.
Whilft

and

for

have

ingenious natives

the

French,

Spaniards,
than

more

in

been

century

regulatingtheir fpeech ;

that

refpeft,having
tongues,

matters, and
tifes

the

on

to

to

his

utter

pick
This

is the

their
ever

well

as

more

perfedt ufe

blilhed

formed.
than

more

circumftance,

every

the

to

this

country,

Vol.

I.

the

with
in the

eleganciesof

in the fame

ftate

in

more

of

the

This

all the

that

made

human

ago;
a

and
mode

reafon, and

invariablythe

has

never

been

[A]

the
ever

teach

to

him

people

owing

to

nobleft
mode

fince.

the

moft

of

proper

reproach
On

the

he

in

is left

favages.

which

required,
earth,

upon

to

fupport

conltitution

notwithftanding a

indelible

trea-

language,

elTentially
necefiary,to
the

of

of fkilful

the

among

language,

was

any

various

thus

and

landed
a

never

of education

fame

attain

to

in

foreigner arrives

found

be

was

fo

were

which,

to

mind

when

had

blcffingsarifingfrom

amazing negled
luch

has

to

if he

as

there

fpeech

countries

all barbarous

mafter

none

are

certainlythere
of

powers

centuries

two

remained

and

of

But
a

politcnefs,

induftry, in cultivating

them, by the inftrudlion

each.

way

as
furprifing,
perhaps

utmoft

and

didlionaries; together with

and

is told, that there

he

civilization

in

Whoever

perfedion

grammars

he can,

as

difgraceof

has,

progrefs

chance.

to

utmoft

and

rights,privileges,and
was

to

Europe, particularlythe Italians,

in

the firft necefiarypoint,enquiresfor

cultivation

merited

-whom

accurate

aftoniftiment

it up

or

as

their

employed,

wholly
the

at

peculiarniceties

and,

London,

aid of

countries

ftill remain

we

left our's
arrive

may

the

other

proportion

and

thofe

of

that

education, eftatotal

change

for thofe

in

times,

of the leuidature of

revival

of

ktters, the

ftudy

PREFACE.

civilized nations of

Europe ;

the colkfted wifdom

quiredin
works

in
languages,

the Greek and Roman

ftudyof

no

other way

in this

and

of ages,

; as

their own

was

they were

wife

languageswere

becaule

the

more

treafure of knowledge,

their view, which

openedto

here

in
general,

fhort time, became

could be

ac-

then poor and barbarous,and the

of their authors, neither fit for entertainment

or

ufe.

Whereas

in the noble

the
enlighten

undcrftanding,
theyfound every thingnecefTaryto
antiquity,
their
in this way,
in
and
taite
the
to
refine
and
progrefs
proportion
;
fancy,
the reft of manover
kind,
themielves to thole ftudies gaineda fiiperiority
theywho applied
Thus
flimulated
fortune.
in
the
rank
and
in
were
in
fame
but
they
not
only,
the chafe, but by the great ends to be attained
attending
not
onlyby the pleafure
purfuir,
(hut
who
could
and
Fortune
make
of
to all,
were
not
by it. The temples Fame
the
Latin.
Latin
and
in
Greek
was
their ofix;rings
particularly
generallanguage,in
of

works

regulatethe

peopleof education both converfed and wrote; and became,


lengthof time, the currency of Europe, as French is at this day.

which
able

all

to be behind

not

hand

with other nations,made

endowments

many

for

Our

confider-

anceftors,

of fchools and colleges,

held in the
of thole ftudies,in their days fo juftly
propagation
perpetual
forefee
that future
eftimation. They could not look into the feeds
of time, nor
higheft
by a continuation
generations,
upon a total changeof circumftances,might fuffer much
would not make fuch alterations
of thofe inftitutions; or that an enlightened
pofterity
in them, as a changeof times might render neceflary.
The changeindeed,fince their days,has been fo great, that the two learned languages
either writes,or converfes in them.
fallen into utter difufe. No
are
one
now
Nay fo
that in order to avoid the imputation
of pedantry,
are
totally
they gone out of fafliion,
for the

no

gentlemanmuft

let it appear in converfation,that he

ever

had

the leaft tindure

of

thofe ftudies-,
and far from

to any
man's advancement
to poftsof honour
contributing
will
or
languages
onlyqualify
perfonstor the ofEce of
Whilft a completemafteryof the Englifii,
both in
tutors.
or private
fchoolmafters,
and fpeaking,
would
be the fureft means
of attaining
thofe ends, and anfwer
writing
of
with
other
well
ant
as
ufe, to an inhabitpurpofe fpeech,
regardto ornament, as
every
of thefe countries,better than a command
of all the other languages
known
in the
world.
Yet fo littleregardhas been paidto it in either refpeft,
that out of our numerous

the utmoft
profit,

(killin thofe

of authors, very few

army

the multitude of

orators,

our

be feledled who

can

even

tolerable

write with accuracy

and among

fpeakeris a prodigy.

All this arifesfrom

regardto

two

bias givento the mind, in our courfe of education,with


a wrong
material articles. The firftis,a total negledt
of our
own
tongue, from

dead languages.The fecond,an


to the attainment of two
painsneceftary
delivered to the ear by the organs of fpeech
inattention to the living
as
language,
j
the
the
the
of inftrucwritten,as prefented
to
making
eye by
pen, the fole objeift

tlie time and


utter

from
lion.

With
Greek

regardto
and

Latin

the firftof thefe,it has been taken for


will of courfe

thoughit is notorious

that many

producea
liave acquiredan

who

that
granted,

fufficient knowledgeof
accurate

our

fkill in

knowledge of
own

tongue

Latin,
writing
make

PREFACE.
make
a

but

figurein

very poor

learned Prelate,in

fhort

their

Englifhftyle.Nay

effayupon

our

grammar,

it has

been provedby
lately

that fome of

moll celebrated

our

of
pafledfor our EnglifhClaflics,have been guilty
of
in many places
and even
grammaticalimproprieties,
great folecifms, inaccuracies,
when we confider that grammar
Nor is this at all furprifing,
their moft finifliedworks.
and that in learning
been taii^hcamongftus as a fci-nce-,
Latin, our youth
has never
that
inftrufted only in the mechanical rules peculiarly
adaptedto
language; where
are
with another, they are as much
at a lofs,as if theyknew
therefore thefe do not fquare
rules at all. Will any of thefe,prefumingupon their knowledgeof Latin, think
no
of their refpeftive
the grammars
theycan mafter the French or Italian,without learning
rules by which
is there not the fame reafon for examiningthe peculiar
tongues ? And
be done by all in the liberalline of life,
the Englifhis governed? This would cenainly

writers,ard fuch

the

were

means

for

down

have hitherto

as

open

to

this
attaining

them.

knowledge.Nothing worthy

hitherto

appeared", and it is not many


which, though it mull be allowed to
the work

of

the faft is,that there has been

But

the

of

name

method

no
a

grammar

of any value was


years fince a diflionary
have been an Herculean
labour, when

yet ftillis capableof great

laid
has

producedj
confidered

each individual
improvement.
is left to acquire
language,as well as he can, by his
any criticalfkillin his own
The
difHculties
that
f
lart
in his way, throughwant
labour.
of fome
own
perpetually
rules
foon
make
him
of
fruitlcfs
and
the
to
him,
guide
purfuit
principles
weary
; and
peoplein generalare fatisfiedwith copyingothers,or making innovations upon unfure
grounds. In confequenceof which, it has been in a perpetualHate of fludluation,
and fafhion. The learned compiler
of the
beingleft whollyto the guidanceof caprice
EnglifhDidlionary,in fpeakingof our language,
fays, That while itwas employedin
the cultivation of every fpecies
of literature,
it has itfelfbeen neglefted
; fufFered to
under
diredlion
the
of
into
wild
exuberance
chance,
fpread
to the tyranny
; refigned
of time and fafhion ; and expofedto the corruption
of ignorance,
and caprice
of innovation.
When
I took tliefirflfurvey
of my undertaking,
I found our fpecchcopious
without order, and energetic
without rules : wherever
I turned my view, there was
*
and confufion to be regulated.'
to be difentangled,
And Swift,in his letperplexity
ter
Lord
is
of
to
Oxford,
opinion,that the corruptions
crept into our
language,
have more
than counterbalanced
it
has
fince
the
received,
any improvements
days of
Charles the Firfl. No
wonder
indeed our
written languagefhould be in this flate,
when the onlyarticle attended to, and regularly
words pro.
taught,is that of fpelling
perly.
as

one

man,

Hence

'

'

But

low

as

the flate of the written

languageis,

worfe-,with regardto which, nothinghas been done,


of the words

from
our

and

havingany
the
learning
afterwards

way

attainable.

openedfor

that of the

fpoken is infinitely

a
rightpronunciation
fo far
to every other point,
we
are
refpect
that even
and graceful
from
a juft
delivery,
teaching
fo
falfe
are
rules,
fpcech,we
whollypervertedby

firftelements

of

corruptedby

bad

And

even

to

render

with

habits,that there
c

is fcarce

of arriving
polTibility
ar

PREFACE.
adorn and
in the moft ufeful and pleafing
art that can
degreeof perfeftion
human
nature.
dignify
of this art has been produdlive
of the worft confequences.It is by
The total negleft
carried
focieties,
are
fpeechthat all affairsrelative to the nation at large,or particular
at

any

of all affairs ecclefiafticaland

In the conduA

on.

civil,in church,

in

parliament,

veftries in parillies,
the
are
juries,
juftice,
county courts, grand
wretched
the
(late
of elocution
In all which places,
requifite.
powers of fpeecheffcntially
and
difcernment
in
of
tafte;
more
is apparent to perfons
particularly the
any
of religion.
But in
to the fupport
church, where that talent is of the utmoft moment
that
the
confole themfelves with
the fpeakers
thought,
theyare not worfe than
general,
of arriving
at any degreeof excellence in that
their neighbours:and numbers, hopelefs
what theycannot
attain.
way, endeavour, as is ufual on fuch occafions,to depreciate
courts

and petty

of

Nay it has been gravelymaintained by many writers,that oratory is not fuited to the
geniusof the nation,or nature of the conftitution ; and tiiatany ufe of it,in the pulpir,
of Oratory,from the
be improper. To this term
the ftnate-houfe,
or
bar, would even
ccnfufed notions,of fomeideas entertained of that art, they annex
ftrange
erroneous
thingartificialin
the

tones,

inventions of

mere

that
looks,and gefture,

man.

But

if the

true

art

have

no

foundation

of oratory be

in nature,

only to

and

exhibit

are

nature

his thougltsand
fpeakerto difplay
and forcible manner
-, lb as to enlighten
fentiments,in the moft perfpicuous,
pleafing,
leave
the
the minds of
and
the
charm
on
the underftanding,
deepeftimprefiions
ear,
but the moft vain pedant,
Can any one
the hearers
or ftupid
barbarian,fay,that fuch
in
the
world
? To reafon with blind preis improperfor this or any other fociety
art
an
judice,
but
would
invincible
be
I
would
leave
fruitlefs-,
a(k
all
or
to
ignorance,
beg
who aflertthis doftrine a few queftions.
the caufe of religion,
if the ferit would not contribute much
Whether
to promote
with
and
church
fermons
of
the
delivered
with
vice
were
propriety,
alwaysperformed

advantage-,if its objeftbe,

drefl:to

to

enable

the

"

due force ?
Whether
nature

power

it would

not

be of fervice

to

the ftate,if all our

fliould alfo be furniftied,


from
the abilities,
of

their fentiments
delivering

of South

or

whether

North

this would

be

art
a

and

with
praftice,

the habitual

and
corredt,perfpicuous,

equallyufeful

had from

forcible

the

gentlemenof the bar?


it would
much
of fociety,
Whether
and imto the eafe and pleafure
provement
not contribute
of politenefs,
if all gentlemenin publicmeetings,or privatecompany,
and with an utterance
their thoughts
fliould be able to exprcfs
fo regulated,
clearly,
as
of their auditors ?
or ofience to the ears
to givepainto the underftanding,
not
contribute to put an end to the odious dillinclion kept
it would not greatly
Whether
of the fame king,if a way were
ment
opened,by which the attainup between the fubje(fts
both
of
in
of the Englifli
and pronunciapoint phrafeology
tion,
tongue in its purity,
of
his
inhabitants
rendered
all
be
to
Majefty's
dominions, whether
eafy
might

manner?

And

in
readily,

fcnators,who

not

of Ireland,or
Britain,

to

the other Britifii


?
dependencies

Whether

PREFACE.
Whether
of

our

ic would

tongue

redound

rendered

were

authors in the

not

much

eafyto

to

of this nation, if the attainment

the honour

fo as
foreigners,

enable them

to

to

read

our

and converfe with the natives of thefe countries upon


original,

lent
excel-

equal

terms

both to the prefcnt


would not accrue
advantages
important
age, and
and reduced to a fixed and manent
if the Engliili
languagewere afcertained,
perpofterity,

Whether
to

many

ftandard ?

of thefe points,
be not that
to the accomplifhment
neceffary
all
children
of
whether
male
thefe
or
female,
realms,
openinga method, whereby
the firfl:
rudiments, in a grammatical
knowledgeof the Englifh
may be inftrudled from
and
of
it
with
and grace-, in the fame
reading
fpeaking
propriety
tongue, and the art
lefs confequence
and other arts, of infinitely
to them,
regular
way as other languages,
now
are
taught?
and others perhapsof ftillgreater confequencewhich may
To compafsthefe points,
of the Author's purfuits
in life,
and the
flow from them, has been the chief objedl
main end of the prefent
publication.
It mufl: be obvious, that in order to fpreadabroad the Englifii
languageas a living
facilitate
and
the
attainment
of
its
it
is
in the firftplace
to
fpeech,
tongue,
neceflary
that a ftandard of pronunciation
/liould be eftabliflied,
and a method
of acquiring
a
ftate of the written languageis not at
juftone (hould be laid open. That the prefent
all calculated to anfwer that end, is evident from this ; that not onlythe natives of Ireland,
and are taughtto read it,pronounce
Scotland, and Wales, who fpeakEnglifli,
but each county in England has its peculiar
it differently,
dialeft,which infeds not
their
b
ut
alio.
this by any alteration
their
All
reform
to
reading
fpeech,
only
attempts
be utterly
the only plan which
in our written languagewould
: And
imprafticable
could poffibly
be followed with any profpedof fuccefs,
what
the
is
Author has purfued
and Dictionary.
in his Rhetorical Grammar
he has laid open a method
In his Grammar,
of teaching
every thingwhich regards
firft
the
their
from
nioft
extended combinations in words and
found,
fimpleelements, to
Whether

the firfl:
Hep

of

fentences.

He

has

out
pointed

the

principles
upon

which

our

is founded,
pronunciation

rules by which it is regulated.


general
of each word to a certainty
Didionaryhe has reduced the pronunciation
by
fixed and vifible marks; the only way by which uniformity
of found could be propagated
This we find efiedually
done in the art of mufic by notes ; for
to any diftance.
in whatever part of the globemufic is fo taught,
the adeptsin it read it exadlythe
of pronunciation,
of this Grammar
fame way.
A fimilar uniformity
and Dictionary,
by means
fliallbe taught
may be fpreadthroughall parts of the globe,wherever Englifh
by their aid.

and the

In his

But

it may

be

the
what right
afl;ed,

this occafion,and
on
legiflator

what

in

beingin

an

which
article,

Vol. I.

is far from

Author

his

has

to

alTume

pretenfions
are

to

himfelf the oiiice of

eftabliflian

fettled ftate among

[B]

to

ubfolute ftandard

any clafsof

people?

It is
well

PREFACE.
well

of the fame words, not only


of pronunciation
known, that there is a great diverfity

adoptedby tke uniThat the propriety


in the fcnate-houfe.
verfities
at the bar, and fome
; fome
prevail
who have adopted
of thefe feveral pronunciations
is controverted by the feveral perfons
ihem; and what righthas this felf-appointed
judge to determine which is the beft ?
The Author allows the propriety
of the objedion,and therefore thinks it necefTary
to layopen the grounds
upon which he puts in his claim to this arduous ofBce.
There was a time, and that at no very diftant period,
which may be called the Auof
of
guftanage
England,I mean
during the reign Queen Anne, when Englifhwas
the language
of
fpoken at court ; and when the fame attention was paid to propriety
ity
as that of French
at the Court of Verfailles. This
pronunciation,
produceda uniformin that article in all the polite
have
been
circles;and a gentlemanor lady would
much
alliamed of a wrong
as
then, as perfonsof a liberal education
pronunciation
would now
be of mif-fpelling
the accefTion of a foreign
But on
words.
familyto the
conferred by that happy event, the Englifhlanguage
throne,amid the many bleffings
From
fiiftcrcdmuch
for the French.
that
by beingbanithed the court, to make room
time the regardformerly
has been gradually
declining
; fo that
paid to pronunciation
of
the greateft
in that pointare to be found among
now
people fafliion;
improprieties
in

but
individuals,

bodies of

in whole

That

men.

there

fome

are

confined to the vulgar,are


which thirty
or
pronunciations,
forty
years ago were
graduallygainingground; and if fomethingbe not done to ftopthis growing evil,and

many

to become
a mere
the Englifhis likely
jargon,which
prefent,
fuch
ftandard had
that
is
be
a
wifhed,
to
every one may pronoimce as he pleafes.It
that Englifhwas then
been eftablifhedat the periodbefore mentioned,as it is probable,
it in that very
flateof perfedion.Nor is it yet too late to recover
fpokenin its highefl

fix a

generalllandard

flate. It
made

was

that

my

rank
more

or

fortune to receive the

material

the youth committed

to

genius.Eminent
to

that

as

he

pointin

had

who

under
to

his

than
writing,

fpeaking.Nor could he bear to


them.
refped,without correcting

he

to

was

exadlnefs of

the

be much

to
happinefs

He

was

of his

he
ftyle,

was

for
not

in
pronunciation

by his friends in that

hear any miftakes committed


1 had

mafler,who

the age, whether

for the purity


and accuracy of his

was

care.

pafTedgreat part

of
men
diflinguifhed

familiarintercourfewith the mofl

attentive

my education

earlypart of

objed of inftrudion

friend,and chofen companionof Swift

the intimate

life in

at

with

in the

him

four hours

day,
of
opportunities
frequent
of Queen
of pronunciation
had prevailed
at the court
beingconvinced that a uniformity
who
Swift's
that
of
with
Anne, by comparing
perfonages were there
many diftinguifhed

and for feveral months


earlypart of my life,
ftillthe benefit of his inftrudion.
receiving

initiatedinto life; among


of Chellerfield.

And

the number

read

him

three

or

I have fince had

of which

were

is
pronunciation

that very

to

of Dorfet and the Earl

the Duke
ftillthe

cuftomaryone

among

the

defendants
politer
part of the world bred in that reign. Upon invefligating
of that time was formed,I found,that though
which the pronunciation
the principles
on
of all the

there were

no

rules laid down

for its regulation,


yet there
3

was

fecretinfluence of

ana-

logy

PREFACE.
which
operating,
logy confl:antly

attraded

claffcs,to itfelf as their

And

the anomalies

center.

founded

were

the different

where

there

the beft

upon

words, accordingto their feveral


any deviations

were

principleby

which

from

that

logy,
ana-

be regulated,

fpeechcan

preferringthe pronunciationwhich was the moft eafy to the organs of


and
moft agreeableto the ear.
has laid open
So far the Author
fpeech,
confequently
bis pretenfions,
that pronunciation
depended only upon cuftom and
upon a fuppofition
that of

fafliion. But when


which

is
pronunciation

our

the claim
vain

or

he has laid in

that
reflcft,

we

in

permanent

and

degreeof

Icarce

it might

fiderable addition

be

to

from

an

will

made,

-, a

new

that which
one

work

was

by
no

fome

at

when
been

by

the

principles
upon
he
regulated, hopes

be confidered

not

certain

no

periodbe

probablytheywere

as

either

eftablifhed

in the

the writers in

Queen

(land

means

by vain and

attempted to

duce
intro-

the teft of examination

alterations in that

moulding our

prefent
reignj

Anne's

that time

have
fingularity,

refpedl,
produdive

alphabet,and

greateft

followed in the
implicitly

attempted fince

afFeftation of

without

its charaders

followed

in orJer
In the

fhould

that ufed

making a

of

con-

pointutterly
impradicable.

the
regard to pronunciation,

having

ic was

both

be fixed upon,

deviates from

articles,has he in this

exerted

to

be proved, that
indifputably

any-realbenefit,

As

it is

language,as a perpetualflufluthat a
pronouncing,ic is furelya pointto be wirtied,

which
principles

can

lifeof

by

which

befal any

can

feveral innovations
judicioufly
rejedled

changes,upon

With

evil fo great

period(hould

writers, who,
pragmatical

his

laid open

ever

undertaken, will

has
perfection.Dr. Johnfon'sfpelling

Di(5tionary.It
he has

no

ftandard

obvious

if poffible,
that

and

the rules

the office he has

and
pointof fpelling

ation both

and

to

founded, and

prefumptuous.

When

as

he adds, that he is the firftwho

Author

has laid his reafons before

eftabliflied at the

endeavoured

to

fix

fame
two

the

public of

Thus, in both thefe

sra.

anchors

to

our

language,
floating

of fafhion.
keep it fteadyagainftthe galesof caprice,and current
followed Dr. Johnfon-, only fometimes making
explanatorypart he has chiefly
to

plainerwords,
the utmoft
fuch

more

accuracy

adaptedto
was

the

capacityof Englifhreaders.

in ufing the
necefl^ary

in this refpecl,
induftry
by

marks

reiterated examination

that he hopesthere is
printedoff",

not

an

error

of any

of

he has
pronunciation,

of each

proofflieet before

confequence
throughout

the whole.

RHE.

SUBSCRIBERS.

of

LIST

Mr.

THEJ. Right

Hon.

Earl

L. Aickenhead,

Aid

Richard

R.

P.

worth, Efq;

B. Allen,

John

Henry Beaufoy, Efq;

of Antrim

Efq;

Efq;

Ifrael

Arthur

Mr.

Alleyn

Annefly, Efq;

Francis

Blair, Efq;

Blennerhaflet,Efq;

Gerald

BlennerhafTet, Efq;

Mr.

Armftrong

Blandford

Honour

Arthur

Cornelius

Annefly, Efq;

Robert

Bidulph, Efq;

Richard

Mrs.

Joihua Allen, Efq;


Mr.

Thomas

John Blakeney, Efq;

Sets

Two

Bell

Bolton, Efq;

Charles

Bonner

Francis

Arnaftead, Efq;

James Bofwell, Efq;

Robert

Afli worth,

Hugh Boyd, Efq;

Attorney

Efq;

General

of Ireland

Mr.
B.

His

Grace

His

Excellency the

Lieutenant
Hon.

Right

Duke

John

Bedford.

of

Earl of

Buckingham,

Countefs

of

Lord

Bangor

Hon.

Lord

Vifcount

Right

Hon.

Lord

Bedive

Right

Hon.

John

Beresford

Right

Hon.

William

Walter

Rev.

Rev.

Dr.

John Barry

Rev.

William

Bathurft, Efq;

William

Batterfby

Edward

William

James

Rev.

JofliuaBrown,

Mr.

Bayly
Baynes,Efq;

Mrs.

Bullen, Efq;
Elizabeth

Phineas

Buller

John

C.

Right

Hon.

Earl of Charlemont

Right

Rev.

Bifhop of Cloyne
Jofhua Cooper.

Right Hon.
Right

Earl of Cork

Hon.

Bifhop of

Rev.

Right
Right Hon.

Lord

Rev.

Mr.

Cranfield

Baynes
Bernard

Beamifli,Efq;

Becher, Efq;

John Belchier,Efq;
Vol.

1.

Orrery

Vifcount

Crofbic

John Campbell, Efq;

Capt. Allen

Francis

and

Cork

John Caillaud, Efq;

William
Rev.

Burdett

Burgh, Efq;
Bury, Efq;

John Baynes,Efq;

Baynes, Junior,Efq;

LL.D.

Brown

Hon.

Beresford

Brook
Brown

Hon.

Thomas

Beauchamp

HufTeyBurgh

and

Mr.

Buckingham

Baker, Efq;

Hon.

Mathew

Lord

Brocas

Lawrence

Robert

Right Hon.
Right

R. P.

of Ireland
the

Dean

Rev.

Major Aubrey

Dr,

Campbell

Caner

Hugh Carlefon, Efq; Serjeant.at

Law

John Carleton, Efq;


Edward

Chamberlaync, Efq;

Thomas

Chamberlaync, Efq;
[CJ

Danid

LIST

A.

GeorgeChampagne,
Richard Champion

Mr.
Rev.

JofephChapman,
William
Charnley

Mr.
Monf.

De

Chemilly.
Efq;
John Chcfliyre,
Rev. Mr.

Hon.

and

Hon.

Mrs.

William

M.

Mr.

Clement,

Robert
Mr.

His Grace

Cholmondeley

V. P. T.

Cockell, Efq;

Mr.

Dennis

Rev.

William

Peter Le

Guernfey

Coghlan

Charles Cole,
Samuel

Connor.

Henry

Daniel

Mr.

Dawfon, Efq;

Mr.
Sets

Two

Conyngham, Efq;

Cook

Richard

Arthur

Dawfon, A. M.

Deane

Mr.

Conner, Efq;

William

Davies, A. M.

Davis, Efq;

Chriftopher
Deey, Efq;
Henry Delamain

John Colthurft,Efq;
Henry Colthurft,Efq;
Conron, Efq;
Chriftopher
Rev.

B. D.

Robert

Lady

Collins, Efq;

Judge Daras

JofephDavie,

Rev. William

Efq;

Arthur

Dempfy

John Deverell,Efq;
StephenDickfon, Efq;
William

Dilke, Efq;

'

John Dillon, Efq;


Edward

Charles

Dorman, Efq;
PhilipDoyne, Efq;

Ifaac

Mr.

Mifs
Sir

Cooper, Efq;

Henry Coote, Efq;


Corry,Efq;
Corry

James Cotter

Thomas
Mr.

Lancelot
Cox

Mr.

Dr.

Robert
Richard

of St. Patrick's

Hon.

Henry

Hon.

Thomas

Craven, Efq;
Crifpin,Efq;
Croftes,Efq;

Rev.

Caleb

Croftes

Mifs

Mary

Sir Michael

Croker

Cromie,Bart.

Ely.

R. P.

Eccles, Efq;

Eden, Efq;
Edgeworth, Efq;

Cranfield

Mrs.

Earl of

William
Ufher

Richard

Arthur

E.

Ifaac Ambrofe

Cowper

Cradock, Dean

Henry Durbin

RightNon.

Coutts,Efq;

Mr.
Rev.

Dublin

Daly, Efq;

Rev. Thomas

Cocq.

Archbifhopof

Dalton

Mifs Elizabeth

Clinch

Cobbe, Efq;

William

the

Right Hon. Lord Dartrey. Two fets


Right Hon. Lady Dartrey
Right Hon. Sir Robert Deane, Bart. 50 Copie.s
Right Hon. Lord Vifcount Devece
of Dromore
RightRev. Lord Biftiop
Mifs

C. D.

Clements, Efq;

Thomas

Mr.

Cuningham
D.

Clarke

Lawrence

Cullen
Robert

Paris

Charles Churchill, Efq;

Dr.

Edmond

Lieut. Gen.

Cholmondeley

J. A.

Crowe, LL.D.

Dawfon

James Cuff, Efq;

D.D.

Chriftmas, Efq;

Mr.

John Crookfhank, Efq;


Crofbie,Efq;
Rev.

Chandler, D. D.

Thomas

Rev.

SUBSCRIBERS.

Chambers, Efq;

Daniel
Mr.

of

Erfkine
Erfkine

Evans, A. M.

Simon

P^wart, Efq;

Simon

Ewart, junior,Efq;
F.

RightHon. Lord Farnham


Right Hon. James Fortefcue
Jofeph

LIST

of

SUBSCRIBERS.

JofephFarel, Efq;

Arthur

Guinnefs, Efq;

Mr.

Samuel

Guinnefs, Merchant

Fell

John

H.

Efq;
Fitzgerald,
Efq;
Fitzgerald,

Edward
William

John P'itzgibbon,
Junior,Efq;
Mr.

Hon.

Fitzmaurice

Right

Hon.

Lord

Right

Hon.

Mr.

Right Hon. Lady Harriet Hobart


Right Hon. Lady Huntingdon

Rev.

William

Rev.

GeorgeFlury

Mifs

Rev.

William

Robert

Richard

Windfor

Fitz-Tliomas

Foot

Dr.

Ford.

Three

Richard
Rev.

William
Mr.

Efq;

John

Two

Dr.

William
Rev.

Foftrook

Dominick

Frank, Efq;

Hon.

Frafer.

of

lege,
Queen's Col-

Anthony

Sets

Two

Fuller, Efq;

Right

Hon.

G.

Lord

Chief

Rev.

John

Mr.

William

Henderfon

Henning

Rev.

Dr.

Hon.

William

Mrs.

Elizabeth

Mr.

Glerawlf

Hewetfon

Hill

Jeremiah Hill

James

Griffith

Hoare, Efq;

Rev.

William

George, Efq;
George

James Hotchkis, Efq;

JufticeDe

Grey

Gibfon
Dr.

Holcombe

Peter Holmes,
Rev.

Efq;
Hornfby

Mr.

Rev.

Dr. Hotham

Gorges Edmond

Howard,

Hon.

Mifs

George Goold, Efq;


Gabriel Goldney, Efq;
Thomas
Goldney, Efq;

Mr.

William

Robert

Gordon, Efq;

Right

Hon.

Lord

Thomas

Grady, Efq;

Right

Hon.

Richard

Goodenough

Mr.

John

Mr.

Valentine

Grant
Grantham

Rev.

Mr.

Daniel

St.

Thomas
Richard

De

Grey, Efq;
Griffith,
Efq;

R. P.

Hunt

I.

Burnaby Green, Efq;


GodfreyGreene, Efq;

Gregory,Efq;

Efq;

Ifabella Howard.

Francis Hutchinfon, Efq;

Clifford

Edward

Hewitt, Efqj

Williams

Gardiner,Efq;
Gardiner,Efq;
Garrick, Efq;

David

Mrs.

Mr.

Henry Hobart

Luke

Dennis

Vifcount

Heard, Efq;

BenjaminHeath

Hon.

"

Mr.

Lord

R. P.

Capt. George Herry

French

Peeke

Harford, Junior

Harrifon, Efq;
Bart.
Harry Harftonge,
John Heard, Efq;

Forfter

Provcft
Fothergill,

Mr.

Mark

Sir

Oxford

Rev.

Efq;

Hammond,

Hare, Efq;

Nicholas

Sets

Fortick, Efq;

Thomas

Rev.

Mr.

Sets

Ford, Efq;

Dr.

Hamilton, Efq;
Dowdall

Richard

John Forbes, Efq;


Gilbert Ford,

Hamilton

John

Foote, Efq;

Headfort

SecretaryHeron

Chancellor

of Ireland

Jackfon

Jackfon, Efq;

CyrilJackfon
William

Rev.

Jarvis

Mr.

Jeans
Efq;
John Jeffreys,

Denham

Jephfon,Junior,Efq;
Robert

LIST
Robert

of

Jephfon, Efq;

William

Jones,Efq;
Jordan,Junior,Efq;

Edward

R. P.

Right

Lord

Six Sets

Mountmorres.

Ruby M'Carthy, Efq;


William

R.P.

K.
Hon.

Lord

Right Hon,

GregoryJohnfton,Efq;

Thomas

SUBSCRIBERS,

M'Culloch, Jnnlor,Efq;
M'Gwire, Efq;

Walter

M'Gwire, Efq;
John Maddifon, Efq;

William

Kingfborough

James Kearny, Efq;

Rev.

Thomas

BellinghamMauleverer, Efq;

Mifs
Mr.

Keate, Efq;

Kemp

Rev.

JofephKing

Mifs

Dr.

Hon.

Marfhe's

Ralph Knox, Efq;

Richard
L.

Rev.

James

William
Mifs

Rebecca

of Femes

Library
Martin, Efq;

Francis Mathew,
London

Lambard

Lambe,

Marley, Dean

Charles Marfham

Knowles

Right Rev.. Lord Bifhop of

Major

William

Efq;
GorgesMeredyth,Efq;

John Mirehoufe, Efq;

Efq;

Lane

Rev.

Mr.

James Alockler
James Mockler, LL.B.

Rev.

John Langford,Efq;

John

Sir Hercules

Bart,
Langrifhe,
James Haughton Langfton,Efq;

W.

John Lapp, Efq;


David Latouche, Junior,Efq;

Alexander

James Montgomery, Efq;

Mrs.

Latouche

William

Rev.

Dr. Laws

Mrs.

Mafon, Efq;

Monfell, Efq;

Montague

Montgomery,Efq; Two

Montgomery, Efq;
Henry Moore, Efq;
Hon. Harvey Morrcs.
Two
Mrs. Moylan
Rev. Robert Myddleton

Henry Leach, Efq^


John Lee, Efq;
Rev.

Monck

T.

Dr. Lefanu

JofephLefanu, Efq;
Mrs.

Ltfter,Surgeon

John Lloyd,Efq;
John Lloyd,Efq;
Rev.

Rev.

Napier, Efq;

Edward

North, Efq;
O.

Lloyd,A.M.
Lloyd, Efq;

Mr.

Edv.'ard

Right Hon.

Richard

Thomas

Locke

Charles

Silver Oliver

O'Connor, Efq;

Rev. Mr.
William

Odell

Odell,Efq

Henry Loftus,Efq;
John Longfield,
Efq;
Mrs. Longfield

Derby O'Grady, Efq;

JofephLord, Efq;

Rev. Archdeacon

Sir Francis Lumm,

Sets

N.

Lefcvre

Thomas

Bart.

Hamilton
Corn.

O'Hara, Efq;

R. P.

O'Keeffe, Efq;
Oliver

Right Hon. Long

Milford

RightHon.
Right Hon.

Lord

Molcfworth

John O'Neil, Efq;


Michael Ormfty, Efq;
William
Ormfby, Efq;
John Herbert Orpen, M.
George Overend, Efq;

Lord

Vifcount Mountcafhell

Richard Overend,Junior,Efcj;

Mifs

Sets

Lyon.
M.

R. P,

D.

Arthur

LIST
Arthur Owen,

of

SUBSCRIBERS.

Efq;

Sir Alexander
P.

Edmond

RightHon.

Monf.

Sexton

of Commons

the Houfe

Rev. Mr.

Mr.

of
Perry,Speaker

in Ireland

Rev.
Paris.

Three

Sets

Mr.

Theobald

Mr.

Scott, Efq;

Scott

Shepherd

John

Rev.

John Parnell,Efq;
James

Claude

Bryan Sheepy,Efq;

Pack

Robert

Schomberg

GeorgeLewis

Sherlock

John Simmofts, Efq;

Payne,Efq;

Pryce Peacock, Efq;


Samuel Pechell,Efq;

Mr.

John Simmons

Mr.

William

Pembroke

Charles Smith,

Society

Cooper Penrofe, Efq;

Mr.

Rev.

Dean

Rev.

James Philips,D.

Perry

Thomas

Mr.

Plummer

Dr. Staker

Mifs

Elizabeth

T.
,

Purcell

Samuel

Robert

Francis

Stephens

Rainftop

Sterling.R. P.
Efq;
Sterling,

Annefly Stewart, Bart.


Sir James Stewart, Bart.
Robert Stewart,Efq;

Raftall

Mrs.

Grace St. George

Thomas
Rev.

St.

George,Efq;

James Stopford

Rev.

JofephStopford
Stopford

Rev. William
Edward

Roche, Efq;

William

Rochfort, Efq;

Robert

Rofs, Efq;

Mr.

Strettell,
Efq;
Stuart,Efq;
Stubber,Efq;

Stump

Mr.

Ryder
Thomas
Ryder,Efq;
W. BcauchampRye, M.

T.
William
D.

R. P.

S.

Mr.

Tayler

William

Mr.

Mifs

Francis

Vol.

Sandys

M.
Sarsfield,
I.

D.

Talbot, Efq;

John Taylor,Efq;

RightHon. Earl of Shannon


RightHon. Lord Vifcount Southwell
George Sail,Merchant
Thomas

R. P.

Sir

Henry Reed
Mr. Reily
John Revell, Efq;
Jacob Reynardfon,
Efq;
Thomas
Roberts, Efq;
David

Steele,Efq;

Mr.

Mrs.

Mr.

Edward

Smith

Parfons

R.

Rev.

William

James Sterling,
Efq;

Toby Parcel, Junior,Efq;


Q:
Dr. Henry Quin
Walter

M.

George Stannard,Efq;
R. Steele,
Efq;

James Plunket, Efq;


Arthur Pomeroy,Efq;
Major Powel

Mr.

Smith, A.

Smith, Efq;
Smith, Efq;

Mifs

William

Plummer

Efq;

JofcphSmith

Pidgeon,Efq;
Jeffrey
Piercy,Efq;

Richard

Smeton

Rev. Nathaniel
D.

Thomas

Rev.

Sheridan

Andrews

Martin

Edward

Bodham

Edward

Thornliill

Tighe, Efq;
Tighe, Efq;

Jane Tindall

Colonel Tonfon

[D]

James

LIST

Travers,

Thomas

Efq;
Two

Trinity College Library,

Rev.

Hon.

Mr.

Jofeph

Thomas

Warren,
Webb,

William

Whately,

Mr.

Agmondefliam Vefey

Mr.

Efq;

John Vaughan,

Thomas

Efq;

Efq;

Willis

Francis

William

Wilfon

Efq;
Efq;

Woiney,

John Wogan,

Efq;

Benjamin Vidor,
John Ufher, Efq;

Mr.

Thomas

Major Vyfe

Mr.

Wyatt,

Efq;

Efq;
Woodall

Surgeon

Philip Vyvyan, Efq;

Y.
W.

"

Right

Hon.

Lord

Wandesford.

Right

Rev.

Lord

Bifhop

John

Thomas

Hon.

Robert

R.

of Waterford

Waller, Efq;
Ward

R.P.

Efq;

White,

John Wilfon,

Vandercom

"

Efq;

James Wilfon,

Efq;

Fitwilliam

Efq;

Warren

William

V.

Vanburgh,

"

Ward

Warren,

Hamilton

Benjamin Twyning

Right
"

Sets

Oxon

Efq;

James Twigg,

Edward

Richard
Mrs.

Travers, Efq;

Walter

B. D.

Towniend,

William

SUBSCRIBERS.
Hon.

Efq;

James Topping,
Rev.

of

P.

Rev.

Yarker,
Mr.

Efq;

Yarker

Barry Yelverton, Efq;


Mr.

Frederick

M^fs

Younge

Yeamans

TABLE

TABLE

Of Pranunciatien,

0/ Efiiphajis,
Of
Of

Tones,

Of

the Recitation

or

"

-.----

0/ Paufes or Stops,
the Pitch

CONTENTS.

of

Management of

Poetic Numbers,

of

the VoicCy

APPENDIX.
Rules

to

be

by the
obferved

with
Obfervations

natives

regard to

Explanation
of the

Marks

the

of Ireland,

in order

to

pronunciation
of the natives

ufedin

the

Diilionaryto pointout

attain

of

jujipronunciation
"/'Engli{h,

Scotland

the

and

Wales,

pronunciation
of the tvords.

RHE-

RHETORICAL

GRAMMAR

ENGLISH

Calculated

LANGUAGE.

folely
and

Organs

Vol.

I.

of

for

thePiirpofes

Juftnefs

Speech,

of

of

teaching

Delivery,

in

Propriety
that

of

Tongue,

ciation,
Pronun-

by

the

Eiiglifli
alphabet

the

there

fuperfluous

the

to

vowel
for

fimple

all the

complete

it

be

letters

we

by

was

in

alphabet,

adopted
time

this

to

fettled

principles,

menfe

time

reading

and

afliftance

any

afford

To

becoming
one

and

of

the

fuch

diverfityand

clue

maftcrs
main

in

were

hitherto

in thofe

according
to

even

this

the

method

objeiSlspropofed
2

bed

and

educated

in

have

to

general
great

To

natives,

of

the

give

to

foreigners or

letters

that

of

for

to

fimple

the

revival

though

founds

ufed,
founds,
a

right pronunciation

tained
con-

and
not

work
to

the

from
upon
of

im-

words

acquire it,

to

ever

iflake

to

itfclf, there

deficiencyin

this

it became

provincials

only

reprefent

Europe,

contrivances

that

the

to

after

fuperabounding
times,

regard

and

five confonant

the

throughout

up

flands

With

peculiar

number

clumfy

the

marking

ufe

make

fomany

fafliion

of

the

mark

ceding
pre-

which

confequently

are

when

j,

diphthongs

deficiency is,

this

nineteen

are

in

from

books'.

intricate
here

for

deducting

of

Latin.

ignorance

Thus,

there

as

confonants

afpiration.

of

twenty-eight

to

of

founds

of

but

the

before

marks

remain

ought

ancient
of

o.

there

account

impoffible
by

e,

became

which

whim

and

of

that

mark

of

Two

compound

are

us,

reafon

irregularityin

the

them

"?,

found
The

the

by

of

merely

but

Englifli tongue,

the

marks.

and

s;

realityamount

on

days

the

to

wholly

given
through

of

fimple

found

is rendered

in

tongue,

ox

vowels,

letters.

our

of

two

which

there

but

the

alphabet,

not

labour,

it

of

or

to

were

thofe

their

marks

are

letter,

no

of

of

founds

for

pronounced

as

every

Roman

fuited

means

no

thofe

which

is

are

tongue,

the

adopted

Two

h
u,

charaders

more

it, which

in

that

alphabet,

fyllable.

vowels

and

incur

nine

to

ought

fimple

founds

either

and

ftand

to

found

And

gz.

mentioned,

above

fame

them,

real

of

the

or

of

two

hear

we

marks

of

x,

in
ks

the

having

letters

no

fimple

the

reprefent

to

have

which
q

and

vowels,

founds

and

another

dzh;

for

founds

thofe

of

many

is ill calculated

alphabet

this

"c,

R,

twenty-fix letters,

appear

bcdefghijklmnopqr
But

Simple Sounds.

Of

I.

SECTION

GR

RHETORICAL

laid

the

labyrinth,
down,

following

to

and

enable

to

acquire

all, who

will

juft pronunciation

take
of

our

the

pains

tongue,

of
is

work,
In

In order

this it will be

to

the firftplaceto afcertain the number

in
necelTary

firftI {hall

And

tongue.

our

GRAMMAR.

RHETORICAL

of

fimplefounds

in

the vowels.

begin with

Scheme

of ibe

Vowels.

fo

by heart,

be able

to

as

to

would

be

in
readily

it

repeat

the

prehend
comreadilyand clearly

vowels, fhould get

the order in which

the words

the above

lie,on

rallel,
pa-

line; as,
perpendicular

not

In this fcheme

hit

hate

bet

bear, "c.
vowel

fee that each

we

and Third

hall,

ftands for three different founds; and

occafion

I fhall have

becaufe

in this manner,

Second,

in the

is laid down

what

fcheme

that all who


necefl'ary
with
followingtreatife
regardto

they proceed any farther,it will

Before

them
particularize

to

founds, accordingto the order

in which

hereafter

they lie,and

I have clafled them


the titles of

by

they

as

Firft,

marked

are

by

figures.

thofe

of this

firilview

At
vowels

in
of

tongue

our

of

in

perceivedin
is the fame

So that
which

are

of

in

third

founds

noofe.

The

but

of

in

found

diphthongs.

is only the
of lovely',
fyllablc

the

The
/ in

of

And

no

fecond

with

fecond

founds

of

in

of

of

of

cf

cates
dupli-

e,

fame.

found

founds

b^er, and

and

in bufh

the third

the two

regard to

feveral

are

alfa the

ibund

fight, and

fhort found

lefs than 17 founds


there

/, beer, field, are

in hall.

fecond

have

we

fhall find that

we

Thus
and

in

as

The
is

of

only
u

in

y, the firft

the fecond

in Ije

f;'ght.

there
fubdudlingthefe eightduplicates,
as

imagine that

be apt to

examination,

nearer

fhort found

only the
in

the laft

as

would

one

on

The

fimplefounds,

not

are

is

not,

the fliortfound

cube,

the fame.

hate, bear, are


found

but,

marked.
founds, only differently

fame

the

fcheme,

follow

onlynine fimplevocal

remain

founds

or

vowels,

aaaeooeiu

hall

hat

hate

beer

Number
Thefe
eb

From
ftve muft

"

and

Till

amount

ed

to

ef

eg

the number

theyfhall

em

of charaders

be excluded

hold it in his

el

have

as

are

en

which

improper:

two

as

follow
er

cp
appear
are

to

fit

but.

et

es

ev

in the Roman

fuperfluous,
c and

got it by hpnrt, the beft way

hand, in order

bet

cf SimpleSounds of Cofonants.

nineteen, which
ek

noofe

no:e

will

be furc that he does

etfi

ez

alphabetas
q;

cfh

cth
marks

having

of

ezh

ing.

fimplefounds,

the fame power

only

be, that each reader fiiould copy the above fcheme,


not

miilake the marks.

as

,c,

or

an

is

in excel

of zh

and therefore
chara(Slers,

they are
reality

of the

have

fimpleas

as

and

/,

this

mark

by

an

; but

precedes a diphthong

of

compound,

and

above,

are

articulate found,

of

is, or

not

fimple

gz;

h,

as

truth is, the

the

alphabet

Roman

mark

to

it

by

and Jh,

in

them

adopted from

in then

their h,

jundionof

But

by
4th found, czh, being fometimes reprefented
fimplefound ing is uniformlymarked

The

from that

of

mark

three of

we

have

fingle
z,

The

without

found

alphabet,

with
afpiration,

thofe founds

yet given no

as

in

as

of etti,

fuch
language,

letter into their

or

marking

in Ihall.

as

each

languagewas

them.

introduce the Greek

to

marked

by two
grammariansas compound founds, though in

our

being able

marking

th,as

tfiin ;

in oficr.

as

by

enumerated

lettersin their

no

not

have

expedient we

the

to

s,

marks

are

it

reprefentsno

james, dzhames

of the reft. But

the expedient of

in the word

tR, as

two

it

/" when

with fome words


theta,indeed, they had adoptedtogether

the Greek

they fell upon


a

ezh, edzh

confidered

been

any

"c,
theatrum, theologia,

as

: and
afpiration

as

q that of

letter,as

no

Englifhalphabetas

thofe founds, confequently


they had
or

is

example.

in

laftfive confonants

The

d,

in ceafe : and

as

s,

quality. H

in

as

precededby

as

; gz,

is u,

an

effort of the breath,or

merelyan

founds; j

i, as in card ; of

firftvowel

whofe
and

of

f ;

GRAMMAR.

RHETORICAL

azure

of
by a jun(5lion

of

liar
pecu-

fometiraes

and g,

as

fing,

ring,"c.
There

befides two

are

miftaken
utterly
The

formation
The

grammarians,as

our

thefe

charafters is

of

to

fland

we

and ufe have been

nature

fpeak of diphthongs.

to

come

for the Ihort founds

marks

as

whofe

zv,

fliewn when

of ee, and 00,

in the

they fhould therefore be called.

diphthongs; by
of the Englifhalphabet,
with regardboth
by the followingfcheme.
which

and

alphabet,
y

{hall be

names

whole

view

one

by

ufe of

chief

lettersin the Roman

founds

to

and

letters,
may

be exhibited in

Fowels.
3

aaaeooeiu

hall

hat

hate

beer

noofe

note

fhort

fit

bet

but

fhort

00

ee

Confonants.
eb

ed

ef

ek

eg

el

em

ep

en

ek

or

efs

their

I have

in that manner,

Th

marked

Vol.

has

by

I.

two

contrary

founds

placeda
to

; one

ftroke drawn

vowel

the ufual

in the word

etR

their

eks

nature

and

or

egz.

powers

will

before the other confonants,that

for
praiSice,

reafon

to

efh

eth

ezh

ing

qua

latter characters in this manner,

And

ez

ev

By foundingthefe
names.

et

es

j
edge

ha

er

be

ttt'K,the other in t^ert. To

theymay

be cxprefTedin
be all founded

givenhereafter.
them,
diftinguifli

the former

found is

acrofs the upper part of the R.

S E C T

IO

GRAMMAR.

RHETORICAL

II.

SECTION

of the vowels

T7*IRST,
"*"

at

kind

former

that

and

the Nature

Of

which

be divided into

may

Qominated

firftfix

of

are

firft long vowels, I do not


be

may

mean

prolongedad libitum,though-

ftridly
fpeakingthey fliould be

therefore

the

de-

doubtful.

Vowels.
longor dcubifid

Six
hall

in that

beer

hate

hat

pronouncingthem

In

and

capableof beingrervdered fliort;

time

found

whofe

fuch

fliort. The

long and

callingthe

the three laft,of the latter. In

long, but theyare


theyare neceflarily

the fame

of the SimpleSounds.

Formation

noofe.

note

perceivea juftand regularfcale,by

order, we

I. is the fulleft found, made

proceeds in marking thofe founds.


mouth, and the voice ftrikes upon that part
ilTues:

the voice

in like

is formed

by

fo ; and
Thefe

the teeth.

near

the

in

the

the voice

greateft
aperture
the

to

of the

by which
palTage

the ftroke of the voice

vanced
ad-

more

foundinge the mouth is almoft clofed,and the


only long vowels formed within the mouth.

the

are

After that, the feat of articulation is advanced

by

is neareft

palatewhich

graduallylefs aperture, and

ftillmore
proportion

ftroke of the voice is

of

which

to

the

lips; 6 beingformed

by

fmall

pufhingout'

6 by
the lips in a figure
refemblingthe circular character which
; and
the found out
througha chink or foramen more of tfttf
advancingthe lipsftillmore, and puflaing
attention
in repeating
the vowels
So that whoever
in this
will give but a flight
oblong kind.

reprefentsthat found

of

of
order, will perceivea regularand gradualprogreflion
to
are

the

extreme

in their

difficult to

when

aSj

three laftvowels, founded

The

o.

on
fiiort,
being incapableof prolongation;
and
their
them
founds
can
true
feparately,
pronounce

united

to

be divided

may
be

cannot

of
partaking

which

the

ed, eg, ek, ep,

the Natttre and Formation


into

prolonged;the
of

nature

mutes
clafles,

two

bet, fit,but^

it would

pointed out

be

only in

found

fyllables

vowels, from

which

of Confonants.

and femivowels.

femivowels, fuch

thirteen

And

et.

be

in the words
account

fubfequentconfonants.

Of
Confonants

the firftfeat of articulation

voice, from

nature

theyare

founds

the

founds

whofe

theyderive

femivowels, ef, el,

their

cm,

can
name.

en,

er,

The

mutes,

be

continued
There

are

at

pleafurej

fix mutes,

are

es, ev,

thofe whofe

eb^

etlT,eth, efh,

ez,

ezh, ing.
The

be

at

mutes

all

be fubdivided

may

prolonged, Thefe

though for
The

formed

by

the voice

afpirated. The
etS, efli. The

ek,

ep,

and

be fubdivided

may
;

the

vocal

vocal

el,

em,

femivowels may

are,

into vocal

thofe
afpirated,

are,

impure. The pure, are


impure, are thofe

The

et.

very ftiortfpace. Thefe

femivowels

are,

into pure

en,

formed
er,

eb, ed, eg.


and afpirated. The

by
ev,

the breath.
ez,

thofe whofe

whofe

are

eih, ezh, ing.

be fubdivided into pure, and


4-

nine

The

impure.

may

cannot

be

tinued,
con-

thofe which

vocal, are

There

founds

founds

vocal, and

are

four

afpirated,cf,
The

pure,

cs,

fuch
as

obtained

have

towards

firftof

is formed
the

by

the roof

touch

the

of

the

degree

the

flop the

to

the

is

roof

fo
poflible,

under

and

Er

that of ed and

the

mouth

found

the
the

is formed

without

jaw,

of

roof

that

fides of

the

over

mouth.

the

to

tongue

little behind

the

may

be

which

tongue,

by

not

et.

little behind
cepted
interin

are

vibratingmotion

of

about

the

touching either, and

at

is formed.

formed
the

and

and

eg

that the found


manner

as

15

continue

may

the
raifing

the

up

for

middle

in

nafal,

flopped

thus

at

the

applicationof

the

as

in ek^ the voice


et.

of

account

on

in the fame

by clofingthe lipsmuch

formed

and

fo

in eg the tongue

ed and

forming

laft clafs, called

the tongue

of

is, that

little while

mentioned

before

was

ing, make
Em

ek^ by

only difference of their formation

the
and

manner

lips,is permitted to pafs

and

voice

fame

feat, and

by

clofelyapplied

more

to

like
the

and
ifTuingthrough thatpalTage,

from

of

roof
to

the

organ
fo

mouth,

force the

el; only

as

in

as

there

is

great meafure

greater part of it back

through

nofe.

this, much

Behind
eg,

en,

nofe.

in the

much

the tongue,

of

em,

back

nofe.

is formed

more

fame

the
as

this difference,that the voice

in eb, with

as

through
En

firftbut
the

the

iffuingthrough

round's

of
foft

as

through

upper

palateare

mouth

confonants,

three

thatf/

the

in
wholly intercepted,
The

the

teeth

at
clofelyprefled

fo

is not

between

end

lies

formation

glidesgently

voice

line
flraight

towards

back

Farther

is

be

tongue

teeth, they

feat is farther removed

thofe whofe

from

feat of

whofe

er,

the

pofitionthe

is clofe to the

feat of their formation

the

as

palatine.

prefluremuft

diftance from

fame

el and

are

The

in this

the

tip of

called

gentleapplication of

ed.

pofture,in

horizontal

to

feat of

and
;

the

thence

this clafs

but

them
dental, todiftinguifh

of

name

palate,and

the

The
El

the

founds

the other

of

pioducing any

in

GRAMMAR,

RHETORICAL

produced

of

the

be forced
I fhall

the

mouth,

the

in

fo

as

back

through

now

exhibit

that

the

at

fame

feat, and

ing, by raifmg

found

one

part of

the

fame

of
difpofition

middle

the
voice

may

of

the

ifTue

the

organs

tongue

to

through

the

as

in

forming the

gentle

mouth,

contadl

and

the

found

with

the

remainder

nofe.

view

fcheme

of the whole

alphabet,accordingto

the method

laid down.

SCHEME

above

GRAMMAR.

RHETORICAL

SCHEME

offimpleSounds

Number

Vowels,

ALPHABET.

THE

OF

in

Tongue28.

our

hall

hat

hate

beer

noofe

note

Confonants,eb

ed

ef

el

ek

eg

or

Impure,

13 Semivowels, ef

el

ed

TfliTtf/, el

ef
Afpirated,

ep

et.

eb

ed

eg.
efs

er

em

en

efs

etR

er

4 Labial,

eb

ep

ev

8 Dental,

6d

et

eth

Palatine,eg

ek

el

Nafal,

en

efh

ezh

ing.

efs;

or

Semivoiveh.

and

et.

ep

ev

ez

ev

ez

etti

eth

efh

eth

ezh

ing.

ezh

ing.

efh.

Divided

em

eth

afpiration,

ek

eg

ek

en

em

etR

ez

".

of

into Mutes

6 Aluies, eb
3 Pure Mutes,

of ek

ev

^z.

letter, h, merelya mark


divided
Confonants

et

es

ftands for edzh.

for is

X,

No

er

ep

has the power

which

Compound, j,

en

that of ek before

q,

em

which

Superfluous,
c,

fit

fliort ee

fliort 00
19

bet

again into

ef.
ettt

efs

ez

ezh

efli.

er.

ing.

III.

SECTION

Of Diphthongs.
TTAVING

examined

founds
There
the

are

or

two

I.

fimple founds

in

our

tongue,

I fiiallnow

piocecdto

the double

diphthongs.
of

our

nioft part marked

Vol.

all the

diphthongswhich

have

ufuallypafledfor fimplefounds,bccaufe theyare

by fmglecharacters,which

are
c

and

li,as

founded

in the words

for

fight.
blilci

blue

fed

diphthongs.

the founds

the firftmade
the

to

the

get

can

is in

and

paflagethrough

the vowel

when

quicklyinto
diphthong!?
with

the

the found

o,

that

formed

by

the

or

oy

diphthong oi

found
The
fame

is

changed by

diphthong ou
manner

as

is

perfeiSed,by

is checked

and

its

and

the

by

two

firftvowel

or

a,

compofed

is

ow

mouth

and blended

with

heard

not

the

the

to

but

and

attend

we

fame

before

the

in the

fame

and
flenderone,

diphthong!.'

rapidlyuttered, and

fame vowels

of the

dwelt
e

thus

fallingfo

third found

or

that of ! ;

heard
diftinftly

and

oj

is formed

of foundinga,
pofition

which

is

before its

much

in

the

before that found

but

pofitionof foundingo, the


refults the diphthong ou or

the

lipsto

that

oi, noife.
and

as

is

upon,

as

founds

6, from

latter

the

and

is

by

is the

both, which
fo

If

the upper

to

near

per-

and
a
vow^els,

found

to

found, checked

former

being

of the

jaw

reality
they are

our

vowels.

firftin the

being at

of the under

motion

is drawn

jaw

the

union

going

were

the full

thus

diftinit power

own

is formed
the

under

its juniElion
with the latter vowel

the

founds

jun*Sionof

this difference,that

if it

found, different from

third

of

diphthong

lips,the

in

is firftopened

fliallfind that the mouth

pofition
;

Bur

flcndereft of

the fmalltft aperture of the mouth.

as

is formed

with it,producesa
coalefcing

The

the

the fullefland

ot

by

we

the fame

alphabet.

cmrepeating

the latter

and
largeft,

procefs in forming this found,

as
pofition

The

in

! is compofed

found

The

degree of aperture,
voice

thofe vowels

given to

by

GRAMMAR.

RHETORICAL

10

firftfound
as

oiv,

in

thou, now.
All the other

of
diphthongs

the characters w

and y,

by

the fiiortfounds

other vowels and

combining with

tongue

our

all the
preceding

are

formed

of

and

them.

marked

by

thus.

As

word.

SECTION
tie Manner

Of
1

for
neceflary

will be

T
in

fimplefounds

all the

any farther.

And

peculiarto

are

point out

be

as
more

thefe

are

full in

as

tongue

the

my

the articulations are

and

and
Englifli,

and ing.
tth, ct'\\,

wifh

offormingcertain

to

Sounds.

properly,to
Englifti

pronounce

diphthongsenumerated

and

not

are

the French

to

are

I have

found
have

be found

diredions about
formed

unlefs they are


confequently,

within

which
them.
the

not, that

the founds

alreadydefcribed

founds
peculiar

in their

own

explainedabove,
For

before

in thofe founds
which

of

our

vowels, and all our

forming the

fcarce any Frenchman

and

which

purpofe I fliall

or

two

founds

can
foreigner

confonants
of

the tongue is

told to do it,theywill never

never

of themfelves

reigners.
fo-

except
and

etiT

conquer,

It muft be obferved then, that in the French

mouth,

perfect

theyproceed

being a language generallyfpoken by

of all

the mode

tongues.

themfelves

make

exercifed
fliould be conftantly
particularly
foreigners

more

the

fuch founds

In the French

but

all who

IV.

eth,

I ihall

tongue all

protrudedbeyondthe

teeth ;

placethe organin a pofition


that

A
that it

had been in before

never

that is neareft

the found

utter

to

theyare urged to
of

tongue, and

et%

to

R.

this

that

pronounce

in

as

them, theynaturally

to

in like

found,

new

they continue
of

being informed

of

want

call it den

And

a t.

pointedout

the organs

own

d, and

mcchanifm

containingthofe founds, for

in all words

I C

it in their

to

thin,tin; changing eth

fo that when

having the

then^ without

the word

they pronounce

manner

do all their lives

to

thod
followngplainfimpleme-

the

followed.
Suppofethen you were
producingthofe founds, if it be but ftridlly
neceflarily
found
the
when
form
etb
it
he
fiiould
or
how
a word
fyllable.
a
begins
foreigner
(hewing

of

defirous of

protrudethe tipof

Defire him

to

let
pofition

him

any.

intention

an

teeth, and

his

behind

the
prefsit againil

voice with

muft

the organs

thefe founds

continued

be

to

the

in

the

by

is

before ; and

in

breath
fome

In both

only.

under

To

let him

then

the tongue

in that

ter
ut-

time

the fame

at

f/lT,

the

pronounce

the

of the tongue,
v/ithdravving
certainly
producethe word thin.

as

breathe,breath,he muft
finiflithe word

to

whilft in that of breath,the

for
pofition

fame

will

in the words

he
precedingletters,
as

touchingthe

drasv back

previousto

only, which

beyond them

fomewhat

be produced.
neceflarily

as
fyllable,

teeth

all

at

then,and

but
pofition,

breath
or

the upper

the end

to

tt. is formed

corffonaht
tongue

edge of

the

to

emit
word

will

hmt

the

founding the

after
inftantaneoufly
the tongue

end

the word

right found

the

inftead of any voice, he muil


When

teeth without

upper
found

to

exactlyin

be

his teeth and

his tongue between

foundingthe
voice

is

oiF

breathe,the
the

at

cafes it will be of ufe

time after the formation

of

told,that

by applyingthe tipof

word

cut

be

to

and

the

continue

the

at the fame
letter,

the

voice is

vowel,

time

pro-

"

found

longingthe

of the voice

marked

confonant

nearlyapproachingto it,to
The
oiilydifference between

nafal vowels.

tongue

it be
fpecls

touch the roof

not

in

fimilar

raife the middle

to

to
by ing, is perhapspeculiar

be found

in the French

does

of

into the

With

regardto

this number
found

in

pofition.If

that there is

words
a

open

but

on

ours

And

as

them

wide

Our

if he

towards

were

the French

the

roof

nafal vowel

above, viz.

will be

i,

of his mouth

founded

has

alfo

is
a

the union
a

to

li,oi or

i,

be

found

it confiftsin
2

that

pronounce

purpofe,

as

to

oy, and
in fuch

or

ou

dent will be

words

the

found

There

its

meant

of

is

the found

or

our

defire a foreicmer
that vowel

fuddcn
e

motion

of

is formed,and

completed,nor

not

third found

them

of the vowels

found

to

progrefsby

vin, fine,but

as

to

are

is

the found

diphthongv/hich

has

no

both.

refcmbles

be
inftantly

a,

check

and

Of

toncrue.

cw.

diphthongis formed

that fituation in which

of the two

compound of

found

in all their

in pronouncini'

in the word

in the French

producethat found, you

to

going to

Thus

is a found

ca?np, and

or

after
immediatelyperceptibleby founding

it in
flopping

the upper,

either,and yet

diphthong u
and

dent

as

is, that in forming the French founds,the


producingthe Englifhing,though in other rewants
to produce this found, he has onlv
foreigner

gentlecontatSt with

for that

Dieu, mieux; but the difference will


mew;

fo that in order

as

continued, there refults from


to

words

the difference confifts in this,that their

the firfteffort of the voice

refemblance

in fuch

in

our
risfembling

cuttingoff all found.


inftantly

then
of

fomewhat

of the vowels

jaw

enumerated

difference between

his mouth

the under

till by pradtice
the
latter,

Englifli
language.There

the

Englifhconfonant heard in the word ding-dong.


have feveral not to be found
diphthongs,the Englifli

French

vine,fine.

1, and

to

in the

them
as

therefore

in this way

'the firft four

are

the

of the mouth

his tongue into

nafal vowels; and


any of the

converted

of the breath

former, and

familiar.

founds become
The

in the

it In

French,

to

be

found

perceived
by foundingafter them

this,that their diphthongterminates in

the

French

in the
our

vowel

words
a/,

words

dew,
found

which

which

and

is

have

we

of

laft; and

he is

to

To

form

fome

time

o,

diphthong oi

differs from

found

not

o",

Our

eu.

pronoun

is

you

interceptedby

and

two
diphthong is reprefented

of

the motion

voice

the

then

full found

the

pronounce

f only in this, that the firftvowel

This

e.

be told that it
into

the

an

exadt

a,

dwelling

re-

u.

is

e,

gans
by Englinior-

completedbut rapidlyrunning

not

neceflaryto

found

the

flender

that of

the latter vowel

oy it is

or

before

vowel,

the

of

formed

be

to

properlytherefore,a foreigneris to

it

the firftfound

the found

eye of

pofitionof forming the


with

and

form

To

o.

confider it as ending in the French


French

the
on

founds

the

to
prefentation

in

very hard

is therefore found

and

tongue,

our

terminates

ours

compofed

in

not

GRAMMAR,

RHETORICAL

12

the

of

under-jaw, to
ceafe.

This

is

to
inftantly

is

heard, before
diftindly
either

ways,

oi

by

or

ey,

the

thong
diph-

it unites
in

as

noife,

boys.
To

producethe diphthongou

aperture of the mouth


the organs
towards

jaw

lattervowel

or

from
All

both,

the fame

for

inflance,

of the

but before

that

found

the coaiefcence of

formed

are

having neither
the

two,

greatefl
is

the

fame

the found
third

pleted
com-

of the undertime
of

found

the
ferent
dif-

otu.

by

the

fhort founds
vowels

all the other

all

like manner,

of the words

either

our

they will

of

and

when

e,

reprefented

theyprecedethem

in

of coininga
liberty

new

enumerated
have

many

from

place their

are

exhibited

lipsin the

proper

by

in the words

as

letter like

to

it forms

their affirmative

as
a

to inform
only necefTary

has been

v,

idea

of

view

but

ou:

owing

to

their

if in all

not

being
which

commencing
diphthongs

forming the French

of
pofition

As

and the miftake

the charafter

it from

them

diphthong.

ou,

or

Eng-

found.

our

are

to

be

confidered

mieux,viande,bien

by

their j',

or

them
as

as

anfweringto

in the laft fyllables

moyen.

tongue, which

reality
theyare only fo
fuch
diftinguifh

vees

diphthongsformed

I have

which

found

be

when

ou,

found, and takingup their

producing the

voyage, royaume,

Befide thofe
in

by

foundingthat

of

their /,

the French

to

the fame
individually

interwoven

two

fail of

they cannot

thofe formed

To

pronunciationof thefe, it will

of the

nature

true

that letter

with

vowels

or

combining with

true

is

we

pronoun

it, wherein
reprefents

In

there fhould be the

that
necefTary

diphthong i, by

arifes from

tongue

our

commit
they conflantly

informed

in

thus,

in the

as

found and power

exactlyin

anfwers

iv

our

lifh o,

is

the found

fyllable.

our

which

to

diphthongou

is the

in the
inftrudt foreigners

To
that

and y, and

owl, it

form

the

to

completed,there

which

the charadlers

by

and

diphthongsin

the other

about

of pronouncing o, by a rapidmotion
pofition
protrudingthe lips in the form of founding 6, at

and

fhort

voice

in cut,

as

ow,

were

change

the upper,

floppingthe
former

as

to

are

or

if it

the

been

and

moft

different ways
true

defcribed,there

vaft

of
variety

abfurdlycalled diphthongsby
of

the
reprefenting

diphthongs,which

word, and fhall

is

call them

means

or
digraphs,

fame

our

combinations

of

grammarians,when

fimplefounds

of

our

vowels.

1 fhall take the


double-founding,
double

written.

SECTION

GRAMMAR.

RHETORICAL

SECTION
the

Of

I.

confidered

are

characler fhould be fet down

Worth.
fpelUngor refrefenting

types of founds, in order

the

as

which

word

in any

fliould have

Every diftincl fimplefound

in

make

to

them

corre-

obferved.
rules fliould be ftridlly
the four following
their archetypes,

to
fpoiid

No

V.

Ufeand Abufe ofLetters

words

written

WHEN

13

is

pronounced.

not

diltinft character

it,for which

mark

to

it flioulJ

uniformlyftand.
character fhould

fame

3. The

founds fliould be marked

compound

4. All

their

producethofe founds, upon


farily
rules

Thefe

obferved
ftridlly

were

that

infomuch

Rome,

joiningletters fo
mafters,

to

to

as

adeptsin

them

fo

violated,or rather indeed

books,

which
cyphers,

the

art

of thofe who

ments

conceal

the

of

art

caufes which

from

layin

contributed

prefentI

our

which

fhall content

founds, as
are

to

it is

all who
our

heart

fhall
firrah

"

not

Vid. Lectures

on

Elocution.

in the

names

not

the

old Greece

thefe rules

are

been

that
confufion,

to

flate of

the

mentioned

been

or

weeks

frequently
to

nunciation
pro-

years.

mofl:
or
hierogliphics,

before

have

fo

few

be derived

difficult

conceal the fentiour

itvi well educated

and

of their

manner

of
praftice

better calculated

key, than

necef-

alphabet.

farther aid of rules

affiftancecan

no

all except

from

fet forth

is to
fpelling

natives.

The

but

were

in

there
an

exprefs

reader is referred *.

to
exhibiting

view fuch

fhould be

of Vozvels marked

plaifler

or

the darkeft

alphabet,as has

the learner
neceflary

laugh

I.

words,

the curious

far

Vot.

had

increafe the

myfelfwith

Sounds

the

all
Englifli

little

invented,were

to
guidehim throughthis labyrinth

Same

reading;and

language,that

defective
to

and
naturally

readingproperlyrequiresthe labour of many

has hitherto

treatife for that purpofe,to which


At

of

their

without

one,

every

in the

Whereas

art.

written

our

man

ufed them

of this

enabled

fightin

properly

pronunciation of

true

fource
original
other

the

charafters,as

diiFerent founds.

with the
of their alphabet alone, together

that
totally
difregarded,

is the flate of

indeed

Such

and

will

celebrated languagesof
juflily

two

at

the

of two
reprefentative

beingpronouncedaccordingto

and words,
fyllables

their words

the
fuch

as

only by

in the

knowledge

the
make

pronounce

only might render


from

be fet down

never

aware

in marking
fpecimensof irregularity

of, before

he

enters

juflpronunciation.

in

Varietyofdifferent
Ways.

upon

the rules

RHETORICAL

he

ea

Tea

ei

deceit

ey

key

ce

fcetus

ie

field

ee

fee

eo

people

machine

GRAMMAR.

Sounds
Different
there

With
Ihall

many

more

here

is often mute,

has three

as

by the fame Vowels.


who

inftances of

find the ftateof

we

marked

our

in marking
irregularity

confonants

in

has its found marked

by

too

tedious

founds,

has

has the fame

has four

two

found

different combinations

founds,

as

that of ad
.

Nor

enumerate.

of

ceafe,

fh

fecial.

letters,ph

G,
-

laugh.
joy.

Philip,
gold, gentle.

care,

gh
G

to

debt, tomb.

two

vowels

our

better.

much

founds,

go

yes,

rofe,

fh

paflion,

zh

ofier.
T

alfo

GRAMMAR.

RHETORICAL

,"

will

the tongue forward (o as to toucli the teeth in forming


is producedby pufliing
pronunciation
the
d
in
the
for as
it
is
can
and
the
to
cure
they
properly
eafy,
pronounce
;
way
the
the
in
of
little
that
reft
let
them
pofuion
a
fyllable,
keeping
forming^/,
tongue
loud,
upon
it
and
without
the
found der
the
then let them
pufliing forward,
feparateit from
upper gum
of foundingd at the end of
For the organ beingleft in the pofition
be producedof courfe.

the

huJ,
fyllable

vicious

that found
word
and

unlefs it makes

is

movement,

new

in the cafe

as

often

though not

letteris fometimes

d in uttering
the laft fyllable,
of formingthe fame
pofition
of protrudingit fo as to touch the teeth.
This

the

in
neceffarily

handkerchief,handfome,

in the words

as
quiefcent,

handfe).

F
F

found
always its own
it from
to diflinguifh

has

founded

laugh,cough:

of which

found

marked

words,

it has the power

as

by two^'s,
in

as

well

as

of

in

fpelling.Though

as

in

and

v,

it is

cha^,feoff;fometimes

and
phikfophy,
epitaph;

fometimes

is

con-

by

by ^/^,as

place.

in its proper

more

particleof,where

o^in

is it often

ending of

in the beginningand

/"i,both
in

the word

fingle,
yet

when

flant to its found

in the

except

cv,

G
G

in oentle.

as

before the vowels


before

is very dubious

letter is

Hebrew,

the

derived from

This

in lauirh,of which

as

characSlcris

This

are

technical

or

/',

in

as

an

foft found

rule.

However, itspowers

wanted

alphabetare

our

followed

ejh,as

fliall. Ch

with
conjunftion

too,

ihall be confidered in

by

an

;//,

as

where

except

found,

ftands

y ;

general

found

geefe,
geld

gear,

only in fome

proper

in

phlegm; zdly.By

gh affumes

the power

an

n,

of

an

But

all words
beginning with that letter
only the following: heir,honefi,
honour,hofpi-

it is put to
to

for k in chorus

; for

c,

that it is

combined

in

varietyof

other ufes wherever

ch, it ftands for the compound

t, it ftands for two

With

effort of
or
fignof afpiration,

mere

and
fingle,

it has when

it ferves to {hew

of
treating

but is

to be fupplied.United

tjh,

likewife

be

in

jy.

gu,

ufe, except

is to

alwaysits

before e, and

the Greek.

from

terms

articulate

only power

charm, pronouncedtfliarm.

as

or

common

confonant,

It has, like c,

g.

fecond

found

its hard

efFort of the breath, except

an

in

light,
fuglt;

hour, humour, humble, humbles.


tal, hofiler,
defefts of

any

or/

withy

common

foft

hereafter.

of any

mark

no

precededby

be

more

is the

This

the breath.
to

to

in all words

filent. ift.When
frequently

illre'ign,
condign;3dly, By

^as

generalits

be reducible

to

its derivatives ; and

its derivatives ; get and

and

in

o, u;

a,

not

as

its foft found

e, it has

Before the vowel

names

fo

other

hard, the

the following
fyllables,
ga, je,jior gi, go,
by repeating

be known

may

/,

the other in

gold;

in

be called

firftof thefe may

The

found

hard

firftor
but

to itfelf,
as
peculiar

founds,one

has two

and

tfiin.

does

in

founds, thin

phikfophy
\

as
filent,

in

as

thought.With

gh

the

found

With

for

laugh.

In

fome others which

letters.

J
.

letter is the

This
is

difficult found

it,it

pronounce

to

of a
reprefentative
to

fuch

is

have

and
to

to

found

the

the French

compound

prefentthe
6

found

j,

in the

which

found of ed%h

firftof thefe

to

is
or

that
pofition

exadly the
dzha,

the eye,

firftto

fpeltwith

form

%h

or

found

as

produced.
the French

I have
To
_;, as

to

letter d with

the

called the

This

z.
afpirated

that letter is formed

it has when

fame

will be

up of ^ and

made

in their feveral tongues ; and

it not

as
foreigners
to dtfire them
only requifite

it, as ed, keepingthe tongue


try

compound

enable
vowel
then

them

before
let them

afpiratedz

or

e2.h,

facilitate this, it will be proper

thus

edjc"and afterwards,in
order

RHETORICAL

with
begina fyllable

order to

in the

place the tongue


letter is

This

that found, which

with it,let them


concluding
the previous
vowel let them
uttering
vowel, as djoy [joy],djoke[joke].

of foundinged, and without


pofition
fubfequentyfollowed by a

and
filent,

never

has

alwaysthe

17

difficultthan

is more

oi d into that of the

the found

run

GRAMMAR.

is alfo reprcfcnted
by foft

fame found, which

g,

as

in

gejiure.
iejif
K
K

It precedesan
annexed

fame found, reprefented


alfo

the
alwaj's

has

to

in the fame

hard c,

as

in

by

hard r,

fyllable,kiiaw,knot ;

king,card.

as

pronouncedno,

as

It is alwaysfilentwhen

fiot ;

and

is

when
fuperfluous

lock^Jiid.
L

filent but
alwaysone uniform found, and is never
is
founded
In
it
word
as r,
one
as
balm^ pfalm.
only
fyllable,

when

has

followed

colonel

by an

in the fame

pronounced curnel.

"

M
in its found,and is never

alfo uniform

Mh

filent.
N

is likewife uniform, but

it

When

precedesg

it

is always mute

another
reprefents

after

in the fame

fimplefound

as
fyllable,

be mentioned

to

in

hymn, condemn.

hereafter.

P
letter has

This
of

power

an/,

has

always one uniform


philofophy.

as

always the

fome other vowel,


in

diphthongfound
letter is

or

the words

the

ours

the

into which
to

the

where
pique,antique,

in the French

"

as

havingthe found

in the fame

manner

as

is admitted.

is never

it precedesa

onlywhen

the

followed

vowels

two

lattervowels

two

well

as

that in the French


confifts in this,

diphthongfound

foreigners.It

letterit ftands

/;,and then it aflumes the

an

and
filent,

are

by

combined

are

the

fyllable.

vowel,
following

followingvowel,

joinedto

quarrel^
que/Hon^
antiquity
; where

alwaysfollowed by

with
immediately
the

i, for which

k finiflies
the

their ufe of it and

with

in the words

found of the confonant


This

of

power

as

found except when

This

of k.

in the word

in

Englifli
; but

the
With

the differencebetween

is filent,
and
us

the

the q unites itfelf

forms

quoi,the only one

will be fufficientto

pointout

diphthong

in the French

its true

ciation
pronun-

filent.
R

This

letterhas

alwaysthe fame found, and is never

filent

5
S ftands for four differentfounds ;

3dly,Jh, as

in

paffion
; 4thly,zh,

It has its own

words, ift.When

proper

found of

as

found,as \nfa,yes ; 2dly,z,


peculiar

ift,Its own

as

in rofe ;

in ofier.

alwaysat

beginningof words. The fame at the end of


of
monofyllable
as, has, was, and the plurals
words
In
all
in
double
as
ending
idly.
7}, faultlcfs,

the

theyterminate in as, except in the

endingin ea, fuch as feas,pleas,"c.


"c.
3dly,All words endingin is,as this,tennis;except the verb is,and the pronoun his,
deprefs,
where
it has the found of 2.
genius; cutaneous, naufeous,
4thly,All endingin us and t"us ; as circus,
nouns

5thly,When

by any of
preceded in the fame fyllable

the

pure mutes,

k, p,

t,

or

ttT and

f;

as

locks,caps, hats,baftis,
fcoffsi
Vol.

I.

It

^Ir and/;

mutes,

the

precededin

ift,When

It has the found of z,


the pure

GRAMMAR.

RHETORICAL

,8

fame

fyllable
by

dams, "c.
blabs,beds,begs,bells,

as

the vowel

a word
finifhing
precededby

adiy,It

riches,feries; except when

as

e,

any other confonant


has the found

of

precededby a

befide
when

mute

pure

as dates,cakes, "c.
fyllable,

in the fame

\nfionprecededby
eliding

oi fljin all words

It has the found

confonant j

in

as

emulfmi,expan-

"c.
f:on,difpeifion,

fon, precededby

of zh in

And

vowel

in

as

As
incljion,
explojlan,
occaf.on,
cohefton,
ccnfufion.

ending\nfier,as crofier,hofier.

alfo in all words

r
letter has its own

This

It has the found of

found

proper

all words, and at the end of

beginningof

the

at

fyllables.

in the wtor6 fatiety.

It has the found ofy" in all terminations in tion,


as nation,
notion,"c. ; except when
fanclion,
s

in
precedes,

like

t has the found of

manner

by
In

marked
cafe it takes the found of tjhufually

which

an

s,

7*

Irifliand other

pronouncingthis letterthe
the

regardto

with

that flruflure.

This

found of the d, I

for

d;

arifes from

the

mean

of
protruding

In

tial,as martial,nuptial-,
except when

thicken
provincials

the

found

better,
theyfaybetthcr; for utter, utther,and

faultymanner

an

Sec,
bajlion.
quejlion,

as

ceded
pre-

alfo the found of ch.

it has

when
be/lial,
celejlial,

in

as

in all terminations in

ch

by

the fame

the tongue fo

caufe

before

was
on

mentioned

was

touch the teeth

to

as

that

as

fo

and

tioned
men-

in all words
as

of

the
affecting

is curable

only

of ii, the other

of^z.

in the fame way.

V
has

uniform

alwaysone

and

found,

is

filent.

never

X
character ftands for

This

of words

At the end

found of ks
2.

of ks wherever

3.

pronouncedks,
4.

if the

But

found of
thus

by

may
a

in

lie,,as

vowel, if

accent

do

immediatelyupon

the

is where

be

changed to

Thus
and

few

the words

it, it has alwaysthe

upon

immediatelylie upon

flillthe found

that

it is ftill
fyl'able,

gz

as

in

fyllable
beginningwith
following

There

is but

one

of the letter
rightpronunciacion

exemplaryfrom

egzaltation,
though

in the latter. And

cafe in which

in fome
is preferved

derivatives from

the

the fame

accent

there

words

that
primitives

example, and
be

vowel, the

exonerate, exuberant,"c.
example,exalt,exert, exiji,

followed

the found of ^z

onlyin

not

by an
every fituation except when
have
afliftthe memory
in which
it is onlyneccflary
to

to

executor.
ex'ecute

is

has the accent

exhilarate.
exhibition,
exculpate,

the accent

the found of ks in

vowel;

and

tax.

/;,it has
by a confonant, or afpirated
fyllable

next

fure rule is providedfor the

word,

the power

in executioner.

as

is then

in the

the accent

followed

When

has

extricnte.
exercife,

as

"

it is followed

When

found of ks, as in vex,

alwaysthe

of
in the firftfyllable

it is found

When

1.

it has

which

compound founds,one

two

in all

recourfe

exceptionsto

this

contrary to the maxims


have

the

changed to

muft be obferved with

to

words

laid down

all words

fuch

former, and

a
as

that

which

accordingto

exalt,muft be founded

the firftfyllable
in the

regardto

two

generalrule,and

above

found of ^z in them

exaltation from

have

beginningwith
fyllable

accented

are

And

it is to

cafes,as

rule.

egzemplary
to

the third

of this clafs,
Z

This

RHETORICAL

GRAMMA

39

letteris feen in very few words

This

by

both of thefe

and

Having done

in

as

s,

ail the confonants

with

have

as

no

has been for the moft: part ufurped

as its power
Englifli,

itsown,

one

fupplied
by

are

fimplefounds

fuch

founds

two
reprefents

It

i.

of

in

as

razor

the other zh, or French

in

as

y,

azure

ofier.
reafon,

that appear

peculiarcharaders

I (hall now
alphabet,

in

our

to

mark

and

them,

examine

proceedto

therefore

are

reprefented
by

letters.

two

Thefe

different founds marked

two

are

have

of formation

been

combination

the fame

by

alreadyfufficiently
explained
;

of ih.

there remains

of this mark to its tx^^odifferent ufes.


application
of words
tt\ has alwaysits afpirated
In the beginning
found,oris

ift,in

except
the

the pronoun

Their

formed

and

nature

point

to

now

whollyby

thou^and its derivatives,


thee,them.,thine,their,"c.
as

ner
man-

the riwht

out

the

and

breath,

2dly, in

than, that,
the,their,then,thence,there,this,thither,
followingmonofyllabies,
thou,thy,though,

thus; in all which


tfi ;

it has its vocal foond.

With

or

after it, it has

ly

At the end of words

/S has its

found, except
afpirated

in

the

underneath,
lureath,to feet
h, booth,
fmooih,to foolh. The
fometimes
And

-mith all my

more,

It has

vocal ;

before
afpirated

is to be obferved

the fame

many

alwaysthe

found

of

tTiwart.
tiiroiv,

as

when

followingwords;

confonant, vocal before

it is not

compounded,

to

neath,
be/})eath,

ivith is fometimes
particle

but

vowel ;

rated,
afpi-

without.
witnjland,

as

in its detached

ftate; as, luitt.

heart.
found

alwaysitsvocal

when

followed

by

final mute

as in bathey
fyllable;

in the fame

breathe.
followed

When

the v/ords

by

found,
j in the lafl fyliable it has its afpirate

In all other fituationsof th,when

compound words,
of to

found

which

few

retain the

found

the moft

of words,
fyllablcs
the vocal

in

generalrule is,that

before vowels; except in derivative and

retains the primitive


primitives
; thus Icath/ome
and
the
of tooth
tootlTing originalafpirate
;

of their

confonant

loath,though precedinga

a
though preceding

In

in any middle

found before confonants,and


afpirate

it has the

healthy;
fympathy,
except

as

ureathyand worthy.

vowel.

inflances th is founded

words, thill,
thyme,Thames,

and

as

it

always is

French, like

in

and

/;
fingle

thefe

are

the

Thomas.
Sh

is the proper

This
wherever

is

combination
the proper
zs

in

it has

it appears

ufurpedin

cetaceous

as

reprefented
by ch
In order

French,

much

to

cion and
;

and in

in words

pronounce

it will be

the French

the fame
invariably
the

I have
found

greater number

reprefentative,
by the letters

partial
fecial,
i in
csous

for the found which

mark

and

s.

of

taken

from

an

wherever

the

is

and

to
onlyneceilary

inform

in all words

in ciousand

J/ja/l,
wijh; and

the

s,

machine.
French, as chevalier,
of letters,
which
is no
that
foreigners

our

of this

power

of which

it is

in cialand
ervding

//"?/,

contentious
as capricious,
tious,

precededby another

this combination
properly

ch in the words

never

in

filent. But

the found
words, containing

By

nation ;
tion,zs fufpicion,

fun by

called ejli,
to be found

and

as

It is
imprejfion.

where

to

be found

the
7Z1has uniformly

fame

alfo

in the

found

as

charitc,cherc, "c.
Zh

This

20

I C

R,

Zh
This

found which

it; I
reprefent
Jh. It
is

is

in

I have called izh in the liftof letters,


has hitherto got

have

therefore

added

but

fcmetimes, though

the

an

to

for its

feldom

reprefented
by

termination

confifted of four
the

iaft into one,

two

the French

The
But

found
there

as

mixed

added

to

found,
hard

to

thefe combined

the difference confifts.


of

the

"

and y,

or

foft

word

fame

exa"llythe

make

only three

if it were

as

its

generalmark
"

is

to

primitives
endingin

Ng
always uniform
the fame

to

that of the

as

manner,

as

fpelt
occajun,
givingthe

thus

if

they
of

found

it

ng^

has

ng

in the words

as

mute

the

into

next

is never
be

filent.

to
neceflary

it, its found


a

is

changed

is
fyllable

with only its own


fyllable

the found of the Iaft


g

it lends

yet fometimes

after

it will

Jlrange. zdly. When

range,

flows
generally

luronger

the end of words, and

at

in

next
as long,
fyllable,
pronounced
longer
Jlrmger; which fhould
\ ftrong,
Thefe two,
with
the word
Xong-ger,ftrong-^^r.
younger, pronounced young-_g^^r, are

add the hard

as,

Frenchy;

of them, reducing
fyllables

apparent combination,

ift.Whenever

^,

\x\bang,hanger; wrong,

as

be

firftrule.

the

only exceptions to

To

thefe

the Iaft fyllable


: thefe

to

are

be added

may

likewife fome

linger,
finger,
conger,

anger,

primitivewords

its
if

as

that

the

alfo

with all derivatives,

monger

"c.
fijhmonger,

3dly,All
to

letters is

different founds annexed

are

one

but

oc-ca-fi ;

pronouncingthe

but

in azure;

as

this ftruflure in the French

of

on

z,

i"i

its correlative

correfpondto

ftate to the

written

z%

and

divided

it

that confonant.

of

fiiew wherein
to

thus
fyllables

found

making

as

vowels, afion,
i/ion,
o/ion,
ufion
ejion,

any of the

Jion precededby
This
Bccafton,
cohefton,
divif.on,
exphfmiyinfufion.
and foreigners
are
to avoid pronouncingwords
an

mark,

peculiarmark

no

words

ending in

nge retain the

with the

found
primitive

when
fucceeding
fyllable

added

it,as

All other words ending in ^^r, preJlranger


challenger.
range, ranger ; Jlrange,
; challenge,
ceded
h
ave
of
former
the
the
found
foft
an
n
by
fyllable
"c.
clofing
harbinger,
g or _/,as mejfinger^

Of ConfonantDigraphs.
I have before fliewn
I fhall now

enumerate

founded,in

the fame

largeliftof fimplefounds

the

debt

doubt

ck

crack

attack

gn

fign malign

gn

incip.
gnat
gnaw
g
flegm apothegm
g

All the above


four other

are

where

by

I called Digraphs',

vowels, which

two

two

prefented

to

are

the eye, and but

one

fyllaljle.

bt

gm

marked

inftancesof confonants

filent.

kn

knife

know

k filent.

Im

balm

pfalm

finalg

mb

lamb

limb

mn

hymn

contemn

"

wr

wry

wrong

filentwhen
conftantly

combinations

applied

to

combined

in the fame

different purpofes;and

thefe

fyllable.Befide thefe,there

ch, go,
areyi-,

and

are

wh.

Sc.
This
The

combination

fame

rule which

is fometimes

pointedout

founded
the

true

as

fimples,

in

as

of
pronunciation

feene;

fometimes

as

Ih, as

\n

feoff.

before the different vowels, will ferve

in this cafe alfo,only prefixing


an
j,
3

ki

ka

se

fka

Tvheic

GRAMMAR.

RHETORICAL

is filentbefore

se

and

s!

ko

ku

si

fko

fkii

only in the waxd

/, except

*i

and
(keptic,

itsderivatives.

in the words

charm, chsfus,

founded
Jlrptlc,

a
This

combination

ft or

in three differentways,

pronounced

ift is the

chivalry.The
The

is

compound
found

compound

in
tjhis what prevails

of

to

be found

of t/h,the zd has the found of /f,and


all

the

Englifhwords

in

3d of J?}.
ufe, before

common

all the vowels *.


2d in proper

The

in technical

The

3d

The

words

in

and technical terms

names

terms

and

differfrom the ufual

ufc which

common

adoptedfrom

few other words

the Greek.

derived from

French.

the

of
pronunciation

ch

thefe that

are

follow,

with their derivatives.

chagrin

chamade

chamois

chancre.

champaign (wine)
champignon
chandelier
chevalier
chicane

chivalry
chaife

All words
Jch

and

ch have the

in
terminating
its derivatives,
as

found
general

of ijhyexcept the

:
following

headach. Sec.

hemiftich,conch, anarch, monarch, hierarch,tetrarch,herefiarch,


Lilach,maftich,diftich,
nuch,
euloch, ftomach, founded as i and yacht,where ch is filent,
pronouncedyot.
"

Gh

This
words

combination

is fometimes

as

hard g,

fometimes

It is filent

at

where
following,

of hard
the end

in the

of

at

the

words

beginningof
and

it alTumes the power

founded

The

to

is often

as
filent;

in the

all words.

as
fyllables,

in

high,neigh,ciaugh-ter,
except onlyin

To

cst/gh

chough

enough

laugh

rough

tough;

chuf

enuf

laf

ruf

tuf.

following
"

fliok

lough

hligh;

lok

blithe.

word

facilitatethe

raethod

as

was

I.

in the Irifh pronunciation


not

of this found to foreign


pronunciation
organs,
with
propofedwith regardto the lattery,

before

be formed in the

Vol.

the

"

found
lough,for lake, has a peculiarguttural
whom
it
is
in general
Englifh
organs, by
pronouncedlok,

is

and

ofy"

hiccough Jhough

fame

/,

cof

founded hiccup

'

as

^ho/i,laugh,light.

It has the found

And

founded

manner

there

it will be

to follow
only neceffary

this difference,that

the found of the French J^"


defcribcd,preceding
i

fuited to

as

infteadof

the
a

etch.

ff,f,

22

I C

R.

in
This

is two

combination

who, founded hoo, where


In the fecond the

precedesthe -m,
As

zw

employed;

ways

the

ufelefs.
utterly
diphthongwith the

in tvhen, pronounced as

as

in all founds of this fort the

placethe

h in

Didionary.Thefe

is,that it never

flands for the

while

the

vowels,the

vj

forms

fimpleh,

that follows the h, whofe

vowel

vocal

found,

inftead of before,which
differentufes of wh

as

in

found
afpirate

be

may

it has been

I have

error

reformed

pointedout

by

one

to
great abfurdity

in

markingthofe

fimplerule,which

/; except before the vowel o ; when


it precedes
fimpleafpirate
any o"
in
with
the
them, precededby
as,
diphthongs conjundtion
afpirates;

luhaU

ivheel

hoale

hoel

"while

why,

hoile

hoy;

is filentbefore the vowel

o,

who

whole

whoop.

ho

hole

hop.

as

in

VI.

SECTION
Riiks

pov/cr of

if written hoen.

afpirate
precedesthe

writingafter the w,

founds in the

the other

it has only the


firft,

is

forms

in the

for the

Words.
of EngViJli

Pronunciation

Of Monofyllahks,
RULE.

GENERAL

MONOSYLLABLES

endingin fingleconfonants,have

IIV

nant

marked

; and

in the

or

ftrefson

the confo-

Scheme,
hat

and this,whether

the

bet

fit

confiftsof
monofyllable

but;

mt

2, 3, 4,

as,.
5 letters,

or

led

am

But

their accent

have their firftfounds, as


vowels, with very few exceptions,,

in that cafe the

this rule refers onlyto fuch

fp'it Jlrop
contain but
as
monofyllables

Jlruck,
vowel,

one

"

EXCEPTIONS.

1.

fame

When

found ;

precedesr
as

car,

It has the found


2.

The

vowels

is on

the vowel, which

is thus made

long,thoughit retains the

bar, far.

of
e

the accent

6 in

was,

and i before

wad; and of
r

in

war.

change their found

to

that of

"

as

htr,Jir,
Jlir; pronounced

bur,fur,flur.
3. The

vowel

has the found of / in ;"?;, (yis)0 that of

in

fon (sun) and

"

has its 2d

found in put.

Of

GRAMMAR.

RHETORICAL

i^

0
vowel

The

i. It has
and
.c.k

founds, and

all its three

thefe differentfounds

as
irregular,

is very

for that

changesits found

It likewife

termination.

fame

the

before

has

of u,

and

often

are

has often that of

the found of 6 before

ff, 6

feoff.

mock,

/",

oft, foft ; founded

/(/,

bold, sold.

aft,saft.

Except gold.

folk ;

//,

flroll.
toll,joll,
toll,trolL,
fcroll,
droll,poll,roll.,

;":/,^

bomb

ng^

fong,ftrong,"c.

monk,

"/,

font, front

td,

ford, fword

//",

"/^,

/ mute.
"

6 comb

"

fponk

b filent.

founded

^Excepttong,

tung.

fpunk.

munk,

"

womb

tomb,

"

6 loll,doll,noil.

li wont.

"

chord, cord, lord

"

word.

"

work.

ri,

cork, fork, ftork

rn,

born, horn,

;7,

port, fort,fport

yj,

mofs, glofs,":c.

Except grofs.

y?,

cofl,loft,toft,croft,froft, 6 hoft, ghoft,moft, poft

^}T,

GotBa

"

pork

"c.

morn,

"

6 borne

"

fhort,fnort,fort

\_fignifying
torn,
fuffercd}^

motlT"
u

fworn.

worn,

wort.

"

"

"

it,

corn,

"

brotlT,clotR,frotti,
trotlT,wrota

"

doft.

"

botlT,fortiT,
quotR,flotlT

dotS, raonttl,wortll.

bolt, colt,dolt, "c.


V

This

has

vowel

words,

alwaysits firftfound

where

in the words

as

it has the found of

7"//,
hurl,"c.
pluclc,

endingin
Of Monofyllahles
The
marks

in

mute

that the vowels

The
it

is,it has

has

there is but

where
monofyllables,

vowel

fometimes

and

are

is feldom

to

followed

alwaysits third found, except

when

between

founds

of
monofyllables

in

its fecond, fometimes

lowing
except in the fol-

mute.

confonant

one

their fecond

have

hull,
full,bujh,pujij.
full,

precededby

an

;", and

and

alfo in

there

that

general,but
fort by a mute

vowel u, followed

The

its third found.

the vowel

then

it has the found

; and

by
of

final,

are

ceptions.
ex-

when

mute

e,

o.

EXAMPLES.

Exceptions:
Exceptions:
u.

"

move,

like

here,
pure,

ar

bad

e,

come,

e,

fome, done,

[founded as

one

prove.

"

[pret.of

if written

To

none

where

won],

pe, hav

the

e.

is pronounced like

fhon'e.
gon'e,
"

dove, glove,love, (hove

; in

which

the

lofe,whofe,
o

is founded

n.

wer'e.

mere.

Exceptions:

there,where.

mule.

Exceptions:

rude, rule, prude, and

has

bid,] ga

always the found of

o.

"

all preceded by

an

r,

where

the

6
But

But when

but

vowel,

final or

in

before

ths

beingon

in that cafe not

accent

mufl have,
fyllabie

cording
ac-

its fecond, but its firft(hort found.

barge,farce

flillbeinglengthened,
as,

25

pronounced in fuch

the confonants,the vowel

generalon

Examples. Badge, {a

where the
except fcarce,

e) chance, pence, edge,fince,cringe,dodge, horfe (exceptforce and worfe, u),

the found of

curfe,

confonants, the

precededby two

is

mute

the rule before laid down, not

to

has

GRAMMAR.

RHETORICAL

drudge, "c.

thofe
; and
exceptedwords ending in ange, as range, change, ftrange
found
in
but
their
fecond
clothe, "c. where the vowels have
;
as bathe, blithe,
ending in tlie,
the laftcafe, tb ought to be confidered only as a fingle
letter,beingbut a fimplefound marked by
mufl: be

this rule

From

letters.

two

in
ending
Of Moncfyllabks
ends
monofyllable
Englifti

No

he, fhe, we,

words

has
The

who,

all other

ii^n

at

the end of any

is

and

vowel

and

to

ends

and

fro,pro

The

con.

of

and

any

is

'

words

as

its third found.

in the

monofyllable
except

The

the, when
particle

phatic,
em-

go,

try,

ho, I6, no,

has the found

to
particle

lu

be found

in fome technical

fry,fhy,pronounced

of

following: bo,

the word

only to

in the words

by _y, as
placefupplied

except
monofyllable,

the end

word,
Englifli

the

itfelf. In fuch

it is to have
precedes

which

the fecond found

monofyllablebut

no

'

fecond,the, founded fhort.

its

times

havingits

with
monofyllables

ends

never
fingle

never

foreignwords,

do ;

two,

be,

at

alway in
The

ye,

me,

a
particle

it has its third found.

where

its third found ;

vowel
terms,

and

pronounced at

is never
fingle,

e, when

vowel

The

that the vowel

pronounced.

are

the

pronounced,except

it only marks

fea,plea,"c.

pea, tea,

in

Voixds that

or

/oo,fometimes

of u,

so,

tho' ;

wo,

if written

as

in
fpelt

tu.

the former way,

pronouncedlo.

and

But there
of them

are

that
monofyllables

many

Ay

has

always the

Aw

has

always the

Ea

has the found

end in

found of

as,

day,pray

found of

as,

daw,

vowels, though there

two

I fhall call digraphs,


to

Thefe

uttered.

them
diftinguifh
;

from

be but the found of one

diphthongs.

except in the affirmative particle


ay.
'

saw.

,
.

Ee

the fame

Ey

has the found

le off

as.

as,

doe,

as,

woo,

Ou

you

Ow

of e;

tea,

as,

they,grey

as,

not

much

Vol.

more

I.

except

e,

key

ley.

'

;"

"
.

diph. thou.
bl6w, glow, bow

(to fhoot with),and

in which

diphthong;

"

it is

bow

all other

(an

of

act

monofyllables
except
reverence),
cow,

the

followinc;,

how, plow, now,

vow.

blue,clue, ":c. ; except


Ue after

inflead of its foft one,


number

and

coo.

mentioned.

The

sea.

foe ; except fhoe.


too,

brow,
as,

He, die.

Oe

Ue

fee,thee.

as,

Oo

as,

of

of double

vowels,

I
confiderable,
as

or

as

rue,
g

true, where

ferves

only to

rogue, vogue

digraphs,to

fhall (hew

it has the found

(how

; and

be found

of

after r,

that the g is to have

after q the found


at

the

of/,

as

its hard
as

fore
be-

was

found

pique.

of monofyllables,
is
beginning

in their order.
"

Ai

ARHETORICALGRAMiMAR.

26
Ai

aid,air,"c.

Au

in the word

Aw

as

Ea

ear, eat, "c.

always the

this has

aunt,

in the word

found of the fecond

awl.

in awe,

the fame

Always

except when

e,

it

eel, e'en (foreven),e'er (forever).

Ei

eight.
oaf, oak, "c.

Oo

ooze.

Ow

owe,

Oi,
But
r.re as

Ai

confonant

in

are

ou,

always true

diphthongsat the

of

the

the number

follow

diphthongonlyin

own.

always 6.

digraphsin

maid, pain, sail,"c.

Au

caught,fraud, vaunt.

bawl, dawn,

Ay

days,prays,

Ea

leaf,fpealc,
mean,

"c.

d, dead, head,

a,

of

except

and in

is much
monofyllables

their founds^

greater, and

the found

to

fpear,Uz.

follow the

tear, wear,

the laft of

e.

ea

realm, dealt,search,"c.

The

in

have

of

in that cafe is

confonant,
fingle

in

the found

of

"',as,

to

read, plead,"c. follow


reft in r,

The

e.

as

dear,near,

In
the two

firfthaving the found of e,

all otliersthat of

e.

generallythe found

placedfor

the moll part

the found

of

and

In

the third found.

and hearth have

Heart

others

confonants, it has

two

the law eftablifhed that the accent

'

e.

exceptions
;

the found

by

of

generalrule.

All other

is followed

in

read),bread, dread, ftead,tread,

(pret.of To

fwear, have

fvveat,threat, and great, are

k, fleak,break, have

sez.

ends
fyllable

followingin

The

bear,pear,

the

ending in

(a metal),read

have

fays,foimded

generalwhen

followingwords

generalrule.

the

when

middle

Always
"c.

lead

fpread,which

/,

beginningof monofyllables,
as, oil,out.

Always a, except faid,founded sed.


ftaunch.
Except h.iunt,draught,laugh,jaunt,flaunt,
a.
Always

lawn.

except in the

r,

owl.

Aw

But

by another

rule before laid down.

eye.
o

Oa

followed

precedesr

eartR^,
earl',
accordingto
fyllable
; as, earn',

Ee

Ey

a.

aught.

accordingto

the confonants

on

This

a.

of e,

rule has the

as,

following

exceptions.
2dly, In

beaft,feaft,"c.

y?,
; except
wreath; and
3dly, In th, heatiT,fheattT,
Ee
Ei

as

bleed,fteel,
fleet,"c.

alwayse;

as,

alwayse;

heir,"c.
as, feign,

Ew

le

6
o

with
;

to the

rule.
general

final,breathe.

except been, founded

and
; except height

bm.

founded
Height,

hite and

flite,
^i filent.

Always u, except fliew'd and (hewn, pronouncedfhod and fhon,as 6..


field,
fiend,"c.
and.
grief,
Exceptions: friend,fierce (foundedferce),
pierce,
tierce,
sleve, pronounced

Go

breaft

"c.
; lewd, fiew'd,

The

Oa

all conform

ending in ch, as teach, preach,which

l(t.Words

siv.

of verbs
preterit

boat, load, groan,


poor,

ending in ;V, as die, lie,makes

"c.

food,cool,"c.

all pronouncedas

"

died,lied.

Excep. broad, groat ; a.


Excep. hood, good, flood,wood, look, took,foot,foot,wool
-

-door,floor; h

"

and blood, flood, as


5

u,

Oa

RHETORICAL

GRAMMAR.

27

a
as
loud, gout, "c.
Exceptions: cough (cof),rough (ruf),
diphtliong,
generally
touch,yoiing,j
mould, court, though,dough, fource,
four,mourn,
fcourge,
tough (tiif),

is

Ou

alio

mould;

"

through,your, youth, wound;

"

could, fhould,would

"

of 6

has the found

Ovv

endingin

verbs

it is

where
Ua

oiu,

as

digraph,the

and

in all the

flow'd,flown,grown,

diphthong;and

guard is

in

bo'wl,rowl,

in

is fo

(/filent)

"

"c. except

all other

on

pronouncedbat,brat, "c.
{gh filent)
of monofyllabic
and participles
preterits

bought,brought,fought,nought,fought,thought;

only the verbs, to

plow,

vow,

cow,

occafions,
as brown, fowl, "c.

being filent;but

after g it is

alwaysa diphthong,as fquall,

quart, "c.

digraphafter

in

guefs,gueft;

Ue

is

Ui

digraphin build,built,guilt,v/ith

of

in the middle

is

the found

alwaysforms
fyllable

found

twice ; and is never

diphthongafter q,

as

in

quell.

of 1.

Qiiilt,a diphthong. Guide, guile,


Juice,bruife,cruife,fruit ;^ digraphs,

the found

with
W

but

with diphthongfounds.
gyide,gyile,
of o.
Suit,as if written syot, a diphthong.

if written

as

as

g,

in the middle of

found

never

but

diphthongwith

after the confonants

that

s, t, and

as

fwain,

in

tlT.

it in the fame fyllable,


as its
following
fituatlon is alwaysfupplied
by the vowel /.

with
fyllables

placein formingdiphthongsin

followingvowel,

the

vowel

Of MonofyUabksformed by Diphthongs.

-blue.

before

of the vowels

Two

But

thefe founds

as

mentioned
are

in

in

are

generalreprefentedby

treatedof under the head of vowels, there is


other
The
It

words,

firuation in words
to
exceptions

Ou

words

occafion

no

diphthongsare ci,ou, and fuch as are formed by


diphthongoi is marked alfo by oy, and ou by ow

at the end of

diphthongs,which
reality

and

oy

and nv,

it has

as

been the cuftom

for
purelyEnglifh,

this rule

are

the pronouns

other

no

in

to

mouth,

as

before enumerated

any other combination

in

the y and

writing

"

When

wag,

wan,

in

have

been

here.

The

fupplyingthe placeof

to

caprice.The

but that of

i and

in that

let thofe vowels appear

only-

found,

fame

and

of digraphs. Neither
treating

are

found, as broil,moift,boy,joys"

alwaysdiphthongsexcept

thefe founds

of

is

ever

in the

reprefented
by

of letters.

precedesa,

and

ym.

Of Diphtho}igs
formedby
Wa.

fightand

and y.

reafon that appears

owl, have alfo the fame

in

of them

fayany thingmore

alwaysdiphthongs,and prefervealwaysthe

are

fingleletter each,

never

and
/, thou.,

are

wafp,

that vowel

\V.

has its firftfound

only in

the

words
following

waft,

wax.

terminated
by confonants, it has cither the Ihort found of
monofyllablcs
6), as wad, was, wat, wa(h, watch ; or it has the full longfound, according

In all other

(the fame
to

/,

as

the rules before laid down


as

for the vowel

ift.When

it

precedesr,

as

war,

warn

or

walk, wall.

When

the

laid down

ends
monofyllable

in mute

e,

the vowel

for it in its fimpleftate,


and has

united with

fore
follows the rule be-

alwaysits fecond found ;

as

wage,

wade,,

ware.

Whea

GRAMMAR,

RHETORICAL

28

a digraph
commencing with a, the fame rule is obferved
precedes
laid down for fuch digraph; as, way, wail, "c.
follows the laws of the fimplevowel e ; before fuigle
or
71ie diphthongwe

When

We.

IV

alwaysits firftfound,

it has

nants

is followed

confonant

by a

of lirfte,

found

Ex.

"

It

weak,

precedes

word

whey,

before

"

except

into

diphthonghas

in the word

It unites

wih

where

Some
of the

Two

the word

ght,hi, and

as

found

in the

in all words

in the

its derivatives

and

ciation
pronun-

but this is againfl


analogy.
wire.

wield.

word
antiquated

where

wifh, "c.

The

It is

wot.

is followed

changed

word, work,

by r; as,
worn
Except the participles

all words

ending

in

and

mute,

as

with

"

in the word
u

woad

with

"

o, in woo,

(a hurt),and

wound

in would,

woof,

wood, wool,

"

of To
wound, participle

wind,

diphthongsformed by iv are precededby / or tlT,in which cafe they follow the rules
fimplediphthongs;as, twain, twang, twelve, twig, twin, twine,twirl (twerl),tlTwart.
diphthong,founded

is no

diphthonghas

This
before

Ye.

wit,wing,

as

wife, wine,

as,

firft", wurd, wurk, "c.


and

wo

I,

nd; as, wight, wild, wind.

only in the word

that

its firftfound
and

of

called wind,
generally

it is

as

found

the

to.

formed by
Of Diphthc7igs
Ya.

wealth.

its diphthongfound.

has

ou

confonants,e

two

it precedes cy
afpirate

an

of

womb.

only

founded wud, wul


-

founded

in the word

is that

"c.

wore,

It is

(wun),

won

world,worfe, "c.
/worn, 6; as alfo
woke,

the

fimplevowel /.

it has

but e, and

vowel

no

in this

before

"

With

weed.

alwaysits fecond

the final e, it has

The

diphthong

pronounced fliortwith

its general
found

follows,as

it

fwCar

wear,

confonants

the terminations

before

It unites with
Wo.

as

week,

as

the laws of the

of Viind is controverted,
With

laws

whofe

e ;

r,

of e,

double

or

as

is

double confo-

this

e.

fingle

Before

in which

only word

fir.ale is ivere, which

digraphea,

diphthongfollows

This

Wi.

wean

the

with the found

as

mute

The

before

was

wer.

It unites itfelfwith
e-

with

wed, weft.

as

Has

y^'^^^
ya'rn
j before

'"

the found of

yean, year;

of

found of 6 in
Yi.

Yield.

Yo.

Yon.
yung
1^

"

the found

forms

of

of

an

It follows

yacht,pronounced yot.
e

before

in yawn,

aw

in the affirmation

yell,yelk,yeft,
yet.

Before //, it has the found

never

ye

yelk,pronouncedyokeof

6 v/ith

middle of

in

final in yare

in the pronoun

in yearn,

of
e

Y.

It is founded

or
as

the

rule of

yawl.

conjundionyea
i

in yes,

yis;and

of

in

has the

egg.

as

you, your,

: except
yiiuth

young,

pronounced

final,as yoke, yore.

diphthongbut

when

it

beginsa

word

or words its placeis alwaysfupplied


fyllables
by

followed
an

by

another

vowel;

SECTION

in the

GRAMMAR.

RHETORICAL

29

VII.

SECTION

Of Bijfyllabks.
A S
^"^

the

words
of Englifli
pronunciation

firftplaceto have
with

Accent

us

means

this
monofyllables

In

We

When

confonants.

the

on

in the few inftanccs where

in
neceflary

the

letterof

one

fyllable,

word.

is called the
diftinguiflied
the
monofyllables

in

it is

ftrefs of the voice upon

certain

in words of
be called the accented letter;

may

alreadyfeen

have

all the other letters in

the letter fo

contains

which

than

more

no

it from
diftinguiflies

which

is ciiiefly
rei^ulated
by accent, it will be

idea of that term.


precife

accented

efFeiSlof accent,

confonant,the vowels

have

more

one,

it is laid on

vowels

that

fyllable.
accordingas

firftfound, except

uniformlytheir

is fubftituted in the

the found of another vowel

than
fyllables

of that

room

or

only

prefented

to the eye.

When
to

the
rules

It is

is

accent

on

alreadylaid

vowel, it has fomctimes

down, but

never

to obferve,that
onlyneceftliry

all other

of

words,

the fame laws of

before

were

as

fecond, fometimes

its

its third

its firft,
exceptingonly the vowel

laid down

accent

with

hold

with

"?

which
difcovering

And

is the

in
fyllable

all words

found,

the accented

In
regardto monofyllables.
to

of more
confifting

ing
accord-

few inftances.

pointout

lables
fyl-

order to

the

means

than
fyllables

one.

firftwith

:
regardto diflyllables
have the accent
all fimpledifTyllables

Almoft

for the moft part compound


fuch

accented

regardto

afcertain the pronunciationof thofe words, the firftobjecttherefore muft be


of

in

as,

words, made by

ab, ac, ad, at, com,

de, dif,em,

con,

on

the

and
firft,

thofe which

have

borrowed
or
prefix
prepofition
chiefly
en,

e, ex,

im, in,ob, op,

it on
from

the laftare
the Latin ;

per, pre, pro, re,

fe,fub,

admit
affirm
Examples : abhor
fur, tranf,"c."
dece^ive,
commen
dlfa'rm,
ce, condudt',
emba'rk (pronouncedimba^rlc),
enchant' (inchant'),
exa'lt,
obfcu're,
impa'ir,
Inci'tc,
oppo'fe,
,

una'rm.
recant',
feclu'de,
permit',
propo'fe,
fubmit',
transfo'rm,
furve'y,
Befide thefe

Examples

there

of the latterhave

with regard
to the former

ift,Where
accent

on

the

the

of Englifli
following
growth ; a, be, for, fore,mif, out,
aba'fe,
befo're,
outdo',una'rm,"c. All words
forget',
forewa'rn,
mifgiv'e,
are

the verb and


and
firft,

the accent
or

Roman
the

noun

the verbs

on

for the moft part

on

the laftfyllable
; but there

are

un

"

pounded
com-

exceptions

prefixes.
are

exprefled
by the

the laftfyllable,
as

fame word, the

may

nouns

be feen in the

have

the
frequently

followinglift.

GRAMMAR.

Except the
and

and

one

are

nouns

almoft
lift,

above

all other words

the fame

word, have

in the fame

the accent

the

that is, where the verbs


predicament,
fame; fuch as, aflault,
aflent,
affront,

repofe,"c.
attire,
array, difplay,
2.

and

The
fuch

rule
nouns

refers chiefly
to verbs,
placingthe accent on the laft of compound diiTyllables,
and other parts of fpeech,'Jie genehave been juftmentioned ; in other nouns
ral

of
as

the firftfyllable
chiefly
prevails
; fuch as, concord, conquer,

law of

having the accent on


And
mal, diftant,
extant, "c.

even

in the words

formed

with

the

dif-

prefix
out, the accent
Englifli

is

the firftof all other words ; as,

to outdo',
outbid',
only,and on
fome
verbs
have
the
alfo
which
"c.
There
are
accent
on
compound
o
ut'rage,
out'cry,
;
and
others
be
learned
few
ufe.
to
a
firftfyllable,
fuch as, perjure,
conjure,
by
injure,

of verbs
the laftfyllable

placedon
"c.

an

the

Rules
When

confonants

two

feen

are

joinedto the firftvowel, and


fonant

is doubled,as,

confonant

When

the

which

en

in
together

the Accent is laid in

Dijfyllables.

the middle of fuch words, the firftof thefe is ufually

laft to the latter; in which

cafe the accent

"c.
am'ber, bab'ler,dif'cord,
chear'ful,
ab'fent,

Ex.

of verbs with

the Letter

out
forfinding

This

is

on

the former

is alwaysthe cafe when

"c. except
ad'der,baffle,beg'gar,
bet'ter,
cher'ry,
col'lege,

con-

the

in the cafe

prefixes, before mentioned.


as

there is but

confonant

one

in the

middle,the

is in

accent

the

on
general

vowel,
preceding

Sometimes indeed
dow'er, "c.
ague, audit,bible,booty,cider,criiel,
and accented ; as, blem'-ifti,
cher'-ifti,
chol'-er,.
the fingle
confonant is taken into the firftfyllable,

diphthong,or digraph;

as,

pun'-ilh,
rad'-iflj,
fin'-ew,
fam'-ifli,
ten'-ant,he.
pal'-ace,
per'-il,
hab'-it,
thefe is not
When
were

but the number

of

great,and muft be learned by ufe.


is

the accent

laid down

for

on

the laft fyllable,


its feat may

be known

the
by obferving

fame

rules as

monofyllables.

Of Pelyfyllabks.
As the accent

of

is chiefly
determined by
polyfyllables

which
of thofe final fyllables
the feat of the accent

by

names,

is referable to

I fliall
make

are

them.

moft
As

common

the final fyllable,


I fhall enter
in

I fliallhave

into

an

amination
ex-

language,and fhew in what way


the fcveral fyloccafion to diftinguifli
lables
our

ufe of the technicalLatin terms

for that

purpofe,and

call the laft

fyllable

for

is

though there

GRAM

RHETORICAL

32

the eye

to
prefented

one

into the articulation of the former

taken

confider it in the ufual way

fyllable
; but

they follow their


difcriminable

hie

part

formed
adjectives

as,

the

it is either when
antepenult,

confonants

two

All

words
triflyllabic

the word

have

the

follows the primitive,as,

is

farther back

no

derivable
advifable,

or

that fituation,
delec'table,
refran'gible.
as, intrac'table,

in
together

come

verbs, in general

the accent

"

when

from

dif'putable
Except, remediable,irrep'arable,
; from
in polyfyllables
is thrown
as far back
as the fourth

accent

and when
fifthfyllables
mon'ofyllable
; as, am'icable,violable,

than

are

1 (hall

aborifliable,
dif'ciplinable,
reproveable,
prop'agable,

"c.
prop'agate,

reprove,

In generalthe
difpiite.
rem'edy,repair,
and

accent

RULE.

for the mod

are

in their accent;
primitives

from

final mute, and the hi

the feat of the

out
pointing

in

R.

forminga fyllable.

as

in
terminating

the words

the end, yet it is only

at

GENERAL

As

accent

the

on

to diffy!'Antepenult,
except compounds by prefixes

lables 3 as, unable, unftablc.


In
All
The

words have
trfflyllabic
have
polyfyllables

other

the
the

accent

cle.
vehicle.
antepenult.Examp. mir'acle,or'acle,

the

on

farther back; as, tab'ernacle,


con'venticle,
receptacle,

accent

iVC.

In
To
that

die,flc,glc,klc,pie,tie.

all thefe terminations is to be

theydo

appliedthe fame obfervation


conftitute fyllables,
but are united with
really

not

the intervention

founds,.without
There

are

few

words

of

in any
fyllables

two

immediatelyprecedingthem
"c.
buc'kle,
pur'ple,
tac'kle,
ap'ple,
is

the letter

on

There

are

thefe are,

and

fourth

of the
polyfyllables

few

made

was

former

with

regardto hie,

only in their confonant

of any vowel.
than

more

that
the

; as,

termination

of the

above terminations,and

the

cent
ac-

fnaf 'fle,
cradle,fad'dle,
eagle,ftrug'gle,

picwhich

have the

and
man'ciple,prin'ciple,
quad'ruple,
fex'tuple,

all in

accent

on

upU. One

the

antepenult.
;

has it upon

the

back, participle.
fyllable
In

ure.

in ure the accent


is on the antepenult,
the fourth;
or farther back on
polyfyllables
terminating
ar'chiteflure ; except when
cy'nofure,
judicature,
leg'iflature,
theyfollow their primitives,
as,

In
as,

cncloTure,intermix'ture.
In

ate.
RULE.

GENERAL

in ate have for the moft part the accent


terminating
"c. except when two
bate,im'precate,
liquidate,
multip'licate,
Words

as,

the

antepenult.Examp. rep'roprecedethe laft fyllable;

confonants

confum'mate, conftel'late.

When
in

the vowel
a

precedes
ate,

diphthongfound

as,

to

whatever
confonant
lable
may precedeit,it unites with the laft fylcalum'niate,"c. which are not
affociate,
irradiate,
collegiate,

accordingto
pronounced as four fyllables,
Ihate,irra-dyate.
The
upon.
an

on

ate
fyllable

On

alTocic't
;

other
to

at

the end

of verbs

is

the French

pronounced ate,

occafions it has the found of

articulate

mode, af-foci-ate,ir-ra-di-ate;

as,

to

with

the found

aggregate"

an

of

but aflb-

i, though not

aggreget

; to

dwelt

afibcii'itc
"

(a verb), articulet (an adjedive).


In

GRAMMAR.

RHETORICAL

33

In ive.

termination in

This

fhort with

is alwaysfounded
polyfyllables

1,

Iv.

fme.
alwaysthe accent

in f.vehave

Words

vowel

termination, whether

or

penult,and

the

on

confonantj

as,

the letter immediately


that
preceding

on

fubmirfive,
adhelive,repuKfive,
inciufive,
the.

thofe in tive have

But

for the moft

the accent

part

the

on

or
antepenult,

flillfarther back.

communicative, "c.
vindic'ative,
rel'ative,
fignificative,
Examples: neg'ative,
from evade, decide. 2dly,
decifive,
they follow primitives
; as, evafive,
Exceptions: ift,When
atten'tive,
confonants precedethe final; as, calefac'tive,
prefump'tlve,
Where
afler'tive,
two
digeffub'ftance.
which
follows its primitive
tive ; except fub'ftantive,
the laft in tive,except onlyin the word
is never
The accent
on
In

it

alwaysfollows

the accent

ing.

of
participle

beingthe termination of the a"tive

This

recitative.

and is
of the primitive,

all verbs, it is

to fay,that
onlyneceffjry

itfelfaccented.

never

In ca].

endingIn

All words

the antepenult.
on
invariably
mefyllab'ical,
; as, laical,

the accent

calhivs

he.
thod'ical,
In ial.
termination is alwaysfounded

This
in

diphthong;
by

or

/, it is

no

"

letter if

longera

of all words

accent

vowel

fyllable,
unitingitfelfwith

or

diphthong,but

has the

found oi

the

the found

confonant
preceding

yal.

But when

ceded
pre-

fubJhal,as, judicial,
artificial,

fubftanfhal.
pronounced, judifhal,

reverential
ftantial,
The

one

as

with
la-bial,
cor-dia!,conge-nial,
minifte-rial,

as

in thefe terminations

confonant, or
fingle

on

is

on

the former

the

of

on
penult,immediately

two

confonants

as,

the

preceding

conconnu'-biai,

creden'-tial.
viv'-ial,
It has the
verbs

accent

/, and

on

fo forms

fyllables,
onlyin

two

the words

deni-al,decri-al

"

from the

deny',decry'.
In

This

beinga

termination of

fo formed

fchatall words

formed
adje"5lives

retain the

/"/.
from

it is onlynecefTary
to obferve,
fubftantives,

of their primitives
; as,

accent

won'der-ful.
reveng'e-ful,

In ian.
This

termination

founded
found
own

with

the

letter c before it is

logiQian,academiflian,with

the

tertian,
gentian; except when

; a?,

accent

pronouncedflian ;
on

precededby

the
an

confonant.

j, as,

as,

logic'ian,
acadcmic'ian,
With

it has the

where
chriftian,
fuftianf;

fame

has its

found.
With

With
luvian

precedingit,it has the found oi j ; as, comedian, collegian.


all other letters it forms a diphthong;as, academian, fatur'nian,
dihirtorian,
librarian,
and the accent
is on the letterimmediately
whether vowel or
precedingthe laft fyllabL-,
n

or

confonant.
Vol.

I.

la

RHETORICAL

34

GRAMMAR.
In

WorJs

precedingconfonant;

the

joined

to

elifionof the vowel

an
general

in this termination have- in

en,

fo that the letter" is immediately

e^

lead'n,hid'd'n,fod'dn (exceptfudden, fulien,


and

as,

Sec.
chos'n,haft'n,glift'n.
barren),

precededby ot the vowel


regimen,fpecimen. The

When
women,

all fubHantives

except tolc'n,and

precededby

other confonants

all the

with

chicken, linnen

when

fame

it forms

therefore

pronounced,and

is

a
fylhble;as, hymen,
brethren.
And
firen,
in
warren,

; as,

den,
garden (oftenill pronounced, gard'n),burin
and
ven
ending
as, heav'n, rav'n, doa'^n,
"",
; as,

all

niizz'n.
When

the

is

ai

pronounced as

(pronounced wimniin),

is

found

the
fyllable

except thofe in

warrin, "c.

changed

men

in

as,

burdin, women

hymen, fpecimen,acuWn,

as,

to

"c.
In ion.
All words
which

the

to be

is

ton

pronounced

as

the

million with two,


confonants
The

it. Thus

is upon

accent

as,

and

pronouncedas
"c.
clar'ion,
opin'ion,

vowel

is either

of two

that

the

on

if written

the
immediately
preceding

founds of the vowels

it is doubled
fingle,

but

in

the
/,has exaflly

one

mod

Here

of
it is

pronouncing

fame

found

as

confonant, precedingion,
fingle
as

as

in the above

inflances,

or
quater'nion,
fepten'trion
3

'n

"

on

the

confonant ; as, deeurion,occafwn, communion.

in

before this termination

afion

efion

pronounced occa'zhun

but

"

thus, vermillyun.It is the fame with the other

Terminations

The

i.as

firftof three confonants;

or

laft fyllable,
with

gabion,vermilion, million.

precedesbe

vermilion,though it

is

feat of the accent


the former

on

confonant

into the

precedingconfonant

the

diphthong. Examples

obferved,that though the

when

or

isn take

terminatingin

are

Jion.

as

follow

adhe'zhun

ofion

ifion

desi'zhun

ufion

confu^zhun.

explozhun

the found is no longerz^/^" but _/""";


7?tf",
preceding
fion.
Except onlywhere the accent is on s preceded
as emulTion, expan'fion,
fubmerfion,
compaf
derifion,
pronouncedas if written,
by the vowel /,and then it has ftillthe found zhun ; as, incifion,

But

the

when

is

accent

any confonant

on

deciz'zhun,deriz'zhun.
In tion.
This

is

termination

vowels
preceding

are

alwaysfounded /hun,except
follow

as

When

//c",
precedes

"c.
tion, fubfcrip'tion,
when

it is

and
tfliun,

The

0-

ition

etion

precededby

an

or

this holds conftant with

in ion has

the accent

is on

as,

the

regard
alwaysthe found of u

all words

and

imperfec'tion,
fatisfac'tion,
injunc'-

only cafe

commixtion
digellion,
to

revolu fhun.

devolhun

that ; as,

flillpronounced Jhun; and


s

s, and the founds of the

ution ;

otion

un
poslfh

approba'fhunreplefhun

confonant

precededby an

ation

pronounced

when

"

where

it is founded

is
tj/iun,

commix'pronounced,diges'tlhun,

of that clafs.

is not

pronounced yin, but

yun.

In

GRAMMAR.

RHETORICAL

In
in eer have the
All polyfyllables
As
fyllable.

one

accent

and

cer

the

on

"

"

derived the
in

And
aftroKoger,
getig'rapher.
is

accent

of e,

never

precededby

Ger

cafes

In moft other cafes its fofc found

the fourth

on

compound verbs;

changed into

^ in the former

words

few

is

is for the moft part

accent

the laftbut in

on

In all other

er.

vk'ay, cr.

in the
\erbs, or adjedives

from

in their accent;
tiieirprimitives

wifer, foberer.

romancer,

not
polyfyllables

The

formed

nouns

follow
fyllable,

the addition of that

by

pronouncedin

the fame

er.

beingfor the moft part

terminatingin er,

racer,

In

have alfo thofe in ier when

domine''er cavalic'r,
cordelie'r
mufkete'er,
; founded

degreemarked
comparative
as,

icr.

laft,as

In
Words

35

the

antepenult.
; as, fcav'enger,

fal'amander.
fyllable;
as, al'abafter,

infer';when
refer',

as,

and founded

u,

on

ur;

romanfur, falamandur.

as,

fyllable
alwayshas its own hard found ;
as, manager, dowager,danger,manger ;
"

it has the found

a?,

dag'ger,
brag'ger.

except, anger,

finger,

in
primitives
ling-gur. Some retain the found
linger pronounced,ang-gur, fing-gur,
fing-ur,
ring-ur. Conger, and monger,
finger,
ringer pronounced, fling-ur,
tng; as, flinger,
of their

"

"

with its derivatives


The

pronounced,cong-gur,

are

terminating
evy

is

alwaysfounded

ur.

In
When

or

precededby

or.

confonant
diphthongwith it,takingthe preceding

by

vowel,

is

the accent

verbs,follow

from

occafions the accent

confonant

precededby a

Sor

/ it forms

the vowel

"c.
fyllable;
as, fenior,inferior,

into the

when

is

"c.
filh-mung-gur,

mung-gur,

the

the

on

be

that

on

confonant, except con'feiTor;

rived
dein tor, being moftly
words
nouns
tranflator,
ded'icator,
primitives;
equiv'ocator,
as,

antepenult.While

of

accent

to

their

"c.
All terminations in
the termination

tfar

or

as,

pronouncedur;

are

neighbur,behaviur

as,
"

In

beingfor
ending in hfsand nefs,
Polyfyllables
or

other

retain
fubft^mtives,

feniur,dedicatur.

fame is to be obferved in

efi.
the moft

part fubftantives derived from

of their primitives
; as,

the accent

The

fpelr,
neighbour,behaviour.

adjeflives

rem'edilefs
ran'fomlefs,
mer'cilefs,

"

"c.
wick'ednefs, inquif'itivenefs,
def'picablenefs,
The

laft

"c.
afiefs',
when
"_/},

has
fyllable

the

In others, as,

accent

only

difTyllable,
compound words;

as,

oui

has the vowels

takes the confonant


reous,

ethereous

"

or

is

on

the

penult.

oia.

it,itforms
immediatelypreceding

immediatelybefore

deprefs',
exprefs',

wickednifs,duchifs,5cc.
In

When

as,

the accent
duch'efs (exceptnobiefs'),
god'defs,
lar'gcfs,

accented,is founded //};

not

in

thofe vowels

into the

diphthongwith them, and


laft fyllable;
fuccedaas, ceriileous,
a

nefarious,"c. pronounced as
abftemioui,
fymphonious,

if written,ccru-lyus,

abfte-myus,"c.
But wlien
as

if written

/ are preceded'lya r or /, ^he laft fyllable


is not a diphthong,but is pronounced
e or
Jhin; as, herbaceous,
fentcn'tious"
oftenUlious,
pronouncedas if written,
iagacigus,

"c,
fenten-flius,
herba-fhus^
In

36

RHETORICAL

A
In all the terminations

fonant, taken
then

the

into

is laid

accent

in

ious, the

or

eou"

laft

the

GRAMMAR.

the vowel

con-

precedes that confonant, and

hideous, pernicious, rclig'ious,


"c,
propit'ious,

as,

the letter immediately


the
precedino-

on

fyllabl",
except only where

that confonant

on

is

accent

"c.
pronounced, hid'-yus,
pernifli'-us,
On

the
occafions,

other

for the moft part is on

accent

voluminous;
mirac'ulous,

except when

"

the

confonants

two

antepenult.
; as, friv'olous,
glob'ulous,

interfere

tremend'ous,concin'nous,

as,

"

enor'mous.
The

termination

alwaysfounded

is

oui

us

and is never

word

rendez.'

pronouncedrondevoo.

VDus,

In
in Mt
Polyfyllables

luxuriant,Sec.
but

"

accented but in the French

the accent

have

Except when

has
prot'eftant

the

accent

the

on

confonants

two

rec'reant,
antepenult.
; as, pred'icant,
extrav'agant,

in the words, confidant',


nor
complaifant';
two

nouns

"

But

pen'dent,"c.
retain the

accent

the confonant

on

laid

never

ant

on

in

in

cept
expolyfyllables,

compound verbs, fuch

as

ent.

confonant

any

precedingfuch

precedingent except

termination

m,

forming

deincum'bent,exer'cent,

; as,

terminatingin meni, being in generalfubftantives derived from verbs,


without regardto this rule; as, eftab lifhment,aflon'ifliment,
primitives,

words

of their

accent

"c.
appel'Iant,
trium'phant,

as,

"

diflyllables,
except
the Levant'.
gallant',

In

the

is

accent

on

in bent,cent, dent,or
terminating
Polyfyllables
tnent, have

in the middle

meet

the firft. The

on

recant',enchant'; and
decant',

ant.

embar'raffment.
When

the

vowel

confonant
fingle

the

preceding/'or

precedesent

When

precedesany
it forms

terminations,the

of thefe

the former of two,


a

with
fyllable

or

it ; as,

three

is

accent

on

the

antepenult,either

beneficent,com'pliment,"c.

as,

obedient, lenient,diffil'ient,
confen'tient,

"c.
Words
"c.

in lent have

except when

"

alwaysthe
ll'smeet;

two

accent

on

the

antepenult.
purulent,
; as, benev'olcnt,flat'ulent,

to
attol'lent;
repcl'lent,

as,

which

alfo the word

ex'cellent is

an

exception.
All words

in

ment

too, that

are

derived,have

not

the accent

en

the

antepenult.
; as, lig'ament,

tes'tament.
laft fyllable
is never

The

but in

accented

dilTyllables.
In

in
terminating

Words

ejl.

ej},beingfor the mofl: part

in the fuperlative
degree,retain
adjectives

the

accents

of their primitives.
In
formed

ijl.

and
adjecllves,
rationalift,
mor'alift,
primitives;
as, an'nalift,
loy'alift.

They

are

chiefly
nouns,

from

other

nouns

or

retain the accent

of their

In^.
There

arc

perhapsnot
ay

"

In
"c.

more

words

lefs than

an

in the

Englifli
languageterminatingin

this letter,than

in any other ;

eighthpart of the whole.

liable compound
difl)
have
Polyfyllables

verbs and

the

accent

nouns

on

the

laft;as, delay',difplay',
array',
"c.
fac'urday,
antepenult.
caft'away,
; as, yes'tcrday,
the

accent

is

on

the

^"Words endingin

chiromancy

of the

the accent
The

But when
the

is

accent

accent

"

in

Words

R.

37

derived

as,

words;

as,

"c.
dcmoc'racy,
ariftoc'racy,

"c. :
rar'efy,
ed'ify,
fecun'dify,

as,

and

"

its firflfound; as,

againft

even

perfoa'ify,
divcrTifyhorn perTonand

diverfe.

but
philos'ophy,
at'rophy
;

ftiU

antepenult.

the

on

accent

genearogy,
etymology,"c.
antepenult.
; as, prod'igy,
when
another^;
as, fbaggy,
foggy,"c.
precededby
foft^,except
the

on

It has alwaysthe found of

^Ij

confonants

two

antepenult,
;

the

on

in
primitives

has the

Likewife

|-y"

floppedby

fy has always its fecond found.


by phy,y has
fy is reprefented

or
tain
refubftantives made out of verbs, nouns,
adjeiftives,
being in general
"c.
in''timacy,
legit'imacy,
bril'liancy,
primitives
j as, appliancy,
back, to the fourth fyHable;as, nec'romancy,
is thrown
derived the accent

except where

alwaysthe

Has

fy

I C

cy,

thus

not
"

of their

the accent
Ill words

and participles,
alwaysretain
adjectives

from

formed

bly,beingadverbs

the

accent

"c.
def'picably,
of their primitives
indefat'igably,
; as, prob'ably,

endingin ly;

is to be obferved in all words

fame

A, "The

as,

delib'erately,
poriticly,
inderinitely,

kc.
vol'untariiy,
///y"
or

alwaysthe

Has

of
the firfl:

on

who

They

accent
two

pronounce

the vowel,
confonant preceding
fingle
"c.
Dcuteron'omy,
phyfiog'nomy,
polyg'amy,
as, big'amy,in'famy,
analogy.
ac'ademyinflead of acad'emygo againft
either
antepenult,

the

on

has the accent


on
tyi" 111 triiTyllables,
the
fourth ; as,
on
polyfyllables

anem'ony. Except alfo


iiot'ony.

thofe

the

the

on

antepenult.
; as, prog'eny,
tyranny, cal'umny.Sec. :

and
mat'rimony,
ig'nominy,cer'emony,

ending in gony

all in mony,

in

except

mocofmog'ony
hexag'ony,
; and cacoph'ony,

; as,

In ry.
ary

"

Takes

the accent

on

the

the
on
polyfyllables

and in

"c.
ubiq'uitary,

"

founded
9ry

"

In
In

tory,
"

back

different confonants, as,

two

difpen'caravan'fary,

is an exception),
(con/teftamen'tary,
parliamen'tary
ad'verfary

letter s, follow

for the moft

Has

placedfarther

this

preventedby

"c. beingonly a reduplication


voluntary,exceptions). Ac'ceflary,
nec'efTary,

mentary, momentary,

ery

except when

fary,anniver'fary
(yet to
of the fame

in trifTyllables
dury, fal'ary,
rofemary:"
antepenult,
; as, fug'riry,
fourth ; as, fim'ilary,
vocab'ulary,
vul'nerary,
ex'emplary,cpiftolary,

part the
;

the

accent

generalrule.
the

on

and
antepenult,

it is only in the

del'etery,
bap'tiftery,
mon'aflery,
prcs'bytcry.This

followingwords
termination

is

it i.5

always

erry.

has the -iccent on


triiTyllables
the fourth,or
on
polyfyllables
"c.
judicatory,
pacificatory,
rule holds

This

except

and
contradic'tory
;

when

the

two

in this cafe (he

"

antepenult.
; as, pleth'ory,
priory, mcm'ory, "c.
pif'catory
cubatory,
; dcd'ica; as, probatory,

farther back

different confonants

meet

as,

compul'fory,
calefiic'tory

followingare exceptions,
def'ultory,
inventory,prom'on-

per'emptory,
tory, rec'eptory,
rep'ertory,
conTirtory.
This

termination

is alwaysfounded

as

if written

urry.

Inyj-.
WorJs
fourth

in
in

Vol.

I.

^-

have

the

accent

on

the antepcnuli.
; as,

"c. :
k.p'rofj',
fan'tafy,
apof'tafy,

on

the

epilepfy,coa'croverfy.
k

In

RHETORICAL

38

GRAMMAR.
In

In /y, with
Polyfyllables
and

the laft letter of

on

the vowels

e or

"

ty.

before

the
it,have uniformly

accent

the antepenult,

on

fyllable;
fociety,
improb'ity,
as, fobriety,
acer'bity,
Deity,fpon-

that

"c.
taiieity,
c
precedes;Vv,it has the accent upon
"c.
pronounced,
felif'ity,
veraf'ity,
feroc'ity
felic'ity,
confonant
it
has
When
a fingle
precedes;/y,
alwaysthe

When

it,and

letter

the

is founded

as

as,

verac'ity,

"

"c.
curiof'ity,
extremity,barbar'ity,
When
confonants precedeit, it
two

is on

the former

accent

on

it ; as,

timid'ity,
frugaFity,

infcar'city,
fecun'dity,
abfur'dity,

as,

"c.
fir'mity,
termination is

This

Under
The

few

fo many

terminations
foregoing

the
that

and

to

render

rules before

the
diflylbbles,
;

the other

belongto

as
exceptions

where

ty, with the firflfound of y.

alwaysfounded

theyare

included almoft all the words

are

terminations,are
them

laid down
the
filent,

either

of littleufe.

for them

As

will

reducible

not

Englifh language.

generalrules,or

to

with

of monofyllables
and
they confift chiefly
in

is to
Didlionary

in the

great meafyre

eflablifh their pronunciation

be confulted.

and reduced the apparent confufion there


Having thus laboured throughthis chaos of fpelling,
of
fhall
into
fome
we
now
more
a
to
lightfomeregion,where we fhall have
degree order,
emerge
in treating
of the art of reading,
the proper
fewer diiKculties to retard our progrefs
or
; I mean

words

of
delivery
As

and

this

has
fubjeft

another

on

in
arranged

when

fentences.

difcuffed

alreadybeen

Elocution, I fliallcontent

by me

in

courfe of ledures

attainment

of that art, without

defirous of

into
entering

Of
dependsupon
Jufi:delivery

Pitch of the voice.

Of

more

fome
ments
com-

any
minute

in-

vir.

the Art

due attention

Pronunciation:

Accent:

Articulation;

Reading,

the works themfelves.

SECTION

the Art of

on

from them,
myfelf at prefent,with extrafting

rules for the


and fome praftical
principles,
general
thofe
who
them
are
readers,
; referring
upon

of the fubjed,to
veftigation

of Delivery.
followingarticles :
Emphafis: Paufes or Stops: Tones:
to

the

each of thefe in their order.

and

Key

or

firftof

And

ARTICULATION.
A

good articulation confifts,in givingevery


the moil

according
of
the fyllables
to

ledgetheir number
pointsare

not

approved cufloni of
which

and

words

its due proportionof found,


fyllable

pronouncingit; and

in

making

fuch

diftinftion between

acki.owcompofed, that the ear fliallwithout difficulty


each letter belongs.Where
thefe
to which
fyllable

once,

obfcrvcd,the articulation

Diftindlncfs of articulation
cr

are

perceive,at

letter in

defetSlive.
proportionally
able
depends, primarily,
upon being
is

lettersby the organs of fptcch,in the

manner

to

before dcfcribtd in

form

the

elements
fimple
that fubjedl
;

on
treating

and

becaufe the
the

to

RHETORICAL

4"5

is made

accent

Thus

vowel

the

iide,road, cube, are

the

over
rapidly
by paffir.g

followingconfjnant.

over
pafling
quiclcly

GRAMMAR.

the

before it takes in the found of the confonant.


the obiervation
the

of all

peculiar
geniusof

and
tongue, implicitly

our

always placingthe
the Greeks, was,
that

but by
diflinftly
expreffed
voice

iflue,aiid

to

the confonants.
as

vowel.

as

all fuch

fo

half of the words

in the whole
any -yvord

Now

vowel.

accent

language;

the

over

the

of
pofitions

juftas

of examining

the Greek
of this

the organs

in

be

not

for the

forming

placedon

fonant
a con-

ries,
compilersof .dictiona-

fyllable,
and foreigners
in
provincials
oat-

thod,
me-

praftice

they could
clear
entirely

well be

time,

whollycfcapcd

notes,

is
paffage

can

has

reafon

language. For inftance ;


vowel /, theywill of courfe

if

the pronunciation

theyfliould look

found it endiavour.

^'rdicate;
preapitate; phenom'enon,pheprecipitate,
clafs. And

of the fame

in that manner;';
in

our

voice

dwells fome

followed

change of
the

the different

miflead

in

the
fliort,

who, inflead

have
pedantically

confifted in

muff
fpelling-books,

words

point is, it

marking the accented

of

throughall words

on

the voice

divEtionaries ;

which,
uttering

in

"/i?/icatewill be called

manner

and

over

accents

which

this

as

confifts in ftrefs only, it

accent

the
endeavour,finding

In the fame
wa-menon

their

as

this method

perhaps one

for the word

mark

the vov/els

our

By

vocabularies,and
of

accentual

or
floppedby
interrupted

not

But

Obvious

all

contrary reafon,the words, all,laid,

vowels, on

grammarians,and compilersof

our

of

among

but far

beingon

accent

vowel, and givinga fmart firoke of the voice

led\ hid',rcd\ cub',are


"ii^',

the confonant

to

the

long;

the words

do

nor

which,

they

the

in

lay the

ever

faft,we
accent

of their
diverfity

find the Scots do pronounce


the confonant

upon

pronunciationfrom

in

that of the

is a pitythat our
compilersof diiSionaries fliould have
in the rightway would have afforded
grofsan error, as the marking of the accents
that is to be found with relpedt
moft general
and certain guidesto true pronunciation,

confifls. It
people of England chiefly
fallen into fo
of the

one

to

tongue

our

for it is

vowel
confonant, each preceding
and

in
exemplified

whole

of

our

there

this makes

is
no

in

our

in the word

fainter

one

difference v/:th

the

fecondaryone,

the

rightufe

as

the

is

is on

accent

accented

one

are

two

accents

of

be

regardto

the

evidentlyto

rule, as

fhew

the

primaryaccent

that it is but

is

on

to

one

the

tur^,expos'^tula-

founded

one,

it is

perceived;

the ftrongeraccent
expos"tu!ator'y,
but
fyllable

the

of another.

fyllable
; but
to

the

vowels,

exceptionin

no

ufurpsthe power

languagehas

the laft

on

there

which

to

vowel

one

that whenever

fet forth in the fcheme

found, as

there
longerpolyfyllables

other fiiinter. Thus,

forcible than

more

inflances where

in the few

in fome

but
pos^'';
fyllable
but
tiir'-ry

its firftfhort

faid above, that


every word

obfervcd,that

the
flronger,

has

words, hat, bet, fit,not, but

the

except
language,

It has been
be

the whole,
througho'ut

conftant rule

word

one

is fo much

which

tains
con-

botli.

To

fuch

with
to

have

as

it, in

regardto

readingand

layit upon

the fame

and

to

tion

aloud, or

never

fpeak in

of

accent

in

fpeakingin

letter of the

common

public:

difcourfe,I fhall only lay down


which

is,that

in reading,
as they are
fyllable

theyfhould

accuftomed

to

one

alwaystake

rule
care

do in converfa-

lay any flrefs upon any other fyllable.For there are few who either read
this law of accent, by dwellingequallyupon
public^that do not tranfgrefs

in the fame word : fuch as, fo'i-tu^ne,


en^cro^achmcnt',
na''tu're,
con'-jec'fyllables
But this is not uttering
which
"c.
tu're,
pa'-tien'ce,
properly
pronounced
words, but fyllables
;
encro'achment,
na'ture,
pa'conjec'ture,
are
alwaystied togetherby an accent; as, for'tune,

different

ticncc.
be

Any

habit

of

this fort

givesan

avoided by all who


carefully

unnatural

conftrained air to

deliver them.felvcs in

fpeech,and

fhould therefore

public.

Of

elegance. With

regard

to

due accent,

with regardto propriety


; fccondly,
light
; firft,
its
have
fhould
each
that
word
it
is
neceflary
regard propriety,

be confidered in

Pronunciation may
and

confidered
fcparately

of words

twofold

to

letter in it its proper

each

is the chief

and

This

found.

is all that is

of words
this regards
the delivery

in
required

of in the former

pointtreated

of
befide propriety,
to elegance,
proportion
refpefl

With

41

PRONUNCIATION.

0/

with

GRAMMAR,

RHETORICAL

alfo is

found

arrangedin fentences ; and this is the

as

pronunciation

the

mar.
part of this Gramto

be taken in ; and

I fhall now

point which

confider.
chiefly
As

there has been

hitherto laid open

method

no

of pronouncingwords,
propriety

That
neglcifted.
founded

this has

and

fame

the

upon

it is

wonder

no

of

fecond, or

that the

givesdelightto the ear


in
as that which
princrple
pleafes

ornamental

mufical

part, has been

mere
tirely
en-

founds, is

proportion
;

I mean
compofition,

of thefe I (hall givethe

the former

To

the

mean

of articulate

the utterance

in

found.

to

Quality. At prefentI

latter that of

the

Quantity,to

the firftpart, I

even
attaining

which

twofold reference,to time, and

profodianname

of

fhall confider

quantity

the other article to another head.


only,referring

Our

earlynotions

between

judge

time

all imbibed

quantityare

from the Latin

the difference

profody;in which,

is eftablifhed by rules that have no reference


fyllables
that fyllables
called long, which
are

in this cafe j infomuch

to

the

ear,

the fole

fhorteft that

the

are

the organs of fpeech; and others are called (hort,which take up much longer
of falfe
The
mind thus takinga bias under the prejudice
in pronouncingthan the former.

be uttered

can

{hort

long and

competent

of

by

after arrives at

rules,never

that all attempts hitherto

to

knowledge of the
profodyof

fettlethe

true
our

of

nature

:
quantity

language,have

been

and

accordinglywe

find

fruitlefs.

vain and

I have (liewn that fome, both vowels and confonants,


of the fimpleelements or letters,
treating
founds
be prolonged
(hort ; that is, whofe founds cannot
pofTibly
naturally
; and thefe are the
the
and
three
iu
founds
the
confonant
of
of
vocal
as
and
k, p, t,
;
;
pure mutes,
u,
e, i,

In
are

of

words

beck, lip,cut.

I have
be

alfo,that the founds of all the other vowels, and of the confonant femivowels,may

(hewn

prolongedto

thofe which
nature

above,

there

I have

time

it is to be

on

to

are

which
fliort,
abfolutely
fyllables

it is in his power

faid that

in

the confonant

accented, in order

confonant, when

to

confonant

by

(hort ;
make

it

the accent

which

on

vocal

means

obferved,tliatallthefe may
of time, as
as fliorta fpacc

or

obviate

this,I would

and

be prolongedby
poffibly

cannot

prolongthe

I mean,

others to v/hat

tlie accent

that. But

recommend

on

the

this rule is fo far from


in

as

our

(hort

tongue

the
any effortof

degreehe pleafes.

is long;
the fyllable
vov"-el,

(liould dwell

it,givinga

proportionalquantityin

(hort

is

that the Reader

pafsrapidly
over

are
pronounced
fyllables

all

rapidgabbleof

Without

by

which

long;

is

appears

accented

(horten

to

pronouncingwords, when

the molt part the accented

To

but at the fame

are

fpeaker; yet

whole

pleafe
;

degreewe

and are capableof beinguttered in


a (hort quantity,
(hort. So that they who fpeakof fyllables
and in their own
as
naturally
abfolutcly
of
the
of
cant
for
common
profodians,
fpeak a non-entity
:
long,
though, as I have (hewn

alfo be reduced

when

what

fmart

on

ftrokc

the vowel when


the

to

following

being attended to, that for


fpaceof time,as
is

tiie accented

and
utterly
defiroycJ,

the

fyllables.
it to every

one

to

pay

attention
particular

and to dwell upon


fyllable,
long as to make it double the quantityof
this,fpeechmuft be deprivedof all fmoothnefs and harmony.
it fo

to

every vocal

the fliortones:

'

Vol.

I.

T'

'

RHETORICAL

42
It has been
and
fiiort,

Taid above, that when

may

Emphafis. In the

head, that of

i)i certain

will
circumftances,

pronunciationof
reader

mutes

defired

is here

and

that of the

;
a

after it is

of

the

time, I fhall point out

mean

found

be founded

of

the confonant

I fliallfpealc
more

and lay down


prolongation,

have

their fubdivifion into

kind are, m,

that head

fayon
is

large
confonants,
which,

the

fome

at

rules for the proper

continued

It

impure.

for

fliewn,that

littletime; and

prolongingthe

found of

femivowels.

of others

of the latter

the confonants

there

was

impure,

is about

refer to the
chiefly

when
difagreeable

of
beginning,

that of the

now
queftion

the

muft

ezh, et^, eth :


s, f, ejl),

r,

and

pure

prolonged;

be at all

cannot

to

in the

made
recollect the divifion,

to

femivowels,duringpleafure. As

refembles the

blowingof
formed.

once

tlie ear,

pleafure

to

wind

througha chink,

Ezb,

eth,et'R,have
ejli^
continued.

when
agreeable

their found

make

with

fliould
fyllable

the

/, ",

v,

to the ear.
Of
pleafing
M,
ing.
z,
havingits

if it continues
tion
entirely
throughthe nofe, is difagreeable
any lengthof time after its formathan an articulate found.
the bwing of oxen,
it refembles more
R, when continued,is
as
iS is only a hifs,like that of ferpents.F, prolonged,
of curs.
harfli found, like the fnarling

found

to

mutes

thefe the found of fome

the former

admit of fuch

femivowels,and

confonants,what I

alfo

the confonant

on

all.

the found of the pure

Of

is

generalholds good. Yet there are cafes in which


thus rendered long; of which
and the fyllable

this rule in

next

into

the accent

be dwelt upon,

under the

The

GRAMMAR.

are,

too

fliallbe

Rules to be

mark

of the breath

much

The

femivowels,/, n,

which
occafions,

certain

on
prolongation

the

and like s, retains no

only founds

of

an

mixed

therefore which

ev, ez, ing. Not but


hereafter.
explained

articulate found,
in

formingthem,

can

be

prolonged

all the others will admit

the Confonants.
in founding
obferved

prolongedexcept when the accent is upon them ; which can only


a long found
can, love. When
theyare precededby a fhort foundingvowel : as,7f//,
take
the
confonant
into
the
in its fhortand
the
vowel,
the voice muft dwell upon
fyllable
precedes,
would
take
the
the
time of two
fyllable
long
eft found; olherwife,were
up
they both dwelt upon,
None

1.

of them

to

are

be

happen when

founds, and would therefore


attended

to be
neceflary

very

after

femivowel

feem
to

be

to
pradticc,

Their

2.

words.

found

is

to

of

apt

to

is an

of

our

article

prolongthe found of

peopleof England are to be


the following
confonant,which

in

except
prolonged,

be

are

This

the

of the number

cautioned
is too

nerally
ge-

long fyllables,

or
monofyllables,

of othei
final fyllables

As,
bold

the

Swell

Fulfil your
But

Scotland,who

hand,

quicklyinto

too

the great diminution

never

va-Te,
ral-n,bra-ve,day-s.

as,

other

the

ai-ainftrunningthe found of the vowel


the

two

the natives

by
On

long vowel.

to

muft not

we

note

"

purpofe

"

fay.
fwel-lingnote

The

"

all"
Fulfil-ling

The
for this would

words

to

which

3. Neither

can-nons

roar

of the fundamental
one
trnufgrcfs
them to
theybelong,and transferring

be

to

confonant,

they clofc a fentencc.

nor

Thus

vowel,
in the

are

to

laws

of accent,

from
fyllables
by feparating

the next,

be dwelt upon

beyondtheir common

when
quantity,

line"
following
And

RHETORICAL

if I Jofe thy love

And

found of the word

The

love may

muft
thoughequallyemphatical,
If

the
tranfpofe

we

completed;

not

beyond its common


be reverfed

as

thus

to

its common

but that of a!!,

it clofes the fcnfc.

time, as

that of love reduced

and
"7//,

be attended

fentences,conftitutes

of

43

"

if I (hou'd lofe thy love.

"

to

R"

all.

the fenfe is

line,the thingwill

all

neceflary

rule is alfo very

laft words

the

as
prolonged,

the time is increafed in the word

This

I lofe my

"

be continued

not

I lofe my
Here

be

of the

members

MA

GRAM

to

the natives of

by

difference between

material

one

Scotland,as
the

quantity.
dwellingupon
Englifla
fpeechand
the

their's.

begin a word,

confonants

4. When

muft be taken, that before their union


fufed found of their

is very

This

own.

or

with

fyllable,
theymuft
the

letter,
following
theybe

to
difagreeable

the

fhort; and great

be founded

ear,

precededby any

not

yet is

and

no

care
con-

fault.

uncommon

to this in pronouncingthe letter s, has been the chief caufe of our


languagebeinoattending
in
the
it
abound
fo
does
in that
much
called by foreigners
not
Hiffing
language; though reality
for the moft part, with us, the found of z.
letter as either the Greek or Roman
; the final s having,
But if care be not taken earlyin formingthe pronunciation,people are apt to contraft a habit of

The

not

before they utter the found of s, as well as of continuingit at the


hiffing
in all the femivowels.
found at the beginningof words is equallydifagreeable

Of
in fentences,
the
Emphafis difcharges,

on

which

into

them

forms

and

laid,and

it is
to

the mark

which

fame kind of office that


forms

members

into words

them

of fentences.

from

each

the reft;fo
the

words

gether,
to-

dignifies the fyllable

accent

other,as fimpletypes of

As accent

emphafisunites

fo

As

diftinguifhed
by the ear than
it in a flronger
prefents
lightto

words
diftinguiflies

does in words.

accent

it more

makes

it belongs,and

which

the word

fentences,or

confufed

EMPHASIS.

and
ties fyllables
together,

is the link which

This

end.

emphafisennobles

Accent,
underftanding.
our

is

ideas,without reference

theyftand to each other. Emphafis is the mark which pointsout


in their various combinations,
of relationfhip,
and the rank which theyhold in
their feveral degrees
be refoived into their original
there no accents, words would
Were
the mind.
: were
fyllables
fentences would
be refoived into their original
and
in
this
the
hearer
there no emphafis,
cafe,
words;

to

relation in which

the mutual

muft

be

of making
pains himfelf,firft,

the

at

Whereas, by the
marks,

at

; and
liftening

henfion

of

the

ufe of

the fame
can

and

accent

time

that

they

the

accompany

matter

offered

to

emphafis,
words,
are

and

uttered,the

fpeaker at

his

the

out

the fame

words,
their

and

their meanin"-.

afterwards

tain
meaning, beingpointedout by cer-

hearer has all the trouble


pace that

he goes,

with

faved,but
as

clear

the fpeaker
himfelf has, if he
as
confideration,

that of

comprc-

felf
delivers him-

wdl.
From
laid upon

this

it might appear,

account

the word

which

that

and
it belongs,

emphafisis only a

more

forcible

that it is cxaiEtly
of the fame

accent

than

ordinary,

differing
onlyin
of elocution,has too generally
: an
opinion,which, to the great prejudice
degreeof ftrength
vailed.
preBut there is an abfolute and conftitutional ditFerence between accent
and emphafis,
as there
befides a greater ftrefs,
is
certainly
ought to be,which confifts in this; that every emphaticfyllable,
fhew the neceffity
marked
in the voice. To
alfo by a change of note
of this,vvc need onlyobferve,that the mind, in communicatingits ideas,is in a continual flatc of aflivity,
emotion, or
to

nature,

agitation.

the

end

thofe ideas

the difFerent efFeftswhich

from
agitation,
as

GRAMMAR.

RHETORICAL

4+

fuch communication

of

which
feelings

as

who

in him

they excite

to manifeft thefe ;

Emotions.

Ey ideas,I

the

producedby
feelings,

calmer

the

paflions,to

of
thought is the obje{3:

former,I
of the

call the

one

fignsof

the

one

languageof
The

ideas,have

our

no

fityof languagesfpoken by
For
of emotions.
language
confequencein
beingdid

our

world,
that
the

where

they are

fancy,

But

figns

the

are

the two, which

the

in the other

language,as

manner

various

feelings
by
comprehenfive
; as
have

not

ideas ;

merits

is not

annexed

cafe, to

an

at.^ of the

them

to

their

regardto

the

of much

matter

fo, the Author


man

but

of

flamped

reft of the animal

with

tones.

there

regardto the
Only ours, from

he has done

as

feelings,

was

conveyingof

mere

fo with

it is not

of thefe internal

exprefstheir various

of the heart,which

fhort,

with

the communication

of this

In

exprefsthe

is

the different nations of the world.


as

Words

emotions.

eflentialdiiFerence between

an

ferves to

which

which
the
are
whollyarbitrary
; that is,words,
but
them,
depend purelyupon convention,in
proved by the diveremployed; which is fufficiently

ideas

connexion

That

the other.

the languageof
latter,

than
focial intercourfe,

our

emotion

or

the

there is

nature, in the fame

our

all

operationof the intelleft and fancy.

the

feelingof

natural

more
hold, is infinitely

we

But

leave the invention

not

it himfelf upon
who

languageof

the difFerent focieties of men,

more

internal

ideas ; and

tones, of the other.

ulmoft attention.

our

thoughtswhich rife and pafsin fucceffion in the mind of man :


its ideas ; as wc'.l
in arranging,
combining, and feparating
violent
the
from
of the
more
mind itfelf,
agitation
by thofe ideas,

of the mind

all the efrettsproducedon

as

I fiiallcall.Ideas and

which
claiFes,

two

to

all

mean,

emotions, all exertions

by

be reduced

marks, befide words,

other

be fome

fpeaker. Now,

alfo all the difFerent

a fimilar ftateof mind,


only reprefent

can
ftate,

a monotonous

free from all a"livity


emotion.
or
perfedlly
of man
All that pafFcs
in the mind
may

there mufl

them,

utters

uttered in

words

the ideas,but

merely to layopen

is not

of the

the mind

produceon

the

mind,

rank
fuperior
exertion

an

peculiartone

and

of

notes

minds

which, when
properlyufed, excite in the
; and
they are to be exprefFed
unifon
the
of
in
hand
to thofe notes, analogous
nature
of others, tuned
tions.
emoby
invariably
in the room
therefore man
Whenever
of thofe
interferes,
by fubftituting
any other notes

which

nature

voice, by which

the

of

has

annexed

the ails arid

to

For

corrupted,and failsof its end.


natural

only, will

notes

The

by

means

of the

have

been

fet forth

in this

us

all

which

are

myfelfwith layingopen the caufe


is nothing elfe than the
country. Which

tion

trained in the

Nothing

room.

That

"

moft

accurate

that

reafon
their

there

own

which
From

more

can
are

ufe of

few

art
a

of

reading; whereby

people,who

emphafis,when

this view

been

habituated

of the caufe

ftcpis, to get
ccHjiry

from
of

the

the truth

they

ap:

utter

the Art

on

to

the different nations


of

Reading;

great meafure

at

loft
in
of

of this

childhood,in the

the remedy
diforder,

room

fubftituted in their

the

obfervafollowing
that have

provincialrone,
in

common

of
and

of thofe cf

of courfe

fuperinducedby

erroneous

are

than
pofition,

their fentiments

the

method

fubftitutc the artificialtones

lid of the artificialnotes

in

very defeflive and

it, in readingaloud the fentiments

their

is

all the various,natural,expreflive


tones

without
fpeak F.nglifh

of

emotions

in unifon to

corruptedin

artificial,
unmeaning, reading notes

few

confirm
clearly

theyhave not the fame ufe


in public,is, that they are

they have

been
ledure

of its having been

fuppreffed
; and

fpeech are

tuned

thofe of the artificialkind.


has

nature

languageof

heart,thus

largein the fecond

at

fo far the

mind,

to
correfpondence

prefentI (hall content


to

the

of the human

languageof
expreflive

this

which

world,

vibrate in

never

of
feelings

the chords

not

the

difcourfe ; and

the

others,or delivering
cant

of

itfelf.
fuggefts

the bad

habit

reading,to

the natural

of

The

kind.

firftne-

reading;and

to

f^pp'y

reading,after

in

notes

that
neceflary

each

to be ufed in order

to

properlyvaried

in

fail to deliver the words

will not

this
accomplifli

is

meaning of his words, he


thod
flialldefer fpeakingof the me-

But

point,tillI have treated of the

PAUSES

this,it

to

into the

as

tones.

we

In order

them

have

of the Author; and if

feel the fentiments

fentiments,as well

of the Author's
fpirit

is,that

fought for.
properly

but
only underftand,

reader fhould not

into the

he enters

ftart forth if

ourfelves,ready to

all prepared within

ufe of

acquirethe

to

are

we

anfwer

got rid of the others; my

have

we

45

If it be afked,how

thofe of the natural kind.

fypplytheir placeswith
the proper

GRAMMAR.

RHETORICAL

that of
article,

next

STOPS.

or

been conhas, at different periodsof time, and by different perfons,


Stopping,like fpelling,
this day
thereat
and
had
Itsdifferent
has
nor
are
in
fafhions;
as
fidered, a great meafure,
arbitrary,

any fure

eftablifliedfor the

genera!rules

taken
not
was
pun(Sluation
and probablywould,
in

was

from

the art of

had that

by
regulated

great mtafure

(Irudion,often without reference

that

be

paufescan

to

the

divided

part, depend

difcourfe.

in

either

emphafis. I

on

unknown,
have

them

than

Into

fentences,or

are

with

regard

of

fentence,there ought to be

be

to emphafisthan
neceffary

more

one

the number

to

of words

of fentences from

members

that

we

laftword

which

of

words

to

accent

or

us

the

the former

emphafes the

two

by

emphafis,

there

If it be afked, why

words

in the fame

the end

at

be

may

in
gether,
to-

fentence
miftake

no

of every fuch member

paufefliould any

more

the
why emphafisalone,will not fufRciently
diftinguifh

paufes,as

other, without

appertainto

belongingto

the

belonging

each

united

connefts

link which

is,

fuffi-

are

when

meaning

of fentences ; when

emphatic word, that

one

to

: but
rapidly

pointedout

fhewingwhat
the

than

more

with the found


pre-acquainted

are

muft be

to

members

perceptible
paufe.

each

tindlypronounced,however
which

and

member,

there

into

their

which

to;

that words

alreadyfhcwn,

from each other, by accent;


but to point out
diftinguifhed
cicntly
and
A
s
paufes,are necefTary. emphafisis the
fentences, emphafis,

and forms

onlygeneralrule,by

unattended

or

type,
its arche-

moderns; but

the

their grammaticalcon-

the

And

of

art

ftudied ; that is,certaia

theyhad

which

by ftops,accordingto

paufesufed
been

perfedlion
by

brought

to

been

have

ought to
certainly

the rules of grammar,

has
properly,
regulated

mofl

the

paufes,for

ftudied and

truth is, the modern

The

that art.

fpeaking,which

been

art

and others
kept together,

parts of fpeechare

which

pradice of

we

reader
each

of words,

or

and

fpeaker;and

intermediate words

this

unlefs

emphatic one;

emphaticone,

as

we

(hall not

are

to

miftake

cannot

with
pre-acquainted

not

are

? the anfwer

does words

accent

be

the

them

is obvious

when

dif-

meaning of fentences,
only be done, by

can

paufe

be made

able to know

at
at

dently
evi-

the end

ail

of

times, to

be referred ; and this muft often breed

confufion in the fenfe.


unfit as the ftate of

Thus

readinghave
the worft
the voice

ing

annexed

punctuationis

another

notes

paufes and
preceding

accordingto the fenfe of the words, the


be reprefcntcd
pofTibly
by fo fmall a
yet all this immenfe
Vol.

its own

anfv\'ereven

end, the teachers

its nature, which

of

the

of

art

has been attended with

it,quiteforeignto
certain artificialnotes
with regard
of
to delivery
confequences
; and that is by affociating
littlefittedtheyare to anfwer this end, we may judge,by confidcrto thefe ftops. How

that the

only of

to

office to

two;

I.

one

refts in difcourfe,
are

numerou.'
exceedingly

emotions

or

number

varietyare Avallowed

annexed

to the

up

ftopswhich

of the
as

and
mark
la

four

mind,
or

five marks, which

loft in the
members

the exertions of

readingnotes.

and

various"

fancy; and

are

ufed

Which

of fentences,as comma,

not
can-

ftops:
confift
ufually
as

fcmicolon.
and

RHETORICAL

46
and colon

the other to

full

the

GRAMMAR.

taughtto
note
preiTed
Here
that fo

is

complete. By fome,

deprefsit

lO

fource of the bad

the true

prevailswhich
generally

is,that

cadences,from thofe which

we

in the latter.

we

of

manner

the pupils are

By others,the

de-

in public,
readingand fpeaking

read in

taught

to

are

ufe in

in all recitalsand

of the natural one,

fentence

cafe,and

in degree.
cafes,only differing

is ufed in both

tlien is to be found

and

tones

Head

the

flop,when

elevate their voice in the former

different way,

this artificial
manner,

fpeaking
; and

well
at fchool,as
repetitions

in

as

different

with

beingufed

in-

reading,generally

of all who afterwards fpeak in public. For theyare apt to confider this fpecies
delivery
of courfe,without
to that kind which
which
comes
theyhave been taught,as fuperior
delivery,
the
moft
be
ufed
all
it
to
occafions.
But as there
on
public
proper
any pains; and therefore judge
of reading,
herfelf revolts ; when
which nature
manner
againfl
is fomethingin this monotonous

infeiflsthe
of

they are

fentiments

deliver their own

to

each
fpeaking,

in

not
individual,

varied and expreffive


tones, falls into
in the proper ufe of fuitably
of the voice,to which all fentences are
tain elevations and depreflions
void

both

of

harmony

;;nd

is at
expreflion,

has this unnatural mode

Thus
ilanding.

are

Having
and flops,it now
phafis
tion

That

"

remains

thofe
Fiterate,

pafsin

illiterate man

no

that have

train in

to

ever

learned

minds, and

our

committed

abufes

fource of thefe abufes may

The

is ufed ; infomuch

in the

to the
difgufling

the
fenate-houfe,

mofl

under-

churches.

our

importantarticlesof

cer^

being

the
pulpit,
a juftand

that the inftances of

and fenfibly
felt in
generally

two

by

tune,

or

emdelivery,

the

remedy.
be farther traced,by attentively
obfervaweighingthe following
in fpeaking;it is onlythe
ufes falfe emphafes,tones, or flops,

to
are

pointout

read, that

fall into

can

there conne6led

or

of that

errors

For,

fort.

illiterateman,

divided,the

the idea that makes

To

his mind.

exadly as theypafsin

thoutrht,exhibits them

is moft

of which

the want

rare

very

the many

(hewn

the ear, and

to

cant

inflruded

fet alike; and this tune,

fpreaditfelfin the

of utterance,

publicdeclamation

bar, and every placewhere


natural elocution

difcordant

once

having been

certain

as

ideas

our

without

rule

or

the moft forcible

in utterance;
and therefore the ftrongefl
force of expreflion
there,he givesthe greateft
jmprefTion
emotions
excited in him
mark.
And
whatever
are
by
cmphafisto the word which ftands as its
; as thefe neceffarily
by fuitable tones, looks, and geftures
thofe ideas, he cannot
helpmanifefting
be fupprefled.
and without painscannot
Whereas
law of his conftitution,
from an original
proceed
the

has learned to

who

man

jules of

which
flopping,

the moft

out

are

read, has been taught to conned


taken

not

importantword,

from the natural train of

which

another of lefs confequence. He

is therefore often

taught to

is not

; which
emotions, tones, looks, and geftures
as
fliort,

teacher of the
of

art

thofe
fpelJing

of

readingthinks

fentences,and members

as

form

of fentences

and corredingwhat
foughtfor,by fupplying
it is manifett from
fame

what

has been

a juftand
thirgas fpeaking,

it

make

put this in

praftice,
yet upon

habits in

before,that

thingwhich

to
pradiceaccording

be

found

can
dailypradife,

more

point

flops
j the

and

manner

ftopsto feparate

in the ufe of the

remedyis to beof reading.For

It is here therefore the

be

art

brought to

be

of courfe follow,though more

However

ear.

the eye but lettersand

he has inftrudted you in the

readingcould

would
forcible delivery

trial it would
we

if

to

emphafistransferred to

and defc"tive in the

is erroneous

and pleafing
to the
graceful

requiredto
bad

faid

into words

each other.

mark

no

words, any part of the languageof


applied.la
whollyomitted,or abfurdly

nothingoffered to

them

from

the

has

his

his duty, when

he has done

fo
lettersproperly,

therefore

are

languagethere is

in the v/hole written

ideas. He

our

or
negledled,

to

annex

feparatehis words, by arbitrary

or

eafy it

may

difficultthan is

be removed

appear

at

exadly

the

might be

firftfight
to

imagined.Confirmed

onlyby a rightmethod, and daily

that method.
Such

difference in him, from

ftiould occafion any


and

over

be

to

the

thingaloud, for

time

fome

This will make

drift and

do this

to

attentive

him

falfe

I would
fight,

recommend

has cafl his eye

him

and

if this

read

it

and

errors

it

it will

as

him

to

not

taken in the

over

defeiSls

guides,the flops;and

it,and

over

the

to

But

fentence.

and
pafT-ige,

printed
;

or

are

in the

written

are

let
fettled,

before

each

fcope of

at

leaft,till he

at

he had

manner

zs

m.iriced any

has

ufuallywritten

as

graduallyto neglcS thofe

main

he will be able

praflice,before

he reads fu( h

advife him, after he

the

be the fame.

he yvillcome

graphicart, and
attentive only to

in the
to

broughtit

tillhe has

prevailwhen

aloud
paffage

matter of it,to read the fame

himfelf

made

that
changed, in readingthofe paflages

be

may
will

habit

prevent this,I would

To

cuftomarymanner.

manner

his old

propofedway,

in the

marked

though h:s

be faid,that

it may

But

GRAMMAR.

RHETORICAL

4?

learn

require
long
read

to

any

generalfenfeof

palTage.And 1 would alfo advife him not to deliver any thing from notes in public,v.ithout
ufingthe marks before mentioned, till habit (hall have fettled him in the rightway.
the

making

is

There
to

with

ftops,we

the

is

there

but
the ftops
;

referved for

have

pointing

That

note.

the

of

marking the

notes

of the

the fmaller

members,

it, they make

at

at

to
firft,

the

paufe,attending
the fame

note, which

tune

note,

make

to

words

which

note

in

will be then

fome

to

to

givetime

too

the paufefhould be

As

fhort.

the drift of the


for each

the

if it had

as

the whole

change

fuch

of

juft freftion

ear.

idea

to

make

by
regulated,

ought

its due

the

of

to

let them

But

theywill have
and

importanceof

each

the

If

fufthe

the clofe of

they deprefs
of

They

find it very difficult


attain it in

reading

without
latter,

ftopat
a

ftillmore

remains

to

any

that word

afkingthcmfelves

in

certain

how

they

fayfomething

univerfally
committed, is,that

paufeat

mind,

to

try

contains fome

fufficient

imprefllonon

to

then

paufes,it now

fentence
be

alike.

ftops,will

the great fault almoft


refpeft,

there

at

be manifefted.
clearly

all

or

im-

only by a
to
interruption

the voice

into the firftof the

the intonation of the

every member

whole,

elevated

deftroythat concatenation

never

of

deprefled

and
emphaticfyllables,

their beft method

member,

the

an

method
a

admiration,mterrogation,
or

theyelevate

can

and

in that cafe

of

nature

efTentially
necefTary,

proceeded without

before

note

change ;

they ufe

In this

the

voice

fentences fhould be marked

detached fentences,and

of the former

on
necefTary

the time of their duration.

ef makino- them

as

ance
import-

managing the

it,accordingto

runningthrough all fentences

cant

or

of

notes

do otherwife,if

who

fo many

voice without

Havinn- faid all that is

can

demandingthe

as

incompletefenfes,is either by

method, by having recourfe to the generalrule before laid down,


not
readingthem.
fpeaking,
would utter thole words, if they were

on

of

frequentufe, and

all other

of

the completefenfe of

the

run

to

They

appear

which

fufpendtheir

firftto

will be,

fall into

been accuftomed

have

individual

fentence.

the members

the parts, without

who

lower

or

appropriatedto
chiefly

be

precedepaufes,except

the voice, in the fame

member

next

raife

more

the utmoft

and which,

In the ufual method

to

of

of fentences, or

(hould

difcourfe : the incompletemembers


paflioned

penfion of

whoever

and
gainingattention,

The
paufes,without any change of note.
fentence,or a full completionof the fenfe,is by

members

otherwife

hardlyever

{hould

pointedout,

place.

be done

thing

elevated

The

fufpendednote.

of

flops,which, though of

yet been

laft

the

to

the clofe of

to

ear

And

utterance.

that
delivery,

voice before certain

the
is,fufpending
out

of the

never

onlytaughteither

are

third

of

manner

of

auditory.

has
delivery,
graceful

attention,I

refpeflto

which

forcible

articlerelative to the intonation

one

juftand

utmoft

his

on
imprefllon

an

experience,will, if properlyfollowed,change

the chief end

obtain
certainly

point, will

from

vouch

can

the natural and

to
unafFedting,

and
the artificial

accomplifhthat

is, 1

it

method, fimple as

This

and

idea of

more

or

the end of each


the

ideaj or by the

of
proportion
or
more
clofer,

lefs importance

member,
time

in

remote

RHETORICAL

A
which

conneflion

it has with

that fliades do

end

in

and without

eye;

the main

pictures;by

which,

fentences,and
reader

to

their

all his

make

of
objecl

the proper

the colours

were

the feveral figures


of the

minate

GRAMMAR.

run

into

compofition.In

members,

another, it would

one

order

quicklyinto

too

which, the objeds ftand

of

to the
diftimSlly

out

difiicultto difcri-

be

get the better of this bad habit of

to

another, I would

one

the fjme

Paufes in difcourfe anfwer

the fentence.

ufe

to

49

recommend

ning
run-

it to every

till by degreeshe bringsthem


paufeslongertlian is nccellary,

their due

to

proportion.
tht PITCH

Of
Thefe

In order

are

articlesof the utmoft

to

be heard

But

cafe.

of

ifhe does

it; and

rJfes

caufe

the matter

is what ought
pitch,therefore,

of the voice
it is

Moft

and
ftronger,

are

rife or

eafyto

more

one
are

rot

heard

theyaim

at

Either

all,or

The

difcourfe,

as

And

for the

and fall into


variety,
The
of
prevalence

time,

foft in

or
difcourfe,

in
pliable
that

fo much

have the due

never

difcourfe;from

common

emotions

ment
manage-

which

he either

his mind

of

require.This
bccaufc the orreafons; firft,
gans

two

this pitch,from conftant ufe

when
pradlice,

they read

and

befecondly,

fpeak in public,fall into

or

diffidence,
theyufe the low
the

to

into the

as foon
liftencr,

high pitch;

in this unufual

the reafon for

which

be

is

pitch,in

which

attention

weary

produdiveof

foon wearied

pitch,are

it,will
continuing

to

they
if

or,

confequences

and

languor and

equallyftrongduringthe

it,the fpeakermuft lofe all the benefits which

in

whole

arifefrom

difgufling
monotony.

this

arifes
practice

and

before

from

fpeaking,is like

in thofe who
conclude

numerous

whereas

high and low,

the

piano in mufic ; it

and
the_/ir/^

key ;

miftake

common

auditory. They
pitchof voice,and therefore changeit to

in their common

force ufed in the fame

can

pitch,to high or low, with regularproportion.

trouble

very diftin"l things,making

two

fpeakerfliould deliver himfelf with

ufed, for
generally

and
throughtimidity

firftfetting
out
a

be

to

of the voice

as

largeroom,

fhould be heard
confound

of his

of fkill and

with

organs

hoarfenefs enfue.

is ufed in

avoidingthis fault,theyrun

at

equallybad.

in

which

more

fall from

petfons,throughwant

of the extremes.

all the others.

proportionto

painfulto himfelf,and irkfome to his hearers.


corruptedby bad habits,has three pitchesin his voice; the high,low,

middle, is that

falls,accordingas

or

middle

pitch.

and

force
the

he
pitchhis voice properly,

to

the VOICE.

will be

is not

The

importance,to give due

how

know

his utterance

Every fpeaker,who
and middle

of

it is neceflary
that
fatisfaflion,

with
not

MANAGEMENT

tfW

fame

with

it
a

loud

fpeak,for

that they
impoffible
higher. Thus they
and

foft.

Loud

the different

only refers to

highand low, imply a change of key.

the firfl

and

degreesof

So that the bufinefsof

the force or loudnefs of voice to the fize of the room,


and number
fpeakeris,to proportion
than ordinary,
he is to fpeaklouder,not higher,
pitch. If it be larger
And whoever negledsthis,will never
in a new
be able to
his ufual key, not
one.
manage his

every

of his auditors,in its ufual


in

voice with eafe

to

with

eafe,and

change, and
without

himfelf,or
his

pitch,whenever
in

into
runi\ing

indeed

cafyto
Vol.

due

on

proportion
; and

difcord ;
into the

fmk,

are

fhould

He

rife to

who
a

he

takes

who

with

and

than
proportionally,

to

the

lower

be

pointof

moderate

lower, does

expelledfro^
rife upon

truth.

fuch

They who,

in

that

to

them,

It is true, it is

they remain

it

occafioii,

pitchthan is natural to

dcfccnd ; but wbilft


n

to

to

to guidehim.
proportion

beginin

equallydiftant from

are

fink

high pitch,cannot

any rule of

delivers himftif in

higher,or

produces the effectswhich

oppofite
extreme,

the fafer fide,


Vut

rife gradually
and

I.

nor

his hearers.

to

that he

variety.Whilft
agreeable

avoid this fault,run


err

fatisfa"lion

fubjeSdemands

more

key, it
will

will appear

50

equallyunnatural,and

I C

languidthan

more

R.

the other; and

they will

be very apt,

into that key in which theyhad fet out.


through the body of their difcourfe,to run chiefly
loudnefs
be
With
the
the beft rule for a fpeakerto obferve,i",
to
of
to
ufed,
regard
degree
of
than
he
afford without
can
to
utter
voice,
pain to himfelf,or any
never
a greater quantity
Whilft

effort.
extraordinary

he

whenever

thefe bounds,
tranfgreffes

he

it will

And

time

to

the utmoft

fome

emotion.
extraordinary

ever

of it ; which

extent

For

even

icarce be pardoned: for,as the

the

In
player.

end

beget
order

fhould

which

have

to

of

to

keep within

to
liberty

full power

longerany management
compafs,rather than go at any

his

no

in that

I may

as

command

and

rightmanagement
and yet which
is
delivery,

there is

full

inftru"led in

whirlivivd

fay

ofyour paJ]ion,
you muj}acquire

that the
the voice, it is neceffary

over

of the breath

little known

as

an
as

who

are

article of the

fhort-winded.

They

utmoft

any of the reft.

learningto read, that

clofe of the fenfe,has made

ftop,or

to thofe
fentences,efpecially

it

the

breath

The

is

falfe rule, by
be

to

never

difficultto
exceedingly
therefore

are

to

apt

fpeaker

importance to

drawn,

diftiniftfentences,as

they take
taught not to

been

they have
of

full

as

much

times

of

breathing;to

breath, but when

take

themfelves

run

the utter confufion of the fenfe.

theymake

doing it.

Whereas

only does

it with

ceived

To
may

by

to

if he waits

reader

been fenfible of his


thofe of

of

it,by

fome

degreeof

any reference
the fenfe ;

In order

as

is

or

all fenfible of his


he
uneafinefs,

not

depend upon it that his hearers have alfo-'


For, fo ftrongis the fympathybetween
difficulty.
he may

that
hearing,

the leaft uneafinefsin the

one

is

immediately
per^

this point,it is onlyneceffary


to obferve,that he
fpeakerto accomplifti
he
of
the fmalleft ftop,
breath
at
e
ven
pleafes,
quantity

the

rule before laid down, that of


of the

to

givingthe

true

tone

marks
voice, in that cafe,fufficiently

time, which

connedlion

he is

of the

abfurdly
imagined,but

givesthe fpeakerfuch

power

at

fenfe

upon
over

the

which

fhould

precedefuch

nature

of the

out
paufe,with-

without prejudice
to
to prolong at pleafure,
liberty
the
of
time
in the
does not at all depend upon
length

the
the

tone

of voice

paufes,as,

accompanyingthem.

ufed, may
judicioufly

This

ftruiStureof words
For

in fentences,making like

if there be any
inftance,

paufesto

or
propofition

all of like

fentiment

circum-

contribute much

his meaning. For, by this


point in view, that of ftrongly
inculcating
alwaysproportion his paufesto the importance of the fenfe ; and not merelyto

tindion.

to-

of it ; for whilftr

to the main

may

fufficientcommand

air.

fupplyhimfelf with any

the
onlyobferving
ftop. For the note

ftance

tillhe is put in mind

himfelf,but
difficulty

more

fpeechand

all times

ftops,as

many
For as

the other.

enable
at

ftop,whenever

and
felt his uneaftnefs,
the organs of

there-

full ftop,theyhabitually
ufe

they take breath.


importance a fpeaker,that he fhould have at all times
of breath, as that an organ (hould be fupplied
with a proper quantityof
this,he fliould take care alwaysto get a freflifupply,before he feels any want
he recruits it with fuch eafe,that his hearers are not at
he has fome to fpare,
tone

It is of

long

utter

of breath, and not to ftoptill the failure of that obliges


them to it,which
out
is
entirely
fore likely
the long fentence,into as
to happen in improperplaces;or elfe theyfubdivide

the

dif-

But

but upon
dangerousexperiment, and never juftifiable
the limits in the leaft,
cafe, the tranfgre/fing
Shakefpearhas well obferved in his inftruftion to
judicious
is

the

people in generalare

but when

too,

and
the very torrent, tempeji,

underftand

the whole

the reins,and has

givesup

at

his voice under command.

always have

temperancethat may give itfmoothnefs.

In

he

organs of fpeechwill be

other

he will

be the fafeftway

of it.

will

this,the

does

eafe; and

charge their feveral offices with

means,

the grammatical

without
ftruiSlure,

which he would

he

enforce

difmore

ftrongly

RHETORICAL

the reft,he may

than
ffrongly

attention, and giveit the


will

it is clofed,which
reflexion

by

make

precedeit by

givetime

of any

the mind

to

the

importanceof

fome

publicfpeaker;

every

his hearers, that he will

himfelf underllood.

Yet

mafteryof
But

thefe
fuch

to

oratory, 1
other

pains.

mean

Tones

to

all that is

hitherto

emphafisand

nature

thofe

be divided

may

of
paffions
and

which

paflions,Thefe

world,

and

faid

on

fentences.
parts of

into

kinds

two

The

felt

of

the influence
to

them

in

the very
cheat

Here

of

the

of any

of thofe

would

we
paflions

either
;

who

man

make

is mailer

delivery.

excellent

leaft

tibi ip/i,
is

well known

the

attain the nobler

to

as

of
paflions

the

to

we

not

ends

upon

infinite

ufe and

the proper

of

there

mankind,

clofeft attention,and

nagement
ma-

are

generalintonation,

are
natural,-

implanted in his

the

frame,-by

compact, to

excite emotions

do-not underftand.

we

mark

the different
ideas

may

reach

the

maxim,

and

operations,

and

thcfu- in

do.
languages

pains, when

we

are

ourfelvcs

as
they are neceffarily
produced by them
paflions,
the impaflioned
of writers ; or
in delivering
fpeeches

fhall fail of the

of the

tion,
forrow, lamenta-

in all countries,and
which

long
be-

as

the hand

all the different nations

fancy, in producingtheir
the

fuch

the influence of any of

under

of
expreflive

tones

the fame

are

fettled by

intellect and

voice, appertaining

difcourfe.

natural,and inflituted. The

are

of the

fpeakof that

to

mean

accompanyingwords

exprefs. We

manifeft,^and

refpeclto

tones

thefe,it is evident,neither requireftudynor

difcourfes

own

by all. Thus,

thofe which

are

producethem,

will be

primum
With

our

when
paflions,.

emotions

former

fo far

requirethe

ftate; which

in his animal

differ,in different countries,as

great meafure

a
an

applydofely, at

to

he is
break forth,whenever
fpontaneoufly
ufed by
form a univerfal language,equally

inftituted tones,

exertions,and

of

one

as

or
pleafurable,
this fubjecl,
refers only to particular
notes

flops,in

man

thofe

analogous

The

that

imprcflionon

cafes,even

in elocution,chiefly
depends.
affecting

underftood and
equally

to

us

mon
com-

powerfulefFedt.

any

in many

amongftus,

the article of

mirth,joy,hatred,anger, love,pity,"c.
in

ftill

go

may

fcnfe,nor

very

making

and
difpofitions,

will

mafter which

of thefe, is
and principal
firft,

the

to

fo far from

their views

the tempers,

commanding

be confidered

and
pervadeswhole periods,

which

of

of

power

of which,

to

defirous to extend

(hould be

I have

What

producea

attention,,
nor,

fufficient inducement

He

neither the

it

points.
as

pointsto

The

their

confidered
rhetoric,is comparatively

is
very circumftance,.therefore,

This

are

command

is the ftate of elocution

low

fo

of

of thefc rudiments

even

to

do both.

where

deeper into

and eflcntially
necefr
fundamentally

are

he will be

which,

without

be able

not

it fink

TONES.

confidered the feveral points, that

far I have

faryto

the point,he may

proper occafions may

on

Of
Thus

it, and let

upon

emphaticalword,

very

and this

ruminate

to

SI

longerpaufethan ufual,which will roufe


delivered ; or he may make
a longer
paufeafter

it is

weight when

more

paufebefore

admit

uHigewould

either

accordingto

or,

farther,and

GRAMMAR.

fo
point,mimic

indeed
hearts

far

of

will hold

the

as

fail of

we

the

tones

hearers.

much

but

in

der
un-

in

tempting
at-

affuming

for the time',


feeling,

of thofe

but
paflions,

Si vis

doUtulum
f.ere^

good with regardto

latter,it will requiregreat pains,and

me

all the other

obfcrvatlon,to

the

ejl

paflions.

become

ter
maf-

of them.
When
not

we

confider that

only adaptedin

the

all thefe

tones

are

to

be

to givedue
proportion
juftcft

accompanied by
force

to

fuitable looks and

the kntiment,

but

gcfture
;
alfo
regulated

fuch

to

be put in

And

the

ftudied

never

praaice,except

on

degreeof

having devoted
When

to
fpeechentirely

of

leavingthjt

reflea,that

wc

in
affeding

and

not

have

alfo the moft material

elocution, but

well aftonifhus

it may

All this

it is

be

cannot

the cultivation of the written

language,and

chance.

onlyevery thingwhich

of the fenfe of what

even
henfion,

and

time

whole

our

to

effentially
neceffary.
more
fhewn,
clearly
fucceedcd even
there,
tolerably
is the necelTary
confequenceof

degreeof

thofc who

attention

is fcarce known
of orator}fpecies
Nor is it hardlyever attempted

perfedionin it

the inftances are, of


by recolkdinghow few
bufinefs of their lives.
and
thoughit be the main objea

than

our

art.

indeed iome

ftage; where

at any
of arriving
difficulty

extreme

the

of
principles

the

even

the

that this

need not wonder

wc
graceful,

appear
have

who

us,

among

to

as

way

GRAMMAR.

RHETORICAL

53

is forcible

pleafurable,
every thingwhich

is

to a
pointsnecefTary

dependupon
uttered,

to

think,that fuch elTentialparts

diftinacompre-

ufe of tones, and their accompaniments';

the proper

is

fulJ and

of

languagefhould

in

civilized

country,'

worfe"
that our
youth fliould
and a country of freedom too, be wholly negleaed.Nay
is
in
the
little
that
but
art
of
ufed, they fhould
ufe
thefe,
only be uninftruded in the true
has clearly
pointed out
repugnant to thofe which nature
falfe rules,utterly

not

by
earlyperverted

be
to

how

And

us.

himfelf upon

ftampeJby God
of

it be

can

dies in the ear,

which

is

Such

the

fades upon

or

prefentftate,and fuch

our

livinglanguagebe reftored to

is the

it muft

nature.

the different manner

ever

vention
inone

in old Greece

improvedand

and

dignified

NUMBERS.

be ufed in the recitationof

examine, in the firftplace,wherein

to
neceflary

will be

to

as
eftablifhed,

art, that

of POETIC

the RECITATION

know

of art, and

continue,tillthe objedbe changed; tillthe

ever

its due rank, and fchools of rhetoric

Rome,

to

cold, lifelefswork

fight?

human

In order

vivifying
energetic
language,

penetratethe inmoft receflcsof the foul,for

can

and ornamental
moft ufeful,
the nobleft,
for teaching

Of

the

givenup

for that which

natures,

our

have

we

bartered that,which

? and

man

otherwife,when

verfe,from that

the diiFerence between

of

profe,it

profeand

verfe

confifts.
Poetic numbers

by

fimilar laws.

the

beautyof

are

founded

and
Proportion

each

depends upon

eiTentialdifference between
inarticulatefounds:
bars

order

but

the

are

them, is,that the

in the
fyllables

one

meafure,and

movement.

in bars; and

Feet confiftof

certain number

of thofe

all like

of the

matter

to
correfpond

conftituent parts of verfe are, feet,and

The

fources of the

which
fyllables

mark

the others.

this

This

movement
regular

diftinaion

are

the due

of

certain number

feet,when

meafure, and

in the

notes

meafured

made

from

both, and
The

movement.

cal
other; poeticfeet,to mufi-

diftribution of which, refult

united together,
like
fyllables

pace

notes

the rules of the different

called feet,bccaufe

of the

governed

are

governedby fimilar laws.

completed,accordingto
are

receive

confiftsof articulate,
of the other,

and
properties,

form verfes or ftrains. They


of verfification,
fpecies
the voice as it were
flopsalongthroughthe verfe,in
that the

one

paufes;from

mufical,and

we
pleafure

due obfervation of the laws of

to ftrains: theyhave
verfes,

and

thofe of the

with
principles

the fame

upon

and

it is

by

their aid that

it is therefore

voice,ftiould in fome

manner

necefl^ary
be dif-

the ancient

Romans, by dividing
among
and afccrtaining
their quantity,
longand fliort,
by an exaa proportionin founding
to one
portant,
as two
; and the longfyllables,
long,beingto the ftiort,
beingthus the more im-

from
tinguiftied

was

into
their fyllables
them

the

market! the

movement.

In

arc
Englifli,
fyllables

divided into accented

and unaccented;
and

RHETORICAL

A
the accented

and

ftrefsof the voice

long fyllables
were,
peculiargeniusof

of
variety

errors

tongue,

fome

had recourfe
our

the

havingexamined

not

thofe

to

of

whereof
fyllables

rendered it

tional defecl in their tongue, which


it has neither accent,

quantity,fuited

nor

greater than that of the fhort.


that
prefent,

verfes

our

verfes of ten,
the

by

Hence

for

few

tongue,

our

the Romans.

Profodians

our

With

fallen into

have

compofed,

purpofej

long time

of feet,but

even
fyllables,

given us

the

ear.

hence,

formed

by

of
fyllables

conftltu-

poeticfeet.

their words

For

beingfor

all

proportion

moft

peopleat

and accordingly
minated
fyllables;
theyare denohave we
to this day. Thus
loft fight
of

French, in point of poetic numbers,

the

over

the

which

French,our

like the

of

account

on

long fyllables
beingout of
it was
fuppofcd,as it is by

of

French, they

the

regardto

incapableof numbers

number
a

them.

proportion,on
geometrical

And

of

Profodians

our

without
feet,not fyllables,

to

our

verfification;

with
incompatible

formerlyfnewn,
in

the

farther

geniusof

be

an

chief

verfification
depends

of

harmony

contains

natural

no

in verfe,arifesfrom
pleafure

anfwered

any of them

Thus

tongue.

our

of ours,

it makes

it

to

and

that

And

verfes were

our

the

fome

becaufe the Roman

of them

feet were

were

formed

profody
utterly
by quantity,

fyllables
long; whereas I have
which it is laid,
on
fyllable

makes
certainly

their whole

really
compofed

rules of the Latin

the

exadly,and

denominatingall the accented

long.

theyendeavour

error,

all
examination, boldlyapplied

that the accent, in fome cafes,as

others

in which

this to
finding

though fcarce

they afiertedthe fame

Roman,

53

quantity,among

ourfelves to that of the arithmetical kind, which

of

as
fliort,

R,

of rhimc.

ornament

Some

their

they were

the

to

language has

our

blindlyreduced

the
of pleafing

four

eight,fix,or

beingcapableof

its

; and

poor

the

compofed, not

were

great advantagewhich

power

; and

part equallyaccented

the moft

by

elTentialdifference between

an

verfes by the number

meafured

iM A

ing
havingadoptedthe rules of our neighbours,the French ; and others havof the ancients; though neither of them, in reality,
would fquarewith
of

account

on

from the unaccented,by the peculiar


being as ftrongly
diftinguiflied
fyllables,
the
and pointing
out
capableof marking the movement,
them, are equally
upon

reo-ularpaces of the voice, as the


From

the

theoryof quantity,borrowed from the


long and fhort,as immutably fixed

eftablifh the proportionof

that the

conftructed in a certain way, at once


falls to the ground; when
it is fhevvn,
is perpetually
gulated
quantityof our fyllables
varyingwith the fenfe,and is for the moft part rehas
the
courfe
Le6lures
Art
which
been
of
the
of
in
on
:
proved
by emphafis
fully
reading

Verfe

where

to

the

of words
fyllables

it has

the

over

been

alfo

fliewn,that

this very circumftance

has

givenus

from

the profaic. Of

the poetic paufes, there

other I fhall call the Final.

final,clofes it. The

The

two

are

cefural,divides the

cefural paufe,is known

to

all who

forts ;

verfe into

one

for that very

tindion

reafon,that

profe,fince

to

difference between

niiftaken,whilft
from

Do

we

there has not

equal,or

remains;

It is the line drawn


remove

it, and

between

it is

of

that

the nature

verfe,in

alone
occafions,
which can
boundaries,

in many
impo/Tiblc,

cafes,

to

of

fubjecl.It is

many

their

the

contradifmarks

the

never

be

the
diftinguifh

the other.
not

obferve, that verfe is written in

of verfification,
fpecics
every

Vol.

givenan adequateidea
on

unequalparts ;

with
acquaintance

have any

it is the ufe of this final paufe,which,

the two.
it

been

hitherto

Ctfural,the

denominated

verfe; but the final has hitherto efcapcJthe obflrvation of all the writers upon

each

vantage
amazingad-

ing
other conftituent part of verfe,confifts in paufes,peculiarly
belongingto verfe,and differ-

The

one

an

ancients,in point of poeticnumbers.

I.

different way

line is bounded

by
o

from

profe?

Do

we

the meafure ? that is,muft

not

find that in

when
terminate,
the

the number

the

of feet which

itfelf,
can

form

only that

is it to the eye

judgment of

no

of metre, is

the kind

belongsto

? And
diftin(flly

metre

GRAMMAR.

RHETORICAL

54

meafure

the

; and (hall the ear, the fole judge of numbers,

in the

perceptionof metre,

If it
the

indeed

were

know,

that

fenfe from

law

of

of the

boundaries

of

one

line

one

ends, it will

to

our

would

greateft
perfedionsin

another, I

the

have

be often carried
away

laftword

in fuch

improper;

and

one;

of

is

than

by

thus

the

ufed

and

fing;

you read, you


avoid

to

and

verfe

fo

there

if you

manner

difpofed
; by

in the

poft,into the
the relation

of

than

the line

as

fuch

line,leaves

Wtween

it and

no

fuch

fuch

the

was

to

fee

having

pronounce

this is

fentence,which

certainly
is

complete
in-

an

ihe

meanings
highernote

continual

metre

with
highlydelighted
of

reader

into

of readers have

his

and

tune,

own

fort,that Caefar faid,

this

theywould
means

chofen

theythink

what

do in fentences of

theyreduce

into confufion ; his

verfe

to

profe,were

If

'

imprefEon

its correlative,
which

the

find the fame

In vain have Prior and

difcord.

melody,into

their

theyto

none

hobblingkind of metre, neither


the bed proportioned
numbers
in

laboured

ear

fafer coyrfe,

the riclieftrhime; the laftword,


on

theyfind

another,without the leaft paufe,where

readers,has Milton

couplet,
foughtout

next

who

never

of the fame high


repetition
becomes
diftindlly,
difgufting
by its
to
cept
recitation,
extremelydifagreeableevery ear, exbut

it marks

It

pure

manner

and whofe

and

them,

Now

the

Some,

often confound

words,

fure
mea-

and loft in

hurried
a

from
precipitately

clufter of words, marks

fimilar poftsin
diftinguifhed

the

its
not

verfes

two

which means
the whole efreclof the rhime, as well as the metre, is loft. We
; by
caufe
fall into this laft method, becf Readers (hould readily
wonder, however, that the majority
iikc
and
read
verfe
it
cofts
them
trouble
have
all
learned
read
to
to
profe.
no
profe,
they

giventhc-m

had

need

not

But

it v/i!lbe

if
aflced,

this final

is it poflible
mark
to

voice, how
at

the

as

feems
general,

bulk

one

which

blank verfe ; his order,is turned

Dryden,

well

of

one

the

it,be changedto

fentence.

member

complete

theyufe

we

the

(ing,you fing\'eryill.'

faults,the

profe. In vain, to

nor

with

clofe with

not

of

member

be

flops;

chantingto

runningthe lines

in the fenfe ; in the fame


words

paufe

fenfe,as

verfe,though

air of

thefe feveral

is, that of

which

(hew where

to

the end of fuch lines; but

at

ufuallymarks

as

that appear

to others.
imaginesit givesequalpleafure

To

mark

no

But when

verfe.
beginthe fubfequent

thofe of the fentential kind,

that of the reciterhimfelf;who, in

be

the fenfe does

metre, make

in any of the fentential

givesan

delight,

drawingout

verfe,is,that of

confounded

fenfe,and,

with thofe that

the
disjoining

clofe of every

the

monotony;

note,

cafe,if there

be miftaken.

not

heroic

enthufiaftickind, elevate their voices,at the end of all verfes,to

more

ever

at

note,

theymake

becaufe

of

arrangement

herfelf has annexed

bulk of readers,or divided their opinionsmore,

connexion
necefTary

pointingout the
taughtany other paufe,but

0:hers

by

blank

our

afraid in that

am

of
neceflity

been
the

could

then be fixed,and

thofe verfes ought to be recited,


where

laft words

fuch

in
pleafure

any
nature

to mark

which, of

of the meafure ?
any mark, to pointout the completion
that every line fliould terminate with a flopin the fenfe,
verfification,

profe. Nothinghas puzzledthe


in which

take

which

to

? the eye,

be marked

to

this done

not

be left without

meafure

the

is

metre

founds, nor

in

words

completed. Is

all in the

it

it
voice,but fufpending

with the
conne(fledinftantly
name

has

of the
once

never

all? To

marked

by

this the anfwcr

in the fame individual

This

note

an

is

of the
or
elevation,
deprellion

obvious; by making

that would

I have

be

no

ufed, were

been

thoughtof;

nor

is the management

cf

it

to

be

change
it

to

before defcribed under

word.
following
recitation
to the juft
paufeof fufpenfion
; which, thougheflentially
necefTary

flopis what

of

be
the

verfe,

tion,
acquiredbut by great attenufe of this pauie, the melody

praiSice,
accordingto the method before propofed. By the
with the fenfe.
without interfering
may at all times be preferved

and

of verfe

paufe is neither

at

For the

paufeitfelf,
per-

feaiy

The

but
onlypreferved,

is not

metre

the

paufe,which,

nrft

and the

lines of

two

The

The

As

thus

to

fet down

Ihould be thus divided


not

yet

as

my

place.
paufe, however

to

producingthe

"

be

placethe

inflame-

good

Aide

moderation

"

his
fecurity

"

gold

"

the
provinces

plunder

to

words

which

any

main"

requirean immediate union


neceflarily
hurt the underftanding.
Lines of

muft

cefura
perfedi

whofe

Or

''

'

fpritesof fiery
termagants
'

to

my

place

'

own

crofs

'

native moderation

'

Your

on

placeis fuppliedby

two

with each
this flruc-

or
femi-paufes,

good

fecurity his
'

'

'

to

plunderprovinces
own

and what
kepttogether,

inflame-

Aide

''

refiftlefs
eloquence

In all cafes of this fort,


every man's

"

gold"

employ"
the main"

will pointout
underftanding
may

be

without
feparated

of the voice fliould be from accent

to

to

him, what words

prejudice

it will be onlynecelTary
to obferve
propriety,
fliouldbe pronouncedexadly in the fame way as

recite verfe with

2.

would

all of fimilarftrudlure,
to

"

And

1 he movement

at thofe
improperly,

fineftmelody. There

"

crofs

Back

All the words

refiftlefs eloquence employ"

own

contain
reality

1.

manner"
following

found.

are

native

own

the

place.

lines,and
following

in the

native

place

The

to

that

love their

been

have

of
disjunftion

demi-cefurasjas thus

be

arts

it might givethe ear,


pleafure

other, whatever

own

floppedin

found.

are

his guard,he will be apt

upon

on

Your

in

"

yet

native

"

And

not

arts, that not

of fiery termagants
fprites

Back

Or

I have feen

"

The

fuch unnatural

ftill

that account,

great temptation,on

To

placed after the word /r/7,as thus"

your bleft abodes"

deftroyed.They

^'

Mufes

feats of the cefura,which

do

ccfura be

Waller's,which

loft in him

reader be much

cefura wrong.

is

metre

We've

force.

uncommon

from your bleft abodes-

ftilllove, their

Mufts

the
which pointing,

ture

"

fprungfrom

loft in him

We've

Unlefs

the darts with

out

lowing
unexpectedtrochee fol-

the

is reftored.

metre

Of the fame kind, are

But

fprung

firfl

enforced,by

thus"

verfe,but hobblingprofe. But let the


Ambition

By

much
expreffion

fhoots

Pope's,read

Ambition
is no

the

it were,

as

of

line
following

The

GRAMMAR.

RHETORICAL

56

accent,

to

are

ceflarily
ne-

the fenfe.

the ^tvi following


fhort rules.

in profe.

layingno

ftrefson

mediate
the inter-

f\llables.
3.

There

fliould be the fame obfervation of

fyllables,in
as

emphafis,and

the fame

changeof

notes

on

the

phatic
em-

profe.
4' ^^^
.

paufesrelative

The

4.
manner

in

as

ral and

final,as

before

to
difagreeable

is
in

high

quis

fenfe

the

to

I C

ipfe

No

'

muft

be

or

that of the chanter

is

tune

unpleafingto

tune

the fentiments

refult from

and

due

thofe

to

Such

the old

to

R.

57

be obfervcd

in the fame

peculiarto verfc, the

cefu-

of

readers,indeed, feem generally

obfervation,baud cuiquaminjucwida

But

himfelf.'

proportion

two

fpeciesof chanting into poetical


numbers,

himfelf.

the poet's mufic, when


to
they
doing great injuftice
then only be heard, when
his verfes are
of the poet can

are

paufes.

mufic, for,accordingto

own

man's

given

I call mufical

introducingfiiig-fong
notes,
their

I call fentential,
are

only, which

which
defcrilied,

every ear, but

raptures with

cantat

attention
profe; but particular

ufual fault of

The

they ought

fubftitute their

own

fuch

recited with

obferved, in

time

to

the

confider,that they
in its room.

The

of the voice

notes

feet and

as

paufes, the

conftituent parts of verfe.


Thus

far I have

But

with

time

and

regardto

ever

expedl

the whole

art

and Praclia^

Vol,

I.

the grace

in the feveral

tone

and

the fentiments

to

laid open

to

all that is

recitingverfe, and

in

committed

have
of

to
necelThry,

point out

the

feet,and paufes, and


is obvious

brought

Elocution,in

prevent the reader's


of

means

to

the fame

the exa"t

that littlecan

be

into
falling

attaining

in
elegance of delivery,confifting

and

paffions,it
this part

to

the nicer

general intonation

as

all other

the ufual
proper

arts

are

errors

manner.

proportions both
of

Nor

can

to
inftituted,

are. taught,by

of

the voice fuited

done, by precept alone.

till rhetorical fchools


pcife^lion,
manner

juftand

we

teach

Precept^
Example,

the

precedingGrammar,
INfounded,
for

is

and

put

end

an

of

fiifterent modes

Some
has

authority

have

recourfe

is

have

is, nor

The

only

word,

as

To

fure

this

explain

It has

but

which

the

the

errors

oceafjon

occaiions

others

refer

from

them,

prefcnr,

fhall

thit

is but

for

and

operates,

when

without

it

being

diredlor.

all others

governs

pens,
hap-

preponderate?

very uncertain

reafons

it often

as

analogy, which,

to

which
terminating fyllable,

is the

at

when,

which

determine

what

on

and

deviations

many

in

the

Clip.

for

of

the

accent

termination

the

on

as

laft

be

ften

will

you

latent

upon

may

in ance,

antepenult, or

con'cordance,

pronounced

proceed

termination,

that

the

examining

fliould be

pronunciation

former

words

in

p. 31. where

generalhave

the

word

the

difputed, whether

generallyoperates
in

knowing

not

any

ihail

who

but

and

by examples.

advocates

Grammar,

and

this

on

does

much

been

The

ance.

guide

the rudder

laws,

its

ought

force

cafes,

different partifans of the

the

authority;

to

of

polyfyMablesfe

of

all difficulties in dubious

fubjedt,by

recourfe
be

pronunciation

folve

io

that

to

the

icivc

upon

againftanother,
;

which

will

and

Some

neither

derivation

to

with

acquainted

"7"tce

words.

balanced

principleupon

true

laid open;

influence, they fall into continual

no

well

founding

one

difputesdaily held

the Preface, that

in

mentioned

the

nrft time

the

numberlefs

to

fyllablebut

of

it faid

the

to

in
Polyfyllables

"

Examp.

two.

analogy,

recourfe

by having

find

concor'd-

or

principle

Arrogance,

elegance, fjgnifieance.

nants,

appe'arance,affu 'ranee

as,

that

fallen into

analogy

which

no

The

one

itfelf

fet them
the

accent

for

the

with

good

is another

which

word

termination

p.

my,

certainlythe Icfleningas

as

to

pronunciation
upon

ind in which

rule

2d

the

cafe,

as

it is

has

it

preceded by

on

the penult.

Confo'

two

exceptions mentioned

of
be

of

rule,

any

fame

the

upon

firft

the

on

regard to

much

2{J,y,zvhcn

or

they might

as

right in this

been

rule

adopted,

yet, ignorant

difputable cafes, preferencehas

great advantage
the

will hold

acad'emy,

or

adjuftedby looking

to

might

have

attending to

not

And

error.

dis'cordance, with

obfervation

Ac'ademy,

derivative

the lail, the

on

gine
ima-

ground they might

well

fyllable,as

above,

would

one

as

con'cordance,

attempted.

ever

fame

all

this

word

the

pronounce

In

general, and

by following the
have

its accent

appe'ar,aiFu're

; from

difcor'dance.

abun'dance,

as,

Now

they

the primitive has

ly?. When

Exceptions.

this

it will render

it, as
of

the

word

wind,

principle,that

the vowel

/ is not

the

is

no

the

word

refractory,or refrac'tory.

occafioned

much

difputej

you

will iind

it

37.

given
as

to

that

of

it

it fliould

be

anomalies

as,

of

eafy.

more

monofyllablein

pronounced long;

is moft

pronunciation which

poffiblethe

attainment

whether

there

has

wi'nd
the

or

any

Thus

able
conform-

language will
in

the
vi-'nd',

the

be

former

has

been

Englifh language terminating

blind, rind,

kind

"c.

difpute about

I have

often

in

heard

Dr.

APPENDIX.
Dr. Swift fayto thofe who

in
pronounced it fliort,

why you call it wind.'


Obfervations of this Icind

might be

chief miftakes made

The

by

moft words

bdr, in

Irifh fay,patron, matron,


the

vowel,

the

if

as

the

e;

whole

this rule there

be found in the words,


well

c.ption,

as

father,papa,

fo it would

father; and

as

the
ra-ther,laying

accent

the vowel

on

the vowel

precedesthe
it precedes
/w,

letter

it

when

when

third

Paul

if

found
; aw,

in that of

marked

by

law; all,in

call

of

in

Im,

a,

[ee] is marked
he.

by

is on

accent
to

Ei,

of

the whole

their

of

manner

language,to
rather

ex-

an

it,
pronouncing

the difference.

be

accent

the vowel

on

likewife

; as

this latter exception,


pronounce
quawm,

"c.

cawm,

confonants,fuch

vowels, or

the Irifli
make

In the
as

in

an,

miftake,except

no

of

^-^

ea,

theypronounce
e,

except in the

to

wear.

generalrule,and
ee

in hate.

as

miftake

fuch

change the
univerfally

the

found

ec,

and ;V.

found.

ea,

whenever

want

thefe words

by the Englifh,and

as

by

as

the

if

the
bear,
for-

of knowing

Ireland,after fome time of refidencc in London,

pronounce

Thus

a.

bear, to bear, to
For

In

fpelt,
tay, fay,

they

to

of

lieve,
befecm, field,

were

found

pear,

has its fecond

meet,

is upon

This

found of e, into
if

as
words, tea, fea,pleafe,

words, great, a
following

in

as

Englifli
conftantly
give this

In all which

the gentlemenof
exceptions,

is alfo founded

of fecond a,

vowels, fuch as, ea, ei, e finalmute,

and ie,the Irifh never

the

the accent

when
by the Englifh,

ee

found

the

of

tee, fee,pleefe.The

the vowel

fall into the

to

give it

differentcombinations

fwear, to tear,

thefe

it,it is invariably
pronounced

written,bawm, pfawm,

but in all the others,theyalmoft

in the combination

plays;inftead of

before mentioned.

as

laftcombinations

two

in

aid,in bald; alk,in talk,"c.

it ; whilft the Irifh in moft words

the

as

fecond vowel, e, is for the moft part founded

The

the

whilft

is on the conand the accent


fonant,
fyllable,
the
alfo
found
fame
hat',mai/; as
lengthened

different combinations
;

father

think alfo the word

makes

fa'r,
ba'r,though the

theywere

Irifh,as in

tended
atrule,ftridly
following

exceptionsin

of
ba'lm,pfa'lm.The Irifh,ignorant

as

of that ftruflure as

all words

as

r,

the

in the fame

alwaysits firftfound,

has

by

Englifh.Thus

the confonant,th,
Englifh
pronunciation,

but in the

follows the vowel

confonant

be

to

appear

as

on

Irifh may

which
is taken into the firftfyllable,
as thus, rath'-er,
Whenever

accent

but three

The

mama.

the moft part in the

language.

has the

are

the

unne-

an

Grammar.

ProntDiciation
jiift

in the word

The

be

in the
adjufttd

day,by

found

written,paytron, maytron.

this miftake throughthe


rectify
and
vowel, a, finifhes a fyllable,

[day] by the Englifh.To

in

as

great rriindto find

but it would

length;

that matt'

order to attain

fame

a, havingthe

to, will
the

I have

Englifh,lie for
pronouncing
former beinggenerally
founded

it is pronounced a,

where

them

Englifh
pronounce

When

confiJerable

to a

thingrelative to

the Irifh in

firftvowels, a and

founds of the two


the word

tone,
jeering

in
by the Natives "?/Ireland
cbferved
of EngUp.

be

to

extended

will find every

trouble,as the Reader


ceflary
Rules

59
"

are

apt

fpelt,
greet, beer, fweer, "c.

Irifti; thus the words

receive,
deceit,

re/ave.Ei is alwaysfounded e.^, except when a g


defate,
follows it, as in the words, reign,
6cc. as alfo in the words, reiu (ofa bridle},
rein-deer,
deign,
feign,
vein,drein,veil,
heir,which are pronouncedlike rain,vain,drain,vail,air.
The final mute
makes the preceding^
in the fame fyllable,
when accented,have the found of jy,
e
pronounced by

are

as

in the

the

them

as

if written

w:ord6,fupreme,fincere,replete.Thi"

Irifh,v/ho

pronounce

all fuch words

as

rule

is almoft

broken throughby
univerfally

Jcc.
if written,fuprame,fin?urc,
rcplatc-,

There
air

APPEND

eo
but

are

two

to
exceptions

which
Englifhpronunciation,

this rule in the

tlie

are

words,

there,where.

markingthis found,by a double "",as thus,ee, as thelriflinever malce any miftakes,


of thefe feveral combinations,
the rightpronunciation
for all who want
to acquire
the bed method
is, to fuppofethat ea, ei,and e attended by a final mute e, are all fpeltwith a double e, or ee.
In the way of

Ey

is always founded

like

when
by the Englifli,

key
givethe
A

with
ftrid obfervation of thefe few rules,

due

way

concerned.

are

been

as

the
The

taken
already

In order
under

more

to

poliflied
part of the inhabitants of

diphthongsthey commit

notice of in the Grammar

in the words,

*.

no

pronounce

rated
exceptionsenume-

their words

Englanddo, fo far

fault in, except in the found

Where

of

as
i

in
exactly

the vowels
which

has

onlydifference in pronouncing
the founds of d and t, in certain
thickening

likewife the

is the
out ; which
pointed
this habit f.
an
eafymethod propofedof correcting
the whole, I fliallnow
give a liftof fuch detached words, that do not
to complete
in Ireland from what theyare in
above
rules,as are pronounceddifferently
any of the

any of the confonants


fituations; and

come

it; as

attention to the very few

above, will enable the well-educated natives of Ireland


the fame

is upon

but

two
are
exceptions,in the words
pronouncedpray, convay.
often
ley,founded he, lee. The Irifh,in attemptingto pronounce like the Englifh,
thus
for
ei
to
fame found to ey, as ufually
convee.
pr^iy,convey, theyfaypree,
belongs
;

prey, convey,
and

the accent

this there

To

has been

England.
EngUJhproti.

IriJ})
pron.

Engl'iJ})
pron.

(n

APPENDIX.

EngUJhpron.

Iiijhpron.

EngUjhpron.

JilJJj
pren.

reach

all the words


are
Thefe, after the clofeftattention,
that I have
of

been able

not

included

in the rules Lefore laid down,

collect,in \^hich the well-educated natives

to

of Ireland differ from

thofe

England,
With
of

regardto the natives of Scotland


from the Englifh,
than that
points,

their dialefl: differs more,

as

"

of any others who

fpeakthat

and in

ber
greaternum-

a
language,it will require

more
pains to corre"t it. The mofl: material difference in pointof
pervadestheir whole fpeech,is that of alwayslayingthe accent on the
This has been already
taken notice of in
vowel, in words where it ought to be on the confonant.
the Grammar, and the method
of curingthis habit pointed out.
In this article therefore they
cxercife themfelves,
till theyattain a facility
in accenting
and giving
fhould chiefly
the confonants,
their true founds to the preceding
vowels, accordingto the rule there laid down ; for it is in this
the Scotch and Englifh
that the chief difference between
pronunciationconfifls. With regardto
called
Scotch
is
the
differfrom the Engintonation indeed,or what
commonly
accent, theytotally
in my Ledures on the Art of Reading. But in this,
I have treated at large
lifli
written
; of which
rules can be of littleufe,except when affifledby the living
voice; and therefore the aid of mafters,

greater number

of

and
pronunciation,

rules,and

which

{halljoinexample

who

precept, is here

required.If

the fame

ardour

continues for

a
obtaining
prevail
among the young gentlemenof Scotland,when I
have it in their power to com pa fs the
delivered my Courfe of Lectures at Edinburgh,theywill now
Nor will theylong be
their
certain
and
own
labour,
chiefly
application.
grounds,
by
pointupon
where that is requifice,
without due afliflance,
upon proper encouragement; for as there could be no
to

which
delivery,
juftand polifiied

I found

hopesof havingfkilfulmafters to teach this art, without firflhavinga proper method of inftrudion ;
fo, that method
being now laid open, will no doubt induce numbers to applythemfelves to the
mafteryof it,in order to become preceptors in that mofl ufeful and ornamental of all arts.
Nor are there wantingexamples to flimulate thofe who are in purfuit
and to enof this objefl,
fure fuccefs to their endeavours.
There is at this day a gentlemanof that country, now
don,
in Lonof
the
who
did not leave Scotland tillafter he had been fome years adin a highoffice
vanced
law,
in manhood; and yet, after having received inftrudion for a few months only,according
in this work, his fpeechwas
laid down
to the method
not
from that of the moft
to be diflinguifhed
both
in
natives
of
of
and intonation;and he is perhaps at
England,
polifiied
point pronunciatiori
this day the befl patternto be followed with regard
to both, whether in the Houfe of Commons, or
at

the bar.
And

yet there was

of SefEon,who,
rule

or

thoughhe

more

had

inflance which
extraordinary
never

been

much
method, onlyconverfing

with
regularly
not

flilla

feme of the

of

out

with

fuch

met

with

at

in
Edinburgh,

Scotland,yet merelyby

his

Engliflimenhappened

be

aflors,airived
principal

as

even

at

an

to

accuracy of

own

Lord

pains,w-ihout

there,ard

reading
and had.
pronunciation,

the leafltiniSlureof the Sccttifh intonation.


"

Vol. L

Loid

Ayimoor.

ci

I fliall

62

APPENDIX.
I fhali now

fay a

mightget rid
The

placeof

the

of

room

Thus

the three

inftead of b.,theyufe p

femivowels,they fubftitute/

of eth ; and

ejhin that of ezh.

the

and

impure;

For blood, they fay,plut ; for God,

ufe of the

room

for g,

Cot

them,

thefe

in the
way

kvcn

confonants

defcribed in the

and

their

three

conftantly
fubfrituting

femivowels,in
afpirated

theyufe k,

and

for

or

hard

the

in.

and for d,

c;

In like

dear, tear.

placeoi v;

in the

praift'c
; inftead of

ttofte ; inftead of azure, ofier,


theyfay,afhur,oft.er. Thus
confonants which the Welfh
all. Now
at
never
pronounce

to

eafily
they

placeof

ner,
man-

etti

inftead of virtue and vice, theyfay,firtiie


and

Thus

fice; inftead of zeal and praife,theyfay,feal and

formation between

ftiew how

in order to

from
pronunciationarifes chiefly

Welfh

in the

the three vocal.

in the

Inhabitants of Wales

the

to

provincialdialed.

mutes,

they employ /.
in

words

of the
peculiarity

the three
pure
the

few

of their

their fe\en

there

thefe and

are

no

thofe,ttTefle and

lefs than

feven

of

cur

if the difference in the manner

correfpondentones,

Grammar, theymight in

fiiorttime be

of

pointedout

were

taughtthe perfsdt

ufe of them.
The

peopleof

the Welfli.

Somerfetfhire pronounce

For whereas

the Welfh

change the

into
change the afpirate

the vocal.

zhire;

So that their method

for

thin.
tlTin,

in

the femivowels

vocal into

dire"lly
oppofitcto that of
afpirate,
they of Somerfetfhire

way

the

For father,theyfay,vather
of cure,

for

ZomerzetSomerfetfhire,

is to take the dired

courfe
oppofite

that

to

of the Welfli.

EXPLANATION
Of

ufedin

the Method

'T^HE

the

to point out
Diclionary,
folloiving
of the Words,

firftneceiTary
ftep,is,that every reader fhould commit

of the vowels

to

memory

the Pronuna'afion

the

fchcme
following

*.
Firft.

AccorJinf
One

hat

writ,and
Stir

each

one

the

bet

fit

not

but

love-ly

Tills has been

vowel

ufurpsthe

Birth

Bet

of

power

Love

berth

the above

the other
fpelt,

luv

explanationof the other marks

Bear

Beer

bear

As

thus

"

beer, ";c.

will fliew the vowel

that

"

Bufy bizzy
p. 4.

"

lioIJ it in his hand

This is the
will make

theyare pronounced.

as

bet

As thus

in the Grammar,

ftiieme, and

throughoutthe Didionary.

marked

another, the firftcolumn

that is founded.

alreadyrecomrnendcd

ihoiildcopy

of the vowels

hall

Hall

fixed in his memory.


he has it perfeclly
of the

theyare

as

hate

one

lye

founds

the

are

Hate

other, the

ftur

Reader

exhibits the words

Whenever
is

hat

this fcheme

to

column
Hat

Blood

where
when

he will
only difliculty

blud

Bird

in
it is alfo propofed
he

confult.s the

burd.

note,

that

Didionary, till

be put to ; for the bare

reading

clear to him.
them fiifficicutly

All

APPENDIX.

6^
yfcicm

the

over

Over

Confinant,

flu/

be're

luv

he

biz

zy

of
fyllables

all letters which


and
to

the

are

the words
united

feparated from

fantaftic mode

are

divided according
in the fame

reft; which

followed

in

our

ne

so'fhal.

in utterance

the

re

gro

laf'tur
The

the Voivel.

to

the

mode

fyllable,are

certainlyis

the

and
fpelling-books

natural

of

here

pronouncing them
kept together alfo

divifion,though

it be

grammars.

GENERAL

that

is,

in writing,

contrary

GENERAL

DICTIONARY
OF

THE

ENGLISH

LANGUAGE.

ABA

firft letter of

The

A
Before

Angular number;
word

is written
noun,

; A

has

of

before

corruptedin

it
a

the

to

Given

f.

ABBOT,

The

ab-.^r-t;k'-d-la"ftiun.

To

caft down,

to

deprefs, to bring lov/.

beingbrought

a-ba

f.-ment.

aft of

by

away

is

yarn

on

f.
ab'-ba-fy.
of an
privile";es

ab'-befs. f.

agent

or

caufo

procured.
a

weaver's

warp.

rights,polTcf-

The
abbot.
The

fuperior of

or

ab'-by.f.

ABBY,

ab'-but.

men

Thechief

f.

monafteryof

or

women.

of

convent

of

men.
v.
j
ab-br3'-vy3te.

ABBREVIATE,

fhorten,to

aft of
a.

The

The

f.

-tur.

abatement

cut

To

{hort.
f.
The
ab-brcv-yj'-fhun.

ABBREVIATION,

ma-

quantity taken

or

perfons, whether
religious

higheftdegree.

articulation that has

a-ba'fe.v.

an

ab'. f.

ABBEY,
up

The

nunnery.

To

fpeciesof

a-ba

which

fions, or

give

fum

lefs.

grow

abating.

ABATER,

the

forfalce.

di

'

aft of

ABBESS,
To

a.

v.

^-ban'-dun-ment.

ABASEMENT,

ABATEMENT,

ABB,

To

n.

a-ba'te-ment. f.

ABBACY,
fore-partof

leflen, to

To

a-ba'te,
v.

ABATE,

by

abandoning.

ABASE,

To

the

the

Tomakeafliamed.

minifh.

ticiple,
par-

nifeft motion.
To

a-ba'te

ging
beg-

column.

the

ABARTICULAtIoN,
That

a-bafti'.

ABATE,

year.

a-brm'-dund. part.
;

counting table;

defert;

to

ABASH,

To

abating;the

hunting,

To

tree.

vowel,

placed

From

refign,or quit;

ABANDONMENT,

f.

is fometimes

a-ban'-dun.

ABANDONED,
forfaken

man,

the

the ftern.

ABANDON,

aft of

a-baf 't.ad.

fhip, towards

of

with

hundred

uppermoft member
ABAFT,

nouns

fignification
denotingproportion,

hath

ab'-a-kus. f. A

ABACUS,

up,

is

participial
noun;

the landlord

To

ox

an

as,

great A

or

beginning

an,

as,

alphabet. A,

the

article fet before

an

ABB

fhortening.

ABBREVIATOR,

f. One^
ub-brev-ya'-tur.

,'ho

abrid2;es.
f.

low ; depreflion.

The

flate of

A
f.
.^b-bre'-vy.i-tare.

ABBREVIATURE,
mark

urt;d for the fake of

(hortening.
Tu

A
To

To give
v. a.
ab'-*ly-kate.

ABDICATE,

right, refign.

up

abhorrence

The aft of
ab-dy-kd'-fliun.

ABDICATION,

f.

abdicating,
refignation.
caufes

a.

ab-do'-men.f.

ABDOMEN,

That

called the lower

venter

or

monly
cavitycombelly.

Relat-

ab-dom''-m!-nus.^ ingtothe

abdomen.
To

ab-du'fe.
v.

part, to withdraw

ferve to open

to

pullback

Mufcles

cent
abdu-

divers parts of

body.
ab-dik'-tor.f. The

ABDUCTOR,
which

ABED,

or

draw

ferent
dif-

part from another.

.ib-du'-lcnt.
a.

ABDUCENT,
the

To

a.

one

draw

back

mufcles,

the feveral members.

ad.
a-bed',

In bed.

ab-er'-ranfe.
f.

A deviation
ABERRANCE,
from the right
way, an errour.
The fame with
ABERRANCY,
ab-er'-ran-fy.
Aberrance.

ab-hor'-rur.
f. Abater, detefter.
a-bl'de.v.

ABIDE,
to

right
ABERRATION,
or

; to

remove

To

n.

bear

-or

dwell in

quencesofa thing;it is ufed


and at or
with before a perfon,
a-bi'-dur.f.

ABIDER,
or

dwells

in

The

with

the

in before

place,
confe-

fupportthe

particle
a place.

perfonthat abides

place.

ding.f.
a.
ab'-jekt.
a-bi

Continuance.

Mean
worthlefs ;
or
ABJECT,
value.
or of no
contemptible,
f. A man
v/ithout hope.
ABJECT, ab'-jekt.
To ABJECT,
To throv/ away.
v.
a.
ab-jck't.
f. The
ABJECTEDNESS,
ab-jek'-ted-nsfs.
ftate of an abjeft.
of
f.
Meannefs
ab-jek'-fhun.
ABJECTION,
mind ; fervility
bafenefs.
;
In an
ad.
ab'-jekt-ljr.
ABJECTLY,
abjeft
meanly.
manner,
f.
ABJECTNESS,
ab'-jekt-nefs.
Servility,
meannei

ab-er'-rant.
a.
Wanderingfrom

ABERRANT,
the

inconfiftent
contraryto, foreign,

ABIDING,

ABDUCE,

To

not

ab-dom'-ml-nal
ml-nal. ")a.

ABDOMINAL,
ABDOMINOUS,

which

abdication.

an
implies

or

Struck with

with.

ABKORRER,

ab-d[lc-U-tiv.

ABDICATIVE,

ab-hor'-rent.
a.

ABHORRENT,

to

known

way.

do

to

power

when
qualification;
thing; capacity,

any

ab'-er-ra'-fbun.
f.
The

f. The
a-bll'-ll-ty.

ABILITY,

it

aft
number,
plural
from the common
track.
the faculties or powers of the mind.
deviating
fignifies
ABERRING,
ab-er'-rmg.
part. Going aftray. To ABJURE,
ab-jore. v. a. To fwear not to do
To
ab-e-run'-kate.
To
recant
ABERUNCATE,
v. a.
or
a
pofition
fomething;to rctraifl,
oath.
pullup by the roots.
upon
To ABET,
.a-bet'.
To puQiforward anof.
The
adi
v.
a.
ther,
ABJURATION,
ab-j3-ra'-fhun.
the
taken
to fupport
him in his defigns
ance,
connivof
oath
for
that
end.
by
abjuring;
ab-lak'-tate.v. a.
To
To
ABLACTATE,
encouragement, or help.
a-bet'-ment.
f.
from the breaft.
The acl of
ABETMENT,
wean
it has the

it frequently
abilities,

of

abetting.
ABETTER,
He

a-bet'-tur.
f.

ABETTOR,

that abets; the fupporicr


or encourager of

another.

confideration of the law.

ab-hor'.v.

To ABHOR,

of

a.

To

hate with

mony
acri-

f. Theacl

of abhorring,
.ib-hor'-rcn-fy.

deteftation.

the roots

of trees.

ABLATION,

ab-la'-fliun.
f. The

acl of tak-

ingaw.iy.
away

ab'-la-tiv.
That
a.

the fixth cafe of the Latin

which

takes

nouns.

ble. a.
or
Having ftrongfaculties,
or
or
riches,
knowledge,
ftrength
great
any
other power of mind, body,or fortune ; having

ABLE,
1
^b-hor'-rcnfe.

One

grafting.

f. The
ABLAQyEATION,ab-la-kwe-i'-fhun.

ABLATIVE,

loath.

ABHORRENCE,
ABHORRENCY,
6

of the methods

of openingthe groundabout
pradtice

The
f.
ABEYANCE,
^-be'-y.^nfe.
rightof
lieth
in
it is all
when
fee-fimple
abeyance,
in
the
only
remembrance, intendment, and

; to

ab-lak-ta'-fhun.
f.

ABLACTATION,
or

power

fufficient.
ABLE-

ABO
a.
ible-bod'-dyd.
Strong

ABLE-BODIED,

n.
ab'-Ie-gSte.
v.

To

foine employment.

ftrnd

a'ble-nefs.
f.

ing
fend-

Abilityof body,

Want

ab'-lii-ent.
a.

ABLUENT,
of

of

That

forth

has

which

of

To deny.
a.
ab'-ne-gate.

ABTy'EGATE,

v.

f
Denial,
ab-ne-ga'-lhin.

renunciation.

a-bo'rd.ad.
a-bo'de. f.
refidence ;

In

ftiip.

Stay, continuation

in

a-bol-lift.v.

end

an

to

to;

f.

fecret

thing

an

of heaven.

ABOVE

ALL,

a-buv-a'll.In

the Rrft

place;^

-bori

In open

fight
y

ABOVE-BOARD,

may

a.

To

annul

defiroy.

a-buv'-s!'-ted.
Cited

ABOVE-CITED,
ufed
preffion

before..

An
exa-buv'-ground.

ABOVE-GROUND,
That

be abolilhed.

ABOLISHER,

a-buv

without artificeor trick.

a-bol'-lllh-able.
a.

ABOLISHABLE,

that
fignify,..

to

is alive; not

man

in the grave.

a-bol'-lifh-fnur.
f. He that abo-

a-buv'-men-fhund.

ABOVE-MENTIONED,

liflies.

See ABOVE-CITED.

a-bcl'-llfh-mcnt.
f.

ABOLISHMENT,

The

abolifliing.
a-bO-llib'-fliun.
f. The

ABOLITION,

afl of

To

near
encircling;

ful,
Hatea.
a-bom'-my-nable.

ABOMLJABLE,

i-bom'-my-nablc-nefs. to

ABOMiNABLENESS,

qualityof being abominable

hatc-

hatefully,
odioufly.
v.

To

about

tred,
f. Haa-bom-my-na'-fhun.

ab-6-ndzh'-y-nez.
f. The

lieftinhabitants of

ABORTION,

to

to;

perfon,as

his

with regard
concerning,

fervant.

about, to
purpofes
; to come
or point
; to go about

come

f. The a^ of bringab-or'-fhun.

To

to

thing,

prepare to do it.

flitious charm

ear-

country.

in

a-bou't. ad.

ABRACADABRA,

detefration.

ABORIGINES,

have

foine certain ftate

hate utterly.
abhor, deteft,

ABOMINATION,

To

n.

in circuit;
Circularly;
the
in
to the
oppofition
longeft
nearly
;
way,
fhort ftraight
to
to
bringto
bringabout,
way ;
he
has
the point or ftate dcfired,
brought
as,

ad. Moft
a-bom'-my-nab-ly.

a.
a-bom'-my-nAtc.

the

ABOUT,

odioufnefs.
fulncfs,

To ABOMINATE,

v.

to, relating
to; engagedin, employedupon;
"c. ; relating
as cloaths,
appendantto the perfon,

deteflablc.

ABOxMINABLY,

a-bou'nd.

ABOUND,

; to be in greatplenty.
great plenty
a-bou't. prep.
Round, furrounding,
ABOUT,

abolifliing.

The

The

untimelybirth.
ABOVE, a-biv'.prep. Higherin place; higher
in rank, power
excellence ; beyond,more
or
than ; too proudfor,too high for.
a-buv'.ad.
gions
Over-head; in the reABOVE,

Habitation,dwelling,

a-bode-ment.

ABOLISH,

f.

db-6rt'-ment.f.

ABORTMENT,

of fomethingfuture.
anticipation

act of

out
with-

chief!

ABODEMENT,

which

ad.
Born
ab-6r'tiv-Iy.

time; immaturcly,
untimely.
ab-6r -tlv-nefs. f.
The
ABORTIVENESS,

place.

put

fore
Broughtforth bebrings

nothing.

broughtforth out of time ;

ABNEGATION,

to

wl"ich is born

ftateof abortion.
act

The

cleanfing.

To

timely
un-

the due

fight.

cleaning.
ib-lu'-fhun. f.

ABLUTION,

placeof

ab-or'-tl''.
a.

ABORTIVE,

ABORTIVELY,

vigour,force.
f.
d -blep-fy.
ABLEPSY,

ABODE,

an

the due tisne of birth ; that which

ABLENESS,

ABOARD,

ab-6r'-u'v.
f. That

ABORTIVE,

abroad.

To

produceof

before the due time.

-fiiun. f.
ab-lC-ga

ABLEGATION,

the power

the

untimely;

birth.

body.
ABLEGATE,

abroad upon

ing

of

To

forth

ABRADE,
wear

ab-ra-ka-da-bra.

fuper-

againft
agues.
ab-ra'de.v.

a.

To

rub

cfF,to

away from thx other parts.

ABRASION,

ad of rubbing,

To

a-b^rell'.
ad.
Side by fide.
v. a.
a-bndj'e.

ABRIDGE,

keepingftillthe

in words,

to
contraft,to diminifli,

To

makefhorter

fhort ;

cut

a-brld'-jcd.
p. Deprivedof,

OF,

debarred

word

fed commonly

To

f. He that abridga-brld'-jir.
es,

fhortener;a writer of compendiums

To

acquit of

or

diminution

in

in

Out

v.
ab-ro-gate.

ab-rup't. Broken,
a.

den, without

the

ac'i

law.

or
cuftomary

craggy

proper

fud-

tives.
prepara-

ABRUPTION,

and

fpace;

preparation.

not

limited,as,
ab

ABSCESS,

ab -fefs. f.

body.
To ABSCIND,
ABSCISSION,

morbid

ca\

v.

a.

To

ab-sis'-fliiin.
f. The

off; the rtateof beingcut


ab-(kond'.v. a.
ABSCOND,

ad

of

ting
cut-

To

ABSCONDER,

The

perfon

ftate of

being

ab'-fenfe.f.

The

hcedabfcnt,oppofed to prefence
; inattention,
of
Icffnefs,
neglect

ABSENT,

ab'-f6-nus.a.

the

ab'-fint.a.

mind, inattentive.

prefent
object.
Not prefent;
abfcnt in

Abfurd, contrary

ab-farb.

v.

To

a.

fw.illow up;

fuck up.

ab-fl'r-btnt.
f.

medicine

Swallowed up.
ABSORPT,
ab-fa'rpt.
p.
f. The
act
ab-fa'rp-fh.ui.
ABSORPTION,

of

fv/allowing
up.
ABSTAIN,

^b-ffi'n.
v.

deny one's felf any


ABSTEMIOUS,

that abfconds.

ABSENCE,

That
a.
'-fo-ld-tir'-ry.

that fucks up humours.

To

ab-fc6n'-dur. f.

of penance.

ab'-fo-nant.
toreafon.
a. Contrary

ABSORB,
to

hide one's

ftIf.

fins,or

reafon.

to

off.

off.

emptorily,
per-

abfolves.

ABSONANT,
ABSONOUS,

ityin the

cut

abfolute power,

ad. Complete-fd-l-ite-ly.
ly,

.ib

ADSORBENT,
ab-sind'.

fet

nounce
pro-

ecclefiaftical

the

without condition ;
reftriiSlion;

ABSOLUTORY,

To

halle,fuddcnnefs.

to

to

from dependance,or limits ;


pletenefs
; freedom
defpotifm.
ab-f6-]i5'-{hun.
f. Acquittal;
ABSOLUTION,

f.
An
ab-riip't-nefs.
abrupt

ABRUPTNESS,
manner,

of

pofitively.
ab'-fo-lilte-nsfs.
f. ComABSOLUTENESS,

which

ad. Haftily,
without
ab-rup't-ly.

the due forms

promife;

as things
perfons
; unconditional,
as,
promife; not relative,
as, abfoluto

to

without

fudden feparation.

ABRUPTLY,

or

ab'-fo-lilte.
a.
Complete,applied

the remiffion of
f.
Violent
ab-rup'-fhun.

clear,to

abfolute

an

take

f. The
ab-re.-g;i'-niun.

the repealof
abrogating,

engagement

ABSOLUTELY,
To

a.

well

as

in

within.

law in force, to repeal,to annul.

ABROGATION,
ABRUPT,

of the houfe

To

a.

fenfe
judicial

fin remitted, in

ABSOLUTE,

without, not

ABROGATE,

an
a

In a pofture
to run
beingdifFufed or propagated.

a-bra d. ad.

another conntry

from

ftand off,to

fenfe.

compafs ;

general.

Hate of

ABROAD,

away

fmall

a-bro'tfh.
ad.

ABROACH,
out;

into

in

crime

{res from

work
larger

ab-z6lv'.v.

ABSOLVE,

f. The cona-brldj'e-ment.

tradlion of

db-slft'.
v.'n. To

ABSIST,
leave off".

ABRIDGMENT,

To

Iriflimenliving;
out of their
pregnated
Imab-sIn'-tSya-ttd.
p.

ABSINTHIATED,

abridgments.

of

prefence.

country.

from.

ABRIDGER,
a

To

withdraw,to

with wormwood.

ABRIDGED

regardto

To

a.

ab-fen-te'.
f.

of.

An

into

come

with

to

deprive

to

to

ABSENTEE,

fubftance

fame

ab-fent'.
v.

ABSENT,
forbear

rubbingofF.

ABREAST,
To

ab-ra'-zhun.f. The

ABRASION,
a

n.

To

forbear,to

gratification.

ab-fte'-myus.Temper.ite,
a.

fober,abftinent.
ABSTEMIOUSLY,

ad. Temperately,
abft^'-myuf-ly.

without
foberly,

ABSTEMIOUSNESS,

indulgence.

f.The
ab-ft^'-myuf-nefs.

of beingabftemious.
quality

ABSTEN-

ab-ftin'-fhin.
f.

ABSTENTION,

To

TheaAof

holdingoff.
v. a.
ab-ft^rje.

ABSTERGE,

To

To

ck-anle,

by
ABSURD,

by wiping.

to
a.
ab-fter'-jent.
Clcanfing;

ABSTERGENT,

quality.
hsving cleanfing
ab-fter'fe.
v.

ABSTERSE,

To

a.

cleanfe,
aa of

The

ab-fter'-sK-.
That
a.

has the

reafon.

numbers

abftcrgingcleanfing.
f. Forbearance
ab'f-ty-nenfe.

forbearance of

or
thing; fafting,

ne-

That
a.
ab'f-ty-nent.

ufes ab-

ab-ftrak't.
v.

thingfrom

another

To

a.

take

ideas
feparate

to

to

ab'f-trakt.a.

Separatedfrom

ufed
elfe,generally
fometliing
mental perceptions.

ab'f-trakt.
f.

ABSTRACT,

fmaller quantity,
of

the virtue or power


containing
epitomemade by takingout

the

ab-ftrak'-ted.
p. a.

refined,abftrufe; abfent

er
great-

all contingent

a-bu'-s!v.
taining
a.
abufe; conPracTrifrng
abufe; deceitful.

by a
To

aft

beingabftradted.

ab-ftrak'-tlv.
a.
Havingthe

an

ab-

wrong

border

ufe; reproachfully.
a-but'.v. n. obfolete. To

upon

; to

meet,

or

end at,

approachto.

a-but'-ment. f.

ABUTMENT,

That

which

abuts,or borders upon another.


f. A depthwithout bottom
ABYSS, a-blfs'.
great depth,a gulph.
a-ka'-fha.f. A

ACACIA,

ftraftmanner.

drug;

tree

; a

monly
com-

fo called here.

ab-{lr6'fe.
a.

ABSTRUSE,
from

to

an

academy.
f. A
ak-ka-dc'-myln.

ad. -Obfcurely, ACADEMIAN,


ab-ftro'fe-ly.

or obvioufly.
plainly,

ABSTRUSENESS,

a.
ak-ka-de'-myal.
Relating

Hidden; difficult, ACADEMIAL,

conceptionor apprehenfion.

ABSTRUSELY,

ab-ftro'fe-nefs.
f.

of

culty,
Diffi-

an

is abftrufe.

of

an

fcholar

academyor univerfity.
longing
Bea.
ak-ka-dem'-my-kil.

ACADEMICAL,

to
obfcurity.
f.
ACADEMICK,
ABSTRUSITY,
Abftrufencfs;
ab-ftro'-fy-ty.

that which

ad.
a-bu'-siv-ly.
Improperly,

ABUT,
to

ab-ftrak'-fliun.
f. The

of abftrafting.
power or quality
ad.
In
ABSTRACTLY,
ab-ftrak't-ly.

not

with

The
ill ufe of any thing;
bad cuftom; feducement;
pradlice,

ABUSIVELY,

circumftances.

ABSTRACTIVE,

illufe

an

treat

rudenefs.

ed
Separat-

of mind.

ABSTRACTEDLY,
from
abftraclion,
feparate
fimply,

; the ftateof
abftracling

; to

unjuftcenfure,rude reproach.
a-bu'-zur.f. He that makes an ill
ABUSER,
ufe ; he that deceives ; he that reproaches
with

ad. With
ab-ftrak'-ted-ly.

ABSTRACTION,

impofeupon

fufficiently.
make

a-bu'fe.f.

ABUSIVE,

ABSTRACTED,

remote

deceive,

corrupt

pal
princi-

parts.

of

; to

to

ABUSE,

with relation to

an

than

To

a.

rudenefs.

epitome.

an

ABSTRACT,

a-bu'ze.v.

ABUSE,
of

uberant
ex-

ad. In plena-bim'-dant-ly.
ty;

ABUNDANTLY,
To

Plentiful ;

fullyftored.

more
amply, liberally,

ABSTRACT,

; exuberance,more
greatquantity

; a

enough.
a-bun'-dant.a.
ABUNDANT,

ftinence.

to

quality
impropriety.
injudicioufnefs,
a-bun'-danfe.
f. Plenty;
great
;

than

ABSTINENT,

ab-furd'-ncfs.
f. The

beingabfurd

food.
cefTary

reduce

f. The quality
ab-fur'-dy-ty,

ABUNDANCE,

or

ABSTINENCE,

one

an

ab-furd'.a.. Inconfiftcnt; contrary

ABSURDNESS,
of

ABSTERSIVE,

To

bringto

beingabfurd ; that which is abfurd.


ad. Improperly,
unab-furd'-ly.
ABSURDLY,

cleanfing.

of any

To

reafonably.
ab-fter'-fliun.
f.

ABSTERTION,

of
quality

ABSURDITY,

purify.

to

a.

wafte.
gradual

of

To

ab-fii'me.
v.

ABSUME,
end

an

univerfity.
ak-ku-dem'-m!k.
f.

ftudent

univerfity.
C

ACADE-

ak-ka-dl-mlfh'-an.
f. The

ACADEMICIAN,
member

of

r a-cad

ACADEMIST

The

-de-mift,
"mift,T
"Jf.The
oi,

of

ai

tak"-a-dem'-mlfl:.
J academy.
It. An

of beingacceptable.
quality
ad. In
ak'-fep-ta-bly.

ACCEPTABLY,

memmem

i.ber

f.
ak'-fep-table-nlfs.

ACCEPTABLENESS,

academy.

an

a.
ak'-fep-table,
Grateful;

Relating ACCEPTABLE,
pleafmg.

univerfity.

ak-ka-dem'-mlk.
a.

ACADEMICK,
to

an

f.
ak-fep'-tanfe.
Reception

ACCEPTANCE,

with approbation.
afTembly
fc
of
f. ReceptiACCEPTATION,
ak-lc-p-ta'-fliun.
fociety
on,

{a-kad'-de-my,

ACADEMY,"^

V. or
J.

or,

ak -a-dem'-my.J
uniting
men,
of fome art ; the placewhere
promotion
fciences are taught;a placeof education,in
contradiftinflion to the univerfitiesor publick

for the

fchools.
herb bears-

foot.
f.
a-kat4-lek'-tlk.

To

has the

ak-fe'de.v.

ACCEDE,
to come

completenumber
n.

of

verfe

fyllables.
be added to,

To

ACCEND,

a.

To

kindle,to fet

fire.

meaningof

word.

the

received

meaning.

ak'-fefs.
f. The

way by which any


approached
; the means, or liberty^
of approaching
ineither to things
or
men;
the
returns
or
creafe,enlargement,
addition;
fitsof a diftemper.

ftateof

be

f. The
ak"-fa-far'-ry-nefs.

beingacceffary.
f. Hethatnot
ak'-fef-far-ry.

ACCESSARY,

the chief agent in

ing
be-

crime, contributes to

it.

ditional,
ak'-fef-far-ry.
Joinedto, ad-

ACCESSARY,

a.

ak-fen'-fhun.f.
the ftate of

The

ad

of

beingkindled.

dk'-fent.
f. The

be

which

approached.
ak-fes'-fhun.
f.

ACCESSION,

fomethingadded

of fpeak-

manner

ak-fes'-slble.
That
a.

ACCESSIBLE,
may

ACCENSION,
ACCENT,

the

helpingforward.
ak-fend'.
v.

or
kindling,

f. The
ak-fep'-fliun.

word

ACCESS,

accelerated.

on

bad

accepts.

ACCEPTION,

ACCESSARINESS,

to.

ak-fel'-le-rate.
To
v. a.
ACCELERATE,
make quick,to haften,to quickenmotion.
ak-fel-]e-r4'-fhun.
f. The
ACCELERATION,
adl of quickening
motion ; the ftateof the body

To

To

goodor

f. The
ak-fep'-tiir.
perfonthat

thing
may

ACATALECTIC,
which

whether

ACCEPTER,

fenfe of

a-kan'-tSus.
f. The

ACANTHUS,

ceptable
ac-

manner.

the adt of

Increafe

coming

joiningone's fclf to, as, acceflion

to

by

to,

or

deracy;
confe-

made upon lables


the aft of arriving
ing or pronouncing
at, as, the king's
; the marks
fyltheii" pronunciation
to regulate
acceflion to the throne.
dification
; a moad. In the
of the voice,expreffive
of the pafak"-fef-fur'-ry-ly.
ACCESSORILY,

fions or fentiments.

To ACCENT,
to

fpeakwords

with

marks
grammatical
the

To

manner

ak-fent'.
v.

or

To

a.

pronounce,

particular
regard

to

rulesj

to

write

or

the
note

ak-fen'-tu-ate.
v. a.
ACCENTUATE,
placethe accents properly.

To

ak-fen-tu-a'-fhun.
f. The

ACCENTUATION,

placingthe

accent

in

pronunciation,
or

writing.
To

ACCEPT,

an

acceffory.

nother

a.
ak'-fef-fur-ry.
Joinedto

thing,fb

as

to

f. The
ak'-fy-denfe.

ACCIDENCE,

to

take with

littlebook

of grammar,

and

of the eightparts of
the properties
explaining

fpeech.
ACCIDENT,

f. The
ak'-fy-dent.

qualityof any
from

v. a.
.nk-ftpt'.

a-

increafe it ; additional.

rudiments
the firlt
containing

accents.

acl of

of

ACCESSORY,

being,which

it,at leaft in thought;

property of

word

may

propertyor
be

fcparated

in grammar,

that which

happens

the
un-

forefcen ; cafualty,
chance.
to receive kindly.
pleafure,
f. A property
f. The
ACCEPTABILITY,
ACCIDENTAL,
dk-fy-den't.U.
ak-fep-ta-bll'-ll-ty,
of being
nonciTealiai.
acceptable.
quality

ACCI-

A
hold

think,to

to

caufes ; to make

account

reckon, to

ACCURACY,

aflignthe

ACCURATE,

to

reckoning,to

may

defecSt or

jA

muft anfwer

required,who

for.

without

ak-koun'-tant.f.

ACCOUNTANT,
a

(killedor

man

employedin

is curfed

join,

to

together.
To

a.

entertain

To

a.

drefs,

growing to another,fo

to

To

one

to

aA

To

be
in

To

n.

to

or
advantage

an

commercial

accede to,

fenfe,to

arife,as profits.
ak-kd-ba'-flnm.f.
ACCUBATION,

be

be

duced,
pro-

tient

of leaning
at
pofture

ak-kim'b.

ACCUMB',

To

v.

To

pileup,

to

act of

bituate,to
Done

accumulates

He

that

bringsa

a.

To

ha*

habit.

or

ad.
ak-kiis'-tum-mib-ly.
cuftom.

In

ad.

ak-kus'-tum-ma-ry-l

manner.
cuftomar)-

Ua,
ak-kus'-tum-ma-ry.

ACCUSTOMARY,
ftate of

being

Ak-kd'-m.]-la-tiv.
That
a.
that

chargewith

habit, ufe.

fual,praftifed.

which

is

ACE,

cording
Ac-

ufual.
cuftom, frequent,

fe. f.

An

unit,a fingle
point on

cards

quantity.
f.
A
a-(tr-by-ty.
rough four
of temper.
tafte; applied
to men,
fharpnefs
a-fer'-vatc.
To
To ACERVATE,
v. a.
heap
or

lated.
accumu-

ak-kus'-tum-med. a.

ACCUSTOMED,
to

To

a.

cenfure.

ak-kis'-tum-mable. a.

by longcuftom

accumulated.

which

dice ;

fmall

ACERBITY,

ACCUMULATOR,
that

ik-ku'-mu-ia-tur.f.

a
accumulates,
gathereror

of

enure.

ACCUSTOMARILY,
a.

ak-ku-mu-li'-fliun.f.

ACCUMULATIVE,

term

accufation.

an

ak-kus'-tum.v,

ACCUSTOM,

lie at the

manner.

accumulating
; the

or

ak-ku'-zur.f.

Accordingto

heap together.

ACCUMULATION,
The

To

a.

ak-kd'-mu-l^te.v.

ACCUMULATE,

noun.

tom,
ACCUSTOMANCEjak-kus'-tum-m.infe.fCuf-

meals.

to the antient
tabic,according

To

crime ; to blame

ACCUSTOMABLY,
Thean-

containeth

ak-ku'ze.v.

provementACCUSTOMABLE,
im-

or

aa

another.
chargeagainft

To

added, as

or
produceth

ACCUSE,
a

draw

hook.

ak-krd'.v.

to ; to

To

a.

which

That
a.
ak-ku'-za-tur-ry.

ACCUSER,

ak-kro'tfh.v.

with

which

Growing,that

by growth is added.
as

ak-ku'-za-tiv.
a.

the fourth cafe of

grammar,

of

increafe it.

ak-kr^'-t!v.
a.

ACCRUE,
added

as

The

That

accufmg; the chargebrought againft


any

ACCUSATORY,

ak-kre'-fhun. f.

ACCROACH,

which

one.

ik-ko'-tur-meat.f.
Drefs,

ornaments.
equipage,trappings,

which

That

ak-kd-za'-fliun.
f. The

ACCUSATIVE,

equip.
ACCOUTREMENT,

ACCRETIVE,

t"

blameabJe; culpable.

ACCUSATION,
of

to

ACCRETION,

doom

hateful,
mifery; execrable,

to

ak-ku'-zable.
a.

be cenfured

may

ak-ko'rt.v.

or courtefy.
courtfhip,
ak-kd'-tur.
v.
ACCOUTRE,

To

doomed

or

ACCUSABLE,

with

To

To

a.

ak-kur'-fed,
part. a.

ACCURSED,

accounts.

To

v.

ACCOURT,

ak-kur'fe.
v.

deteftaWe.

ak-kip'le.a.

ACCUPLE,

To

ak'-ku-rat-nefs.
f. Exacl-

mifery.

puter,
com-

accounts.
containing

link

ad. Exactly,
ak'-ku-rat-ly.

nefs,nicety.

ak-kount'-b(ik.f. A book

ACCOUNT-BOOK,

op-

nicely.

errour,

ToACCURSE,

for.
refponfible

to ;

Exa"ft,as

failure.

ACCURATENESS,
Ak-koun'-tant.
able
a. Account-

ACCOUNTANT,

To

ak'-kil-rat.a.

Of(|iomACCURATELY,

dk-koun'-tabl.a.
be

ak'-ku-ra-f\'.
f. Exaflnefs,
nicety.

out
or ignorance
pofedto negligence
; exadl,with-

anfwer

hold in efteem.

ACCOUNTABLE,
an

to

account,
the

up

practices
; to

for

ACE

in opinion;

give an

to

compute;

He

heapertogether.

up.

ACCERVA-

AGO
a-fcr-v;i'-fhun.
f.

ACERVATION,

i-fe'-fcnt.
n.

tendencyto founicfs
2-fe-t6 fe.
ACETOSE,

That

which

To
has

lliat which

a.

beingacetofe.
a-fe'-tus.
a.

a'ke,f.

ACHE,

a'ke. v.

To

ACHE,

To

ACHIEVE,

Sour.

continued

To

n.

at-t(lie
V.

perfonwith

pain.
be in

v.

To

at-tfhe'-vur.
f.

ACHIEVER,

An

ACHIEVEMENT,

He

performanceof

at-tflii^'v-muu.
f. The
action ; the

an

To

cfcutcheon,

-kor.

f.

of
fpecies

the

one's labour

with fharpparticles.
impregnated

To

a-sld'-du-late.
v.
a.

ACIDULATE,
acids in

tingewith

To

An

de-iree.
flight

fault ; to own,

as,

ak-nol'-ledzh-mcnt.

ACKNOWLEDGMENT,
of

Conceflion
of

the

truth

of

any

fault;confeflion

of

pofition
;

ufed
efpecially
diftemper.
more

The
to

heightof any
denote

the

gainby

pov/er.

ak-kw:'-rur.f.

acquires;

The

perfon

g-ainer.

ak -korn.

ak'kwit'.v.

ACQUIT,
clear from

f.

The

of the

chargeof

any

a.

To

guilt,
obligation
; the man
to

fet

free;

abfolve
hath

The

feed

quitted
ac-

ftate

act of acquitting.
or
beingacquitted,
ak-kwit'-tal.
f. Is a deliverance
ACQUITTAL,
of

herb

or

to

; to

duty.

Alc-kv/it'-ment.
f. The

ACQUITMENT,

church.

In poetical
language,poifonin

oak.

To

a.

ak-kwi'-red.particip.
Gained
a.

clear from

thing;
heightof a

a-kil'-ld-ttrlft.
f. One
ak'-kS-nite.f.

ACONITE,

by the

or

v.

his
himfelf well, he difcharged

loweft order in the Romifh

ACORN,

Attainable.
ak-kw!'-rable.
a.
ak-kwire.

ak-kwiz'-zl-tlv.
That
a.
ACQUISITIVE,
which
is acquired.
ment.
attainak-kwift'.
f. Acquirement,
ACQUTST,
To

ak'-me. f.

ACOLOTHIST,

refl:,
fatisfaftion,

benefit

received.

ACME,

ak-kwlre-ment.
f.
ACQUIREMENT,
attainment.
That v/hich is acquired,
gain,
The
f.
ik-kwy-z!fh'-fhun.
ACQUISITION,
act of acquiring;
the thinggained,acquirement.

Grateful.

f.

of content

a.
ak-nol'-le-jlng.

ACKNOWLEDGING,

confeflion

reft

An

benefit.

To

n.

f. A fiak-kwy-efs'-cnfe.

by one's felf.
ACQUIRER,
that

ak-nol'-l^dzh. v. a.
ACKNOWLEDGE,
To own
the knowledge of, to own
any thing
in a particular
charadler ; to confefs,
or perfon
as,

v.

ACQUIRABLE,
To
ACQUIRE,

f. Medicinal fprings ACQUIRED,


a-sid'-du-la.

ACIDUL.^,

ak-kwy-cfs'.

fubmilTion.

content;

beingacid.

Acquifition
; the

fatisfied.

remain

lent appearance

herpes.

Sour, fharp.

fournef^.
f. Sharpnefs,
a-s!d'-d!-tv.
f.
The
as-bid-nefs.
qualityof

ACIDNESS,

or

ACQUIESCENCE,

as'-sid-.
a.

ACIDITY,

To

Tamil iar,well

n-ted.

f.
ak-kvveft'.

thingcaincd.
ACQUIESCE,
in,

or

armorial.
enfigns
a

acquainted,without

are

we

ak-kwa

ACQUEST,

that performs

he endeavours.

what

ACID,

make

known.

An

ACHOR.,

To

a.

fricndfliip.

ACQUAINTED,

perform,

finiOi.

to

whom

of
tiie intimacy

pain.

a.

ak-kwa'nt.v.

ACQUAINT,

n-tanfe. f.. The


ak-kwa
ACQUAINTANCE,
ftate of being acquainted
with, familiarity-,
or
knowledge; familiar knowledge; a flight
the
initial knowledge, fhort of friendfhip
;

f. The flatcof
r.-fc-tos'-fy-ty.

ACETOUS,

ing.
hear-

familiar with ; to inform.

in

it acids.

ACETOSITY,

helpthe

has

acidity.

or

Thedodrine

of founds ; medicines to
theory

or

Q_

ACOUSTICKS,a-kous'-t!ks. f.

Il.npin-

together.
ACESCENT,

bane.
wolfs-

from

general.

fruitborne

To

an

oftence.

ACQUITTANCE,
To

);rocure an

ak-kv.-'it'-tanfe,
v.
n.

to acquit.
acquittance,

ACQLIT-

ACT
f. The
ak-kw!t'-tAnfe.

ACQUITTANCE,
from
difcharging

of

of
receipt

ingthe

a'-kur. f.

ACRE,
in

debt ;

zA

writingteftify-

idle

and
lengthfortyperches,

eighthundred

action,as, I teach.
ACTIVELY,

and

ACTIVENESS,

ak'-kr!d.
a.

ACRIMONIOUS,

Of

hot

bitingtafte.

ak-kry-mo-nyus.

Sharp,

a.

of
fharpnefs

ak'-kry-tude.

ACRITUDE,
heat
biting

the

on

acrid tafte,

An

ak-kro-a-mat'-tl-kal.
a.

ACROAMATICAL,

to deep learning.
pertaining
f.
A
flioot
ak'-kr6-fpire.
ACR03PIRE,
or

a-krofs'.ad.

fomethingfo

To

to

as

a-krofs'-tlk.
f.

the firftletterof every line

makes

up the

which

the poem

of

poem

akt'. v.n.
akt'.v.

To

perform

lityof

done,
Something

whether

good

or

ftate

ad. In act. In efak'-tu-al-ly.

ak'-tu-al-nefs.
f.

f. The
ak'-tu-ar-r)'.

officer who

To

The

qua^

compilesthe

or
regifter

of

minutes

the

ceedings
pro-

ACTUATE,

ill;

deed,an

part of

ploit,
ex-

play,

ak

-td-ate.v.

To

a.

put into

adtion.

To

ACUATE,

ak'-ku-ate.
v.

To

a.

Iharpen.

Prickly,that
-lyate.a.
which terminates in a fharppoint.
a-ku'-men.f. AHiarppoint; figuratively
ACUMEN,
a-ku

ACULEATE,

paffive
fubjedt.

akt'.f.

the

beingadtual.

ACTUARY,

borrowed

to produceefFefts
ftage-player;

on

of the court.

TobeinaiStion,nottoreft.
a.

plays

f. The
ak-tu-al'-ly-ty.

fea, really.
ACTUALNESS,

in

beingtaken,
perfonor thingon

that

beingadtual.

is written.

ACT,

ACT,

of the

name

ACT,

in fome

over

crofs it.

ACROSTICK,

as
character,

laid

Athwart,

which

To

woman

ACTUALLY,

fprouts.

An

that

ACTUALITY,

ak'-kro-fpi-red.
part.

ACROSPIRED,

ak'-trefs.
f. She

lation.

ing
Hav-

a.

He that adts,or performs


a charadter,
a
pertbnates

performs
any
ftage.
.ik'-tu-al.a.
ACTUAL,
Reallyin r.a, not
in fpecumerelypotential
; in act, not purely

or

the end of feeds.

fproutfrom

that

ftage-player.
ACTRESS,

thing;

palate.

he

thing;

any

feverity.

temper,
f.

ACROSS,

ak'-tiir.
f.

ACTOR,

corrofivenefs;

qualityof

beingadtive.

f. Sharpnefs,
ak'-kry-mun-ny.

ACRIMONY,

Of

Quicknefsj

f. The
ik-tiv'-vl-ty.

ACTIVITY,

corrofive.

f.
ak'-t!v-nefs.

nimblencf;-.

yards.
ACRID,

ad. Bufily,
ak'-tlv-ly.
nimbly.

four in breadth,

fortyfquare

quick; in
; nimble, agile,
fedentary
that
which
is
verb
adlive
a
fignifies

or

grammar,
land containing

of
quantity

paffive
; bufy,engagedin action,oppofedto

to

debt.

four thoufand

or

terruption
of intelledts.
proceedswithout inquicknefs
a-kil
part. a.
ACUMINATED,
-my-n'i-tcd.
parliament.
; a
ak'-fiiun.
f.
The
ftate
ACTION,
qualityor
Endingin a point,fharp-pointcd.
a-ku'te.a.
of afting,oppofite
act or thing
ACUTE,
Sharp,oppofsdto blunt ;
to, reft ; an
dif;ale,
done, a deed ; agency, operation
ingenious,
oppofed to ftupid
; acute
; the feriesof
increafed
with
difcafe
which
attended
in
is
an
events
a
fable;
reprefcnted
gefticulation, any
the accordance
of the motions of the body with
of blood,and terminates in a few days;
velocity
the
the words fpoken; a term
in law.
acute
accent, that which raifes or fnarpens
the adion

duringwhich

decree of

ACTIONABLE,
admits

an

ak

-lh6-nab!e.a. That

a("lionin law,

ACTION-TAKING,

v.hlch

punifhable.

ak

a.
-fhun-ta'-k!ng.

or

ni'nner,

ak'-t!v.
That which
a.

of.adting
quality
;

that which

has the power

acls,oppofcd

After

a-ku'te-nefs.f.

acute

Sharpnef;
fpeedycrifis

force of intellects j violence and

of

an

iharply.

ACUTENESS,

Litigious.
ACTIVE,

ad.
a-kd'te-ly.

ACUTELY,

of found.
malady; fharpnefs

ADACTED,

ADD

aJ-k'-tcd. part, a.

ADACTED,

Driven by

ad

-aje.f.

a-di'-jo.f.

ADAGIO,

cians,to mark

maxim,

uied

term

mufi-

addingone

hardnefs

penetrable of
im-

flone of

diamond

the

fum

adamant

of adamant,
havingthe qualities

and

ADAPT,

f. A
'-d.lmz-ap'le.

ad

part of

a-dapt. v.

a.

fit,to fuit,to
To

The
f.
ad-ap-fa-fliin.

one
fitting
thing to another, the

thingto
ADAPTION,

ad-ap'-fhun. The
f.

fitnefs of

aa

to

ad

which

V-

To

a.

ting.
cf fit-

take

or

that

ADDEEM,

a.

fonous

A ferpent,
a

efleem, to

"(

ADDER'S

To

ipcr,a poi-

f. A plant.
ad'-durz-grafs.
f.
ad-durz-timg.

An

herb.

.ad-dible.a.

ADDIBLE,

The

ad-dls. f.

ADDICT,
;

ad-dikt
.

himfelf

a.

to

of
To
in

ax.

devote,to
a

bad

dicate
de-

ADDICTION,

devoting
; the

i ate

of

beingdevoted.

perfon

draw

word

plied
ap-

the
together

v.

To

a.

fweeten.

f. A
ad-de-ncg'-grd-fy.

glands.
f.
a-demp'-fhun.

a-dep t.

*f.

He

that

is

Privation.

completely

art.

a.
ad'-e-qwate.
Equal to,

ADEQUATE,

ad.
ad'-e-kwat-ly.

adequatemanser,
ADEQUATENESS,
ftateof

portionate.
pro-

The

remain

acl of

of

In

an

with exaiSnefs of proper; ion.

ad'-e-kw.it-nefs.
f. The

exaflnefs
beingadequate,

ADHERE,

ad-he

fixed to
firmly

ADHERENCE,
The

The

a.

(killed in all the fecrets of his

To

bein^jaddicted.

ad-d!k'-fhun.f.

f.

that

ad-dalfe.

ADEMPTION,

fenfc,as,

vice.

ad-dlk'-ted-ncfs.
f.

ADDICTEDNESS,
Hate of

v.

it is commonly taken

he addicted

mufcles

ADEC^UATELY,
kind

-fur.

terity
dexflcill,

pof-

of beingadded.
fibility

ADDICE,

a letter.
direfting

body.

treatifeof the

"

herb-.

PolTible to beadded.

ad'-dy-b!l'
ly-ry.f.

ADDIBILITY,

An

ther,
anoaddrefling

of

ADDULCE,

ADEPT,
ad'-durz-wurt.L

ADDER'S-WORT,

of

addrefs
pleafing

ADDENOGRAPHY,

TONGUE,

ther
ano-

Verbal application
to

ad-du'-fcnt.
thofe

to

reptile

ADDER'S-GRASS,

one's

prepare

applyto

to

of

ad-drts

parts of the

ad'-dur.f.

To

a.

any action

that addrefies.

account.

ADDER,

To

man

ADDUCENT,
v.

v.

manner

afcertain tithes.

To

ren
a.
1-p.i-ted.
Having bar-

ad-drcfs
upon

ADDRESSER,

aJ-de'm.

e^gs,

produce nothing.

courtfliip
; manner

anyone;

To
ad-des'-fy-mite.
v. a.

ToADDEClMATE,
To

to
joinfomething

ad

by words.
ad-drefs'.f.
ADDRESS,

before.

was

a.

brains that

to

enter

as,

ADD-

which

adding.
applied to
Originally

ftich as produce nothing,thence


fignifying

ADDRESS,
felf

art

another.

one

That

brains.

proportion.
ADAPTATION,

of

ADDLE-PATED,
To

together

That
a.
ad'-dy-tur-ry.

transferred

minent
pro-

the throat.

reduction

of like kind,

ad-d;fh'-{h6-n.i!.
a.

ad 1.

ADDLE,

as,

hardnefs,indiflblubility.
ADAM'S-APPLE,

ed;
thing add-

is added.

has the power

of

Made

acl of

total.

or

ADDITORY,
ad-a-man'-tln.a.

ADAMANTINE,

To

numbers

more

one

which

Hard

adamant.

of

or

ADDITIONAL,
ad-a-man-te'-an. a.

ADAMANTEAN,

To

two

into

load-

the

flone.

as

thing to another;

The

the

in arithmetick,addition is the

flow time.

ad'-d-mant. f.

ADAMANT,

f. Adad"-dy-ta-ment'.

dition,the thingadded.
ad-dlfh'-fliun.
f.
ADDITION,

proverb.

by

ADDITAMENT,

An

force.

ADAGE,

re,
a

v,

n.

party,

of

To
or

ad-he'-renfe.
f.

proportion.
ftick to

to

opinion,
The

quality

tachment,
adhering,tenacity;fixcdnefs of i^ir.d,at-

fteadijicfs.
AD

HE-

The
f.
ad-hc'-ren-f^-.

ADRERENCY,
with

fame

ad-he'-rent.a.

ADHERENT,

Stickingto;

ad-h^'-rent.f.

to

fan.
parti

ad-he'-rur. f.

ADHERER,
of

act

or

make

tenacious.
Sticking,

ad-h!b'-b!t. v.

To

a.

apply,

another

thing.
dering
a.
Lying clofe,bor-

adjudge.
To ADJUGATE,

f. That
ad-ja'-fcnt.

which

ADJUNCT,
ADJUNCTION,

lies

a-dI-af'f"Vriis.
Neutral.
a.

the

to.

put
afl

To

of

or
thing adjected,

To

A word
ad'-jek-t!v.

ADJECTIVE,
feme

the
fignify

to

noun,

addition

or

circumftancc,or
quality,

added

to

of
feparation
of

ing
be-

good, bad.
ad. After
ADJECTIVELY,
ad'-jek-tiv-ly.

the

manner

of

manner

To

ADJOIN,
unite to,

To
To

an

to

Farewel.

ad-joi'n.
v.

put

a.

the form

To

a.

v. a.
ad-juft'.

of oatht

impofe vn

make

to

form.

To

to
regulate,

conformable.

f.
ad-juft'-ment.
tion,
Regula-

puttingin

method

the ftateof

in method.
f. A
ad'-jo-tant.

duty is

ADJUTOR,
To

join to,

to

to

petty officer,

the
affift

another

day, naming the time.


f. A
ADJOURNMENT,
Ad-jurn'-mcnt.
off tillanother

f. A helper.
ad-jo'-tilr.

ADJUTORY,

ad

a.
-jo-tur-ry.

That

whxh

helps.

to.

To be contiguous
v. n.
to.
ADJOIN, ad-joi'n.
To
off
to
v.
a.
ADJOURN,
ad-jur'n.
put

ADIPOUS,

joinsj

adjective.

a-dii'.
ad.

ADIEU,

To

that

major,by dillribiiling
and
punifhmejit.
overfeeing
pay,
To help,to concur.
v. a.
ad-jo't.
ADJUTE,

whofe

; as,

the
another,prefcribing

order;

being put
ADJUTANT,

another

v.

the act of
f.

to

ad-jo'r.

a.

in.

thingadjoined.

f. He
ad-junk'-tiv.

ed,
Addad-jek-tlfli'-fhus.
ADJUSTMENT,

ADJECTITIOUS,

ad

f. The acl of
ftd-jo-ra'-fliun.

ADJUST,
put in

thrown

the

oath

ADJURE,
oath upon

added.

ioined.

f. The
ad-junk'-fliun.

another.

propofed
V.

Immediately

-junkt.a.

ADJURATION,
an

adding;

ad

is joined.

f. Neutrality,
difference.propofing
ina-di-af'-f6-ry.

adjeding,or

yoke

another.

adjoining
;
ADJUNCTIVE,
that which

ad-jea'.a. To add to, to


C. The
ad-jek'-fhun.

ADJECT,
ADJECTION,

To

a.

-junkt.f. Somethingadherent

ad
to

to

To

-jo-gate. v.

To

f
Help.
ad'-jo-ment.

united

or

another.

ADIAPHOROUS,
ADIAPIIORY,

ad

of

fomething.

upon

next

grantingfomethingto a litigant.
ADJUDICATE,
ad-jo-dy-kate.v. a.

To

ftate of

ad-jafent.

ADJACENT,

give the

f. The
ad-jo-dy-ki'-fhun.

ADJUDICATION,

ADJUNCT,
f. The
ad-jd'-fen-fy.

to

To

to.

ufe.

lyingclofe
ADJACENT,

v. a.
ad-judzh'.

ADJUDGE,

f. Appliad-hy-blfli'-fnun.
cation, ADJUMENT,

ADJACENCY,

going

decree.

ilate

ufe of.

ADHIBITION,

acl of

aft of

ad-he'-slv. f.

ADHIBIT,
to

that adhere^.

to fomething.
flicking

ADHESIVE,
To

He

ad-he'-zhun. f. The

ADHESION,

The

thing controverted to one of the parties; to


fentence to a punifhment; finiply,
to judge,to

follower,a

under ground.
paffage

ad-Iih-fliun. f.

another.

To

united with.

ADHERENT,

ad'-it.f.

ADIT,

ADITION,

adherence.

a.
ad'-dy-pus.

to

ting
put-

Fat.

a.

ToADJUVATE,

v.

further.

ADMEASUREMENT,
The

day.

ad'-j6-vant,
Helpful,ufeful.
To help,
a.
ad'-jo-vute.

ADJUVANT,

;;ct or

ad-mez'-zhur-mcnt. f.

to
pradice of meafuringaccording

rule.

ADMEN-

ADM

ADM
ad-mln-fiio-ra-fliun.f.

ADMENSURATION,
The

aiSlof

meafuring

ad-mln'-nif-tur.
v.

give,to afford,to fupply


; to act
ller or agent in any employment
perform the

office of

fame

a6l

mini-

office;

of

to

executive

or

the

whom

may

of

a.

To

the fame

to
;

charge,and

is accountable

f.
tur-fnip.
ADMIRABLE,

The

in

confequenceof

will.

to

To

be

of

;
an

grant iu

may

enter

the power

conceffion of

or

fition.
po-

.id'-my-ral.An
has

the

chief

officer
of the

government

commander

of

or

ADMiRALSHIP,

id

f. The
'-my-ral-fhlp'.

ad'-my-r.\l-ty.
The

fault

or

power,
To

f.
der,
Wonad-my-ra'-fhun.

wondLi:u;'.

a.

To

warn

fon
per-

of his faults or

\a\ mind

or

duiics,

duty, counfel,gentlereproof.
ad-mo-nifh'-im-ur.f.
A

ludicrous

term.

a. That
ad-min'-ny-tur'-ry.

admonilhcs.
ad-move.

v.

a.

To

bringone

another.

;\d-mur-ma-ra'-fhun.

ADMURMURATION,
f. The

body

ad-mo-nlfli'-un.
f. The hint

ADMOVE,

thingto
admiringor

The

gently.

notice of faults

generaladvifer.
which

unioiv

ad-min'-n!fli-ment.f.

ADMONITORY,
f.

affairs.

tiie at'lof

of

The

.id-mon'-nifn-ur.
f. The

ADMONITION,

fice
of-

oinccis, appointedfor the adniiniftration cf

ADMIRATION,

reprove

ADMONITIONER,

of admiral.

ADMIRALTY,

ad-mon'-nlfh.v.

ADMONISH,

Admonition,

the

carries the admiral.

minglewitfi

ad-mlks'-tfliur.
f.

duty.
ADMONISHMENT,

ma-

king's

fleet;

To

a.

another.

that puts anotbsr


rable
admi-

v.

body with another.

one

f.

that
giftrate

ad-mlks'.

mingledwith
To

r.

ADMIRAL,

naval

enter

allow

ad-mlt'-t.infe.
f.- Theac^of

7
of
ad"'-ray-rable-nefs'.
fault,to
^ ^" ADMONISHER,
ad'-my-ri-bil"-]y-tjr.

ABILITY,

mam;

or

to

ad-m!t'-tibl.
Which
a.

ADMIXTURE,
mired,
ad-

excite wonder.

or ftateof beingadmirable.
qu:dity
ad. In an
ADMIRABLY,
ad'-my-rab-ly.

fhipwhich

upon

office ;

allow, or
pofition
; to

or

entering
;

fuffer to

To

a.

an

fomethingclfc.
ad-miks'-tfhun.f.
ADMIXTION,

The

the

enter

ADMIX,

ad-mln-n!f-tra'-

office of adminiftrator.

ADMIRABLENESS,

ad-m!t'.v.

fuiTcr to

or

mitted
being ad-

of

power

to
admitting,permiffion
cuftom
of
right entering;

To

a.
ad'-my-rable.

of power

navy

aft

argument.

an

ADMITTANCE,

for

^Id-mln-mf-tra'-tnks.
f.

adminifters

ADMINISTRATORSHIP,

ADMIR

The

he that officiates in divine rites ; he

ADMINISTRATRIX,
who

admitting
;

ADMITTABLE,

dying inteftate,

man

that condu(Sts the government.

She

which

be admitted.

ad-m!n-n!f-tri'-tir.
f.

goodsof

his

That

general.

ADMINISTRATOR,
committed

lover.

Withad-

the ft.ite of

admittance,the

argument

adminifters.

He that has the

ad-m!s'-fhiin.
f.

ADMIT,
to

pub-

ad-mln"-nlf-tra-t!v'.
a.

ADMINISTRATIVE,
which

ad-mis'-slble.
a.

the allowance of

lick affairs is committed.

That

ad.
rlng-ly.

ad-m!

of
practice

part of

care

perfon that

be admitted.

adlive

thofe

or

ADMISSION,

dd-mln-nif-tra'-fhun.
f.

the

The

f.

regardswith admiration

ADxMISSIBLE,

to

or
adminiftering
conducing any

employment ;

regardwith

love.

miration.

adminifter.

as

government

the

ad-m!n'-mf-tratc.
v.

ADMINISTRATION,
The

as
or

To

a.

v.

re.

regardwith
ad-mi-rir.

wonders,

To

a.

adminiftrator.

an

ADMINISTRATE,
The

ad-mi

to

ADMIRINGLY,

giveshelp.

ADMINISTER,

To

wonder;

That
a.
ad-my'-nlk'-ii-lar.

ADMINICULAR,
which

ADMIRE,

To

his part.

ad-min'-iklc. f. Help,fi.pport. ADMIRER,

ADMINICLE,

To

each

to

adt of

murmuringto

another.

"

ADO,

ADR
a-do'. f.

ADO,

buffle,
Trouble, difficulty;

tumult, bufinefs; more


bufinels,than

and

tumult

a-d6-les -fenfe.

ADOLESCENCY,

\ age fuca-do-les'-fen-fy.

of

The

f.

To

ceedingchildhood,and fucceeded by puberty.


To ADOPT^
To take a fon by
v.
a-dopt'.
a.
choice, to make him a fon who is not fo by
birth ; to placeany perfonor thingin a nearer
to

of

ad.
After
a-dip'-ted-ly.

choice the

by
ADOPTION,
one'

rightsof

forward

anotlier

he that

ADORABLE,

givesfome
adopt-

He

that is adopted

adoptsanother.

a-do-rabl.

That

a.

ad.
a-do'-ra-bly.

worthy of
ADORATION,

adoration.

In

To

He

that

the
or

perfonwith
thingwith

ornaments

To
to

adores;

drefs ;

fet out

any

place

a-dow

n.

Down,

ad.
prep.

the

on

Down

ground.

tov/ards

ADREAD,
ADRIFT,

a-dr!ft'..id.

Floatingat

a-droit

Active,fkiltul.

ADROITNESS,

ad-van'-tajethat

a.

In

or

refiftance.
,

able, ufeful,opportune.
ad.
ad-vdn-tl'-juf-ly.

ADVANTAGEOUSLY,

the

ad-van-t^'-jif

ADVANTAGEOUSNESS,
To

convenience.
Profitablenefs,
ufefulnefs,

ADVENE,

ad-vene.

fomething,to

be

v.

To

n.

accede

to

fuperadded.

peradded.
a. Advening,fuad-ve'-nycnt.

ftate of fear.

a-droit -ntfs.

f.

randcm.

Dexterity,

ADVENT,
the

Athirft,ihirfty.

holy

ad'-vcnt. f.

The

fubjcAof

our

our

Saviour

devotion

one

of

coming;

this

of

name

the
feafons,fignifying

is, the coming of


the

rcadincft,
adivity.

i-drf,ad.

and
givesfuperiority,

a. Profitdd-van-ta'-jus.

ADVENIENT,
a-"lred'.
ad.

ADRY,

Poffeffed
a.
ad-van'-ta-jed.

profitably.
opportunely,
Conveniently,

ground.

ADROIT,

To

a.

bringfor\vard.

to

of annoyance
opportunities

deck

to

ority
Superi-

ad-van'-tadzh.v.

advantages.
ADVANTAGE-GROUND,

nefs. f.

a-dow'n.

The

of

cmbellifliment.

ADOWN,

ther
ano-

perfeftion.

ad-van'-tadzh. f.

ADVANTAGED,

Ornament,

f.

a-darn-mcnt.

ADOWN,

meet

pointto

one

the ftate of

ADVANTAGE,

decorations.

ADORNMENT,

coming
to

ad-vdn'fe-ment. f.

ADVANTAGEOUS,
a-da'rn.v.

aft of
forward

towards
improvement,progrefs

ground. f. Ground
f.

The

come

rife from
lover; progreffion,

benefit;to promote,

nal
exter-

worfhippcr.
ADORN,

tendencyto

parifon.

ner
man-

ad-d6-r4'-fliun.
f. The

a-do-rur.

come

gainedby ftratagem
; gain,
; fuperiority
fide of the comon
one
profit
; preponderation

extern.ilhomage.

To

To

n.

which

homage paid to the divinity


; homage paid
cfteem.
in
or
perfons highplace
a-do re.
To
ADORE,
v. a.
worfhip with

ADORER,

ad-van'fe. f.
;

v.

vanced,
being adcoming forward ;
preferment;improvement.
ad-vdn'-fur.f. A promoter, forwarder.
AD\'ANCER,

a-d6'-ribl-nefs.
f. Worth-

ADORABLY,

bring
ment,
prefer-

improvement.

ADVANCEMENT,

inefs of divine honours.

To

; to

ADVANTAGE,

ought
ADORABLENESS,

to

ad-van'fe.
make

aft of

be adored.

to

ad of

The

beingadopted.

a-dcp'-tlv.
a.

ADOPTIVE,

that

To

a.

raife to

; to

aA

The

to improve;tofonvard,to
aggrandize;
to offer to the publick.
to
propofe,
;

ADVANCE,

fon.

f.
a-dop'-fhun.

inff ; the ftate of

by

the

the local fenfe

ADVANCE,

To

forward

f. Ke
a-dop'-ti'ir.

ad-ftrik'-lliun.
f.

bindingtogether.
ad-van'fe.v.
ADVANCE,
to

which

complete fomethingelfc,

to

accelerate

fomethingadopted.

ADOPTER,

in

forward, in

elfe.
fomething

ADOPTEDLY,
manner

is taken

ADSTRICTION,
1

ADOLESCENCE,

relation

a. That
ADSCITITIOUS,ad-fy-tIfh'-uc.

ihcv/ of

the affairis worth.

which

duringthe

is made

four weeks

before Chriftmas,

ADVEN-

A
ADUI,ATOIl,

ad'-d.l-.la-tir.
f. A fli-.ttcier.

ADUNQUE,

Fiattera.
ad'-du-la-tiir'-ry.

ADVOCACY,

ADULATORY,

a-dunk'.a.

Crooked.

f. Vindication,
ad'-v6-ka-fy.

defence,apology.
a-dult'.
a.

ADULT,
of

Grownup;

paftthe

age

the caufe of

infancy.
a-dult'.
f.

ADULT,

infancy,or

perfonabove the age of


degreeof flrength,

fome

to

grown

a-dult'-nefs.
f.

ADULTNESS,

The

ftate of

as

a-dul'-tur.
v.

with
adultery

commit

thingwhich
ADULTERATE,

fon
per-

He
of

a. court

that pleads
judicature;
manner,

-ki-lhun. f.

The

fice
of-

pleading,
plea"apology.
ad-v6-li -fliun. f.

ADVOLATION,

The

ac^

to fomething.
flying

ad-vo-lii'-fliin.
f. The

ADVOLUTION,

ad

of

adulterates.

adultery
; to

ad-v6

ADVOCATION,

of

a-dal'-tc-rant.
f. The

or

commit

To

another.

ADULTERANT,
To

a.

in

pleadsany caufe,in whatever


controvertiftor vindicator.

of

ADULTER,

another

he that
,

beingadult.
To

ad'-vo-kate.f.

ADVOCATE,

to fomething.
rolling
a-dil'-t(:-ratc.
To
v. a.
ADVOUTRY,
ad-vou-try.f. Adultery.
fome
ad-vow',
f. He that has the right
AxDVOWE,
foreign
corrupt by

admixture.

of advowfon.

a-dul'-tc-rite.
a.

ADULTERATE,

Tainted

ad-vow'-zun.

ADVOWSON,

of adultery
with fome
to a benefice.
guilt
prefent
; corrupted
To ADURE,
admixture.
ad-u re. v. n.
foreign
ad-uft'.a.
Burnt
a-dur'-ti-rate-nefs'.
f.
ADULTERATENESS,
ADUST,

f.

rightto'

with the

The

or
quality
ADULTERATION,

ftateof

beingadulterate.

a-dul-te-ra'-fhun.
f. The

adt of
of

now
generally

corrupting
by foreignmixture;
beingcontaminated.

the

a-dul'-te-rur.
f. The

ADULTERER,

flate

a-dil'-te-refs.
f.

that commits

perfon

of

an

woman

adultery.

ADULTERINE,

ADULTERY,

i-dil'-te-rine.
f. A

child born

a-dil'-te-rus.
a.

Guiltyof

fhadow
a

out, to

ac'tof violating

to
likenefs,
givea flight

exhibit

faint refemblance.

ADUMBRATION,

it is.

ad-us'-ted.
a.

ADUSTED,

Burnt, dried with

ad-us'-tlble,
That which may
a.

ADUSTIBLE,
adufted,or

burnt

up.

ad-us'-tfliun.
f. The

ADUSTION,

act of burning

drying.
up,
f. An ointment
^GYPTIACUM,
e-jJp-ti'-a-cum.
and
of
negar.
confilting honey, verdigreafe, via.
a-c'-ryal.
Belongingto the air,
the air; placed
of it; inhabiting
confifling

AERIAL,
f. The
a-dul'-te-ry.

the bed of a married perfon.


ad-um'-brant.a. That which
ADUMBRANT,
refemblance.
a
gives flight
To
ad-um'-brate.v. a. To
ADUMBRATE,

"

of the

or

adultercfs.

ADULTEROUS,
adultery.

up,

the humours

body.

be
A

burn up.
fcorched

fire.

guiltyof adultery.
ADULTERESS,

appliedto

To

as

in the air ;

AERIE,

a-ry.

f.

in fituation.

neft of hawks

.and other

birds of prey.

AEROLOGY,

f. The
dodrine
a'-er-il'-Id-jy.

of the air.

AEROMANCY,
.id-um-bri'-fhun.
f. The

high, elevated

of

f. The
a'-er-5-man"-fy.

divining
by the

art

air.

and imperfect
f. The
art
aer-om"-me-try.
givinga flight
reprefent- AEROMETRY,
of meafuring
the air.
a faint fketch.
ad-u-na'-fhi.n.
f. The
f. The obfervftate
ADUNA.TION,
AEROSCOPY,
a'-er-os''-k6-py.

atS of

ation ;

of

ation of the air.


beingunited,imion.
f. Crookcdnefs, ^THIOPS-MINERAL,
ADUNCITY,
ad-un'-fy-tj'.

hookcdnefs.

e'-thyips-mln'-ne

ral. f. A medicine fo called,from its dark

co-

lour

F F

e-ti-tfz.

a-f.'i
r.

AFAR,

At

a.

f.

to

great

diftance.

a-f^'rd. participial
a.

AFEARD,

a'-fer.f.

manners

conceited ;

inclined,m.entally
difpofcd.
ad. In
af-fek'-ihuf-!y.

AFFECTIOUSLY,

af-fek'-tlv.
a.

AFFELTIVE,

tion.

if'-flbl.a.

AFFABLE,

Eafy

of

an

manner.
affedting

condefccncourteoufnefs,civility,

af-fik"-fho-nat-

Fondnefs, tendernefj:,
good-will.
Frightened,
af-fek'-fhun-ned.
a.
AFFCTIONED,
affedtcd,

r.f -fa-bil'-ly-ty.
f. Eafmefs of

AFFABILITY,

ad.
af-fek"-niO-nat'-ly.

fondly,tenderly.
AFFECTIONATENESS,

fouthivefl:
wind.

The

fond,tender.

nefs'. f.

afraid.
terrified,

AFER,

zealous

AFFECTIONATELY,

Eagle-Hone.

greatdillance ;

af-fek'-fto-nltc.
Full
a.

and fulphur,
lour, made of quickfilvcr
grou.td AFFECTIONATE,
of affection,
marble
i
n
mortar.
warm,
together a

/ETITES,

which

manner;,

That

which

fects,
af-

touches.
ftrongly

f. Pafaf-fek-til-os'-fy-ty.
AFFECTUOSITY,
complailimt.
Af -fibl-nefs'.
f. Courtcfj/, fionatenefs.
AFFABLENESS,
af-fek'-td-us.
Full of oafa.
AFFECTUOUS,
afrabilit)-.
fion.
ad. Courteoufly,
AFFABLY,
af'-fa-bly.
civilly.
if-fs'rc.
To AFFERE,
A law term, figaf -fa-briis.a. Skilfully
r. a.
AFFABROUS,
made,
courteous,

'

complete.
f. Bufmefs,fomcthing
to be
AFFAIR, af-fa'r.
managed or tranfa"led.
To AFFEAR,
af-fe r. v. n.
To
confirm,to
af-f"^kt'.
f. AfFeaion, paffion,kn-

fation.
To

5f-fekt'.
v.

AFFECT,

a.

To

a6t upon,

to

af-fi'-anfe.
f.

AFFIANCE,
;

divine

To

eflablifh.

AFFECT,

nifyingto confirm.
tract
marriage-con-

confidence;truftinthe
general,
ai^d prote"tion.
promifes
truft in

af-fi -anfe.

AFFIANCE,
to

bind

by

one

any

v.

a.

promifeto

giveconfidence.
af-fl'-an-fur.
f.
AFFIANCER,

To

betroth,

to
marriage;

He that makes

contradt of marriagebetween
the
two parties.
a
thing; to move
-fhun.K.
af-fi-da
Mutual conaim.
be
to
fond
to
AFFIDATION,
to
to
of,
paflions
;
at,
afpire ;
mutual
the
to be pleafed
love
AFFIDATURE,af-fi'-da-ture.i
traft,
with, to
; to practice appearance
oath
of
of any thing,with fome degreeof
fidelity.

produceeffectsin any

hypocrify
; to

other

imitate in

an

unnatural and

con-

flraincd manner.

upon

af-fek-ta'-fhun.
f.

AFFECTATION,
of

making

artificialappearance,

an

The

act

af,

an

perfonalfenfe,full

aitected

AFFECTEDLY,
fedled manner,

AFfLCTEDNESS,

of

AFFECTION,

metals

ad. In
af-fek'-ted-ly.

an

af-

hypocritically.
.-if-fcK
-ted-nefs. f.

The

f.

The

flate of

beinga.'fcftedby any caufe,or agent; paflion


of any kind; love, kindnefs,
Co fome
good-will

f. The
.Af'-fl-nAje.

by

the

AFFINITY,

ing
afl of refin-

cupel.

af-fi'-ned.
a.

AFFINED,

lady.

af-fek -fhun.

AFFINAGE,

afFcclation,

of beingafFe"Sled.
quality

perfon.

f. Adopaf-fy-ly-a'-fhun.
tion.

af-fJk'-ted.
a.
Moved,
participial

with affeition; lludied with over-much

in

af-fi'-ed.
a.
tract,
Joinedby conparticip.
affianced.

AFFILIATION,

AFFECTED,
care;

oath.

AFFIED,

aukward

imitation.

touched

f. A declaration
af-fy-di'-vlt.

AFFIDAVIT,

Related to another.

f. Relation by m;;raf-f!n'-ny-ty.

riage
; relation to, connexion with.
af-ferm'.v. n.
To declare,to
To AFFIRM,
alTtrtconfidently,
oppofedto the word deny.
To ratify
af-ferm'.v. a.
or approve
AFFIRM,
a

former

law,

AFFIRMABLE,

or

judgment.
af-rer'-mdble.
That which
a.

may be affirmed.
F

AFFIRM-

F F

df-fer'-manfe.
f. Confirmation,

AFFIRMANCE,

that
f. The perfon
df-fer'-mant.

place,affluence;
place.

ad

of

or declaring,
oppofedto negation
affirming
;
affirmed
pofition
oppofedto
; confirmation,
rcpesl.
af-fer'-ma-tiv.
That which
AFFIRMATIVE,
a.

one

To

that which
affirms,oppofedto negative;
or

; to

To

To

the

fide,not negatively.
pofitive
af-fer'-mur.
f. The
AFFIRMER,
perfonthat
To

fubjoin.
f.
AFFIX, .nf-fLics.

a.

To

unite to the

end,

AFFRAY,

of

united
particle

af-flk'-ftiun.
f. The

the flate of

upon any

to

the end

ac^ of affixing

beingaffixed.

af-fla'-t'is.
f. Communication

the power

of

To

af-flikt',
v.

AFFLICT,

To

put

to

turn

To

others.

perfons
upon

more

af-fr!k'-fhun.f. The

adl of

another.

rubbing
thingupon
af-fri'te.
v. a.
AFFRIGHT,

To

affeclwith

fear,to terrify.
af-fri'te.
f. Terrour, fear.
Full of affright
af-fri'te-ful.
a.
AFFRIGHTFUL,
terrible.

terrour,

or

of
preffion

To
a.

To

a.

AFFRIGHT,

of

prophecy.

v.

af-frl'.
To fright,
to terrify.
v. a.
aflault of
af-fra'.
f. A tumultuous

f. The
df-fri'te-ment.

AFFRIGHTMENT,

thing.

AFFLATUS,

or

af-fli-flnin.
f. Aft of breaJiing

AFFLATION,

To

duce
pro-

be able

to

af-fran'-tflnz.
v. a.

one

word.

AFFIXION,

af-for-reft.

AFFRICTION,

-to

thing;

free.

To AFFRAY,

one

af-fiks'.
v.

AFFIX,

yieldor

foreft.

AFFRANCHISE,
make

affirms.

To

a.

confer any

AFFOREST,

ground into

ad. On
af-fcr'-ma-tlv-ly.

AFFIRMATIVELY,

if-fo'rd.v.

grant, or

flows from

fell; to be able to bear expences.

to

can

be affirmed.

may

AFFORD,

the

aa of flowing

that which

place;
particular
placeto another.

to

af-fcr-ma'-fliun.
f. The

flows to any

that which

f. The
AFFLUXION,af-fluk'-fhun.

affirms.

AFFIRA'IATION,

fomc

oppofedto repeal.
AFFIRMANT,

pain,

terrour
fe.ir,
af-frunt'.
v.

AFFRONT,
to

im-

; the ftateof fearfulnefs.

face,to

a.

To

meet

provokeby
avowedly.

encounter

; to

an

face
open

to grieve,
to torment.
infult,to offend
af-flik'-ted-nefs.
rowful AFFRONT,
f. Soraf-frunt f. Infult ofFered to the
AFFLICTEDNESS,
face ; outrage, act of contempt.
nefs,grief.
af-filk'-tur.
that
.nf-frun'-tur.
f. The perfon
f. The perfonthat
AFFLTCTER,
AFFRONTER,
.

afflias.

affronts.

.if-fllk'-niun.
f. The

AFFLICTION,

poinor forrow,calamity
; the

caufe of

llateof forrow-

fulnefs,
mifery.
AFFLICTIVE, af-fllk'-tlv.
a.
ing.
Painful,torment-

which

To

has the

upon

to

any

place,concourfe

ad

of flowing

exuberance

of

To

f. The fame
af'-ilu-cn-f".

with

To

affluence.

part

af '-flu-ent.
a.

Flowingto
abundant, exuberant,wealthy.

AFFLUENTNESS,

af'-flu-ent-ncfs.f.

of beingaffluent.
quality
af '-fluks.
f. The
AFFLUX,
5

any

AFFY,

AFLOAT,
AFOOT,

a^

of

to
flowing

one

pour

thing

af-fa'-zhun. f.

aft of af-

The

betroth

To

V. n.
:\f-fy'.

To

in order to

put confidence in,

put trail in.

AFIELD,
AFLAT,

The

To

a.

another.

v. a.
AFFY, af-fy'.
marriage.

to

.AFFLUENT,

v.

fufing.

riches,
plenty.

AFFLUENCY,

of affronting.
quality

af-fii
zc.

AFFUSE,

AFFUSION,
af'-fld-enfe.
f. The

AFFLUENCE,

af-friin'-tlng.
part.a. Th.-it

AFFRONTING,

To

a-fc Id. ad.

th"3 field.

a-fi;'it'.
ad. Level with the
d-flo te.

ad.

a-fut'.ad.

back ; in aftion, as,

Floating.

On
a

ground.

foot,not

on

horfc-

dcfignis afoot.
AFORE,

AFT
i-fb re.

AFORE,

AGE
in

Before,nearer

prep.

phice

AFTERTHOUGHT,

to any thing; fooncr in time.

a-fo'te.ad. In time

AFORE,

firftin the way

in

AFOREGOING,

front,in

ticns after the

the

ing
Go-

af

too

late.

Succeeding

f.

-ter-timz.

Rcflcc-

times,

fore-part.

a-fo re-gc-ing. part.a.

af'-ter-w.ird.
ad. In

AFTERWARD,

ing
fucceed-

time.
ad. By
a-f'/rc-hand.

AFOREHAND,

previous

a-f6

AFOREMENTIONED,
Mentioned

're-men -fiiund.

after the occafion of


ad. A
a-gen'.

AGAIN,

them
ufing

fecond

time, once

in any
back, in reftitution; befides,

before.

i-f6''re-na-med.
a.

AFORENAMED,

af'-tcr-wk.
f. Contrivance

AFTERWIT,

fitted.
prepared,
previoufiy
provifioii;
provided,

Named

twice

place;

before.

as

of
is

pedients
ex-

paft.

more;

other time

much, markingthe

or

fame quantity

quent
repeated
; againand again,with frerepetition.
AGAINST,
a-genft prep. Contrary,oppoin general
dency,
tenor
fite,
; with contrary motion
ufed of material ailion ; oppofite
to, in
once

a-fo're-fed.
a.

AFORESAID,

Said before.

a-fo're-tlme.
ad. In time paft.

AFORETIME,

a-fra d.

AFRAID,

Struck
a.
particip.

fearful.
terrified,
ad.
AFRESH, a-frefh'.

with fear,

Anew, again.

a-front'.ad.

AFRONT,

In

front, in direfc

oppofition.
af -tcr.

AFTER,

in place;
Following

prep.

in time;
purfuitof; behind; pofteriour
to ;

In

and thp dyingtrade.


phyfick,

time;
fucceeding

of

To
in
At laft,

fine,

in conclufion.

fccun-

dine.
faf'-ter-klapUncxpe^ed

event

after an
liappening

r.t an

end.

affairis fuppofed
to be

af'-ter-koft.
f. The

after the

original
planis executed.
harveft.

f. Methods
af'-ter-game.

after the firftturn

ken
ta-

of affairs.

af'-ter-matR.f. Second crop


in autumn.
af

the meridian

AFTERPAINS,

expence

f. Second
af'-ter-krop.

AFTERMATH,
of grafs
mown
AFTERNOON,

to

-ter-no'n. f.
the

The

time

evening.

f. Pains
af'-ter-p-Jnz.

after

birth.

AFTERTASTE,
the

of the
a.
;'ig'-a-ty.
P.irtaking

lis-ture

agate.

a-ga'zc.a.

AGAZE,

v.

To

ftrike with

amazement.

aje. f. Any periodof time attributed


ration
fomethingas the whole, or part of its duof
fucceffion
a
or
men
generation
;
; the
of
time in which any particular
or
race
man,
the
of
heroes ;
men
lived,as, the age
fpaceof
to

AFTERCROP,
AFTERGAME,

the

AGE,
f. The
if '-ter-bcrtlT.

AFTERBIRTH,

AFTERCOST,

of

loweft clafs.

lowing
fol-

AGATY,

times,pofterity.
af'-ter-a'll.
ad.
AFTERALL,

AF'FERCLAP,

Amaze.
a.
a-g.ift'.
f.
ag'-at. A preciousftone

AGAST,

f. Succeeding
af"-ter-a'-jez.

AFTERAGES,

upon

of.
place; in expeflation
with eagernefs.
AGAPE,
Staring
a-ga p. ad.
f. A drug of ufe in
AGARICK,
ag'-a-rik.

AGATE,

another.

incurred

in
cording
ac-

in imitation of.

af'-ter. ad.

AFTER,

from

formed
ai\,expedients

or
p;ifl; AFTERTIMES,
foregone

before.

a.

.aftcr-tfiat. f.

af 'ter-tift.
f. Tafte remaining

tongue after the draught.

hundred

age

in

years

law,

in

the

man

latter

part of life,old

the age of

years is the full age, a woman


is able to alienate her lands.

AGED,

at

twenty-one
twenty-one

-jcd.a. Old, ftricken in years.


of
.id. After the manner
a -jed-ly.
AGEDLY,
an
agedperfon.
ad.
AGEN,
a-gen'.
Again,in return.
f. The
of a^ing,
AGENCY,
quality
a-jen-fy.
the ftateof beingin adion ; bufincfs performed
by an
AGENT,
AGENT,

agent.
a

a.
-jent.
-jent.f.

Ailingupon,
A

ailive.

a deputy,a
fubflltute,

fador; that which has the

power

of

operating.
AGGE-

f.The
AGGRIE
ag-jen-ne-ra'-niun.

AGGENERATION,
ftateof

growingto another
ad

AGGERATE,

To

AON

body.

v.
-je-rate.

wrong.
To

a.

heap

To

gatherup

in

to vex

ba!!,as thread.

v,

ag-grop.

into

To

giveforright.
gether
bringto-

; to impofe,to hurt in one's

v. a.
ToAGGROUP,
ag-glom'-me-ratc.

AGGLOMERATE,
To

v. a.
ag-gre've.

AGGRIEVE,
row,

up.

To

f. Injury,
Ig-gre'-vans.

VANCE,

To

a.

figure.

one

Struck with horror,as at


a.
AGHAST,
a-gaft'.
ag-gld-ty-nants.f. Thofe
the power
of uniting
the fight
of a fpeclre.
a.
AGILE,
Nimble, ready,adive.
aj'-il.
parts together.
f. Nimbienefs,quickTo AGGLUTINATE,
v. n.
AGILENESS,aj'-il-nefs.
ag-gld'-ty-nate.
To unite one part to another.
nefs,activity.
f. Nimblenefs, quickf.
AGILITY,
AGGLUTINATION,
a-jil'-y-ty.
ag-gll-ty-na'-fliun.
nefs,aitivity.
Union, cohtilon.
To AGIST,
To take in and feed
a.
a-j!fl:'.
v. a.
AGGLUTINATIVE,
ag-glu"-ty-na-tiv'.
and
the
in
the
of
cattle
That which has the power of procuring
king'sforclt,
agglutination.
ftrangers

AGGLUTINANTS,
medicines

which

have

gatherthe

to

To

To
v.
a.
ag'-gran-dize.

AGGRANDIZE,
make

to exalt.
great, to enlarge,

f.

The

(bte of

heavy, in

make

aggr.ivatean

To

g.-cat.

to

make

any

thing

of
conjunftion

a.
ag'-gre-gate.
v.

colleft together,
to

heap many

vert.
contro-

into
particulars

ad

of

thoughts
;

bation,
pertur-

tion,
delibera-

beingconfulted upon.
who

manages

affairs.
f. A
ag'-let.

AGLET,

tag of

pointcarved

of an animal
into fome reprefentation

the pendants

the ends of the chieves of flowers.

at

AGMINAL,

ag

Belongingto

-my-na!. a.

troop.

into on:
particulars
whole ; the v/hule compofed by the collection
of many particulars
; llatcof beingcolkded.
To AGGRESS,
ag-grcfsv. n. To commit the

colledingmany

firfla"n.of violence.

AGGRESSION,
ag-gres'-lhin.
of a quarrel
by fome i.6tof iniquity.
f. The
ag-gr's'-fur.

to
i-nvad.r,
oppofecl

th: defendant.

aflaulter

f. A
ag'-nal.

AGNAIL,
AGNATION,
the fame

father,in

AGNIZE,

direfl male
f.

-un.

ag-nlze.

v.

a.

Defccnt from
line.

Acknowledgment.
To acknovvkdgc
;

own.

f.
ag-nom-my-n;V-fhun.

AGNOMINATION,
vMlufion of
AGNUS

whitlow.

ag-na-fhun.f.

AGNlTION,ag-niih
To
to

ment
f. Commence-

cr

put in

afredl with

being moved

aj-y-ta-tur.f. He

AGITATOR,

To

f. The
ag-gre-ga'-fhun.

AGGREGATION,

AGGRESSOR,

ftateof

the

difturbance of the
the ftateof

mafs.

adl of

To

controverfial examination
difcuflion,

particulars.

many

AGGREGATE,

; to

move

f. The
aj-y-ta'-fhun.

moving any thing;

'

one

v.

to
r.ctuatc,

AGITATION,

f. The
ag-gra-va'-(hun.

circumftances which
aggravating
; the
heightenguiltor calamity.
Framed
a.
ag'-gre-gate.
AGGREGATE,
by
mafs.
into
the colleilion of particular
one
parts
f. Therefultof
AGGREGATE,
ag'-gre-gite.
the

a.
aj'-y-tate.

AGITATE,

ail of

To

may

to

worfe.

AGGRAVATION,

which

to
to bandy, to difcufs,
perturbation;

To

fenfe,as,
metaphorical

accufation

.'".That
?,j'-y-table.

motioji ; to

v.
a.
.ng'-gra-vate.

AGGRAVATE,

rate.

mean

be put in motion.

f. The
ag'-gran-di''-zur.

thit inakjs another


pcifo:'.

f. Campondon,
aj'-Ilt-meiit.

AGITABLE,

being aggrandized.

AGGRANDIZER,
To

or

'ze-mcnt.
Ig'-gran-di

AGGRANDIZEMENT,

money.

AGISTMENT,

one

word

CASTUS,

to

another.

ag-nu"-cas-tus. f. The

chaftc tee.

AGO,

A
ad.
a-t,-V.

AGO,

Paftj as, longago; that is,

ad.
a-gog'.

AGOG,
AGOING,

In

a-go -ing.

AGONE,

AGONISM,

cold fitsfucceeded

AGUED,

ftateof dcfirc.
In aftion.

a.

for a
publickfolcmnity

v. n.
ag'-o-nize.

AGONIZE,
ceffive

To

be in

f. The
ag'-o-ny.
pangs
of
violent
body or mind.
pain
any
ad.
In earneft.
AGOOD,
a-gud'.

a-gra fe.

v.

To

a.

of

of

To

fettle

; to

daub,

to

To

be

in concord

terms

f. Cona-gr^'4ble-nefs.

with, fuitablenefs to;


fiftency
pleafing.

AGREED,

fuitable

manner

a-gre d.

the

of
quality

AID,

ther.
ano-

Aloft, on

high.
help,to fupport,t"

To

a.

a'-dant.a.

Helping,helpful.
helper,an ally.
a'de-lefs.
a.
unfupported.
Hclplefs,

a'-dur.f.

AIDER,
AIDLESS,

AIL, a'le.v.

Settled by con-

a-gr^'-ing-nefs.

femblance of

one

bargain.
iVGRICULTURE,

thing to

another

f.

to

ftrikewith

guefs.

; to

pointto

endeavour

pointthe view, or direil


any thing,to endeavour to
to

The

a'r. f.

earth

of

direftion

which

the

miflile weapon

thingthrown

is di-

element

The

ferious ; the mien,

name

cncompaffingthe
or
light
of the perfon
;.

gentle
gale;mufick, whether
or

afiedled or laboured

manner,
manner

or

; apgefture
pearance.

dered
Stranded,hin-

farther;
by the ground from paffing
of
affairs.
progrefs

in the

Pain, difeafe.

of
a defign
intention,
; the objc"l
; an
guefs.
; conjedlure,
defign

AIR,

an

ad.
a-grou'nd.

trouble,to

to

manner.

reded

compact,

f. The
ag'-ry-mun-ny.

obtain

or

a'm.
; the

plant.

iVGROUND,

flepstowards

reach

husbandry.
AGRIMONY,

To

a.

re-

f. Tillage,
ag"-ry-cul'-ture.

pain,

a.
particip.
le-ing.
Sickly.
V.

AIM,

Concord;
a-gr^'-ment.

a'm.

miflive weapon

the

f.

To

a.

le-ment. f.

AIM,

To

fuitablenefs.

givepain; to ^ffc" in any


AIL, a'le.f. A difeafe.

f. Confift-

AGREEMENT,

than

a'de.f. Help,fupport
; in law, a fubfidy.
a'-d.infe.
f. Help, fupport.

AIDANT,

fent.

of

onward

AIDANCE,

AILMENT,

to.

a.
particip.

AGREEINGNESS,
encc,

a-hi'te.
ad.
a'de. v.

ad.
a-gre'-ab-ly.
ConfiftentlyAILING,

AGREEABLY,
a

contempt.

a-hed'.ad. Further

AID,

To

To

pleafing.

AGREEABLENESS,

in

A word
a-ha'-,a-ha'. interjed.

fuccour.

fiftentwith

with,

frequently,
compaf-

fields

by ftipulation
; to
fettle a price between
and
be
to
feller;
buyer
of the fame mind or opinion
fuit
with.
to
;
Suitable to, conAGREEABLE,
a.
a-gre'-able.
.

moft

complaint.

AHIGHT,

V. n.
a-gre'.

to
yield

cenfure

intimating
triumphand

grant favours

a.
a-gre'ze.

ague.

a', interjeftion.
A word notingfometimes

AHA', aha',

a.
to
l-gra'-ryan.
Relating

AGREE,
to

f. The quality
^'-gA-ifh-ncfs.

an
refembling

fion and

greafe.
To

f. SafTafms.
a'-gue-tree.
of
a.
a'-gii-ifh.
Havingthe qualities

AHEAD,

grounds.
AGREASE,

or

To

ague,

ague.

dillike and

death;

to.

AGRARIAN,

an

ague.

AH,

AGRACK,

with

-TREE,

an

ex-

pain.

AGONY,

To

Struck

f. The
a'-gile-fit.
paroxyfm of

AGUISHNESS,

prize.
To

the

f. A prize-fighter,
AGUISH,
ag-6-n!s'-tez.
at

by

-gu-ed. a.

AGUE-FIT,
for

AGUE

that contends

with
fever,
intermitting
hot.

(hivering.

ad.
a-gon',
Ago, paft.
f. Contention
ag'-o-nivsm.

prize.
AGONISTES,

I R

f. An
a'-giie.

AGUE,

paftfincc.

longtime has

one

dered
hin-

To

AIR, a'r. V.
take the air ;

to

To

a.

warm

expofeto

the

air; to

by the fire.
AIR-

ar'-bUd-dur. f.

AIRBLADDER,

bladder

filledwith air.
Built
a.
a'rTbilt,

AIRBUILT,

a'-rur.f.

AIRER,

in the air.

Painted
u'r-dran.
a.

AIR-DRAWN,

He

that

a'r-hole.f.

AIRHOLE,

hole

admit

to

f. Expofureto
a'-ry-nefs.

f.
a'-rlng.

AIRING,
with

the air ;

the air is exhaufted

machine

jut

f.
d'r-fhaft.

AIRSHAFT,

gay

young

f.
a'r-pump.

AIRPUMP,
means

perfon.
by whofe

of proper vefTels.

for the
paffage

AIRY,

a.
a'-ry.

bodyof

each

word

; a

of

a-late. ad.
alb

f.

to

men

appear at.

pity.

Lately.

furplice.

al-be'-lt.ad.

ALBEIT,

Although,notwith-

ftanding.
Rcfema.
al-bu-jin'-yus.

ALBUGINEOUS,
blingan albugo.

f. A
al-bii'-go.

ALBUGO,

air into mines,

rifying,
Ter-

a-lafs'.interjeft.
A word expreffing
la"

mentation

ALB,

f.
r-ling.

bell that

alarm.

a.
a-la'r-mlng.
particip.

pointedto

ALATE,

communication

the free air.

AIRLING,

i-la'rm-bell.
f. The

givethe

awakening,furprifing.
a-Ia
ALARMPOST,
rm-poft.f. The poftapALAS,

Without

to

ALARMING,

Ihort jaunt.

a'r-lefs.
a.

difturb.

is rung

lichtnefs,
levity.
gaiety,
AIRLESS,

the apprehenfion
of a^iy danger.
furprifewith

to

ALARMBELL,

the air.

to
expofes

to

in air.

air.

AIRINESS,

L G

ALA

Compofed of air

difeafe in the eye"

to
contra6ls a whitenefs.
cornea
by which
; relating
al'-ka-heft.
f. An univerfal difas air,
unfubftantial; ALCAHEST,
highin air ; light
folvent.
without reality,
vain, trifling
; gay, fprightly,
al-ca'd. f. The government of 3
full of mirth, lively,
ALCAID,
lightof heart.
caftle;in Spain,the judgeof a city.
AISLE, 1 le, f. The walk in a church.
al-kan'-na.f. An Egyptian
AIT, a'te.f. A flnallifland in a river.
ALCANNA,
plant
a'ke.
feel
ufed
in
To AKE,
To
v. n.
a lafting
pain.
dying.
al-klm'-my-kal.
a.
AKIN, a-kin'.a. Related to, allied toby blood.
ALCHYMICAL,
Relating
al'-a-bdf-tur.
f. A kind of foft
to alchymy.
ALABASTER,

the

the air ;

marble, eafier to

and

cut,

lefs durable,than

the

al'-a-baf-tur.
Made
a.

ALABASTER,
bafter.

a-l;lk

ALACK,

Alas, an
interject.

of forrow.

notingforrow

and

without

an

alchymift.

of

melancholy.

metals;

kind

of mixed

ufed

metal

for

fpoons.
il'-k6-h6l.f.

ALCOHOL,

deje"tion.

high

rcdified

of wine.
fpirit

f. Cheerfulnels,' ALCOHOLIZATION,
a-lak'-kry-ty.

ALACRITY,

fprightlinefs,
gayety.
al-a-mo'de.
ad. According
ALA.MODE,
to

f.
the

fafliion.

To

The

act

al-ko'-hol-y-za'-fhu

or rectifying
fpirits.
alcoholizing

ALCOHOLIZE,

al-k6'-h6-llze.v.

a.

To

till they are whollydephlegmfpirits


redtify

ALAND,

a-land'.ad.

ALARM,

a-la nn.

fummoned

to

f.

At
A

their arms

land, landed.

cry

by which
;

ated.

men

; notice of any

of clock
a fpecies
.'ipproaching;

are

danger

any tumult

or

diflurbance.
To

manner

f. One who purALCHYMIST,


al'-ky-mift.'
fues or profefles
the fcience of alchymy.
f. The
fublim*
more
al'-ky-my.
expreflion ALCHYMY,
the
tranfmutation
which
propofcs
chymiftry,

ad. Cheerfully,
a-lak'-ryus-ly.

ALACRIOUSLY,

of

of aja-

a-lak'-a-da'.
A word
interjea.

ALACKADAY,

ad. Ii"
al-k!m'-my-kal-ly.

ALCHYMICALLY,

the other kinds.

ALARM,

a-la'rm.
v.

a.

To

call to armsj

ALCORAN,
Mahometan

ALCOVE,

al'-kd-ran.f. The
precepts, and

book of the

credenda.

al-ko've.f. A recefs,or

chamber, feparated
by
a bed pf ftate,
placed

an

part of

in which
eftrade,

ALDER,

is

A
ha?

ALL

of aliment, that
quality

the

which

nou-

f.
ALL, al.
al-ly-jnei/-,ta-r"'-nefs.

The

quality
of.being
alimentary.
That
a.
ALIMENTARY,
al-ly-men'-ta-ry,
that which

belongsto aliment;
of

power

has the

of
quality

ALIMONIOUS,

which

eftate,
which, by the

fen-

of the ecclefiaftical
court, is allowed
the

wife, upon

ALIQUANT,

of

account

Parts of

al-ly-quant.
a.

up the number

number

meafure

or

aliquot
part
a

dead ;

any

-lifli.
a.

remainder

phafis
; as, the beft man

ali\e.

to

al'-ka-hel^.
f. An

ALKAHEST,

has

tendencyto

the

about

term

as, three is

thing.

thing.

l-f6"rz.f. A low game

at

cards,

t%vo.

All health.

i 1-haMun.

All-faints

time

i'l-hal'-l6-tide.
f. The
the firftof November.

1-he 1. f.

The

f.

day.

AU-Hiints,or

near

a
'l-c6nk'-ke-rlng.

of
fpecies

iron-

wort.

That
a.
i"l-jud'-jing.

JUDGING,

which

fovereign
rightof judgment.
a
a. Omnifcient,
ALL-KNOWING,
l-no'-ing.
has the

add

an

em-

univerfal dif-

all wife.

every thing.
ALL
SOULS
DAY,

That

of
properties

That
a.
a'i-se'-Ing.

ALL-SEEING,

which

on

by

the

l"l-Co'\z-di'
f.

of

The

are
fupplications

church

beholds

made

day

for all fouls


of November.

Rome, the fecond

an

alkali.

i'l-fif-flfli'-ent.
ficient
Sufa.

ALL-SUFFICIENT,
f. Any fubflance,
al'-ka-ly.
which,

ALKALI,
when

every

a. That
a"l-de-vou'-ring.

up eveiy

exaftly ALL-HEAL,

folvent,a liquor.
al-ka-les'-sent.
ALKALESCENT,
a.
which

ALL-HALLOWTIDE,

ftate of life;not

is ufed

eats

That

all.

ALlIhAIL,dl-hi'l. f.

aci'ive ;
unextinguifhed,
undeftroyed,

cheerful,fprightly
; it

a' 1-tfhe-ring.a.
to

fubducs

which

which

ALL-

the

thing.

a. Omniparous.
'l-be'-ring.

ALL-DEVOURING,

of

ale.
Refembling
In

every

Quite, comjdctely
; altogether,

aliquant ALL-HALLOWN,

will

as

That

playedby

of twelve.

a-li've.
a.

ALIVE,

whole

givesgayety
ALL-CONQUERING,

four times

being nine,

fuch
quantity,

it without

ALISH,

The

which

ALLFOURS,

make

three making twelve.


a.
ALIQUOT,
al'-ly-quot.
Aliquot parts

an

1. ad.

ber,
num-

never

exaftly
; as, three is an

of ten, thrice three

any

to

reparation.

will
which, however repeated,
,

ALL,

f. Legalproporal'-ly-mun-ny.
tion

of the hufband's
tence

1. f.

ALL-CHEERING,

nourifhing.
a. That
al-ly-mo-nyus.

ALIMONY,

one;

wholl}'.

nourifhes.

ithe

The
ALL-BEARING,
al-ly-men-ta'-fliun.f.

ALIMENTATION,

number, every

quantity,
ever}'part.

ALL,

nourifliing.

whole

The

a.

the whole

confeaion

berries are the biiiis.

the kermes

whereof

ALIMENTARINESS,

which

il-ker'-mez.f.

ALKERMES,

rlfhes.

ation.
mingled with acid,produces ferment-

to

every

ALL-WISE,

thing.
1-v/ize.

a.

PolTeft of infinite

wifdom.

ALKALINE,

al'-ka-line.
a.

That

which

of alkali.
qualities
al-kal'-lv-zaie.
To ALKALIZATE,
v. a.

has

the

make

has the

That
al-kil'-l^-zlte.
a.

To

which

of alkali.
qualities

ALKALIZATION,

of

j;lant.

make

a.

To

mix

it fitterfor

one

metal

coinage
;
abate

to

its

joinany thing
to reprefs.
to pacify,
qualities
; to quiet,
al-la
f.
The
metal
of a bafer kind
ALLAY,
to

another,fo

as

to

wear

the
name

al-la'.v.

another,to

mixed

f. The
al-kd-Iy-zi'-flian.

acl of alkalizating.
al'-ki-net.
f. The
ALKANET,

ALLAY,
with

alkaline.

ALKALIZATE,

To

in coins,to harden

them, that theymay


thingwhich, beingadded,abates
of that with which it
predominant qualities
lefs; any

is mmgled.

ALLAYER,

ALL

ALL
al-la'-ur.
f.

ALLAYER,

has the power

which

or

pcifonor thing
of allaying.
quality
The

al-kV-ment. f.

ALLAYMENT,

That

which

f. The power
al-le'-fyen-fy.

ALLICIENCY,
of

To

attrading.
To
v. a.
al'-ly-gdte.

ALLIGATE,

tie

ot^

thingto another.
allaying.
f. The aft of
f.
ation,
AffirmALLIGATION,
ALLEGATION,
al-ly-gi'-fhun.
al-le-g;V-{hun.
rule
that teaches
the
arithmetical
firmed
declaration;the thingallegedor aftyingtogether
;
of
the
to
an
a
excufe, plea.
adjuft price compounds, formed of
;
of

has tiie power

To

al-ledzh'.

ALLEGE,

maintain

declare,to

; to

v.

To

a.

pleadas

excufe

an

or

be

al-ledzh'-able.
That which
a.
al-lcdzh'-mcnt.
f. The

fame

al-ledzh'-ur.
f. He

ALLEGER,

that

alleges.

f. The
al-le'-jans.
duty of

ALLEGIANCE,

the government.

fubjedsto
ALLEGIANT,

a.
formable
al-le'-jant.
Loyal, con-

to

duty of

the

al-llzh'-un.
f. The

of

puttingone
an

to

the

real,

another

article in

thingto
reckoning,and

addition of it

al-l5-ku'-lhun.
f.

fpeaking

to

Not
a.
al-l6'-dyal.

ALLODIAL,

The

ad

another.

In the
a.
al-le-gor'-r'-kil.

dependent
feudal,in-

f. PofTeffion held
Al-lS'-dyum.

ALLODIUM,

literal.
in abfolute independence,
without
not
allegory,
of a lord paramount.
ad.
ALLEGORICALLY,
al-le-gor'-rl-kal-ly.
form of

After

an

into

turn

allodial lands in

manner.
allegorical

an

To
v. a.
al'-le-go-rf'ze.

ALLEGORIZE,
to
allegory,

form

an

in which fomething
other
difcourfe,
than

is contained

gay,

motion.
fprightly

is intended,

taken.
literally

to

To

It originally
means

eafed,or

To
a.
al-le'-vyitc.

al-lot'.v.

grant ;

feton, to incite.
a"i of

ing
fpeak-

diftribute by

To

a.

to
diftribute,
give each hi"

to

narrower

which

walk in
than

a!-ll -dns. f.

al-l6t'-ment.
f. The

part, the

any

pain

is

garden;

paf-

fireet.

The

flate of

To

grantedto

a league
by confederacy,
;
marriage
; relation by any form of
the pcrfons
allied to each other.

any in

to

to ; to

make

To

a.

to

admit

giveto,

to

to

p^.y

abatement.

ALLOWABLE,

not

whidi

diltribution.

; to permit;
yield

grant,

be

al-lov/. v.

ALLOW,

may
nection
con-

f. That
al-lot'-tl-ry.

ALLOTTERY,
is

f. The act
al-lC-vyA'-fiiun.

with another

relation by
;

make

v.

-ly.f.

fagein towns
ALLIANCE,

to

To

a.

fhare.

fault extenuated.
al

thruft

pafs or

another.

ALLOTMENT,

foften.

making light;that by

ALLEY,

of fpi-

PraifeGod.

To

ALLEVIATE,
light,to eafe,to
ALLEVIATION,

no

fhare.

f. A word
al-le-lo'-ya.

rltual exultation

f. The
al'-ld-kwy.

ALLOT,
lot ;

are

ALLOQUY,

in Milton.

as

ALLELUJAH,

kindred

rapier.
al-lo'.
v.
figurativeToALLOO,

f. A word denoting
in
al-le'-gro.

ALLEGRO,
mufick

in the words

with

ledgment
any acknowThere

England.

al-lundzh'.f.

ALLONGE,

allegory.

f. A
al'-le-gur-ry.

ALLEGORY,

of

act

the admiflion

literal.

not

ALLEGORICAL,

To

ftriking

account.

ALLOCUTION,

allegiance.

ad of

al-lo-ki'-fhun.
f. The

of

of

Not
a.
al-le-gor'-rlk.

ALLEGORICK,

codile
cro-

another.
thingagainft

one

ALLOCATION,

allegation.

cro-

is chiefly
iifed for the

name

of America.

ALLISION,

alleged.

ALLEGEMENT,
with

This

codile.

ALLEGEABLE,

f.
The
al'-ly-ga-tur.

ALLIGATOR,

argument.

may

of difFerentvalue.
ingredients

feveral

affirm,to

admitted

al-low'-abl.a.
without

That

which

contradiction ; lawful,

forbidden.

f.LawALLOWABLENESS,al-low'-abl-n(:-fs.

fulncfs,exemptionfrom prohibition.
a!-low'-ans.
f. SanSion,
ALLOWANCE,
H

ceotc

li;

A
cence

an
permillion
;

appointmentfor any

from the ftri"l rigour;a

ufe; abatement

grantedweeklyor yearly,as
f. Bafer
al-loy'.

ALLOY,
;

To

To

thing,without

al-m! -ty,a. Of unlimited power,

ALMIGHTY,
omnipotent.

a'-mund.

ALMOND,

age
in coin-

have

fome

the direit

colours

To

who

paintsupon paper or parchment.


al-lii're.
To entice to any
v. a.
ALLURE,
or

flowers very like thofe of

al-lu're-ment.
ment,
f. Entice-

a'-mundz.

ad.
al-ld'-rmg-ly.

alluring
manner,

In

an

alms

fome-

Hintingat

thing.
ad.

an

allu-

manner.

are

al-mo'ft.
ad.
a'mz.

"

a'mz-baf-klt.
f. The

thing

fomethingelfe

the motion

of

by
thingcarried by water.
To
unite by kindred,
To ALLY,
v. a.
al-ly'.
or
a relation
friendfhip,
confederacy
; to make
between two things.
f. One united to fome other by
ALLY, al-ly'.
or
friendfhip,
marriage,
confederacy.
to

the

al-ma-can'-tur.
f.

ALMACANTER,
drawn

to the
parallel

ALMACANTER's
An

circle

horizon.

infirument ufcd

to

take

obferv-

aticns of the fun, about the time of its

rifmg

to

a'mz-ded. f.

charitable

a'mz-man. f.

man

1-ma-nak.

ALMANDINE,

f.

l-man-dine. f. A

ALMIGHTINESS,
one

f. A
al'-mug-tre.

ell j

f. A
al'-na-gar.

was

to

the
infpedt

cloth.

with the wick in the midfl.

of wax,

al'-6-ez,
f. A

ALOES,

the Eafl for

wood
precious

higherpricethan gold;
countries;

the

the bed

perfumes,of which

common

ALOETICAL,

tree

medicinal

which

ufed in
fort is

grows

juiceextradled

aloes tree.
a.
il-5-et'-y-kal.
Confifting

of aloes.
chiefly

ALOFT,

a-la'ft.prep.

ALOGY,

of the attributes of God.

by the
formerly

Alnightis a greatcake

al-nit. f.

ALNIGHT,

calendar.

potence,
Omni-

meafarer

affize of woollen

ruby,coarfer

al-nn -ty-nes. f.

tioned
men-

f. Ell-meafure.
al'-naje.

ALNAGE,

from

tree

bufinefs

whofe
officer,

fworn

a-la'ft.ad.

than the oriental.


lighter

lives

fcripture.

ALNAGAR,

of

who

alms.

ALMUG-TREE,

ALOFT,

fetting.

ALMANACK,
and

ALMSMAN,

in hot

al-ma-can'-turz-

STAFF,

{laf'.f.

and

bafket

be

givenaway.
gift.
f. He that fupa'mz-glv-ur.
ports others by his charity.
a'mz-hous. f. An hofpital
for
ALMSHOUSE,
are

in

f. The carrying
of
al-lu'-vyun.

ALLUVION,
any

What

Nearly,well nigh.
is givenin relief of the

provifions put

in which

being allufive.

the water

charity.
placewhere

poor.

upon

al-ld'-siv-nefs.
f. The quality

ALLUSIVENESS,
of

officer of

the poor.

In
al-lu'-slv-ly.

ALLUSIVELY,
five

of
glands

two

f. The
al'-miin-ry,

ALMSDEED,
pleafure.
temptationby propofing
plication.
al-lii'-zhun.
f. A hint, an imALMSGIVER,
ALLUSION,
al-lu'-slv.
a.

peach

diftributed.

ALMSBASKET,

enticingly.

f. Enticement,
ALLURINGNESS,al-lii'-rmg-nefs.

ALLUSIVE,

It ha*
the

the diftributionof

prince,employedin

al-lu'-rur.
f. Enticer,inveigler. ALMS,

ALLLfRER,

The

f.

al'-mo-ner.f. The

ALMONER,

ALMOST,

temptation.
ALLURINGLY,

mond
al-

the throat ; the tonfils.

ALMONRY,

thing.
ALLUREMENT,

a'-mund-tre. f.

TREE,

leaves and

ALMONDS,

ALLUMINOR,

of the

nut

tree.

tion.
men-

f. One
al-kV-my-nur.

The

f.

tree.

ALMOND

abatement,diminution.
al-Iu'de.v. n.
to

fum

ftipcnd.

metal mixed

ALLUDE,
reference

L O

al-o-jy.f.
furdity.

ALONE,

a-lo'ne.a.

On

high, in

the air.

Above.

Unreafonablcncfs

; without
Single

ab-

ny,
compa-

folitarv.

ALONG,

ALT

ALU

ad.
a-long'.

ALONG,

controverfy.

a-loud'. ad.

ALOUD,

Loudly,with

a-lo'.ad.

ALPHA,

al'-fa.f. The

In

low

firftletterin the Greek

to
alphabet,
anfwering

the
fignify

to

To

A ; therefore ufed

our

reciprocal.
ALTERNATE,
form

firft.

al'-fa-bet.
f. The

ALPHABET,

aloft.

place,not

formed
per-

by turns.
al-ter'-n.'it.
ALTERNATE,
a.
Beingby turns,

great

Actingby turns.

f. Adion
al-tir'-na-fy.

ALTERNACY,

noife.

ALOW,

al-ter'n.a.

ALTERN,

a-l6'f.
.-id. Atadiftance.

ALOOF,

al-ter-ka'-fh'm.
f. Debate,

ALTERCATION,

with.

in company

;
through
length

At

forward, onward
lengthwifc;

any fpacemcafurcd

al-ter-nate. v.

to changeone
alternately;

Toper-

a.

thingfor

ther
ano-

reciprocally.
ad.
In reALTERNATELY,
ciprocal
al-ter'-nit-Iy.

ments
or deletters,

of

fucccffion.
fpeech.
cording
Acal-fa-bet'-ty-kal.
a.
ALPHABETICAL,
ALTERNATENESS,
the feriesof letters.

to

of beingalternate.
quality

al-"i-bet'-ty-kal-ly.
ALTERNATION,

ALPHABETICALLY,
ad.

Accordingto the order of the


ad.
At
ALREADY,
dl-red'-dy.
time

before the

als'.ad.

ALS,
ALSO,

ALTAR,
to

heaven

where

In

likewife.

manner,

The

is adminiftered.

the altar in churches.

over

ALTER,

l-tur.v.

To

a.

ALTER,
wife

than

l-tur. v.

it was,

make

become

other-

To

n.

be

to

may

fufier

changed,to

^ 1-te-rablc.

be altered

or

as

1-t^-rable-nes.
f. The

may

of

fuch

Thatv/hlch

h.is

fuch
alterative,
are

fcnfibleoperation,but

conftkution.

as

have

no

al-tll'-ld-kwens.
f. Pompous

ing, pompous
ALTITUDE,

gradually
gainupon

the

of

in Ibund.
f. Heightof place,
al'-ty-tiid.

ation

upward ;

ALUDEL,

an

fitu-

ad.
pletely,
Com.4l-tu-g":th'-":r.
without
redriclion,

al'-ii-dcl.
f. Aludcls

pots ufed in
without

the horizon

regardto lower things; heightof


highcft
point.

ALTOGETHER,

ALUM,

the elevation of
any

bodies above
heavenly
with

without

immediate

art

takingor meafuringaltitudes or heights.


al-t!s'-s6-nant.
ALTISONANT,
a. Highfound-

changes.
producing

f. Theaflcf
al-te-ru-fhiin.
ALTERATION,
the
or
alteringchanging
changemade.
;
al'-te-ra-tlv.
Medicines
ALTERATIVE,
a.
called

beingalternative.
f. Reciprocal
fuczUth'-rA-xf.

language.
f. The
ALTLMETRY,
al-t'm'-me-try.

excellence
a.

ftateof

viciffitude.
ceffion,
al-thd'.
ALTHOUGH,
conj.Notwithftanding,

fpacemeafurcd

be altered.
al-te-rant.

or
quality

of the

ad. In
dl'-tl-rab-ly.

ALTERANT,
the power

beingalterable.

ALTERABLY,
manner

which

changed.

ALTERABLENESS,
of
quality

That

a.

ad. By
al-tcr'-na-tlv-!;-.

ALTILOQUENCE,

change.
ALTERABLE,

rejected,

however.

change,to

otherwife than it is.


To

be

one

reciprocally.
al-ter'-na-tlv-nes.
ALTERNATIVENESS,
f.
ALTERNITY,

d'l-tur-cloth.
f. The cloth

ALTAR-CLOTH,

that if

turns,

The

emolument

the altar.

at

things,fo

two

ALTERNATIVELY,

placewhere offerings

f. An
1-tar-aje.

from oblations

thrown

givenof

the other mufl be taken.

the communion

ALTARAGE,

To

this

laid ; the table in Chriftian churches

are

The

fuccefTion of things.
reciprocal
al-ter'-na-tiV.
f. Thechoice
prefent ALTERNATIVE,

prefent.

l-tur. f.

al-t'T-ni'-fhun.
f.

letters.

Alfo.

l-fo. ad.

a!-tcr'-nat-nec.
f. The

are

fittedinto
chemiftry,
luting.

ai -h'lm. f.

one

tion.
excep-

fubliming
anothcc

kind of mineral fak, of

acid tafie.

ALUM-

f.
al'-lum-ftone.

ALUM-STONE,
calx ufed in

furgery.
al-lum'-my-nus.
a.

ftonc or

ad. Confufedly,
a-ma'z-cd-ly.

AMAZEDLY,
with

amazement.

ALUMINOUS,
alum,

to

of alum.
confifting

or

ALWAYS,
am'.

AM,

of

Perpetu.illy,
out
through-

1-waz'. ad.

all time ;

without
co.'iftantly,

v.oriation.

firft
perfonof the verb To

The

be.

AMABILITY,

f. Lovelincis.
a-mi-bU'-ly-ty.

AMADETTO,

a-ma-det'-to.
f.
am'-a-dot.f.

AMADOT,

a-ma'n. ad.

AMAIN,

fort of pear.

extreme
apprehenfion,
of
dejection
height
;

a-mnl

The mixture

by amalgamation.

To

aft

fending

acl

of

name

f. Bitternefs.a-mar'-ry-tud.

a-mas'-ment. f.

heap, an

lady of

AMASS,
into

a-mas'. v.
mafs

heap or

o.ne

public

add

AMATE,

te.

a-ma

v.

To

n.

ftancc of

terrify,

f. Relating
to
am'-a-tur-ry.

AMATORY,

a-ma-ro-sk

not
fight,

in the
diflcmperature

the
occafioning

AMAZE,
terrour

; to

put into

AMAZE,

love.

dimnefs

of

inner parts,

of fliesand
rcprcfentations

before the
floating
To

any vifibledefeft in the eye,

from

but from fomc

f.

a-ma

dufi

eyes.
ze.

v.

a.

To

confufe

put into confufionwith wonder

with
;

to

perplexity.
f. Aflonifhment,
a-ma
ze.
confu.Gon,

cither of fear or wonder.

The

fent

woman

on

a.

bituminous confidence.
of
Confiding

amber.

am'-bur-drlnk'.
f. Drink

of

amber.
f. A fragrant
am'-bur-gris.
drug
ufed both

like wax,

as

fume
per-

cordial.

am'-bur-fed. f.

AMBER-SEED,

ftrikewith horrour.

AMAUROSIS,

and

or

gummous

am'-bur.

AMBER,

to

fon
per-

f. An embafly.
am'-baf-saje.

that melts almod

To

fovereign

one

am'-bur. f. A yellowtranfparent
fub-

the colour of
together
ther.
AMBERGRIS,
thingto ano-

one

words,

am-bas'-sa-dres.
f.

ambalTadour;a

an

collect

To

a.

; to

from

manner

AMBER-DRINK,

accumulation.

To

vi-

another.

to

power

AMBER,

of amaranths.

AMASMENT,

circuit of

am-bas'-sa-dur.
f.

AMBASSADOUR,

flower unfading.
plant; in poetry,an imaginary
meffage.
am-a-ran'-tfiin.
fiding
Cona.
AMBASSAGE,
AMARANTHINE,

AMARITUDE,

valour ;

am-baf-sS'de.
f. EmbafTy.Net

AMBASSADRESS,

dictates.

am'-a-rantti.f. The

AMARANTH,

Amazonswere

for

f. A
am-ba'-gez.

fent in

a-man-u-en'-s!s.
f. A perfon
another

writes what

famous

women

of words.
multiplicity

meffage.

AMANUENSIS,
who

am'-a-zun. f. The
cf

race

gree
de-

in ufe.

a-man-da'-fhun. f. The
on

ful,
Wonder-

excite aftonifhment.

AMBASSADE,

v.

quickfilver.

with

AMANDATION,
of

n. To
a-mal'-ga-mate.

AMALGAMATE,
unite metals

at an

rr.go.

metals.
of amalgamating
praftice

or

ad.
To
a-m.Vz-lng-ly.

AMAZINGLY',

f.
AMBAGES,
a-mdl-ga-ma'-fhun.

AMALGAMATION,

extreme

wonder

a-ma'z-ing.
part. a.

AMAZON,

^ of metals procured

-ga-ma.

admiration

aftonifhing.

vehemence, with

7f.
a-mal'-gam.

AMALGAMA,

Confufed

unexpected
AMAZING,

that may

AMALGAM,

f.

fear,horrour;

event.

\'igour.

The

a-ma'z-ment.

AMAZEMENT,

ftate

confufion.

beingamazed, wonder,

fort of pear.

With

a-ma'z-ed-nes.f. The

Relating AMAZEDNESS,

Refcmbles

millet.

am'-bur-tre.
f.

AMBERTREE,

beautyis in
has

man

who

in

equallythe ufe of both


is

fhrub whofe

f. A
am-by-dex'-ter.

AMBIDEXTER,
who

its fmall evergreen leaves.

equallyready

to

his

aifton

man

hands
either

; a

fide,

party difputcs.

AMBIDEXTERITY,

f.
am-by-dcx-ter'-ry-ty

of being able equally


to ufe both
quality
; double dealing.
Hava.
AMBIDEXTROUS,
;\m-by-dcx'-trus.
The

hands

ing

the uCc of eitherhand


ing,with equalfacility,
orvboth fides.
double dealing,
praclifing

are

a.
enam'-bj-ent.
Surrounding,

am'-by-gu.

AMBIGU,

entertainment,

a.
Doubtful,
am-big'-u-us.

AMBIGUOUS,

havingtwo

ufingdoubtful

meanings;

That
a.
am"-bu-fa-tur'-ry.
of walking.
faculty
f. A
bloodywart oit
am'-bu'-ry.

h.asthe power

AMEURY,

of fignification.
meaning; uncertainty

horfe's

ad. In
am-blg'-u-uf-ly.

am-bif-kade,

ftation in which

diers

AAIBILOGY,

of

any

-bit. f.

am

compafs

or

circuit of

am-b!{h'-un. f.

AMBITION,

honour

or
preferment

great

or

the

defire of

The

defire of any

thing

works
variegated

am-blfli'-us.
a. Seized

or

ing.
AMBITIOUSLY,

touched

of
eagernefs

of
quality

or

fo be it ;

The

beingambitious.

jeftfo

am

pace

bl.

v.

n.

To

move

tomovceafily
; to

bl. f.

am

AMBLER,

An

upon

as

the

the end

to

be liable

of

of

we,

prayer,

mean,

creed, fo it is.

fuba-me'-nabl.a. Refponfible,
to account.

a-mc'-nans. f.

Coiidud,

copiers
To

A pacer.

food of the

gods;

the

name

of

am-bro'-fhal.a.

AMBROSIAL,
or

With

plant.
of
Partaking

of ambrofia; delicious.
qualities

To

a.

v.

is wrong;

haviour.
be-

correft,to
to

reform

in writers which
life;to reftore pafTages

cafypace.

am'-bliir.f.

a-mend'.

AMEND,

fuppofed

to

are

an
AMBLINGLY,
am'-bling-ly.
amblingmovement.
am-bro'-fha.f. The imaginary
AMBROSIA,

nature

the
call

we

temi.ufedin devotions,

A
end

changeany thingthat

an

walkdaintih'-

ad.

the

m.atterwlth which

cuit.
Compafs, cir-

To

AMBLE,

at

AMENANCE,
f.

AMBLE,
amble, to

am'-by-tiide.

AAlBirUDE,
To

burn,

which
overlaid,

at

AMENABLE,

preference.

am-blfh'-uf-nes.f.

The

are

a-mcn'. ad.

by which,

ad\ancement

am^

enamelled.

ad.
With
am-blih'-uf-ly.

A-MBITIOUSNESS,

Placed in

am-bis'-tfliin.
f. A

am'-mel. f.

AMEL,

ambition,dcfirous of advancement, afpir- AMEN,

with

lyingiit

fcald.

excellent,

AMBITIOUS,

furprize.
AMBUSTION,

thing.

furprifing-

the act of

the ftateof

f. Ambufii,
am'-bufii-ment.

AMBUSHMENT,

The

foU

fallunexpectedly

bufh.

Ufing

ambiguousexpreffions.

to

am'-bulli-cd.
a.

AMBUSHED,

am-bil'-lo-kwus.
a.

AMBILOQUOUS,

enemy

lyingin wait

order

wait.

biguous
am-

fignification.

private

pollwhere

placed,in

an

upon

another,by
f. Talk
am-bll'-ld-gy.

private-

others.
furprife

furprife.

to

afiaffins
are

or

of fignificameaning; duplicity
tion.

of

f,

am'-bufli.
f. The

AMBUSH,

f. Uncertainty
am-big'-u-uf-nes.

lie to

men

am-buf-ka'-do.f.

order

poll,in

an

doubtfully.

ambiguousmanner,
AMBIGUOUSNESS,

AMBIT,

^"

AMBUSCADO,

AMBIGUOUSLY,

or

body.

AMBUSCADE,

expref-

fions.

aces.

ace,

walking.

which

f. Doubtfulam-by-gd'-I-ty.

AMBIGUITY,

placev/hcre alms
and utcnplate,

placewhere

am-bu-lii'-fhun.
f. The aft

AMBULATORY,

medleyof difhes.

of a
confifting

nefs of

An

The

filsfor

of
f.

the

AMBULATION,

palling.

com

diftributed

are
kept.
houfekeeping,
am'z-a'fe.f. A double
AMBS-ACE,

of beingambidextrous.
quality

The

f.

AAIBIENT,

f.
am'-bry.

AMBRY,

am-by-dex'-truf-

AAIBIDEXTROUSNESS,
nes.

.i-mcnd'.v.

AMEND,

bad for the better

recovery of health
an

crrour

To

grow better.

in

reformation

law,

the

change
of life;

correction of

procefs.
a-men'-dur.f. The perfonthat

committed

AMENDER,
amends

the

depraved.

n.

a-mend'-ment. f.

AMENDMENT,
from

have

the

any

in

thiiig.

^I

AMENDS,

AMP

a-meiid'z.f. Pvccompenfe,com-

AMENDS,

AMMUNITION

penfation.
f. Agreeablenefs
of
a-men'-nl-ty.

AMENITY,

am-mA-nUh'-un-

BREAD,

bred'. f.

Bread for the

fupplyof

f. An
am'-nef-ty.

AMNESTY,

armies.

aft of oblivion.

fituation.
To

a-mer'fe.v.

AMERCE,
a

fine or

with
punifli

penalty.
a-mer'-fcr.
f.

AMERCER,
upon

To

a.

He

that fets a

The

f.

cunfey punifhmentof an offender.


a'mz-a'ce.f. Two
aces
AMES-ACE,
at

the fame

time

pe-

which

the

f.

1 prep.

fort of

fruit,

Mingledwith;

a-mungft'.
J conjoinedwith

thers,fo

make

to

as

o-

part of the number.

am'-o-rlft.f.

AMORIST,

An

inamorato, a

gallant.
am'-ur-us. a.

AMOROUS,

am'-e-ttllft.
f. A precious
ftone

on
purple,
colour,bordering
am-c-tlris'-tin.
a. RefemAMETHYSTTINE,

inclined

Enamoured;

turally
na-

love,fond; belongingto

to

love.

violet

with

covered.
immediately

a-mung'.

AMONGST,

dice.

is

Theinnermoftmem-

brane

a-mo'-mum.

AMONG,

thrown

method, irregular.

AMETHYST,
of

foetus in the womb

Out
a.
a-me-tRid'-y-kaU

AMETHODICAL,
of

two

on

am'-nyos.
^

AMOMUM,

a-merY-munt.

AMERCEMENT,

) f.
am'-nyon.

AMNIOS,
fine

mifdemeanour.

any

AMNION,

ad. Fondly,lovingly.
am'-ir-us-ly.

AMOROUSLY,

blingan amethyft.
a.
thy
wora'-myabl.
Lovely,
pleafing,

AMIABLE,
to

be loved ;

f.
Lovelia'-myabl-nefs.

AMIABLENESS,
of

nefs,power
to

Such

manner

as

AMORT,

ad.

a-mo'rt.

The

rightor

Depreffed,
fpiritlefs.

a-mor-ty-za -fhun.

?
'

a-mor'-tiz-ment.S

AMORTIZEMENT,

excite love.

kind.
am'-my-kabl.
a.
Friendly,
f.Friendam'-my-kabl-nes.
AMICABLENESS,

Fond-

nefs, lovingnefs.
AMORTIZATON,

love.
raifing

ad.
a'-myab-ly.

AMIABLY,

am'-ur-uf-nes.f.

AMOROUSNESS,

love,fhewinglove.
pretending

aft of

lands
transferring

to mortmain.

AMICABLE,

linefs,
goodwill.
ad. In
am'-my-kab-ly.
AMICABLY,

To

friendly

To

am'-mis. f.

AMICE,
part of

AMID,
AMIDST,

firfl:
or

The

undermoll:

^prep. In the midft,middle;

a-mid ft.i

mingledwith, furround-

ed by ; among.
ad. Faultily,
AMISS, a-mis'.
criminally;
wrong,
the
of the thing;
not
to
perfedtion
according
in health.
impaired
a-mls'-Aun. f. Lofs.
AMISSION,
To

AMIT,

AMITY,

a-mlt'.v.

a.

To

to

remove,

to

from

move,

to

a-mou'nt. v.

AMOUNT,
the accumulative

a-mo'r. f.

AMOUR,
an

To

rife to in

quality.

a-mou'nt. f.

AMOUNT,

n.

An

The

fum

afFair of

total.

gallantry,

intrigue,
That
a.
am-flb'-yus.

AMPHIBIOUS,
can

live in two

which

elements.
f. The
Im-flb'-yuf-nes.

AMPHIBIOUSNESS,

to

ments,
live in differentele-

f. Friendfhip.
am'-mi-ty.

AMMONIAC,

am-mo-nyak.

f.

gum

fait.

AMMONIACAL,

fait.

am-f::'-b6-lodzh'-y

AMPHIBOLOGICAL,
a.

am-mS-m'-a-kal. a. Having

of ammoniac
the properties

AMMUNITION,
ftorcs.

ftation;

poft or

qualityof being able

lofe.

alien lands

alter.
To

habit.
prieft's

a-mid'.

To

to

AMOVE,
a

way.

n.

^y corporation.
a-mo've. v. a.
To remove

tenements

or
a

a-mo'-rize.
v.

AMORISE,

Doubtful.
f. Difam-fy-bol'-a-jy.

AMPHIBOLOGY,
courfc of uncertain

am-mu-nlfh'-un.f. Military AMPHIBOLOUS,


from

one

to

meaning.

am-flbCbo-Ius.
TofTcd
a.

another.

AMPHN

ANA

thingswith regardtofomc circumflances

twccn
or

of intereftupon
f. A reparation
of
an-nal'-ly-sis.

ANALYSIS,

its firftelements.

belongingto anatomy ; proceedingupon


principles
taughtin anatomy.

refolvcs

of

manner

compounds
refolving
component

an'-a-ly-zur.

ANALYZER,

f. That

the power

of

pointof

another,

view,

ANANAS,
ANAPHORA,
fame

it fliallappear

that

at

fentence

begun with

are

ANARCH,

An

fy,where

the whole

of government,

magiftracy.

an-a-fa'r-ka.f.

ANASARCA,

fort of

from

whom

an'-fif-trel.
Claimed
a.

from

f. Lineage,a
an'-fcf-tr)'.

ANCESTRY,

author of confufion.

f. Want
an'-ar-ky.

ftatewithout

of dif-

perfondefcends.

the

rule.

ANARCHY,

art

anceftors.

a.
Confufed,
an-ar'-ky-al.

ANARCHIAL,

parts.

perfon.
an'-fef-tur.
f. One

of anceftors ; the honour

of

a family,
properly
ancienty.
ank'-ur. f. A heavyiron,to hold
ANCHOR,
the fhip,by beingfixed to the ground; any
thingwhich confers ftability.

To

drop-

fubftance is ftuffed with

humours.
pituitous

ferles

defcent,birth.

of

f. Antiquity
r/n-tftien-try.

ANCHENTRY,
an'-ark.f.

di-

lay any thing open

minute

thin meagre

ANCESTREL,

word.

without

ANCESTOR,

deformed, in

exzA

fcveral claufes of

by

To

a.

the body ; the doctrine of the ftructiire


feeling
the body; the nQ: of dividing
any thing; a

an-a-m6r-f6'-s!s.
f. Deformation; fkeleton ;

reprefentation.
an-n;V-nas.f. The pine apple.
an-.if '-6-ra.
f. A figure,
when

an

; to

of

fo
perfpeclive
projedion,
one

that

bodies,by means

f. The
an-at'-to-my.

ANATOMY,

which has

He

an-at'-to-mize.
v.

animal

and
ftinftly,

analyzing.

ANAMORPHOSIS,

an-at'-t6-m!ft.
f.

ANATOMIZE,

To

into its firftprinciples.

compound

manner.

of difieftion.

diflccl:
an
rcfulve

v.

anatomical

ftudies the ftrufture of animal

parts.

To
a.
an'-:i-lyze.

ANALYZE,

into the

an

ANATOiMIST,

ad.
an-a-l!t'-ty-kal-ly.

fimpleconftituent or
To

In

any

ANALYTICALLY,
The

ad.
an-a-tim'-I-kal-ly.

ANATOMICALLY,
That

a-

thing into firftprinciples


; that
proceeds
by analyfis.

which

or

which
an-a-lit'-ty-kal-

ANALYTICAL,

mulation
accu-

intereft.

an-a-tom'-l-kal.
a.
Relating

ANATOMICAL,

compound into its fcveralparts ; a folution


or
mental, to
corporeal
any thing,whether

any
of

an-it'-t6-s!zm.
f. The

ANATOCISM,

effcds.

ank'-ur.v.

ANCHOR,
to

lie at

anchor;

to

ftopat,

caft anchor,

To

n.

to

refton.

ank'-ur-edzh.f. Ground

ANCHORAGE,
caftanchor upon

the anchors of

fhip;

to

duty

A figure
by
whereANASTROPHE,an-as'-tro-fL-.f.
words

fhould

which

have

been

in a port.
paidfor anchoring
ank'-ur-hdld. f.
precedent, ANCHOR-HOLD,

poftponed.

are

or

an-attl'-e-ma.
f.

ANATHEMA,

A curfe pronounced

ecclefiaftical
authority.

by
ANATHEMATICAL,
That

which

has

of
properties

In

To

an

ANATHEMATIZE,
V.

a.

To

pronounce

authority.
ANATIFEROUS,

an

anathema.

ank'-S-ret^
If.

ANCHORITE,

an-a-tfia-mat'-yANCHOVY,
anathematical

much

manner.

an-attl"-e-ma-tl
'ze.
accurfcd

by ecclefiaftical

an-a-tlf'-fe-rus.
a.

ducks.

hold

Held

by

the anchor.
a.

ANATHEMATICALLY,
ad.
kal-ly.

ank'-ur-red.part. a.

ANCHORED,

an-a-tfie-mat'-y-kal.
ANCHORET,
the

The

faftnefsof the anchor.

ducing
Pro-

ufed

ANCIENT,
old, that

reclufe,a

hermit.
ank'-6-rite.y
f. A
an-tfh6'vy.

by way

of fauce,or

a'n-flient.
a.
has been of

little fea-fifh,

feafoning.

Old,

modern

not

longduration

fi'n-fhcjit,
f. The Aug or
ANCIENT,
of a fhip.

mer.
paft,for-

ftreamer

ANCILNT,

a'n-flient:
f.

ANCIENT,

The

bonrer

of

of
angels;partaking

enfign.

now
riag,

rn-fhent-nefs.

ANCIENTNESS

quity.
Anti-

than

more

of ancient

The

fentenccs

terms

and -!-run. f.

ANDIRON,

in which
fire-grate,

the

of
phroditical
; partaking

the end of

at

To

fpitturns.
both

ang'-gur.
v. a.

ANGER,

an-drog'-y-nis.

ANDROGYNUS,

An

maphrodite.
her-

Something yet

ANEMOMETER,
inftrument contrived

ANEMONE,

an-em

to

To

-o-ne.

ANEMOSCOPE,
invented

to

f. The

-e-mof-ko

an

foretel

pe.

the

f.

a-nent

prep.

which

changes of

ANEURISM;

which

ncvly, in

a new

Over

ANGEL,
a

difeafe of

the

lated.
diexceffively

again,another

time

rod

infinuating

He

The
are

ftick

to

hung.

with
that fifties

f. An
ang'-gly-sSzm.

a.
ang'-gry.

ANGRY,

having the

God

ufed in

afFairs ;

in human
a

bad fenfe,as,

in the ftile of

love,

gels
an-

tiful
beau-

pieceof ancient money.


i

f.
n-jel-Ihot.

Chain

an

Englift

appearance

Touched
of anger;

kind of pear.
an

angry

with

ner.
man-

anger

flamed.
painful,in-

f. Exceffive
ang'-gwifti.

an-jel-y-ka.f. The

name

or

ANGUISHED,

pain either

body.
a.
Exceffively
ang'-gw!fti-ed.

pained.

ANGULAR,

a.
ang'-gu-lar.
Havinganglesor

corners.

ANGULARITY,

{hot.
of

plant.

ANGELICAL,

an-frak'-tftio-usnes.

angelis fometimes
perfonJ

hook

f.
A
ang'-go-ber.
In
ad.
ang'-gri-ly.

ANGOEER,
ANGRILY,

ANGUISH,
windingsand turnings.
of mind
f.
a
Originally
n-jel.
meffenger;

fpirit
employed by

ANGELSHOT,
ANGELICA,

of

of darknefs

f.
ing'l-rod.

f.
ang'-glur.

angle.
ANGLICISM,

manner.

ANFRACTUOUSNESS,
Fulnefs

try to gain by

fomc

idiom.

they become

a-nu'. ad.

ANEW,

f.

Concerning,about;

-u-rlzm. f.

an

in
arteries,

to

fifh,

take

to

hook.

filh with

To

a.

the fifliers
line and

ANGLER,

the

to.
oppofite
againft,

over

ANGLE-ROD,

chine
ma-

wind.

ANENT,

rod, a line,and
v.

hook

other.

artifices.

flower.

wind

body.

inftrument

An

ang'l.

ANGLE,
and

f. An

the wind.

mcafure

angry

tween
fpace interceptedbe-

Th;

each
interfering

f.
ang'l.

of
con.Gfting

the winds.

an-e-mom'-me-ter.

lines

two

f. The
Sn-a-mig'-gri-fj-.

of
defcription

an

f. A
v^ng-gy-og'-gra-fy.

ang 1. f.

ANGLE^

unpublifhed
; fecret hifrory.
ANEMOGRAPKY,

In

of vefTels in the human


defcription

ANGLE,
Jn'-ek-dote.f.

provoke,to

manner.

ANGIOGRAPHY,
f.

on
up-

fore.

To

ad.
ang'-gur-Iy.

ANGERLY,

fcxcs.
ad.

ANECDOTE,

injury
;

is uneafmcfs

fmart of

enrage.

fexes.

two

refembling

receiptof any

an-dr6g'-y-nal-ly.

ANDROGYNALLY,
With

Irons

mifical in.lruhitj.

f. Anger
ang'-gur.

ANGER,

Hermaa.
an-drog'-y-nal.

ANDROGYNAL,

fomevvhat

ment,

joined.

are

longing
be-

human.

f. A
an'-je-!6t.

ANGELOT,

lineage.
or

zngcls;

human.

honour

and', conjunction.The particle


by which

AND,

f.
n-fhcnt-try.

of

nature

a.
an-jel'-lik.
Angelical;above

ANGELICK,
ANCIENTRY,

the

f. Excellence
ANGELICALNESS,an-jtr-ly-kd!-nes.

old times.
f.

angels.

to

ad.
in
a'n-(hent-ly.

ANCIENTLY,

a.
an-jel'-y-kal.
Refembling

f. The quaang-gu-lar'-I-ty.
lity

of

beingangular.
With
ad.
ang'-gu-lar-ly.
ANGULARLY,

angles,
K

ANGU-

f. The
ang'-gu-lir-ncs.

ANGULARNESS,
of
quality

a.
ang'-gu-lus.
Hooked,

an-

That
a.
an'-y-ma-tiv.

a.
Narrow,
an-guft'.

ftrait.

the ftate of

making narrow;

rowed.
beingnar-

hot.
Full of fpirit,
a.
an-y-mo'fe.
f.
Vehemence
an-y-mos'-sl-ty.

ANIMOSE,
ANIMOSITY,
of hatred ;

an-he-la'-fhi.n.f.

ANHELATION,
of

ad

The

ANISE,

Out of breath.

ANHELOSE,

an-he-lofe.

ANIENTED,

an'-y-en-ted.Fruftrated.
a-ni'tes.ad.

an'-ll.f.

ANIL,

The

ftalks indigois

and

In the

fhrub

night-time.
whofe

from

fourth part of the

^
a-nil'-ll-ty.

The

That
a.
an'-y-mabl.

ANIMABLE,

to the

old age of

may

foot

The

bone

of

an'-na-lift.f. A writer of annals.

an'-nalz.f.

ANNALS,

Hiftoriesdigefted
in the

exaiSt order of time.

an'-nats.f.

f.
an-y-mad-vcV-fhun.
ANNATS,

ANIMADVERSION,

Reproof,fevere cenfure; obfervation.


has the power

of

judging.

confider,to obferve;to pafscenfures

To

upon.

an-ne

heat any

the true

v.

Firft fruits.

1.

that the colours laid


to

To
n.
an-y-mad-vert'.

ANIMADVERT,

ANNEAL,

To

a.
an-y-mad-ver'-siV.

ANIMADVERSIVE,
That

jointwhich joinsthe

the ankle.

be put into life.

To

the

liquid meafure

awm.

ank'l-bdne. f.

ANNALIST,
which

fcented feeds.

leg.

ANKLE-BONE,

wom.in.

of apium or parffpecies

ank'l. f. The

ANKL,

leaves

prepared.

a-nl le-nefs. 7 f.

ANILENESS,
ANILITY,

f.

ank'-ur. f.

ANKER,

a.

ANIGHTS,

paflionate
malignity.
-nis.

an

ley,with largefweet

panting.
a.

which

giveslife.

f. The
an-guf-t4'-fhun.

ANGUSTATION,

has the

f. That
an'-y-ma-tur.

ANIMATOR,

gular.
ANGUST,

of

givinglife.

of

power

ad

animates

beingenlivened.

the ftateof

ANIMATIVE,

angles.

of

enlivening
; that which

animatingor

FormeJ
a.
ang'-gu-li-ted.

ANGULOUS,

ad

f. The
an-y-ma'-fhun.

ANIMATION,

beingangular.

ANGULATED,
with

ANN

on

v.

fuch

thingin

a.

it may
a

To

heat

glafs,

piercethrough;

manner

as

to

giveit

temper.

an-neks'. v.

ANNEX,

a.

To

unite

to

at

f. He
the end ; to unite a fmaller thingto a greater.
ANIMADVERTER,
an-y-mid-ver'-tiir.
an-nek-sa'-fhun.f. Conthat pafTes
obferves
or
cenfures,
ANNEXATION,
upon.
f.
A
c
reature
ANIMAL,
poreal
coran'-y-mil. living
jundion, addition; union, coalition.
of
an-nek'-lhun. f. The ad of annexing.
; by way
contempt, we
fay a ftupid ANNEXION,
man

is an

animal.
a.
an'-y-mal.

ANIMAL,
or

relates to animals

That

; animal

which

belongs

fition to

fpiritual,
f. A
ANIMALCULE,
an-y-mal'-kule.
f. The
an-y-mal'-l-ty.

to

To

to;

adf of
reduced

rage,
encou-

a.
in'-y-mdte.
Alive, pofllffing

Tigorous.

an-nl'-h!-late.
v. a.

to
nothing; todeftroy;

celebrated

as

Lively;

ANNIVERSARY,

annul.

ftate of

being

f. A day
an-ny-vcr'-fi-ry.
it returns

in the courfe of the year ;

the ail of celebration of the

dn'-y-ma-tcd.
part. a.

To

f. The
an-ni-hy-la'-fhun.

reducingto nothing,the
to nothing.

ANNIVERSARY,

life.

ANIMATED,

to

which

of exiftence.

ANNIHILATE,
reduce

quicken,
to

incite.

ANIMATE,

be put out

ANNIHILATION,

an'-y-mate,
v. a.

alive;to give powers

make

animal

may

flate

exiftence.

ANIMATE,
to

thingannexed.

a. That
ANNIHILABLE,an-m'-hy-labl.

To

of animal
To

annexing; the

fmall

animal.

ANIMALITY,

an-neks'-ment.f. The ad of

ANNEXMENT,

is ufed in oppo-

anniverfary.

turning
Rea.
an-ny-ver'-fa-ry.

with the revolution of the year i annual.

ANNO

ANN
In
an'-no-dom'-y-m.

DOMINI,

ANNO

year of

the power

an'-no-lis.
f.

ANNOLIS,
like

American

An

mal,ani-

To

an-no-ta'-fliin.
f. Explication;

ANNOTATION,

notes,

an'-no-ta-tur.
f.

declare

to

by a

v.
an-noy'.

ANNOY,
to

ANOINT,
matter

To

a.

the aft of

To

a.

a-nom'-a-lus.

ANOMALOUS,

incommode,

the

The

perfon that

-nu-al.

That

a.

which

is reckoned

that which

the

by

year

rule.

f.
an'-6-my.

ANON,

a-non

ad.

foon
Qiiickly,

an-nu'-y-tant.
f.

receives
or
polTefTes

He

paidfor

of life or

term

years

to

; now

and then.

ad.
a-non'-y-muf-ly.

name,

f. Inappetency.
a-no-rek'-fy.

ANOREXY,

f. A yearlyrent
an-nu'-y-ty.

ANNUITY,

Without

that

annuity.

an

of law.

a name.

ANONYMOUSLY,

year.

Breach

a-non'-y-mus.
a.
Wanting

ANONYMOUS,

ad. Yearly,
an'-nu-al-ly.
every

ANNUITANT,

analogy

or

f. Irregularity
viation
a-nom'-a-ly.
; de-

ANOMY,

comes

lafts only a year.

ANNUALLY,

Irregular;

a.

generalmethod

ad.
regularly.
Ira-nom'-a-lus-ly.

ANOMALY,

annoys.
an

Anomaly,

of

things.
ANOMALOUSLY,
"

from

that which

perfon that

annoying.

f.
an-noy'-ur.

ANNOYER,

yearly;

by

f. The

Irregular.

molcftation.
f. Injury,
an-noy'.
f. That which
ANNOYANCE,
an-noy'-anfe.

ANNUAL,

with

over

unftion.

a-nom-a-lls'-ty-kal.
a.

publifli, ANOMALISTICAL,

fentence.
judicial

ANNOY,

to

rub

a-nom'-i-lizm. f.

from
deviating

annoys

To

a.

v.

confccrate

a-noin-tur.

ANOMALISM,

vex.

be

a-noint.

irregularity.
an-nou'nfe.v.

proclaim;

to

writer of

coramentator.

ANNOUNCE,

To

has

anoints.

ANNOTATOR,
To

which

pain.
mitigating

ANOINTER,

note.

of

uncluous

lizard.

That
a.
an'-o-dyne.

ANODYNE,

the

Lord.

our

an-uth'-ur. a.

ANOTHER,

lowance.
yearlyal-

one

more;

other; not

any

Not
one's

the

fame;

felf;widely

different.
To

an-nul'.

ANNUL,

nullify
;
ANNULAR,
of

to

reduce

make

void, to

Having the

a.

form

of

form

an'-nu-la-ry.
a.
Having
an'-nu-let.f.

former

to

memory

a.

To

to

queftion

; to

Having handles.
n.

To

fpeak in

turn
fpeakin reto
oppofition;

former

f.

proportionto
to

an-nun'-fy4te.
v. a.

To

appear

to

church,
by
falutation of the blelTcd
angel's
on

the

of
twenty-fifth

any call,or authoritative

That

which

or
pofition
queflion,
; a

is faid in

confutation

charge.
an'-fer-abl.
a.

ANSWERABLE,
an-nun-fya'-fhunin

to

an'-fer.f.

return

of

the

tofucceed,to producethe wifhed

fummons.

ANSWER,

number.

day celebrated

of the

to givean
to coraccount;
refpondto, to fuit with; to be equivalentto;
to fatisfy
; to ftand as opany claim or petition
correlative to fomethingelfe; to bear
or
pofite

event

an-nu-me-ra'-fhun.

virgin; folemnjzed
March.

littlering.

number.

ANNUNCIATE,
bringtidings.
ANNUNCIATION-DAY,
The

an-nu'-me-rke. v.

To

da. f.

the

rings.

ANNUMERATION,
Addition

an'-ser.v.

ANSWER,

be accountable for;

ANNUMERATE,
to

an'-sa-ted.
a.

ANSATED,
To

ANNULET,
add

To

a.

nothing.

an'-nu-lar.

ring.
ANNULARY,

To

to

v.

to

which

count
made; obligedto give an acto ;
proportionateto ;
correfpondent

replymay
;

That

be

equal to.

ANSWERABLY,

ad.
In
an'-fer-ab-ly.

due

proportion;

ANT

ANT
proportion
; with

correfpoaJcnce
; fuit-

proper

vioufly.

ab!"-.
an'-fer-abl-ncfs.
f. The

ANSWERAELENESS,

the

he that manages

that anfwers

one
againft
controverfy

ant', f.

An

emmet,

ant'-bcr.f.

An

ant'^hiL f.

The

ANTBEAR,

that feeds

ANTHILL,

earth

of

in

fmall

which

before
ifting
before
iftiiig

their

make

ants

contends

One who
an-tAg'-o-nlft.
f.

another,

with

opponent

an

trary
con-

To

v.

in
figure
in

rhetorick,when
a

different manner,

fignification
; it is
the end

at

matter

of

alfo

word

if not
a

in

is
a

trary
con-

the

to
returning

to
Relating

ant-ar-tlTrit'-ik.
a. Good

an-te-fe'de.
v.
a.

cede
pre-

an-te-fe'-denfe.
f.

ftate of

The

dn-te-fc'-dcnt.a.

Going

which

goes

before; in grammar,

the relative is

an-te

fupportthe

a.
Going
-ryiir.

fubjoined.

the

That
noun

to

before.

front of

building.

f. A

cavity

that leads into the fto;nach.

That

an-thcl-mln'-tn'k.
a.

kills worms.

which
an

-them.

ledion

ANTHONY'S
kind

of

f.

holyfong.

f. A colleaion
an-tlTol'-t.^.

ANTHOLOGY,
of flowers ;

before,preceding.
an-te-fe'-dent.f.
ANTECEDENT,
which

being befoie.

an'-tiz. f. Pillars of largedimenfions

ANTHEM,

goingbefore.

ANTECEDENT,

the doiSlrine of

f. Priority
an-tt-ry-Or'-y-ty.

ANTHELMINTHiCK,

go before.

ANTECEDENCE,
or

To

fer
pre-

an-te-pre-d!k'-a

Somethingpreviousto

; the ftateof

that

To

another.

ANTESTOMACH,an-tc-ftum'-uk.

walkingbefore.

a.

predicaments.

ANTES,

aft.

former

ANTEAMBULATION,an-te-am-bu-la-fliun.

a"S

an'-tc-p6ne.
v.

ANTERIOUR,

afthma.

an'-te-akt.
f.

; to

f.

unt-af-mat'-lk.a. Good

ANTECEDE,

A
ant-ep-;--Iep-'tIk.
a.

convulfions.
againft

ANTERIORITY,

ANTASTHMATICK,

To

f. Thelail
an"-ti-pa-nuk'.

ANTEPREDICAMENT,
the

fore-tafte.

two.

thingto

one

the gout.
againft

the
againft

f. A
an'-te-paft.

ANTEPONE,

mcnt.

ANTARTHRITICK,

ANTEAKT,

was

medicine

pole.

an-te-miin'-dane.a, Tiiat

ANTEPILEPTICK,
To

has

before the world.

but
fyllable

Int-i-po-plek'-tlk.
a.

That

or flopping
preventing
vomiting.

ANTEPENULT,

difeafe.

an-ta'rk-tlk.
a.

file fouthern

ant-e-m^t'-lk. a.
of

ANTEPAST,

an
againft
apoplexy.

ANTARKTICK,

"f. A

which

longparenthefis.

the venereal
againft

ANTAPOPLECTICK,

noon.

ANTEMUNDANE,

peated
re-

ant-d-frO-dlt'-ik.a.

ANTAPHRODITICK,
Efficacious

the fame

dn-tS-me-rldzh'-an.a. Being

ANTEMETICK,
the power

Ant-:'-ni-kl:i'-sIs.
f.
A

ANTANAKLASIS,

curled

horns.

ANTEMERIDIAN,

another.
againft

contend

Good

f. A goat with
an'-tc-iope.

before
n.
an-tig'-5-mze.

to things
cxdeluge; relating
deluge.

the

wreathed

or

to.

ANTAGONIZE,

fomething

Exa.
an-t:-d}-kV-vyan.
the

ANTELOPE,

ANTAGONIST,

date

To

a.

real time ; to date

before the proper time.

rance
protube-

noils.

To

the

ANTEDILUVIAN,

ants.

on

an'-tg-ditc.v.

earlier than

pifmire.
animal

that leads to the chief apartment.

ANTEDATE,

To

firft.

has written

chamber

who

.-in'-te-tfh-'m-bir.
f. The

ANTECPIAMDER,

that

One

leads another.

before, or

goes

an'-scr-ur. f. He

ANSWERER,

an-t"-f^s'-fur.f.

ANTECESSOR,

of beinganfwerable.
qunllty

ANT,

ad. PrsIn-te-fe'-dent-ly.

ANTECEDENTLY,

colleflion o/^evotions ;

col-

of poems.

FIRE,

f. A
an'-to-nyz-fJ're.

cryfipelas.
n

ANTI!RAX,

ANT
an'-ttiraks.
f.

ANTHRAX,

fcab

blotch

or

that

of anatomy.

jy -nyan. f. A
from anthropophagi.
Shakefpeare
of eatinghuman
quality

Good
a.
an.ty-fc'-brilc.

flefh.

The

tangent,

knowledgeof the

of

nature

kal.

man.

That
ant-h!p-not'-ik.

ANTHYPNOTICK,

a.

has the power

of

preventing
deep.

f. Alkali.
an-ty-is'-ld.
f. Corruptly
an'-ty-t(ham-bur.
for antechamber.

mineral

fubftance,of

Contrariety Chriftianity.

prevent him

Good

v.

foretafte,
or
which

is

to

take

take

an

not

yet,

than another,fo

before the time

up

to

as

to

of fomethine,
impreflion

as

if it really
was

to

Havinga

before its time; foretafte.


takingup fomething

palfy,

a.
an-ty-pa-tlTet',y-kd!

natural contrarietyto any

an'-tik.a.

Odd;

ANTICK,

an'-tlk.f.

He

or

ufes odd

wild.
ridiculoudy
playsanticks,

that

a buffoon.
gefticulation,

ad.
With
:ui'-t!k-ly.

ANTICKLY,

pof-

tures.

f. A fenin-ty-kll'-miks.

ANTICLIMAX,
tence

in which

the laft part is lower

firft;
to
oppofite

ANTICONVULSIVE,
Good

than

the

climax.

f. A preternatural
ANTICOil,an'-ty-k6r.
ling
fuela

horfe's breaft,
to his heart.
oppofite

heightened.

the plague.
againft

an-tlf'-fra-sLs.
f. The

fenfe

to
oppofite

their

ufe of

meaning.

an-ti'p'-6-dal.
a.
Relatingto

ANTIPODAL,

the antipodes.
f. Thofe people
dn-tip'-6-des.
ANTIPODES,
on
who, living

their feet

the

the other fideof the

to
oppofite
diredly

an-t;"-c6n-vur-slv.
ANTIPOPE,
a.

convulfions.
againft

in

'

an-ty-pef-ty-len

Efficacious

ANTIPHRASIS,
in

fhun it involuntarily

by which
contrary quality,

it oppofesbecomes
quality

a.

to

f.
an-ty'-pl-rls'-ta-sls

of
oppofition

words
odd

as

oppofedto fympathy.

fhal.

thing.

f. A
natural
an-t!p'-a-tfiy.

ANTIPESTILENTIAL,

ANTICK,

tion
contradic-

a.
an-ty-par-a-llt'-lk.

the
againft

to any thing,fo
contrariety

the

neys.
kid-

laws.

ANTIPERISTASIS,
act of

the reins and

f. A
an'-ty-no-my.

ANTIPATHY,

The

is-

nature.

a.
an-ty-nl-frlt'-Ik.

ANTIPATHETICAL,

clude.
pre-

f. The
an-tls-fy-pa'-fhun.

ANTICIPATION,

metalline

difcafes of
againft

Efficacious

To
an-tls'-fy-plte.
a.

ANTINEPHRITICK,

to

fomethingfooner

of

f. Antimony
an'-ty-mun-ny.

ANTIMONY,

between two
or
to Chriflianity.
Oppofition
contrariety
ANTICHRISTIANITY,
ANTIPARALYTICK,
dn-t^krlf-tfhdn'-i-

take

an-ty-m6-iia'r-ky
Made
a.
an-ty-mo'-nyal.

ANTIMONIAL,

f.

ANTICIPATE,

fine,

Againft
perfoji.
government by fingle

a.

ANTINOMY,
ANTICHRISTIANISM,an-t^-kris'-tfhI-nlfm.

To

of
logarithm

fecant.

or

antimony.

a.
ANTICHRISTIAN,
an-t"'-kns'-tfh'm.
Opto ChrifHanity.
pofite

ty. f.

a-

f.
^ji-ty-Iig'-a-rI:tTm
of the

complement

f.
an-tlTr5-p6s'-o-fy.
ANTIMONARCHYCAL,

ANTHROPOSOPHY,

written

f. A medicine given
an'-ty-dote.

ANTILOGARITHM,

f.
an-tlTr6-p6f'-a-jy.

ANTHROPOPHAGY,

ANTIACID,

of counteradling
poifon.
quality

ANTIFEBRILE,
.an-tHrO-pif-afevers.
word, formed
gainft
by

ludicrous

ANTICHAMBER,

court.
a.
an"-ty-d6'-tal.
Having the

expelpoifon.

to

ANTHROPOPHAGINIAN,

which

or

power

Man-eaters, cannibals.

The

oppofesthe

f.
ANTIDOTE,
an-ttTr6-p6f'-a-ji.

ANTHROPOPHAGI,

the

f. One
an-ty-co'rt-ycr.

ANTICOURTIER,

f. The
an-ttTrO-pol-'-O-jy.
ANTIDOTAL,

ANTHROPOLOGY,
dodrine

the fkin.

burns

which

ANT

globe,have

ours,

f. He
an'-ty-p6pe.

that

ufurps

popedom.
f. A figure
in
an-tip-t6'-s!s.

ANTIPTOSIS,
grammar,

by

which

one

cafe isput for another.


ANTI-

".A

NT

APE

f. A
dn'-tt-kwa-ry.

ANTIQUARY,

ftu-

man

is put the

dious of

Orator

antiquity.
an'-t|-k%v:it".
v. a.
ANTIQUATE,

To

make

To

ftate of

f.
an'-ty-kwd-tcd-nes.

beingobfolete.
an-te'k. a.

ANTIQUE,

Ancient,

nn-te'k. f.

of ancient

modern

not

An

about

The

beingantique.
f. Old times;
an-tik'-kw!-ty.
ANTIQUITY,
of old times ; old age.

AN

TISCORBUTIC

kil. a.

Good

of any humour.

That

has

which

the

of

power

cines
Median-ty-fpas'-tlk.
a.

caufe

which

Efficacious in difeafes of the

fung in

fplcen.

a-or'-ta.
f.

refembled

or

which

out by the type.

is

term

theology.
ANTITYPICAL,
which

That
a.
an-ty-tip'-!-kal.

place; in

fet of

ant'-lur.f. Branch

ANTOECI,

an-to-e-si.

the earth who

of

horn.
flag's

inhabitants

f. Thofe

live under the fame

the fame diftance from the equator ; the


the

north, and

ANTONOMASIA,
form of

of

meridian,
one

at

ward
to-

To

APE,

f. A
d-pa'rt-ment.

V.
a'pe.

APEAK,

name,

room,

kind of
a.

To

monkey

imitator.

; an

as
imitate,

tates
ape imi-

an

ad.

In

the
to pierce
pofture

ground.
f. A
ap'-ep-fy.

lofs of natural

con-

codlion.

a-pe'-ryent.
Gentlypurgative.
a.

That
a.
a-per'-i-t!v.

of
quality

which

has

opening.

a.
a-pert'.
Open.
f. An opening,a
APERTION,
a-per'-fhun.

APERT,

pafTage,gap
a

APERTLY,
APERTNESS,

proper

diftance,

actions.

a-pe ke.

APERTURE,

at a

the reft

f. Exemption from pafap'-a-ttTy.

f. A
an-t6-n6-ma'-fya.
for

from
Separately

ftateof diftiniStion
;

rooms.

the other to the fouth.

fpetch,in which,

of the left ventricle of th"

fion.

the

difeafe.

great artery which

The

the other company.

Good
APERITIVE,
an-ty-ve-ne'-ryal.a.

the venereal
againft

ANTLER,

from

APERIENT,

explainsthe type.

ANTIVENEREAL,

whatever,

Indefinite.

ad.
a-pa'rt.

APEPSY,

of

lity
qua-

ad. Qiiick,
a-pa'fc.
fpeedily
; haftily.

f.
APE, a'pe.

f. That
an'-ty-tipe.

inquietude.

APART,

human

fhadowed

about fome

APACE,

contrail.

ANTITYPE,

deprcffion,

heart.

a.
an-ty-ftro-mat'-ik.

an-tltfi'-e-sls.
f. Oppofition;

ANTITHESIS,

AORTA,

APATHY,

the king's
evil.
again!!:

of mind

f. The
ank'-fyuf-nes.

AORIST,

ode

an

of

beinganxious.
a.
an'-ny.
Every,whoever,

APARTMENT,

In

parts, the fecond ftanza of every three.

ANTISTRUiVEATICK,
Good

careful,full

a'-6-rIft.
f.

in

an-us'-trO-fe.
f.

Trouble

of

retired
a.
an-ty-fplen'-e-tJk.

ANTISTROPHE,

thing

unquietly.

revulfion.

ANTISPLENETICK,

any

ad. Solicitoufly,
ank'-fyuf-ly.

ANXIOUSLY,

the
relieving

cramp.

ANTISPASTICK,

which

on

forged;

Difturbed
a.
ank'-fyus.
event;

riies immediately
a.
out
an-ty-fpaz-mod'-ik.

ANTISPASMODICK,

block

future event, folicitude ;

fome

ANY,
revulfion

iron

den.

cavern,

laid.

are

ANXIOUSNESS,

the fcurvy.
againft
f. The
an-tis'-pa-sis.

ANTISPASIS,

A
The

f.
ank-si'-e-ty.

uncertain

an-t^'-fkor-bd'-ty-

AL,

faythe

lownefs of fpirits.

lity
qua-

of

the antients ; remains

blows

which

ANXIOUS,

an-te'k-nes.f.

dignity. We

layshis metal to be

ANXIETY,

a
main
reantiquity,

times.

ANTIQUENESS,

the fmith
on

of genuineantiquity
; of old fafhion.

ANTIQUE,

an'-vil.f.

ANVIL,

ANTIQUATEDNESS,
The

an'-tur.f.

ANTRE,

obfolcte.

of fome

name

for Cicero.

ing;

an

the a6t of

opening.

ad.
dp'-ert-ly.
Openly.
f. Opennefs.
ap'-ert-nes.
f. Theaftofopcn^
ap'-er-turc.

open

place.
APETA-

fpeech.
APOSTASY,
what

profeffedit

has

is

of

forfake one's

hollow

purulenttumour.
fwel-

them

mandates, particularly
applied

to

Saviour deputed to preach the

office

apoftles.

the contraftion of
as,

To

addrefs

by

require;

word

by

in grammar,

the ufe of

from
A

hollow

mour
tu-

is to

keep medicines

for

falc.
f.
ap'-"-them.

remarkable

faying.

to

one

man.

1.

v.

another

f.
ap-pe'l.
inferior to

APOTHEOSIS,
f.
APOTOME,
a-p6t'-6-mc.
differenceof

two

The

incommenfurable

f.
ip'-v-zvm.

To

n.

to

transfer

call another

law,

To

an

remainder

quantities.

decotlion.

removal

of

a
as

fuperior

accufation

; a

caufe

; in the

court

call upon

any

witnefs.

APPEAR,

f. He that appeals.
ap-pel'-lant.
ap-pe'r. n. To be in fight,
v.

be vifible; to become

exhibit

one's

felf before

to reality
oppofition
; to

f. Deification.
a-po-tfie'-6-sls.

or

ap-pe

APPEALANT,

to

APOTHEGM,

againft
any

an

common
as

f. A man
a-pottt'-c-ka-ry.

employmentit

f. Charge
ap-p^'tfti-mcnt.

witnefs.

purulentmatter.

APOTHECARY,

to

reproach.

APPEAL,

APPEAL,

apoftrophe.

an

filledwith

APOZEM,

to

caufe from

lowclt

v.

exhibited
To

a-pos'-tro-fize.
v. a.

f.
ap'-of-tume.

APOSTUME,

whofc

perfonthan the

real ; the

not

ap-pd'. a. To fatisfy.
Toaccufe;
v. a.
ap-pe'tlh.

APPAY,

ToAPPEACH,

tho', for though.

APOSTROPHIZE,
To

or

a walking
fpeclre,

f. The
ap-p.V-y-tur.

f. In rhetorick, APPEACHMENT,
a-pos'-tro-fe.

intend

officer of the ecclefiaftical


court.

cenfure,

did
fpeechappointed

comma,

f. Appearance,
ap-pa-rish'-un.

only apparent,
fpirit
; fomething
of fome luminary.
vifibility

apoftles.

divcrfion of fpeechto another

To

ad. Evidently,
ap-pa'-rent-ly.

APPARITOR,

a.
a-pof-tol'-llk.
Taught by

APOSTROPHE,

dif-

prcfumptive.

vifibility
;
; a vifibleobje"t

ad.
a-p6f-t6l'-y-kal-ly.

APOSTOLICK,

drefs,to

real ; vifible; open,

certain,not

APPARITION,

apoftles.
of the

To

openly.

gofpel,

of an apoftle.
dignity
vered
Delia-pof-tol'-y-kal.
a.
APOSTOLICAL,

manner

ture
furni-

table
ap-pa'-rent.
a.
Plain, indubi-

APPARENTLY,

or

APOSTOLICALLY,

trade,the

deck.

feeming,not

whom

f. The
a-p6s'tl-(hip.

APOSTLESHIP,

with

or

cover

APPARENT,

perfon font

equipage,fhow.

ap-par'-el.
v. a.

APPAREL,
cloath ; to

coverable ;

f.
a-p6s'tl.

things

habiliments.

To

hollow

Thofe

accompli"meiitof

the tools of

as

fet apart

f. Drefs, vefture;exap-par'-el.
ternal

APPAREL,

f. A
ap'-o-fteme.

the

providedfor the

purpofe;

v.

abfcefs.

APOSTLE,

the

de-

children.
f.

ap-pa-ra-tus.

are

To
a-pos'-te-mate.
n.

f. The
a-pof-te-ma'-fhun.

APOSTEME,

In the

to
fright,

of younger

of ahoufe;

religion.

APOSTEMATION,
of
gathering

which

To

fvvell and corrupt into matter.

by

To

a.

f. Lands
ap'-pa-nije.

APPARATUS,

any

a-pos'-ta-tke.
v. n.

APOSTEMATE,

our

V.

fear.

for the maintenance

apoftate.

an

APOSTATIZE,

ling,an

f. Deprcffion,
ap-pa'l-ment.

of
impreffion

that has for-

religion.
After the
a.
a-pcl-tat'-y-kal.
APOSTATICAL,

To

ap-pa 1.

APPANAGE,,

f. One
a-p6s'-tate.

faken his

manner

APPAL,

APPALEMENT,

generallyapplied

religion.

APOSTATE,

To

To

prefs.
f. Departurefrom
:i-p6s'-ta-fy.

man

to

vehemency, breaks off his

afte"iion or

fome

vifibleas
a

be

court

fpirit
; to

to

feem, in

plainbeyond dif-

pute.

APPEARANCE,

f. The
ap-pc'-rans.

aa

of

coming into fight


; the thingfeen ; femblanco,
not
fhowi entry into a pL^cc
outfit,
reality;

exhibition of the perfonton


court;

company;

mien
prefcnce,

APPEARER,

likelihood,
probability,
f.

-rur.

ap-pe

The

appears.

Reconcileable.
ap-pe'-zabl.
a.
Reap-pe'-zabl-nes.
APPEASABLENESS,
a.

APPEASABLE,

concijeablenufs.

To

ap-p^'z.
V.

APPEASE,
in

ftateof peace

a.

To

pacify,to

; to

quiet,

to

f. A
ap-pe'z-ment.

APPEASEMENT,

put

reconcile.
ftateof

which
belongsto
APPERTINENT,

f. He
dp-pi'-zur.

APPELLANT,
that

appealsfrom

lower

f. A
ap-pel'-la-tlv,

all of the fame

to

common

kind

or

n.".me

fpecics
; as

cording
ad. Acap-pel'-lA-tlv-Iy.

the

of

manner

nouns

appellative.

That
ap-pel'-la-tur-ry.

APPELLATORY,
which

a.

contains

an

who

is

ac-

cufed.

defires.
To

thingupon another; to

tliehand
clapping

APPLAUDER,
or

add

to

To

hang any
as an
fomething

to

to

without beingncccffary
thing,

a.
ap-pen'-dant.
Hanging to

elfe; annexed, concomitant.


fomething

APPENDANT,
or

To

f. An accidental
ap-pen'-dant.

adventitious part.
v. a. To
ap-pen'^dy-kutc.

APPENDICATE,

To

praifeby

general.
He that

praif^^s

f. Approbationloudly
ap-pla'z.

expreflcd,
f.
APPLE, ap'l.
tiic

The

fruit of the

appletree;

pupilof the eye.


f.
ap'l-wum-un.

woman

that fellsapples.

That
a.
ap-pli'-abl.

which

may

be

applied.
APPLIANCE,
the

its efTence.

APPENDANT,

in
praife

ap-pla-dur.f.

f. The
ap-pli'-ks.

aft of applying,

thingapplied.

f.
ap-pen'-dAje.
Something APPLICABILITY,

another

to

commends.

accelFory.
APPENDAGE,
added

v. a.
ap-pli'd.

APPLAUD,

APPLIABLE,
v. a.
ap-pend'.

APPEND,

pleafure
; violent

f. Defire.
ap-pe-tis'h-un.
That which
a.
ap'-pc-ttt-iv.

APPLEWOMAN,

appeal.

f. One
ap-pel-le',

APPELLEE,
To

the defireof fenfual

APPLAUSE,

horfe.

APPELLATIVELY,
to

good;

challenger;
a
hi^^hcr APPETITION,
APPETITIVE,

f. The perfonapap-pel'-Jaic.
pealed
againft.
f. Name.
ap-pcl-la'-fhun.
APPELLATION,

APPELLATIVE,

a.

longing
; kcennefs of ftomach, hunger.

APPELLATE,

man,

ap'-pe-tlbl.Defirable.
f. The Jiaturaldcfirs
ap'-pe-tite.

to

power.

de-

f. The
APPETIBILITY,
ap-pc-ti-bll'-I-ty.
of beingdcfirablc.
quality

of

f. A
ap-pel'-lant.

thing.

a.
ap-pcr'-ty-nent.
ing,
Belong-

1 C Carnal
ap'-P'^'-t"^'ns.
\ fire.
ap'-P-^-ten-fy.

pacifies, APPETITE,

that

another

to.
relating

APPETENCE,
APPETENCY,

quietsdillrurbanccs.

he that

one

belongsto any rank or dignity.


f. That
APPERTENANCE,
ap-per'-te-nans.
which

APPETIBLE,

peace.

APPEASER,

f.
ap-p'r-ta'n-ment.

APPERTAINMENT,
That

perfonthat

f. The
ap-ply-ka-bll'-y-t}'-

of beingfitto be applied.
quality
That
a.
APPLICABLE,
ap'-ply-kabl.

which

be

applied.
may
APPLICABLENESS,

f. Fitap'-ply-kabl-nes.

nefs

to be applied.
ad. In
APPLICABLY,
ap'-ply-kab-ly.
manner

as

that it may

be

fuch

applied.
properly

add to another thing.


f. A rightline
APPLICATE,
ap'-p'y-kate.
bifedl the diar
f.
fo
drawn
acrofs
to
as
a
APPENDICATION,
Ap-pcn-d^-kV-fhun.
curve,

Annexion.

APPENDIX,

added;

concomitant.
or
adjunct
long
To beAPPERTAIN,
n.
v. n.
ip-per-ta
to as of right
to
to
nature.
belong by
;
or

To

meter.

f. Something
ap-pen'-diks.
APPLICATION,
appended
an

f. The aft
ap-ply-ka'-fliun.

applyingany thingto another ; the thing


to any perfon
as a
applied
; the ail of applying
for
of
the
means
petitioner
cinploymcHt any
i
of

ccrtaia

A
end

certain

ftudy;

thought,clofe
afFair.
particular

intenfenefs of

attention to fome

-a-tiv.
ap-pllk

APPLICATIVE,

which

another

To
a.
ap-ply
medicaments
lay

ufe of

to make

as

put

relative

have recourfe to,

to

keep at
To

as

wound

upon

or

to

put

to

In

eftablifh

thing by

any

fix any

To

decree j

to

that fettles

by

beingapprehenfive.

covenant,

to

To
ap-po'r-fliun.
v. a.

condition that the tradefman fhall,.

in the

time, endeavour

To

mean

to

mailer

as

an

The

f.
ap-po'r-fliun-ment.

To

v.

queflions

put

years of

years which
mafter.

APPRIZE,

To

APPROACH,

f. The
ap-pren'-tls-fhip.
is
apprentice

to

pafs under

To
ap-pri'ze.
v. a.
v. n.
ap-pr6'tfh.

near

two

To

matter;

new

in grammar,

in the fame

nouns

near

f. The
a-p6-zlfh'-un.

APPOSITION,
of

the

ment

with

on

; to

to

conceive

terrour,

to

order

by

the

apprehends.

means

inform.
To

drawmake

; to

a.

that

for trial or
mind

j to

fold.

To

lay
on

f.
One
ip-pra-hen'-dur,

of

bring

drawing

advancing.

approaches.

aft of

f. Ths
ap-pr6'tfli-ment.

coming

near.

f. The aft
ap-pr6-ba'-fliun.

himfclf
pleafed
j
approving,or exprefling
the liking
of any thing; atteftation,
fupport.
ObAPPROOF,
ap-prof.f. Commendation.
of

folete.

punifhthink

of

To

f. The perfon
dp-pro'-tfliur.

APPROACHER,

price

fear.

APPREHENDER,
who

perfonappointed

thingsto be
ap-pre-hend v. a.

feize,in

accefs ;

APPROBATION,

priceupon

APPREHEND,
hold

fet

any

to fet

APPROACHMENT,
To

thing.
f. A
APPRAISER,
ap-pri'-zur.
To

addition

puttingof

cafe.

ap-pra'ze.
v. a.

APPRAISE,
upon

fuitablenefs.
propriety,

put

apprentice.

locally
; to draw near, as time
progrefs
towards, mentally.
ad.
APPOSITELY,
ap'-p6-z!t-ly.
Properly, To APPROACH,
ap-pro tfli.v. a.
near
to.
fitly,
fuitably.
f. Fitnefs, APPRO
f. Theaft
ap'-po-^'t-nes.
APPOSITENESS,
ACFI, ap-pro'tih.
adapted.

ia

fervitude.
apprentice's

an

an

To

a.
kp'-po-zk.
Proper,fit,well

APPOSITE,

inftru"lhim

f.
ap-pren'-tls-hud.

APPRENTICESHIP,

ap-p6'ze.a.

to

To
v. a.
ap-pren'-tis.

APPRENTICE,
out

into portions.
dividing

APPOSE,

man

trade,upon

fet

to.

is
of

his art.

allowance paid

proportions.
injuft

that

ferve another

APPRENTICEHOOD,

APPORTIONMENT,
To

an

man.

APPORTION,

Ip-pri-hen'-siv-nes

f. One
ap-pren'-tls.

APPRENTICE,

f. Stipuap-point'-ment.
lation;

; equipment,furniture ;

out

ad.
ap-prS-hen'-s!v-ly.

of
quality

bound

f. He
ap-poin'-tur.

order
decree,eftablifhment;diredlion,

any

a.

manner.
apprehenfive

an

f. The

fixes.

to

ap-pre-hen'-s!v.
Quick"
; fearful.

APPREHENSIVENESS,

APPOINTMENT,

To

underiland

APPREHENSIVELY,

furnifiiin all points,


to eq\iip.

or

f. The
ap-pre-hen'-fhun.

APPREHENSIVE,

petitioner
; to ply, to

ap-point'.
v. a.

APPOINTER,

conceived.

thing;feizure.

to

ftudy;

to

upon,

work.

APPOINT,

thing; to

or
apprehended,

of things
fenticontemplation
; opinion,
conception
by which we
; the faculty
conceive
ideas ; fear ; fufpicion
new
of fome-

thingto

one

fuitable;

certain ufe ; to fix the mind

may

ment,

applying.
v.

; to

That
ap-prl-hen'-slbl.
a.

mere

the acl of

to

be

Belonging APPREHENSION,

a.

longing
Bea.
ap''-ply-ki-tur-'ry.

APPLY,

P P

APPREHENSIBLE,

application.

to

APPLICATORY,
To

To

APPROPINQUE,
draw

near

to.

APPROPRIABLE,
which

may

be

Not

ap-prO-pInk'.
v. n.

To

in ufe.

That
a.
ap-pro'-pry-dbl.

appropriated.
To

APR
To

APPROPRIATE,

cojifign
claim

ufe
particular

exercife

or

to
peculiar,

-pryate.v.

ap-pro

fome

to

exclufive

an

annex

law,

in

-^

right;to
alienate

to

to

make

apogee

the

lower, perihelion,

perigee.

or

APT,

APPROPRIATE,

a.

aphelion,or

nefice.
be-

a'-prund. Wearing an apron.


f. The higherapfis
APSIS, ap'-sis.
is denominated
APRONED,

To

a.

perfon;

or

apt.

a.
Peculiar,
-prydte.

Fit; havinga tendencyto;

a.

to, led

clined
in-

;
ready, quick, as an apt
for.
q\i?Jificd
'v.
To APTATE,
f.
APPROPRIATION,
ap-prO-pry-d'-fliun.
To
make
ap'-tiic.
fit.
a.
The
of
f. Fitnefs ; tendency
application fomething to a particular APTITUDE,
ap'-ti-tdde.
;
difpofition.
piirpofe
; the claim of any
thing as peculiar
;
the fixing
of a particular
ad.
to a word
APTLY,
apt'-ly.
fignification
;
Properly,
fitly;
juftiy,-

configncdto

in law,
the

ap-pro

Ibme

of
fevering

and

proper

houfe,or dean

f. He
ap-pro-pry-l'-tur.

of
poffeiTed

APPROVABLE,

benefice.
appropriated

an

-vabl.

ap-pro

a.

That

with
pleafed
fhow

; to

a.

To

exprefsliking
j to

to

experience
; to

make

like,to

be

prove,

to

worthy

AQUA

calcined

he that makes
of
felony

trial ; in law, one

himfLlf,accufcs

APPROXIMATE,

a-kwit'-Ik.a.

Appror.ch

to

the water

any

thing;

continual

made

approach

The

for

that which

Brandy.

That

habits
in-

which

grows in the

a'-kwa-tile.
a.

the

That

water.

which

habits
in-

water.

A'-kwe-duct.f. A com-eyancc

that,confeiling AQUEDUCT,

to.

a'-kwa-ma-rf'-na.f.

water.
carrying

AQUEOUS,

a-kwe-us.

a.

Water)^.

a'-kwa-uf-nes.
f.

f.
ap-pr^k-fy-m^'-fhun.
AQUEOUSNESS,

APPROXIMATION,

cor-

nitre
purified
by diftilling

a'-kwa-v!'-t:.
f.

VITJE,

another.

a. Near
ap-proks-y-mate.

not

vitriol.

AQUATILE,
that approves

is

Beryl.

f. Approap-proV-ment.
bation,

f. He
Ap-pro'-vur.

which

noun

4 -kv/a-f.l'r-tis.
f. A

MARINA,

of apAQUA
probation.

liking.
APPROVER,

Water.

f.

liquormade

AQUATICK,
APPROVEMENT,

f.

-tote.

ap

FORTIS,

rofive
with

ap-pr^V.v.

APPROVE,

tendency.

h'-kwL

AQUA

in ufe.

Not

henfion

AQUA,

f. Approbaap-pro'-vans.
tion.

VANCE,

APPRU

he learned his

declined with cafjs.

which

f. Approbation.
ap-pro'-val.

APPROVAL,

as
pertinently
; readily,
acutely,

APTOTE,

approbation.

merit:

To

benefice ccclefiaftical
to

perpetualufe of fome religious bufinefs very aptly,


and chapter,
lege.
f. Fitnefs,
or colbiflioprick,
APTNESS,
fuitablenefs;
apt'-nes.
to
difpofition
any thing; quicknefsof appre-

APPROPRIATOR,
that is

wit

particular.

to

Water-

iflinefs.

and nearer
nearer
to the quantity
flill,
a.
fought. AQUILINE,
ak'-v/y-liae.
Refemblingan
f.
The
of
act
when
the
APPULSE,
-pils.
to
llriking eagle;
applied
nofe,hooked.
ap
a-kwofe.
agaiull
a.
AQUOSE,
Watery.
any thing.
f. A
a-kwis -I't-y.
APRICOT,
f. Waterinefs.
or
a'-pry-kot.
APRICOCK,
AQUOSITY,

kind of wall fruit.

APRIL,

f.
-pril.

Januarycounted
APRON,

The

ARABLE,
fourth moiith

of the year,

ar-abl.

a.

Fit for

tillage.

web.
a.
a coba-ra'-nyus.
Refembling

ARANEOUS,

firft.

-prun. f. A cloth hung before,to


keep the other drefs clean, or for ornament.
f. A pieceof lead which coAPRON,
a'-pri'in.
vers
a

the touch-hole of

great

"\in.

a-ri'-fhun.f.

ARATION,
of

The

aft

or

pradice

plowing.
That
a.
ar'-A-tur-ry.

ARATORY,
to

which

tributes
con-

tilLi.gc.
ARBA-

ARC
a'r-ba-llrr.
f. A crofs-bow.

ARBALIST,

ar-b!-tur. f.

ARBITER,

ar-bit'-tra-ment.
f. Will,

ARBITRAMENT,

With
ad.
a'r-bl-tra-ri-ly.

other rule than the will

no

abfodefpotically,

lutely.
trary,
Arbia.
ar-bl-tra'-ryus.

to

pleafure.
aba.
a'r-bi-tra-ry.
Defpotick,
rule,capricious.

a'r-b!-tnUe.v.

ARBITRATE,
determine

; to

To

a.

cide,
de-

ar-bl-tra'-fliun.
f. The

ARBITRATION,
of

agreedon by

caufe

the

by

judge mutually

f.

An

ordinary
extra-

judgebetween party and party, chofen


confent ;

governour
of

fident ; he that has the power


;

trees

his

fmall

a'r-bp-rift.
f.
his

or

belong-

tree or

firft clafs^

One

the

of

f. A plant,
dead
ark-a'n-jel.

ARCHANGEL,

a. Belongark-an-jel'-llk.
ing

ARCHANGELICK,
archangels.

artfti-b^'kn.
f.

placeof profpect,or
the firfl:
clafs,who
other

a'r-hute.f.
A

to
Belonging

trees.

bifnopshis

the condud
fuperintends

ARCANUM,
a'rtfli.
f.
ARCH,

of

fuffragans.

or jurifdiftionof
an archbifhop.
ftate,
pro\'ince,

artfh-tfhan'-tur.f.

artfli-de'kn.
f.

ARCHDEACON,

bifliop's
placeand

The

One

that

office.

f. The
artlh-de'kn-r"'.

ARCHDEACONRY,

office or jurifdiction
of an archdeacon.
f. The
artfh-de'kn-fhlp.
ARCHDEACONSHIP,
office of

archdeacon.

an

artfh-du ke. f.

princesof
ter

or

Auflria and

Chief

title givento

Tufcany.

artfh-dutfh'-es.
f. The

daughterof

fif-

the archduke of Auftria.

artfli-fIl-6s'-6-fur.
f.

philofopher.
'-ite.f.
artfli-prcl

ARCHPRELATE,

Chief

Any

f.Chief
ARCHPRESBYTER,artlh-pres'-bI-ter.

littleflirub.

Strawbenytree.
part of

courfe
circle ;

-num.

Part of

continued
f.
a

ARCHED,

fecrct.

not
circle,

antiquitj'.

on

more

ar-k-a-6-l6dzh'-ik.
lating
a. Re-

ARCHAIOLOGICK,
a

difcourfe

of

an

on

antiquity.

ar'-ka-ifm.
f." An

ARCHAISM,

arch.

f. A difar-ka-6l'-6-jy.

ARCHAIOLOGY,

to

ar-ka

chief

of

prefbyter.

A bower.

fegment,a

ar-ki'd;.f.

The

fignal.
f. A bifhopof
artfli-bifh'-up.

ARCHBISHOP,

arch.

ARCADE,

arches ; to

prelate.

ftudy.

aV-budcl. f.

rk. f.

flirub.

naturalift who

a'r-bo-rus.a.

ARBUSCLE,

of

ARCHPHILOSOPHER,

A'r-bLr. f.

ARBUTE,

of the

n-jel.f.
angels.

ARCHDUCHESS,

compromife.

a'r-bo-ret.
f.

ARBOROUS,
ARBOUR,

an

pre-

tree.

makes

order
higheft

ARCHDUKE,

Of
a.
a'r-bo-ra-ry.

ARBORIST,

ARC,

aftingby

dr-bit'-tre-ment.
f. Deci-

fion,determination
ARBORARY,

the determiner.

ARBITREMENT,

ARBORET,

Chief,
ark-a

the
fupplies

ar-bi-tra-tur.

their mutual

build

terminationchief chanter.
de-

parties.

ARBITRATOR,

to

waggifn,mirthful.

ARCHCHANTER,

fpoticalnefs.

choice

fegment

f.The
ARCHBISHOPRICK,art(h-bilh'-up-r!k.

judge of.

f. Dea'r-bl-tra-rl-ncfs.

ARBITRARINESS,

own

To

a.

a'rtfh.a.

to

will and

mere

on
-folute;depen'ding

by

with arches.

ad.
ARCHBEACON,
ar-bl-tra'-ryus-ly.

no

to

a'rt(h.v.

ARCH,
cover

the will.

dependingon
"ARBITRARIOUSLY,

To

of

bridges;vault of heaven

nettle.

-ARBITRAMOUS,

Accordmg
ARBITRARY,

form

chief.

ARCHANGEL,

determination,choice.
^ARBITRARILY,

buildingin

circle,ufedfor

ARCH,

the v/ill.

upon

To

judge,

a'r-bi-trabl.
pending
Arbitrary, dea.

ARBITRABLE,

of

judge appointed
determination
they^o-

whoft

by the parties,to
fubniit ;
luntarily

than the half;

ar'-tfhed.
part. a.

ancient

phrafe.

Bent in the form

arch.

ARCHER.

ARC

ar'-tfhur.
f.

ARCHER,

Ho

that fhoots with

f. The
ar'-tfhe-ry.

ARCHERY,

a'r-dc-nt.
a.

afFedtionate.
vehement; pafTionate,
fierce,

ufeof thebow;

the bowj

with
{hooting

the act of

the

of

art

an

feiftionatcly.
ar'-tfhez-kort.
f.

of

ancient

f. The
ar'-ka-type.

ARCHETYPE,

the animal

over

ARCHIDI

to an

that

to
Belonging

the verb To

That

the power

or

fkillof

chitect.
ar-

an

contained

boundaries; any open

or

a.

tween
befur-

advife,to direfl.

To

f. The
ar-re-fak'-fhun.

AREFACTION,
of
To

growingdry, the aft of

ftatc

drying.
To dry.

v. a.
ar'-re-fy.

AREFY,

a-re-na'-fhus.
a.
a-re-no'fe.
a.

ARENOSE,
ar-ky-tek-tin'-nik.
a.

has

which

furface

The

a-re'd.v.

AREAD,

ARENACEOUS,

of architeifture.

the work

of

Littleufed.

of any

ARCHITECTONICK,

prefenttcnfe

the

face.

To

f. A profeffor
of
a'r-ky-tekt.

building;a builder;the contriver


thing.
a. That
ARCHITECTIVE,
ar-ky-tek'-tlv.
forms
per-

pluralof

lines

any

archbifhop.

Height,

be.

f.
a'-rya.

longing AREA,
a. Bear-ky-di-ak'-d-nal.

of

art

a'r-du-uf-ncs.f.

ar'. The

prefides ARE,

ar-ky-e-p!s'-k6-pal.
a.

an

climb;

difficulty.

archdeacon.

ARCHITECT,

to

difficult.

oeconomy.

AGONAL,

ARCHIEPIS.OPAL,

the

f. Height,difficulty.
ar-du'-i-ty.

a'r-du-us.
a.
Lofty,hard

ARDUOUSNESS,

ar-!ce'-us.
f. A power

ARCHEUS,

ARDUITY,
ARDUOUS,

a.
ar'-ke-ty-pal.
Original.

ARCHETYPAL,

love,defire,
courage.

as

of
original

any refemblance is made.

which

a'r-dur.f. Heat; heat of afFedion,

ARDOUR,

The

that belongs
confiftory
ing
of
f
archbifhop Canterbury,or the debatcaufes.
fpiritual

molt

chief and
the

ad.
afa'r-dent-ly.
Eagerly,

ARDENTLY,

archer.

ARGHES-COURT,
to

a'r-den-fv.
f. Ardour, eagernefs
Hot, burning,
fiery
j

ARDENCY,
ARDENT,

bow.

a-ren'-u-lus.
a.

ARENULOUS,

Sandy.

Sandy.
Fulloffmall

fand. grav(
f. The
a'r-ky-tek-tfhur.

ARCHITECTURE,
art

or

fcience

of

building
; the

of the fcience of

column

which

and

ARCHIVES,
or

the

of the

pital,
ca-

blature.
enta-

a'r-kivz.f. The places


where

ancient

ARCHWISE,

part of

a'rtfh-wize.
In the form
a.

of

of argil,
or
confifting

of

ARCUATION,

The

act of

bendingany
;
beingbent, curvity,
or crookednefs.
ARCUBALISTER,ar-ku-baI'-if-tur.
f.Acrofsthing,incurvation

bow

man.

rcafons

; to

the

ftate of

largeveflcl for

carrack.

v. n.
a'r-gu.

ARGUE,

To

reafon,to offer

perfuade
by argument;

to

difpute.

f. A reafoner,
a difputer.
a'r-gu-ur.

ARGUER,
ar-ku-i'-fhun.f.

potters clay.

f.
a'r-go-fy.

merchandife,a
To

arch.

lour
co-

clayifh.

an

ark-ta'-fliin.
f. Confinement.

an

coats

of clay,
a.
Confifting
ar-jil'-lus.

ARGOSY,

ARCTATION,
a'rk-tlk.
Northern.
ARCTICK,
a.
a'r-ku-ate.
Bent in the form
ARCUATE,
a.

white

of

gentlemen,
like filver.
a
nd
baronets
filver,
bright
knights,
;
f.
Potters
ARGIL,
clay.
a'r-jil.
a.
ARGILLACEOUS,
ar-jil-li'-fhus.
Clayey,
ARGILLOUS,

arch.

medicines

a.
a'r-jent.
Having the

in the armorial

ufed

cords
re-

are kept,
writings

Such

a.

the pores.

open

ARGENT,

lies immediately
upon

is the lowcft member

as

formance
per-

building.

f. That
a'r-ky-trlve.

ARCHITRAVE,
a

effect or

a-re-6t-Ik.

AREOTICK,

ARGUMENT,

ar-gu-ment.

f.

reafon

the

leged
al-

of
fubje""t
againft
any thing;
of
contents
the
difcourfe
or
writing;
any
any
work
fummcd
up by way of abflratt; conirofor

or

verfy.
N

ARGU-

ARM

a.
ar-gu-men'-til.
ing
Belong-

ARGUMENTAL,
to

fcience of

f.
ar-gu-men-tl'-fhun.
ARK,

Reafoning,the aft of

a.
ar-gd-men'-ta-t!v.
was

te.

ar-gu

Dry, parchedup.

f. Drynefs,ficcity
a-rid'-di-ty.
;

ARIDITY,
kind of

in devotion.
infenfibility

f. The
a'-ryez.

one

ram,

v. n.
a'-rye-tate.

ARIETATE,

butt

f. The aft of
a-rj-e-ti'-fhun.

with
buttinglike a ram ; the a"l of battering
called
an
a
ram.
engine
f. A fhort air, fong,
ARIETTA,
a-ry-et'-ta.

a-r!'te.ad. Rightly,
without erwithout crime ; rightly,
out
withrightly,
of the end defigned.
failing

ARIGHT,
rour

f.
Sootha-ry-6-la-fliun.

ARIOLATION,

a-r!'ze.v.

ARISE,
To

arifen.
tip

as

death

from
to

upon

the fun

to

get

refl; to revive from

from

or
fleep,

enter

pret. arofe,part,

n.

upward as

mount

ftation;

new

to

mence
com-

f. That
a-rlf-tok'-kra-fy.

form of government which


power

placesthe fupreme

a-rlf-to-krat'-ti-kal.
a.

Relatingto ariftocracy.
ARISTOCRATICALNESS,
kal-nes.

f.

from

to

an

or

method

of arithmetick.

a'rm. v.

ARM,

rnaflerof the

art

ARITHMETICK,

large
boughof

the fea; power,

furnifliwith

armour

of offence ; to

add

that may
any thing
fitup.
To

the

reaches from

with
plate
to
ftrength
; to furnifli,

To

n.

take

againfl.
ar-ma'-da. f.
ARMADA,

An

arms

to

vide
pro-

for

armament

fea.

ar-ma-dll'-l6.
f. A four-footed

animal

of Brafil.

ARMAMENT,

f. A

a r-ma-ment.

naval force.

ARMATURE,

a'r-ma-ture.f.

ARMENTAL,

ar-men'-tal. ) a. Belonging
to
a'r-men-tine. a drove or herd

Armour.

of cattle.

Slender
a.
a'rm-ga'nt.

ARMGAUNT,

as

the

rather,flender with want.


a'rm-hole.f. The cavityunder
ARM-HOLE,
; or

arm

ar-mldzh'-e-rus.
a.

ARMIGEROUS,

Bearing

arms.
a.
a
a'r-mil-a-ry.
Refembling

bracelet.

a'r-mll-a-ted.
a.
f. The
a'r-mingz.

Wearing

fame with wafte-

clothcs.

in

f. Power
dr-mlp'-o-tens.

war.

ARMIPOTENT,

a.
ar-mlp'-6-tent.
Mighty

in war.
A-rlttl-met'-tl-kal-ly.

arithmetical manner.

ARITHMETICIAN,

To

a.

ARMIPOTENCE,

numbers.

a-rltlT-met'-tl-kal.
cording
Aca.

the rules

ARITHMETICALLY,
In

by

events

ARITHMETICAL,

the.

the fecular arm.

a'rm. v.

ARM,

ARMINGS,

f. A foretelling
a-rlt'lT-man-fy.

of future

ad.

ARMILLATED,
a-rlf-to-krat'-tl- bracelets.

ftate.
ariftocratical

An

which

inlet of water

an

ARMILLARY,

in the nobles.

ARISTOCRATICAL,

ARITHMANCY,

with

the flioulder.

hoftility.
ARISTOCRACY,

limb

tree;

ARMENTINE,

faying.
To

a'rm. f. The

ARMADILLO,

tune.

or

ter,
wa-

Noah

deluge;the

of God

to the fhoulder

To

ram.

ARIETATION,

the univerfal

covenant

of defence,or weapons
To

the

that in which

the hand

might,as
of the twelve

of the zodiack.
figns

like a

tion.
computa-

Jews.
ARM,

ar-rld. a.

ARIES,

prefervedfrom

of the
repofitory

Subtile,witty,fharp,

a.

fhrill.

To

of

art

vefTclto fwini upon

appliedto
ufually

of argument, containing
Confifting
argument.

ARGUTE,

a'rk.f.

reafoning.

ARGUMENTATIVE,

the

argument.

ARGUMENTATION,

ARID,

numbers

ARMISTICE,

a-rltfi-mc-dfh'-an.
f. A
of numbers.

a;rhR'.me-tik. f.

ARMLET,
of

armour

ar'-ml-ftis.
f. A ftiorttruce.
arm-let.

f.

for the armj

littlearm
a

piece

bracelet for the

The
ARMO-

ART
ARRODE,

To

ART

ar-rode.

y.

To

a.

or

ARTFULNESS,

art-fal-nes.

aft or

ARTHRITICK,

ar-tHrlt'-'k.

gnaw

f.

ning.
Skill,Cun-

nibble.

ARROGANCE,

7f
ar'-ro-gans.

ARROGANCY,

^ quality of
ar'-ro-gan-fy-.

The

takingmuch

one's felf.

upon

ad. In an
ar'-r6-gant-ly.

ARROGANTLY,

to joints.
relating
f. This plantis
a r-ty-tfhoke.
but hath largefcaly
heads
the thiftle,

very like

rogant
ar-

fhapedlike
f.
ar'-ro-gant-nes.

ARROGANTNESS,

To
v. a.
ar'-ro-gite.

ARROGATE,

ARTICK,

; to
vainly

exhibit

ARROGATION,
in

proud

claims.
unjuft
f. A
ar-rd-ga-fliun.

ar'-rO.
f.

ARROW,

is {hot from

To

The

gnawing.

water

plant.

The

buttocks.

to war,
a magazine.
requifitc
ar-fen'-J-kal.
a.
ARSENICAL,

a'rf-n!k.
f.

not

The

taughtby nature

the liberal

arts

mineral fubftance ;

power

of

doing fomething

and inftinit;

fcience,as

terity
dex(kill,
trade;artfulnefs,

the artery, that which

which

lates
re-

is contained

f. The
ar-tl-ry-6t'-td-my.

canal, conveyingthe blood


all parts of the

from

the heart

to

body.

a'rt-ful.a.

Performed

with

to
ftipulate,

ad. With
a'rt-fdl-ly.
o

Diftina

make

man

to

To
up in

draw

terms.

ad.
In
ar-tlk'-d-late-ly.

articulate voice.

of
quality

ar-tlk'-ii-late-nes.
f.

beingarticulate.
ar-tlk-u-U'-fhun.
f. The

ARTICULATION,

of bones ; the act of forming


or joint
juncture,
in plants.
words ; in botany,the joints
a'r-ti-fis.
f. Trick, fraud,ftraARTIFICE,

tagem

art, trade.

ar-tif'-fl-fur.
f.

An

a
artift,

contriver;
a
a
manufiicSurer;
forger,
or

terous
dex-

artful fellow.

ar-tl-fis'h-al.
Made
a.

natural ; fiditious,
not

not

contrived with

ARTIFICIALLY,

by art,
genuine; artful,

fkill.
ad.
fully,
Artar-tl-fifh'-al-ly.

with good contrivance; by


fkill,
naturally.
fulnefs.
f. Artar-ti-flfli'-al-nis.
ARTIFICIALNESS,
with

art,

not

ARTILLERY,
cannon,

fully.

To

art ;

terous.
dexnot
artificial,
natural;cunning,fkilful,

ARTFULLY,

to

ARTIFICIAL,

of letting
blood from the artery; the
operation
of
an
cutting
artery.
f. An arteryis a conical
ARTERY,
a'r-te-ry.

ARTFUL,

articles ;

fpeakas

ARTICULATELY,

in

the artery.

ARTERIOTOMY,

ticular
par-

llipu-

ar-tik'-u-late.
v. a.

to

ARTIFICER,

cunning.
That
a.
ARTERIAL,
ar-te'-ryal.
;

to

n.

ar-t!k'-u-late.
a.

words,

The

f.

term,

into articles.

out

Containing ARTICULATENESS,

violent corrofive poifon.


rt.

account,

ar-tlk'-u-lar.
to
a.
Belonging

ARTICULATE,
form

an

arfenick.

a'r-tlkl.
v.

ARTICULATE,
To

ar's-fut.
f. A kind of water fowl.
FOOT,
ar's-fma'rt.
ARSE
f. A plant.
SMART,
a'rf-nal.
f. A repofitory
of things
ARSENAL,

an

complex thing;

terms.

branched

ARSE

ARSENICK,

part of fpeech,as

thejoints.

ar'-ro-hed.
f.

ar'fe.f.

claufe of
fingle

ARTICULAR,

of arrows.
a.
ar'-ro-y.
Confifting

ARSE,

ARTICLE,
make

which

pointed
weapon

a.

ar'-t!kl.f.
;

pine tree.

Northern.

lation ; pointof time, exadt time.

ing
claim-

bow.

ARROWHEAD,
ARROWY,

ART,

the, an

of the

cone

part of any

manner.

ar-ro'-zhun. f. A

ARROSION,

claim

the

a'r-tik.

ARTICLE,
To

Gouty,

ARTICHOKE,

manner.

rogance.
Ar-

la.

ar-tRrlt'-I-kal.i
to
relating

AL,

the gout

a. Haughty,
ar'-ro-gant.
proud.

ARROGANT,

ARTHRITIC

art, fkil-

ARTISAN,
an

arti

f. Weaponsof
ar-tll'-lc-ry.

war;

great ordnance.
ar-t!-zan'.f.

of
Artift,profefTor

manufadurer, low tradefman.


ARTIST,

a'r-tlft.
f. The

ARTIST,

Ikilfulman,

not

S C
of an
profcfTor

novice.

artlefsmaid

an

have

a'r-tu-ite.
v.

To

a.

reckoned

a-ruu-di-ni'-fhus.
Of
a.

in the

it were,

the fame time that ;

; as

in fome

fame

or

in what

f. A
af-fi-fet'-I-da.

of
broughtfrom the Eaft Indies,
ofFenfivefmell.
tafte,and a ftrong

of

az-bes'-tln.
a.

or

fharp
name

Somethingin-

az-bes'-tiis.
f. A
may

be

fort of native

into
fplit

threa4s

inch to ten inches in


from one
filaments,
able.
tradlength,
yet fomewhat
very fine,brittle,

in

which
theiire,

ly
on-

af-kar'-i-dcz.
f. Little

proceed from

ASCEND,
ihinx.

The

Saviour is

worms

ftate of afccnt.
adt of

Rife, the

;
rifing

way by which one ai'tends; an eminence,,


or highplace.
af-fer-ti'ne.
To make
To ASCERTAIN,
v. a.
make
confident.
to fix,
to cftablifa; to
certain,

af-fer-ti-nur.f. The

ASCERTAINER,
or

; a

af-fcr-ta'n-ment.
f. A
ftandard.

af-ket'-Ik.
a.

ASCETICK,

Employedwholly
mortification.

af-ket'-lk.
f. He

ASCETICK,

per-

eftabliflies.

ASCERTAINMENT,

that retires to

devotion,a hermit.
of
f. A particular
fpecics
ASCITES, af-ki'-tes.
of
a
fwelling
dropfy,
parts, from

ASCITICAL,

an

the lower

bellyand

extravafation of

pending
de-

waten

}a. Dropfical,
af-klt'-lkal.
hy-

dropical.

a. Supplemental,
ASCITITIOUS,af-si-tlfli'-us.

to

one

ftand

To

mount

degreeof
higherin

wards
up-

ASCRIBABLE,

ledge
knowlogy.
genea-

may
To

af-fC-nd'.
v. a.

To climb up any

af-fkri'-bab!.
That
a.

which

be afcribed.

ASCRIBE,
as

To

our

additional.

af-fci^d'.
v. n.

another i

ing.
mount-

The

in the re"a:iim.

to

our

before Whitfuntide.

one

ASCITICK,,.af-k!t'-ik.
\

whitens it.

; to

af-fent'.
f.

ASCENT,

It is endued with the wonderful property


unconfumed
remaining

ASCEND,

afcenfion of

af-fen'-siv.
In
a.

fon that proves

and

To

the

in exercifes of devotion and

folfileftone,
which

ASCARIDES,

or
thingrifing

Day, af-Rn"-{hun-di'.f.
which

ASCENSIVE,

combuftible.

of

on

day,the Thurfdaybut

plant.

ASBESTOS,

to

fettledrule

ASBESTINE,

ad of af-

commemorated, commonly called HolyThurf-

in

gum

af-fa-ra-bak'-ka.
f. The

ASARABACCA,

day

ner
man-

fame ;

refin

; the

heaven

ASCENSION

fort;while, at

to As ; anfwering
to
fenfe,anfwering
reciprocal
Such ; havingSo to anfwer it,in the conditional
fenfe ; anfwering
to So conditionally
; As for,
vith refpecl
to ; As well
to ; As to, with refpect
with ; As though,as if.
as, equally

ASAFOETIDA,

Saviour

with

The

the vifibleelevation of
rifing;

with;

if,in the

; how,
equally

with, anfweringto Like

uf-fcn'-Ihin.
f.

cendingor

degreewith

fame
as

aftrological

an

f. Influence,
af-fcn'-dai-fy.

ASCENSION,

reeds.

AS, az'. conjunct.In the fame manner


fomethingelfe ; like,of the fame kind

manner

fupc-

power.

ing
Abounda.
d-run-d!n'-yus,

ARUNDINEOU3,
with

kindred

the horizon.

ASCENDENCY,

like reeds.

or

of
degrees

in

overpowering
;
fenfe,above

ARUNDINACIOUS,

the

upwards.
af-fcn'-dant.
a.
Superior,
dominant,
pre-

limb

tear

t"
fuppofed
by aflrologcrs

elevation
great influence ; height,

ACCENDANT,

limb.

from

is

part of

time above the


particular

influence; oneof
riority,

fkill,as

contrived without

any

horizon,which

artlefsmanner,

artlefstale.

an

ToARTUATE,

at
ecliptick

naturally,
fincerely.
without fraud,
ARTLESS, a'rt-Ics.a. Unficilful,
as

af-fcn'-dant.
f. The

ASCENDANT,
Ai

ad. In an
a'rt-Ief-ly.

ARTLESLY,

art;

S G

caufe

; to

ASCRIPTION,

af-krS'bc.
v.
attribute to

To

a.

as

attribute to

potrcfibr.

f. The
af-krip'-faun.

aiSlof

afcribing.
O

ASCRIP-

ASP
That
a.
af-knp-tlfh'-us.

ASCRIPTITIOUS,
f.

ash.

tree.

afti'-kul-urd.
Coloured
a.

COLOURED,

ASH

that It kills without a poflibility


of
operation,
Thofe
that
bitten
are
applyingany remedy.
and lethargy.
by it,die by flecp
f
.
A
tree.
ASP, Afp'.
f. A plant
ed
callaf-pal'-a-tSus.
ASPALATHUS,

is arciibed.

which

ASH,

ASP

between

and grey.

'brown

a-M'-med.

ASHAMED,

Touched

a.

alh'n.a.

I\Iade of afliwood.

afh'-iz.f. The

burnt

the remains

thing

body.

a(h-wenz'-da. f.

The

firft
dayof Lent, fo called from the ancient cufafhes on
fprinlding

of

the head.

a{h'-lir.
f. Free ftones as theycome

ASHLAR,

in
f. Qiiartering
afh'-Ie-r!ng.

ASHLERING,

a-fho're.
ad. On fliore,
the land
on

ASHORE,

An

ASIDE,

a-5ide.

part ;

from

herb.

To

ad.

fide;to another

one

a.
as'-si-na-ry.
Belongingto

as

-si-nine.

afk'.v.

ASK,
demand,

to

claim

to
Belonging

a.

an

an

afs.

To

a.

; to

ASPER,

to
petition,
beg; to
to
enquire,toqueflion;

obSideways,
\
I liquely.
a-fkant'.
ad. Obliquely,
on
one

ASKAUNT.

or

aft;-ur.

ASKER,

afl:'-ur.
f.

Petitioner ;

f.

a-ficiV.
ad.

ASKEW,

enquirer.

Afide,with

contempt,

ASLAKE,

ASP,

or

whofe

of
roughnefs

their leaves.

f. Unevennefs,
af-per'-y-ty.
roughnefs

of furface ; roughnefs
of found
of temper.
ruggednefs

ASPEROUS,

ASPERSE,
with

cenfure

ASPERSION,

a-fla'ke.
v.

a.

To

remit, to

flacken.

ASLOPE,

a. Plants,
af-per-y-fa'-lyus.

roughnefs,

f. Negledl,
.if-per-na'-lhun.

ASPERNATION,

To

newt.

water

ccntemptuoufly.

ASLANT,
ASLEEP,

make

difregard.

ASKER,

To

To

f. A making
af-pe-nV-fliun.

fo called from the

fide.

v. a.
as'-pe-rate.

rough.
ASPERIFOLIOUS,

'

ASKAUNCE,

afptreeji

a.
as'-per.
Rough, rugged.

rough.
ASPERATION,

5 ad.

the

afpenwood.

ASPERITY,

require.
ASKANCE,

tree, the leaves of which

a.
to
as'-pin.
Belonging

of

ASPERATE,

To

afs.

ASININE,

f. A
as'-pin.

ASPEN,
made

the company.

ASINARY,

To

view.

whitifh grey.

v.

alwaystremble.

ing
a.
afh'-y.
Afli-coloured,
pale,inclinto

of

name

af-pek't.a. To behold.
Vifible.
a.
al-p^k'-tabl.
f.
.af-ptk'-fhun.
Beholding,

ASPECT,

ASPECTABLE,
ASPECTION,

the land,

the

ASHY,

tain
cer-

plant.
f. Look, air,appearance j
as'-pekt.
ASPECT,
countenance
view, adt of beholding
; glance,
j
direction towards any point,pofition;
difpofitionof any thingto fomething
elfe,relationj
other
to
of a planet
difpofition
planets.

ASPEN,

fhore,to
afli'-wed.
f.
ASHWEED,
to

To

of the quarry.

out

of

f. The
af-p.V-a-gus.

ASPARAGUS,

remains of any

of the

ASHWEDNESDAY,
tom

the wood
Jerufalem;

tree.

ASHEN,
ASHES,

of

the wood

with

fliame.

one

or

calumny.
f. A fprinkling
af-per'-fhun.

calumny,cenfure.
ASPHALTICK,

a-flant'.
ad. Obliquely,
on

a.
.is'-pe-rus.
Rough, uneven.
To
v. a.
af-pers'e.
befpattejr

.if-fal'-tlk.
tuminous.
a.
Gummy, bi-

fide.

ad.
af-fal'-tos.
into fleep.
f. A bituminous,
a-lle'p.
ASPHALTOS,
Sleeping;
With
ad.
liquely. inflammable fubftance,refembling
oba-fio'pe.
pitch, and
declivity,

ASPICK,

f.
afp'.

poifonis fo

A kind of

and
dangerous

ferpent,
quickin its

found fwimming on
the furface
chiefly
Lacus Afphaltites,
Dead Sea, where
or

floodthe citiesof Sodom

of the
ently
anci-

and Gomorrah.

ASPHAL-

ASS
af-fal'-tum.
f.

ASPHALTUM,
flone found

as'-f6-del.f.
f.
as'-pik.

To

ASPIRATE,

Thename

of

-pi-rute.
v.

as

full breath,

with

bituminous;

Babylon.
Day-lilly.

the ancient

near

ASPHODEL,
ASPICK,

ASS

a.

ASSAULTER,

pronounce

with

examination
f. A breathing
af-pl-ri'-fhin.

ardent wifh ; the

after,an

defiring
fomething
high;
a

To

or
afpiring,
of
pronunciation

any
To

vowel with full breath.


To

of ineafures

dcfire with

as

line of
ftraight

of burden

fellow,a dolt.
v. a.
ASSAIL, af-fd'le.

hoftile manner,

with

argument

To

or

attack

fall upon;

in
to

To

To

cenfure.

af-fa'-l.Ant.
invading.
a.
ASSENT,
Attacking,
af-fa'-lur.
f.

One

attacks

who

another.

fquirrel.
f.
ASSASSIN, af-fas'-sm.
fudden

murderer,one

that

treachery.
ASSASSINATION,

; to

way-lay,to

ance.
Attend-

To

a.

af-fem'bl.v.

tion
collec-

gether
bringto-

To

n.

meet

gether.
to-

by

of

fiege
; violence

met

ad

of

to
agreeing

af-fent'.
v.

with

the

ASSERT,
either

To

n.

concede, to

af-fen-ta'-fhun.
f. Compli-

opinionof

another

of

out

flattery.

af-fent'-ment.
f. Confent.
af-fcrt'.
v.

by

words

To

a.
or

maintain, to

aftions

claim, to vindicate a title to.


af-fer'-fliun.
f. The
ASSERTION,

to

affirm ;

to

act of af-

ferting.
ASSERTIVE,

af-fer'-t!v.
a.
Pofitive,dogmatical.

ASSERTOR,

af-f"!-r'-tur.
f. Maintaincr,
vindicator,

derer,
Mur-

mankiller.

af-fd It. f.

company

thing; confent,agreement.

defend

af-faf-si-na'-fhun.
f. The

af-fd'-fhun.
f.

f. A
af-fcm'-bly.

ASSENTMENT,

To

take

afTaffinating.
af-fas'-I-nu-tur.
f.
ASSASSINATOR,

or

mint,

place.

af-fent'.
f. The

ASSENT,

To

af-fas'-sl-nate.
v. a.

violence

To

ance

violence.

To ASSASSINATE,

ASSAULT,

officer of the

af-fem'bl.v.

yieldto.
ASSENTATION,
flying

f. The
af-fa-pan'-n!k.

ASSAPANICK,

ASSATION,

An

together.
any

ad

one

A.SSEMBLY,

ASSAILANT,

by

of individuals brought to^^cther.

ASSEMBLE,

af-fi'-ldnt.f. He that attacks,

murder

metals
allaying

af-fcm'-blcJzh.
f.

number

into

tack
at-

be attacked.

by

trial of; to

r.f-fi-ku'-fiiun.
f. Acquirement.

ASSEMBLE,

ASSAILANT,

kills

make

af-fa'-labl.
That which may
a.

ASSAILABLE,

ASSAILER,

To

af-fck-ta'-fhin.
f.

flupiJ, ASSEMBLAGE,

; a

to
affault,

to

upon

for the due trial of fdrcr.

heavy,dull
To

the

vifion.

animal

An

the firft
entrance

af-(iV-ur.
f.

ASSAYER,

A-SSECUTION,

in

law,

in

try, to endeavour.

to

ryineaway.
a-fkwlnt'.ad.
ASQUINT,
the

lently
vio-

weightsuftd by

the touchllone in

ASSECTATION,

not
Obliquely,

and

af-fii'.
v. a.

ASSAY,

to pant after fomething


eagernefs,
higher;to
rife higher.
f. A caraf-por-ta'-fhun.
ASPORTATION,

ASS, afs'.f.

who

thing;attack,trouble.

applyto,

v. n.
af-p!'re..

ASPIRE,

attack, to

One

Examination

the clerk of the market

act of

the

To

a.

af-falt-iir.f.

af-fa'.f.

ASSAY,

full breath.

ASPIRATION,

ofFered to
iiijiny

affaultsanother.

Pronounced
a.
as'-pi-rate.

ASPIRATE,

of

invade.

horfe,hog.

as

violent kind

perfon.
af-fllt.v.
ASSAULT,

To

fcrpent.

To

In law,
man's

Roafting.

Storm, oppofedto fap

attack;
invxfion,
hoflility,

affirmer.

ASSERVE,

To
or

af-ferv'.
v.

a.

To

fervc,
help,

fecond,

T"

ASS

ASS
To

af-fes'.v.

ASSESS,

To

a.

chargewith

thingelfe.

af-fes'-fliun.
f.

ASSESSION,
by one.
ASSESSMENT,

be converted to the fame nature with fome-

may

any certain fum.


down
fitting

To

convert

af-fes'-mer.t.
f. The

af-sim'-i-iate.
v. a.

ASSIMILATE,
the fame

to

another

with

nature

To

thing;

to bringto a likenefs,
or refemblance.
af-s!m'-mi-lat-nc's.f.
ASSIMILATENESS,
aflefling.
af-fes
-fur.
Likenefs.
C
The
that
fits
ASSESSOR,
perfon
af-slm-ml-la'-fliun.
f. The
ASSIMILATION,
by the judge; he that fitsby another as next in
on

he that

dignity
;

aiStof converting
or
any thingto the nature
fubftance of another ; the ftateof beingaflimi-

Jaystaxes.

as'-fets.
f. Goods

ASSETS,

fum levied

certain property ^ the a"l of

that burden, which

fulficienttodifcharge

is caft upon

the

executor

lated;

or

heir.
To

v.

To

a.

af-fcv'-e-rate.
affirm with

ASSEVERATE,

as
great folemnity,
upon oath.
af-fev-e-ra'-(hun.
f.
ASSEVERATION,
as
affirmation,

lemn
So-

To

other

fome

ASSIDUITY,
ASSIDUOUS,

af-sld'-u-us.
Conftant
a.

in

in application.

gently,
ad. Diliaf-sid'-iS-uf-ly.

continually.
f. A
ASSIENTO,
af-fy-en'-to.
powers,

or

America

contrail

with flaves.

af-sfne. v.

appoint;

to

fix with

To

a.

mark

af-sls'-tant.
f.

out,

regardto quantityor

To

as

minifterial.

af-si'ze.
f.

of judicature
held

court

year in every county in which

tried

gaged
perfon enbut
iliary
principal, as aux-

by

judgeand
the

af-si'zc.
v.

AS5IZE,

caufes

ordinance

jury;
weightof

thing.
f.
ASSIZER, af-si'-zur.
care

of

weightsand

ASSOCIABLE,

reafon for; in law,

to appointa
j to givea
deputy,or make over a rightto another,
af-s!'ne-abl.
That
which
ASSIGNABLE,
a.

an

an

or

bread.

a.

To

An

officerthat has the

fix the

rate

of

any

to

lue
va-

affairnot

ftatute to determine

or

kingsof Spain and other


the Spanifhdominions in
furnifhing

ASSIGN,

twice
are

between the

for

af-sls'-tant.
ing
a.
Helping,lend-

ASSISTANT,

ASSIZE,

convention

help.

af-sis'-tans.
f. Help, furtherance.

ASSISTANCE,

ASSISTANT,

f. Diligence.
af-fy-du'-I-tj'.

ASSIDUOUSLY,

To

aid.

blockhead.

af-sift'.
V. a.

ASSIST,

oath.

upon

as'-hcJ. f.

ASSHEAD,

To

growing like

being.
af-fev'-er.

ASSEVER,

To

aft of

the

af-fo-fliabl.

be

joinedto
ASSOCIATE,

may
To

meafures.

with another

as

That

a.

which

another.

af-fo'-fhate.
v. a.
a

confederate

to

To

unite

as
.adopt

be

friend upon equalterms ; to


affigned.
may
accompany.
f.
af-fo'-fliate.
Confederate.
An
ASSIGNATION,
ASSOCIATE,
af-sig-na'-fliun.apa.
pointment
to

meet,

pcintmennts;

ufed

of
generally

makingover

thingto

love ap-

ASSOCIATE,
confederate

another.

He that is appointed
C
af-fy-ne'.
deputedby another,to do any act,or perform
or enjoy
any bufinefs,
any commodity.
af-si'-nirr.
f. He that affigns.
ASSIGNEE,
af-s!'ne-ment.
ASSIGNMENT,
f. Appoint-

ASSIGNEE,

or

of

thingwith regardto another thing


perfofl;in law, the deed by which any thing
one

is transferred from

ASSIMILABLE,

one

to

another.

if-sim'-i-Iabl.
a.
That which

; a

ASSOCIATION,

f.

partner;

companion.
af-fo-fha'-fhun.
f. Union,

conjundlion,
partnerfliip;
confederacy;
fociety;

or

rncnt

af-fo-fhatc.

coime"tion.

.ds'-fii-nans.
f. Reference

ASSONANCE,
one

found

ASSONANT,

to

another

of

it.
refembling

as'-f6-nant.
a.
another
Refembling

found.

To

To

ASSORT,

ASSOT,

affart'.
v.a.
df-fot'.
v.

a.

To
To

range in cl.afl'cs.
infatuate.
To

ASS
To
a.
af-fvva'je.

ASSUAGE,

To

ad.
af-nio'-rcd-ly.
mitigate, ASSUREDLY,
Certainly,
indubitably.

v.

to foi'ten; to

appeafe, pacify
to

cale.

; to

f. What
af-fwa'je-ment.

ASSUAGEMENT,

of

f. One
af-fwa'-jur.

appeafes.

furance

af-fwa'-slv.
a.

ASSUASIVE,

tigating.
miSoftening,

af-fhd'-rur.f.
; he

that

To
v. a.
af-fib'-jo-gate.

to.
fubject
ASSUEFACTION,

flate of

ASSUETUDE,
cuftom.
To

af-fu'me. v.

one's felfj

To

a.

take ;

to

claim

or

take

upon

feize

fuppofefomcthingwithout
unjuftly
; to

proof;

to

ASSUMER,

to

arrogate, to

appropriate.
:'if-fu'-mur.
f.

arrogant man.

af-fu'-ming.
pai-ticip.

ASSUMING,

a.

gant,
Arro-

haught)-.
af-fum'-slt.
f.

ASSUMPSIT,
mife

made

him

by word, whereby a

taketh upon

perform or pay any thingto

to

takingany thingto

one's

aft of

thingwithout farther proof;


fuppofed,a poftulate
; the takingup

the

thing

To

fecure

confidence,truft

from doubt, certain

To

To

infurance.

ASSURE,
make
to

iC-iho'Te.
v.

To

dence
give confi-

by a firm promife; to^ fecure another; to


to exempt from doubt or fear;
confident,

make

fecure.

an

part of

fhip.

wonder,

or

To

a.

to
terrify,

word

f.

to
Qiiality

af-ton'-IIh-m'nt.
f.
.af-tou'nd.
v.

ASTOUND,

with fear

confound

A-

Toaftonifli,

a.

wonder.

or

a-ftrad 1. ad.

With

one's

legs

thing.
f. A
as'-tra-gal.

ASTRAGAL,
member,

found
con-

confufion of mind.

mazement,

acrofs any

To

a.

amaze.

excite aftonifliment.

ASTONISHMENT,

to

to

af-ton'-n!lh-mg-ne

ASTONISHINGNESS,

in the form

of

ring,at

little round
the tops and

bottoms of columns.

as'-trul.
a.

ASTRAL,

to
Starry,
relating

the

ftars.

a-ftra'.
ad.

To

ASTRICT,

Out of the

af-tr!k't.
v,

a.

To

rightway.
contraci

by

application.

ASTRICTION,
power

of

af-tr!k'-fln'ii.
f. The

the parts of the


contradting

af-fho'-ied.particip.
a.
Certain,
indubitable;certain,
not doubting
; immodelt,

ASTRICTIVE,

coiifidtnt.
A-icioufly

ASTRICTORY,

ASSURED,

with

In the hinder

af-ton'-nHli.
v.

ASTONISH,

ASTRAY,
a.

the

with fear

unknowledge; firmnefs,

of mowant
doubtingfteadinefs; confidence,
defty; ground of confidence,
given;
fecurity
of
credit
fpirit,
viction
intrepidity;
teftimony
; con-

"

ufed for aftoniflied.

pectation
ex-

freedom

found
biffing

to fright.
ftartle,
ASTONIED,
af-to'-ny-ed.
part. a.

which

Certain

frequent,difficult,

a-ftert'.v.

ASTRADDLE,
af-fbo'-rans.f.

conftellation.

af-mat'-!-kil.-7a.
Troubled

ASTERT,

To

is affumed.

ASSURANCE,

af-mat'-lk.

a-ftern'.
ad.

ASTERN,

any per-

That
df-fimp'-tlv.
a.

ASSUMPTIVE,

cough.

"

fon into heaven.

ing,
print-

afrhma.

felf;the fuppofition

of any

f.

another.

f. The
af-fimp'-fhun.

ASSUMPTION,

in

and

ASTHMATICK,

voluntary
proman

mark

fliortrefpiration,
with
joined

tiic {hip,behind
An

make

and

ASTHMATICAL,

ASSUAIE,

as'-te-rifm.
f.
as'-ma.

ASTHMA,

as'-fwe-tude.
f. Accuftomance,

givesafgood

to

*.

as

beingaccuftomed.

that

givesfecurity

as'-tc-rlfk.
f.

ASTERISM,
af-fwe-falc'-fiiun.
f. The

He

any lofs.

ASTERISK,

ToASSUBJUGATE,

ftate

The

beingalTured,
certainty.

pacifies ASSURER,

who

af-fho'-red-ncs.
f.

ASSUREDNESS,

foftens.

or
mitigates
ASSUAGER,
or

AST

afl

or

body.

ing.
bindaf-trlk'-tiv.
a.
Stiptick,

a.
af-tr!k'-tur-ry.
Aftringent.

ASTRIDE,

ad. With
a-ftri'de.

ASTRIDE,

Bearing,

contraftion,

to

To

the parts draw

make

make

the parts of the


of contradling

together.

body.

f.
as'-tro-lab.

AT,

An

he

time,

pole,

event

the ftarsto have

af-tro-l6'-jan.

Relating
j"

profeffing
aflrology.
aftrology,

to

as
ftate,

In

manner.
allrological

an

in
mofl:,

At

To
v. n.
ToASTROLOGIZE,af-tr6l'-6-ji'ze.

fometimes

placewhere

At

fometimes

At

at

fignifying

any

attention,as
At

fometimes

feems
to,

is at

notes

he is at home

lame

as

he

with furniflied

fame

fometimes

all, in any

At fometimes

thingis,as

obedient

of, or

peace

the
nearly

is

At

the ftateof moft per-

the

at arms

man

the

power

word

the particular
dition
confignifies

At

employment
a

near-

implies
fuperlative
adjedlive

work

ASTROLOGlCALLY,af-tr6-l6dzh'-y-kal-ly.fituation;
ad.

at

or

the

is at the houfe before

before

marks

with, as

a.
af-tr6-lcdzh-y-kal.
]

placenotes

man

of the perfon,as

difcover

af-tr6-l6dzh'-ik.

the coexiftence of the time with the

fedion, "c.

f. Aftrologer.

ASTROLOGICAL,

At before

place,as

At before

in the

events.

ASTROLOGICK,

in
figure

is
conjundioncopulative

is in it ; At

notes

fea.

foretel or
to
profefies

ASTROLOGIAN,

at',prep.

inflrument

f. One
that,
af-tr6l'-6-jer.

power,

when

nefs of the

takingthe altitude of the

the influence of
fupDofing
caufal

never

omitted.

ftars,at

or

a-sin'-dl-ton.
f.

grammar,

the flars.
defcribing

the fun

would

meet.

ence
f. The faiaf-trog'-ra-fy.

ASTROLOGER,

and

approach nearer
but which

curve,

ASYNDETON,

contra"?iing.
ASTROGRAPHY,

ufed for
chiefly

fome

to'

nearer

a.
af-trln'-jent.
Binding,

ASTRINGENT,

ASTROLABE,

f. Afymptotes
a-s!mp'-t6te.

rightlines,which

are

f.The power
af-trln'-jen-fy.

ASTRINGENCY,

of

fymmetry,difproportion.

ASYMPTOTE,
v. a.
af-trin'je.

ASTPJNGE,

to

f. Contrariety
a-slm'-me-try.

ASYMMETRY,

legsopen.

ftars.
hr.ving

or

To

the

af-trif-e-riis.a.

ASTRIFEROUS,

S Y

as

to

at

In, noting

in the
fignify

your

fervice

manner,

at'-a-bal.
f. A kind of tabour ufed."
ATAEAL,
praclife
aftrology.
f. The praflice
by the Moors.
af-trcl-o-jy.
f. Exemptionfrom
of foretelling
ATARAXY,
at'-t;\-rak-fy.
thingsby the knowledgeof the
flars.
vexation, tranquillity.
nace
furaf-tron'-no-mur.
atti'-.i-nor.
f. A digefting
f. He that
ASTRONOMER,
ATHANOR,

ASTROLOGY,

fludies the celeftialmotions.

7 a.
af-tro-nom'-y-kal.

ASTRONOMICAL,

to

a.

In

an

ATHEIST,

aftronomy.

af-trd-nim'-y-kal
-!y.

ASTRONOMICALLY,
aftronomical

mixed

the knowledge
fcience,teaching
celeftialbodies,their magnitudes,
tions,
mo-

mathematical
of the

and
diftanccs,
periods,
eclipfes,

founded
Divinity
bodies.

ASUNDER,

order.

on

the obfervation of the

to

atheifm,impious.

an

ad. In
a-tlTe-Is'-tl-kal-ly.

atheifticalmanner.

ATHEISTICALNESS,

leftial
ce-

that denies the

a-tRe-is'-ti-k;\!.
Given
a.

ATHEISTICALLY,

ATHEISTICK,

a-ttie-Js'-ti-kal-nes.
f.

beingatheiftical.
a-tfic-Is'-tlk.
Given
a.

to

atheifm.

a-fun'-dur.ad. Apart, feparately, ATHEOUS,

ATHEROMA,
together.
f.
A
a
ASYLUM,
a-fy'-lum. fanduary,refuge. wen.
not

a'-tlTe'-!ftf. One

f.
The quality
of
as'-tr6-tlTi-ol"-6-jy.

ASTRO-THEOLOGY,

exiftence of God.

ATHEISTICAL,

manner.

f. A
af-tr6n'-n6-my.

ASTRONOMY,

of
diftselief

God.
longing
^Be-

af-trO-nom'-ik.

ASTRONOMICK,

keep heat for fome time.


a'-tfic-Ifm.
f. The
ATHEISM,
to

;V-tlTc-us.
Atheiftick,
a.
go.'.lefs.
a-tRe-ro-ma.

f. A

of
fpccies

ATHE-

ATT

at-ten-u-a'-fhin.
f. The
by the mixture of fomething ATTENUATION,
foften
in juft
a" of making any thingthin or flender.
to
regulate,
; to mix
proportions
at'-tur.f. Corruptmatter.
elfe.
ATTER,
; to fitto fomething
weaken

mingle,to
elfe ; to

To

ATT

v. a.
at-tem'-pe-rate.

ATTEiMPERATE,
TTo

To

proportion fomething.

to venture

f.
at-tempt'.

attempts

Liable
at-temp'-tabl.
a.

that attempts ;

at-tend'.

ATTEND,
fix the mind

upon

prefentwith,
to be

appendantto;

another

train ;

attends ;
waits

as

any

for.
to ; to ftay
confequent
n.

To

that
fuitor

thing;

agent ;

the train ;
one

one

that is

court

fees,and

appointedor
adion

at

an

inhibition

office of

; a

at-ten'-fliun.
f. The

Heedful,

of

gardful.
re-

To

ad.
Heedat-ten'-tlv-ly.

ATTENTIVENESS,

at-ten'-tlv-ncs.
f. Heed-

fulnefs,attention.
at-ten'-u-ant.
Endued
a.
ATTENUANT,
of

making thin

or

flender.

at-ten-ii-ate.
a.

ATTENUATE,
flender.

Made

thin,

to

who

one

defend

or
profecute

to

ing
yield-

lord.

new

a.

To

draw

to

draw.

at-trak'-fhun.
f. The

ATTRACTION,
or

drawingany thing;
enticing,

power

to

draw

or

the

power

at-trak'-t!v.
a.
any

enticing.
ATTRACTIVE,
draws

chargeof

lawyer.

at-trak't.
^".

ATTRACTIVE,
with

the

.^t-turn'-ment.
f.

ATTRACT,

of

fully,carefully.

him

fomething; to allure,to invite.


at-trak'-tl-kal.
a.
ATTRACTICAL,
Having
the power

ATTENTIVELY,

as
a perfon
takes
requeft,

f. The
at-tur'-ny-flilp.

of the tenement
aft

which

attorney.

an

ATTORNMENT,

is decreed.

or heeding.
attending
at-ten'-tiv.
a.
ATTENTIVE,

or

retained to

law

ATTORNEYSHIP,
Intent,attentive.
at-ten'-tates.
f. Proceedings

ATTENTION,

the power

takes upon

or

in their abfence ;
bufinefs,

other men's

an

painted

f. Such
at-tur'-ny.

heed to,

is

ftatue or

liftsup.

or

that

prefent

the attire.
that attires another,

at-t6l'-lcnt.
That
a.

by confent,commandment,

at-tent'.
a.

after

that

concomitant, a confequent.
at-ten'-dur.
f. Companion, af-

ATTENTATES,
a

raifes

nying
Accompa-

botany,the

placed.

ATTOLLENT,

fociate.

ATTENT,
in

is
figure

waiting,
perfons

in

three parts,the

the
f. A
poflure,
at'-ty-tude.

adlion in which

or
pofture

ATTORNEY,

belongsto

flag;

or

drelTer.

aft of

One

buck

at-ti'-rur.
f. One

ATTIRER,

ATTENDER,

of

plantis divided into


and
empalement,the foliation,
a

ATTITUDE,

; fervice ; the

or

the horns

tention
yieldat-

at-ten'-dant.f.
one

at-ti're.
ing,
f. Clothes,drefs ; in hunt-

flower of

be

; to

Todrcfs, to habit,

a.

array.

regard,to

fubordinate.

ATTENDANT,

at-tire.v.

ATTIRE,
to

accompany;

attention,regard.
at-ten'-dant.a.

ATTENDANT,
as

to

fummons

upon

To

a.
on

Hard by.
at-tlg'-u-us.
a.
To
touch
at-tin'je.
v.
a.

ATTINGE,

ATTIRE,

at-ten'-dans.f. The

ATTENDANCE,

waiting

perfon

Hay, to delay.

; to

on

v.

wait

it-tend',v.

ATTEND,

at

to

Tcfti-

lightly.

to

endeavourer.

an

bear witncfs

at-tlf-td'-fhun.f.

ATTIGUOUS,

To

f. The
at-temp'-tur.

To

a.

call to witnefs.

; to

evidence.

mony,
ef-

attack, an

attacks.

or

ATTEMPTER,

To

An

witnefs

ATTESTATION,

To

ATTEMPTABLE,

be

attack,

endeavour.

fay,an

to

To

; to try, to endeavour.

upon

ATTEMPT,

To

of, to

at-tempt'.
v. a.

ATTEMPT,

at-teft'.v.

ATTEST,

To

to

of

power

alluring

Having

the

thing; inviting,
alluring,

at-trak'-t!v.
f. That

which

incites.

ATTRAC-

ad. With
at-trak'-tlv-ly.

ATTRACTIVELY,
the power

of

at-trak'-tlv-ncs.
f. The
at-tralc'-tur.
f. The

agent

at-trak-ti'-{hun.
f. Frequent

ATTRACTATION,

av-a-rifli'-us.
Covetous.
a.
ad.
Coav-a-rlfli'-uf-ly.

AVARICIOUSLY,

at'-tra-herit.
f. That

which

av-a-rifh'-if-nes.
f. The

AVARICIOUSNESS,
of
quality

handling.
ATTRAHENT,

beingavaricious.
a-va'nt.interjca.A

AVAUNT,

by which

draws.

at-tr!b'-u-tabl.
That
a.

ATTRIBUTABLE,
which

be afcribed

may

or

cribe,to yield
;

a'-burn, a.

To

af-

caufe.

AUCTION,

f.
a'k-fliun.

which

to impute, as to a
f. The
at'-trl-biite.

one

at-trl-bd'-niun.
f.

Com-

much

Ground,

a.

by

worn

at-tr!'te-nes.
f. The being
at-trifh'-un.
f.

The

aft of

wearingthingsby rubbing; grieffor fin,arifingonlyfrom the fear of punifliment


; the loweft degreeof repentance.
To

ATTUNE,

at-tu

thingmufical

; to

ne.

tune

To

thingto

one

a-twe'n.ad.

ATWIXT,

a-tw!kft'.
prep.

two

a.

v.

ATWEEN,

To

Not

an

a'k-tiv.a.

or

prep,

make

any

another.

tween.
betwixt,be-

In the middle of

AVAIL,

profit
; to

promote,

To

manner

of fale in

thing

perfon

Of

an

increafing
lity.
qua-

f. Fowling,
a-ku-pa'-fliun.

bird-catching.
a-du'-ihus.
a.
Bold, impudent.
a-da

AUDACIOUSLY,
impudently.
AUDACIOUSNESS,

AUDIBLE,

ad. Boldly,
-fliu4--ly.

a-da'-fhuf-nes.
f. Impudence.

holdnefs.
f. Spirit,
a-das'-I-ty.

AUDACITY,

a'-dibl. a.

perceived
by
AUDIBLNESS,

That

which

may

be

hearing; loud enough to be heard;


of
a'-dlbl-nes.
f, Cap.iblenefs

beingheard.
AUDIBLY,

things.
a-val.

lour.
co-

ufed.

AUDACIOUS,

worn.

ATTRITION,

tan

auction.

AUCUPATION,

rubbing.
ATTRITENESS,

f. The
;ik-fliO-nc'r.

that manages

AUCTIVE,

menda,tion.
at-trite.

of

a.
ak-fho-na-ry.
Belonging

AUCTIONIER,

honour.

ATTRIBUTION,

Brown,

perfonbids after another ; the

fold by audion.
tributed
thingatto another ; quality
adherent;a thing AUCTIONARY,
auftion.
to an
belongingto another,an appendant; reputation,

ATTRIBUTE,

is driven away.

one

any

AUBURNE,

horrence,
word of ab-

attributed.

at-trlb'-ilte.
v. a.

ATTRIBUTE,

ATTRITE,

Covetoufnefs,infati-

able defire.

A-etoufly.

that attracts.

To

f.
av'-a-rls.

AVARICIOUS,

of-beingattradlive.
quality
ATTRACTOR,

f. T^je van.
a-vint-gard.

AVANT-GUARD,
AVARICE,

attracting.

ATTRACTIVENESS,

ad.
a'-dlb-ly.

In fuch

manner

as
profit, turn to
f. The aft of hearing;
to affift.
i'-dyens.
AUDIENCE,
profper,
a-va'l.f. Profit,advantage,
the liberty
of fpeaking
benefit.
AVAIL,
granted,a hearing; an
a-va'-labl. a.
vantageous;auditory,
adcollected to hear ; the recepAVAILABLE,
Profitable,
tion
perfons
folemn
force.
delivers
of
who
a
man
meflage.
powerful,having
any
d-va'-labl-nes.
f. Power
AVAILABLENESS,
AUDIT, a'-dit.f. A final account.
of promotingthe end for which it is ufed.
To take an account
To AUDIT,
a -dlt. v. a.
ad.
AVAILABLY,
a-va-lab-ly.
Powerfully,
finally.
v.

a.

to

to

profitably.

AUDITION,

a-vS'l-ment.
f.

AVAILMENT,

advantage.
To

AVALE,

to be heard.

a-va'l.
v.

a.

f.
a-difh'-un.

Hearing.

f. A hearer^a perfon
a'-dl-tur.
AUDITOR,
take
account
an
to
ultimately
; a king's
employed
of
the
accounts
to deprefi.
examining
Toletfall,
officer,
who, yearly
all
Q,

Ufefulnefs,

AVE
afl under officers accountable,makes up

neral
ge-

deteftation; the caufe of averfion.


That
a.
a'-di-tur-ry.

AUDITORY,
of

has

which

f.
a-dl-tur-ry.

leflures

AUGER,

that

woman

to

a-ve!'.v.

AVEL,

To

a.

f. A
a-ve-ma'-ry.

AVEMARY,

Romanics

repeated
fliip
by the

To

pullaway.
form

of

in honour

of

To

paidto

oats

another

f. Punifliment.
a-ven'-jans.
f. Vengeance,
AVENGEMENT,a-venj'e-ment.

f. Punifher; revenger,
a-ven'-jur.

a'-vens.f.

To

be

before

a-ver'.v.

AVER,

by which

alley,or

To

a.

declare

is

to

That

pay

a-ver'-ment. f.

any
of

walk

to

AVERUNCATE,

duty
the king;

Eftablifliment

con*

To

v.

judge

f. The
a-gu-ra'-lhun.

tice
prac-

f. The fame with augur.


a'-gu-rur.
a.
a-gu'-ryal.
AUGURIAL,
Relatingto augury.
f. The zA of prognoftiAUGURY,
i'-gu-r^.

an

omen

omens

by augurs

the rules obferved

predi"lion.

or

a-guft'.

AUGUST,

Great, grand,royal,

a.

f.
a'-guft.

AUGUST,
month

a-v^r-fa'-fhun.f.

name

of.the

eighth

f. Elevation
a-guft'-ncs.

of.

look, dignity.
f.
a'-vya-ry.

keep birds

Hatred,

a-vi'-tus.
a.

AVIZE,

a-vizc.

himfelf

a-veis'-ncs.
f. Utiwlllingncfs,
AULD,

did.

AULETICK,
^

Left

by

man's

an-

ufed.

ceftors. Not
To

to

in.

AVITOUS,

to..

place inclofed

f. Greedinefs,
a-vld'-i-ty.
eagernefs..

AVIDITY,

with, imwilUng
pleafed
backad. Unwillingly;
AVERSELY,
a-vcrs'-ly.

The

Januaryinclufive.

from

AUGUSTNESS,

a-ver-run'-kate,
v. a. To

a-vers'c.
a.
Malign, not favourable j

backwardncfs,

guefs,to

To

magnificent.

abhorrence.

warcily.
AVERSENESS,

dict
pre-

AUGURER,

AVIARY,

not

to
pretends

n.
a'-gu-rate.

by augury.
AUGURATION,

fer-

up.

AVERSE,

who

v. n.
a'-gur.

pofitively. catingby
or

One

of birds.
flight

of augury.

a-ver'-nat.f. A fort of grape.

AVERSATION,

Increafe;{late of

by figns.
jecSure

thingby evidence.

AVERNAT,

increafe,

bigger.

f.
a'-gur.

by
AUGUR,

proportion.

mean

AVERMENT,

root

an

way

av'-e-raje.
the tenant

vice which

To

f.

AVERAGE,

of any

entered

A mifchance,

houfe.

is made

the

felony.

death, without

av'-e-nu. f.

medium,

bennet.

Herb

a-ven'-tfhur.f.

a man's
caufing

trees

To

f.The
d'g-men-ti"-{hun.

ToAUGURATE,

taker of vengeance.

placemay

v. n.
ag-ment'.

bigger.

AUGUR,
To

revenge.

AVENUE,

increafe,

more.

or
making bigger;theftateof
increafing
beingmade bigger; the thingadded,by which

revenge ; to

punifh.

AVENTURE,

To

a"t of
To

AVENGEANCE,

AVENS,

make

grow

Any thing.

v. a.
ag-ment'.

AUGMENTATION,

certain quantity

landlord.

v. a.
a-venj'e.

AVENGER,

bore

to

increafe.

av'-en-edzh.f.

AVENGE,

tool
carpenter's

AUGMENT^ a'g-ment.
f.

VirginMary.
AVENAGE,

a't. pronoun.

biggeror
AUGMENT,

to

wor-

of the

-gur. f.

AUGMENT,

To

hears.

To

to
afide,

turn

holes with.

place

AUGHT,

a'-dl-tres.
f. The

AUDITRESS,

audience,a

hear

be heard.

to

are

An

to

To

a.

ofF; to put by.

turn

perfonsaflembled

colleftion of

a-vert'.v.

AVERT,

To

hearing.

AUDITORY,
where

a-ver'-fliun.
f. Hatred,didike,

AVERSION,

book.

the power

;
a.

v.

to

a.

To

counfel

; to

think
be-

confider.

Old.

Not

ufed..

a-lct'-lk.
a.
Belongingto pipes.

AULICK,

A
AULICK,

a'-lik.
a.

to
Belonging

AULIN,

-lin. f. A

French meafure of

length,

a-ma'l.v. a.
To variegate.
AU.MAIL,
ant',f. A father or mother's firter.
AUNT,
To

a-vo-ka

AVOCADO,

f.

-do.

call

To

a.

f. The
av-vo-ka'-{lu'.n.

AVOCATION,

afide;the
calling
To

a-voi'd.v.

AVOID,
endeavour

to

To

to

void

to

to

evacuate,

quit.

retire j

To

n.

come
be-

to

a-voi'-dabl.a.

be avoided

efcaped.

or

a-voi'-dans. f.

AVOIDANCE,

which

That

; the courfe
avoiding

by

aa

The

of

any thing is

which

a-voi'-dur.f.

AVOIDER,
fhuns any

thing;

the

The

perfon that

perfonthat carries
thingsare

the veflelin which

thingaway;

any
ried
car-

away.

a-voi'd-les.
a.

AVOIRDUPOIS,
of

kind

and

is in

feventeen

z.
a.
a-ver-dc-poi
a
pound contains fixteen
proportionto a pound Troy,

which

weight,of

ounces,
as

a-vow'-zal.f.

to

AVOWTRY,

The

flying

u-vou'tfli.
V.

AVOUCH,
maintain

to

producein

a.-

favour

To

affirm,to

of another

; to

vindicate,
tojullify.
i-vou'tlh. f.

AVOUCH,

dence.
Declaration,evi-

avows

AVOUCHABLE,

That

may

be avouched.

To

AV^OW,

a-vov/'.
v.

a.

to declare
Tojurtify,

ufed

term

openly.
be

a-v.ow'-abl.
a.
Thatwhichmay

openlydeclared.

AVOVVAL,
i;

a-vow'-al. f.

declaJuftificatory

tion.

AVOWEDLY,
\owed

raiiner.

ad. In
u-vow'-ed-ly.

an

.1-

for the

maggot

or

of infers, the chryfalis.


fpecies
a'-rikl.
f. The
external ear; two
AURICLE,
of any

appendagesof the heart,being two mufcular


the two ventricles thereof.
caps, covering
a-nV-u-la.

AURICULA,

Bear's

a.

ear,

flower.

fenfe

or

a-rik'-u-lar.
a.

reach of

Within

told
; fecret,
hearing

the

in the

ear.

ad. Inaftu-r!k'-u-lar-ly.

AURICULARLY,
manner.

a-rlf'-fe-rus.
a.

producesgold.
AURIGATION,

the

That

a-ro'-ra.
f.

goddefsthat opens

of crowfoot ;
fpecies
day, poetically

tliegates of

a'f-kul-ta'-fhun.
f.

to.
or liftening
hearkening
f. The
a f-pis.
AUSPICE,

drawn
undertaking

the

aft of

ufed.

morning.

AUSCULTATION,

from

which

f. The
a-ri-ga'-Ihun.

carriages.Not
driving

of any future

omens

from birds ;

A.

vour
faproteiSlion,
to

others

pietyof their patron.


to
a.
af-piih'-"l.
Relating

pro-

gnofticks.
AUSPICIOUS,
fuccefs ;

AVOWABLE,

caufe

confefrxon.

firftapparept change of the eruca,

AUSPICIAL,
a-vou'tih-er.
f. He that avouches.

AVOUCHER,

takes

one

fliewn ; influence,
good derived

i-vou'tfli-abl.
a;

or

fortof pear.

f. A
a-re'-lya.

the
To

f.

a -rate.

AURELIA,

AURORA,

fourteen.

a-v6-la-(hin. f.

AVOLATION,

that

f. Adultery.
a-vow'-tiy.

AURIFEROUS,

Inevitable.

right

is called his avowr)'.

he took it ; which

cret

AVOIDLESS,

the

taker flialljuftify,
for what

AURICULAR,

olT.

carried

He

f. Where
a-vow'-ry.

AVOWRY,

AURATE,

(hun,toefcape;

vacant.

or

AVOIDABLE,
may

fhun

To

a.

a-voi'd.v.

AVOID,

aft of

bufinefs that calls.

whom

juftifies.

AVOWSAL,

aw^ay.

to

belongs.

a-vow'-ur. f.

the
diftrefs,

plant.

av'-v6-klte.v.

AVOCATE,

To

of any church

of advowfon

AVOWER,

ell.

an

a-vow'-c'.f. He

AVOWEE,

the court.

With
a.
af-pifh'-us.

fortunate ;
profperous,

omens

of

favourable,

kind, propitious
lucky,h^ppy, appliedto
;

things.
AUSPICIOUSLY,

ad. Happily,
af-pifli'-uf-ly.

profperoully.
AUSPICIOUSNESS,

f. Pioif-pl(h'-uf-nes.

happincfs.
fpcrity,
AUSTERE^

AUTOCRASY,
Severe,harfli,
"rigid
;

af-te're.
a.

AUSTERE,

harfh.
fower of tafte,

f. Independent
i-tok'-ra-fy.

power.
f. A
i'-t6-graf.
particular

id.
gidly. AUTOGRAPH,
riaf-t"-'re-ly.
Severely,

AUSTERELY,

writing,the original.

own
perfon's

af-te're-nes,
f.

AUSTERENESS,

one's

f. Severity,
tified
moraf-ter'-I-ty.

life,ftriitnefs;
af-tral.

AUSTRAL,
AUSTRINE,

Southern.

With

^-tlTen
ad.
-tl-kal-ly.
to
requifite

circumftances

procure

AUTHENTICALNESS,

of beingauthentick,
genuinenefs.
quality

f.
i-ton'-no-my.

according

genuinenefs.
l-tlTen'-tlk.
That which
a.
AUTHENTICK,
has every thingrequifite
to giveitauthority.

f. Ocular
a'-tip-fy.

AUTOPSY,

AUTHENTICKLY,
authentick

own

between

AUTHOR,

he that efthing; the efficient,


firft
writer of
the
fedts or producesany thing;
any thing; a writer in general.
mover

of any

a-tiim'-nal.
a.

due

of

In

an

authoritativemanner,

authority
; with

due

f.

AUXILIARY,

with

fhew

To

appearance.

; to

a-tfio-ri-za'-fliun.
f. EI'-tU-rhc.

put into

To

give
make
to any perfon
to
authority
thing
;
any
legal
; to eftablilhany thing by authority
; to
be
to
jiiftify,prove a thing to
right
; to give
credit to any perfonor thing.
a.

wait

a.

To

roiifeout

of

fleep
;
any ftaterefembling

a-wa'ke.
ceafe

v.

action.

new

AWAKE,
to
fleep,

ke.

a-wa

raife from

AWAKE,
v.

to
expcdt,

attend,to
a-wa'te.f. Ambufli.

AWAKE,

to

To

a.

be in ftore for.

fleep
; to
To

by authority.

AUTHORIZE,

a-wa'te.v.

AWAIT,

To

for

teftimony
; credibility.

To

f. Help,
agz-y-ly-a'-fhun.

AUXILIATION,

a-tSor'-l-ta-tiv-AWAIT,

Authoritative

ftablifhment

afliftant
;.

aflifting.
helping,

f. Legalpower;
AUTHORITY,
a-ttl6r'-i-ty.
credit
rule
tenance;
couninfluence,
; power,
; fupport,

AUTHORIZATION,

ing
pull-

Amplification.
Help-

K.anda.
igz-il'-yar.
\ er,
agz-il'-ya-ry.

AUXILIAR,

authority.

AUTHORITATIVENESS,
nes.

authority.

aks-e'-s!s.
f.

AUXESIS,

act of

another.

aid.
a-ttior'-i-ta-tlv-ly.

AUTHORITATIVELY,
ad.

air of

an
authority
; having

Belongingto

a-vil'-lhun.f. The

thingfrom

one

a-tlTor'-l-ta-tlv.
ing
a. Hav-

AUTHORITATIVE,

feafon of the year

The

autumn.

firftbeginneror

The

eyes.

and winter.

fummer

AVULSION,
a'-ttTur.
f.

own

a'-tum. f.

AUTUMN,

demonftration.

ad. By
a-tip'-ti-kal-ly.

of one's

means

a-tlTen'-tlk-nes.
f. Authenticity.

AUTHENTICKNESS,

living

eyes.

AUTOPTICALLY,

AUTUMNAL,

manner.

The

prefcription.

Perceived
a.
a-top'-t'-kal.

AUTOPTICAL,

ad. After
a-tflen-tlk-ly.

and

mind

own

in ufe.

thority,
f. Auby one's
l-tlTen-tis'-s!-ty.

AUTHENTICITY,

Having

of motion.

one's

to

Not

a-tRen'-t!-kal-nes.
f.

within itfelf.

of motion

a-tom'-a-tus.a.

AUTONOMY,

thority.
au-

ing
Hav-

itfelf.

a-tom'-a-ton. f. A machine

in itfelf the power

AUTHENTICALLY,

an

moving

AUTOMATOUS,

tick.

The

of

that hath the power

^-tlTen'-ti-kal.
Authena.

AUTHENTICAL,

a-tO-mat'-I-kal.
a.

the power

AUTOMATON,

Southern.

a'f-trme.a.

writing.

own

AUTOMATICAL,

harflidifciplinc,
cruelty,
a.

Of
a.
a-t6-graf'-i-kal.

Severity, AUTOGRAPHICAL,

in tafte.
ftriiElnefs,
rigour; roughiiefs

AUSTERITY,

to

v.

n.

break from

To

fleep.

a-wa'ke.a. Without

not fleepfleep,

ing.
To

AWAKEN,

To

AWARD,

a-wii'kn. See AWAKE.


a-wa'rd.

giveany thingby a
to

v.

a.

To

to
adjudge,

fentence
judicial

; to

judge,

determine.

AWARD,

AWN
a-wl rJ.

AWARD,

a-w6 kc.

termination.
deAWOKE,
Judgment,fcntejicc,

f.

a-wurk'.

AWORK,
AWARE,
To

re.

a-wa

of

attentive.
Vigilant,

a.

a-wa're. v.

AWARE,

To

n.

beware, to

be

a-wi'. ad.
let

perfon;

us

go

Abfent

from any

of

begone

; out

placeor

one's

or

Reverential

a'.

V.

fear,reverence.
ftrike with

To

a.

a'-bind. f.
a'-ful. a.

AWFUL,

That

fills with

or

vefted with

reverence,

ftrikes with

worfhipful,in-

ftruck with

awe,

timorous.

reverentiah

In

a-fdl-ly.ad.
d'-fal-nes.f.

AWFULNESS,
with
ftriking

fl-ruck with

The

qualityof

ftatc of

folemnitj'
; the

awe,

being

Some

AXILLARY,

ak'-sis.f.

AXIS,

ad.
d'-kurd-ly,
Clumfily,

AWKWARDLY,

i'-kurd-nls.

I. f. A

pointedinftrument

a'-les.a.

AWLESS,

the pov/er of

a'm. f.

feventh

or

in
of

gance,
Inele-

Without

to

boreholes.

reverence;

Dutch

out
with-

anfwering

tierce, or

Englifli

veflel to

evident
propofition

The

line, real

ax'l.

AXLE,

at-

imaginary,

or

whick

wheel,

of the wheel

I'y.

ad.

it may

pin

which

palTesthrough

which

on
are

The

f.

ax'l-tre.
S

the

the

lutions
circumvo-

performed.

Yes.

a', ad.

for
Always, to eternity,
f.
a'-gren.

AYGREEN,

a'-ry.
a.

AYRY,

the

ever.

fame with houfe-

The

fun,

meridian

of

or

keep oiF the

ftar,is

an

place and

of the

horizon

contained
the

compafs, is
cover

See AIRY.

The
f.
az'-y-muttr.

circle and

one

ton.

of
confifting

fliarp
edge.

fpreadover

weather.

ing the
AZURE,

an

fun's
a

between

arch

is

a:^rauth of
between

an

the

arch

fun's

magneticalmeridian;
inftrument

ufed

the

given vertical

any

line; magnetical
azimuth,

meafure

is called

f,
a'-ning.

points;^

two

revolve.

AZIMUTH,

reverence.
caufing

England
an

f.

clumfinefs.
gentility,

of

want

not

leek.

unreadily,inelegantly.
AWKWARDNESS,

oblique vifion ;

pafTes
through any thing,on

AYE,

verfe, untoward.

what

the Aafc of

firftfight.

impolite,
Inelegant,
AY,
untaught; unready, unhandy, clumfy; per-

AWME,

ftate

diredion,
ftraight

inftrument
a

ak'-fhiim. f.

AXIOM,

a'-kurd. a.

AWKWARD,

1 a.
agz-il'-lar.
Belongingto
the
agz-U'-la-ry.
armpit.
j

midft of the

time.

in

equallybetween

An

head, with

AXLE-TREE,

awe.

a-hwi'le.ad.

AWHILE,

AWNING,

Not

afquint,with

aks'. f.

AXE,

that

manner,

AWL,

in

rightflate,per\erfely.

AXILLAR,

check.

which

reverence;

dignity;

AWFULLY,

boat

in

metal

AWEBAND,

to

ad.
a-ry'.

AWRY,

not

fear.

awe,

work,

ad. In
a-wurk'-ing.

level,
unevenly;not
a', f.

AWE,

To

from Awake.
preterite
On

labour.

AWORKING,

obliquely
;

own

power.

AWE,

The
ad.

working.

cautious.

AWAY,

at

of the

azimuth
azimuth

fea for find^

azimuth.
magnetical

-zhur.

a.

Blue, faint blue.

^"

B.
BAG

BAG
ba'. f.

BAA,

BAA,

To

child

talk

to

V.

idlyj

flieep.

To

n.

prattlelike

tell fecrets ;

to

came

again,in

bab'-blur. f.

BABBLER,

idle

An

ba'be. f.

of the

f.

image in

infant; a fmall

child, an

imitation of

child, which

bak'-kl-ted.a. Eefet with pearls.

Having many
BACCHANALIAN,

berries.

drunken

BOLE,

tall,but very
BACCIFERQUS,

any

bak-sif'-e-rus.a.

batfti'-e-lur.
f.

knightof

takes

who

man

Campion,

condiiion of

outer

the

an

The

part of the hand

placebehind;

; the thick
fight
to the edge.
|iof(#d

of

covers

bak'-rom.

part of

when
the

hind

the

in

enemy

The

The

f.

play

buildings

The

part of
a

takingthe

part of

animal ; the

houfe.

bak'-ftaf.f. An
fun's altitude

TofallofF.

n.

apoftate.

An

inftrument ufefea.

at

bak'-ft;irz.f.

BACKSTAIRS,

mour
ar-

behind.

hinder
an

bak-di'-dur.f.

BACKSTAFF,

pieceof

room

bak'--(lide.
v.

BACKSLIDE,

The

private

bak'-flaz.f. Ropes which keep

BACKSTAYS,
the mart from

hinder

An

flairs in the houfe.

heib.

The
f.
bat(h'-e-lur-{hip.
a

back.

the back.

bak'-s!de.f.

thing;

ful in

bit(h'-e-lurz-

bachelor.

bak'. f.

rear;

behind

door

tables.

f.
bak'-pes.

BACKSLIDER,

ried
unmar-

firft degrees
;

his

BUTTON,

BACHELORSHIP,

BACK,

man

the lowefl:order.

BACHELORS
but"n. f.

niator,
privycalum-

The

Having a

yardof ground behind

BerryTo

BACHELOR,

bak'-houfe. f.

BACKSIDE,

full and broad-leaved.

bearing.

cenfure-

the c' '.ef part of the houfe.

which

bak'-kus-bole.f. A flower

To

a.

bak-gam'-mun.f.

BACKROOM,

not

game

behind

feaftsof Bacchus.

BACCHUS

to-

tain,
main-

; to

the abfent.

dice and

with

BACKPIECE,

BACCHANALS,

or

drunkard.

bak'-ka-nalz.f. The

horfe;

the back

fecret.

BACKHOUSE,
f.
bak-ka-na'-lyan,

To

bak'-frend.f.

BACKGAMMON,

with.

out

of

BACKFRIEND,

play
girls

BACCATED,

the

time.

mount

bakt'. a.

BACKED,

ba-by.

fccond

a.

the houfe.

largeft

kmd.

BABY,

again, a

bak'-dor. f.

BACKDOOR,

monkey

thingspaft;

bak'-bi-tur.f.

BACKBITER,

babe

Childifh.

ba-bo'n. f.

BABOON,

toward

bak'-bite.v.

cenfurer

biV-blfti.
a.

hind,
be-

reproachthe abfent.

child.

or

BABISH,

one

prefentftation ;

placeupon

; to

BACKBITE,
or

f. Fineryto pleafe
a
ba'-be-ry.

BABERY,

forward

place whence

to juftify,
to fupport;to
ftrengthen;

to

To
infant.

An

the

bak'. v.
horfe

the

fecond.

talker; a

fecrets.

teller of

break

bab'1-ment. f. Senfdefs prate.

BABBLEMENT,

BABE,

Idle talk,fenfelefs prattle.

To
from

return;

BACK,

To

bab'l. f.

coming

not

talk

to

ad.

backward

much.

BABBLE,

bak'.

BACK,

Tocrylilcealhecp.

n.

bab'l. v.

BABBLE,

To

cry of

The

ba'.

the

body;

it is fhut ; the

part of any

part of any

thing

tool, op-

pitchingforward.
bak'-fOrd. f.

BACKSWORD,
one

with

fword

fharpedge.
bik'-wardz. ad. With

BACKWARDS,
fonvards

the

towards the back

prefentftation to

the

; on

the back

the back

placebehind

from

regreffivelv;

bil'-asro'-by.
{.

RUBY,

EALA3S

BAN

B A

A kind of

ufed

ruby.
f. A
bal-ko'-ny.

BALCONY,
or

of

flone, before the window


bald.

BALD,

Without

a.

of

frame

hair

wood,

without

in

b-il'-Iut.
v.

BALLOT,

ad. Nakedly,meanly,inbild-ly.
f. Gentian,a
ba'ld-mun-ny.

plant.

fapor juiceof

The

f.

f.
bi'ld-nls.

the lofs of hair

meannefs

The
of

of

want

f.

bundle

of

juicedrawn

balm

goods.

f. A
f.

of

to

BALSAMICK,

the {hole of

BALUSTRADE,

BALL,
dancing.
bal'-ldd.
f. A fong.
BALLAD,
f. One
BALLAD-SINGER,
bal'-Ud-smg-ur.
ba 1. f.

v/hofe

An

entertainment

employment

is

to

in the

frreets.

bal'-l.'ilK
f. Something
put
to
fhip keep it fteady.

BALLAST,
bottom

'BALLETTE,
BALLOON,
necked
on

at

the

of the

b;\l'-!^t.
f.

bal-lo'n.f.

veird ufcd in

fliort-

ball

placed

ftuftedwith
pillar
; a ball of pafteboard,

combuftible matter, which

air,and then burfts.

The

ad

f.

Ointment, unguent.
dian
In-

An

bal-fam'-i-kal. Unauous,

Ja.

^ mitigating.
bal-uf-tri'de.
f. Rows
of

littlepillars
called balufters.

bam'-bo. f. An

Indian

plantof

the

reed kind.

bam-bo'zl. v.

BAMBOOZLE,

To

to

impofeupon.

BAMBOOZLER,
ban',
BAN,

f. A

notice

Publick

To

ceive,
de-

low word.

bam-boz-lur.
f.

a.

cheat.

given of

any

thing; acurfe,excommunication
; interdi"lion;
Ban of the Empire,a publickcenfure by which
the

of
privileges

any German

prince are

fuf-

pended.

largeround

chymiftry
; a

grant,
fra-

bal-fam'-Ik.

BAMBOO,

BANANA

A d.incc.
A

foft ;
foothing,

plant.
BALSAMICAL,

of

fingballads

of
Having the qualities

bal-fum-apl. f.

APPLE,

fruf-

is.
herrings
-BALL, ba 1. f. Any thingmade in a round
form ; a round thingto playwith ; a globe; a
of fovereignty
globeborne as an enfign
; any
iiart of the body that approachesto roundnefs.
way

markable
plantre-

bath.

ba 1-fum.

difappoint,
thing; to omit.
b:V-kurz.f. Men who givea fign
to

mifs any

"BALKERS,
which

To

longing
Bea.
bal"-ne-a-tur'-ry.

to a

BALSAM
a.

fcent.

bathing.

of land left imploughed.


bridge
Djfappointmentwhen leaft BALSAM,

ba'k. v.

tree

bal-ne-d'-fhun.f.

BALNEATORY,

great beam.

plant.

f. A bathing-room.
bal'-ne-a-ry.

Sorrowfully, BALNEATION,
ba'le-fdl-ly.

ba k.

trate;

or

gates
miti-

affuafive.
mitigating,

odoriferous ;

BALNEARY,

blk. f.

BALK,

grant
fra-

or

f. The
gll'-yad.

ftrongbalfamick

ad.

expe"Sed.
To

the balfam

from

producingbalm

full

of

name

ba'm of

a.
bal'-my.

BALMY,

mifchievoufly.
BALK,bak.

The

GILEAD,

v/riting.

-of mifchief.

:BALEFULLY,

BALK,

OF

for the

bii'le-ful.
a.
Sorrowful,fad;

BALEFUL,

"BALK,

ba'm. f.

BALM,

hair;

bi'1-drik.
f. A girdle
; the zodiack.

bale.

BALE,

fhrub,

valuable

; any thingthat fooths

ointment

BALM

ALDRICK,

by

pain.

BALDMONY,

choofe

ballot.

bam.

BALM,

eleganth'.

BALDNESS,

To

n.

odoriferous; any
remarkably

BALDLY,

votingby

bal-le"-ta'-fliun.
f. The aft

covering
; unadorned, inelegant
; ftripped, BALLOTATION,
of votingby
dignity.
ture.
mix-

ticket

ballot.

ral
natu-

bil-der-difh.f. Rude

the aSi. of

givingvotes;

without

BALDERDASH,

littlebail or

ballot.

To

a joom.

bal'-lit.f.

BALLOT,

is fhot up into the

thingbound round
together
perfons
j
joined
neckcloth worn
by
chiefly
any

of

company

kind
particular

a
bandage; a chain
kept in reftraint;
any

tye,
is

connexion

or

another

any animal

by which
union

ba-na'-na-tre.
f. Plantain.

TREE,
band', f.

BAND,

of

the
.

BAP

BAN
the

ing,
in architecture,
any flatlow mould-

clergy
;

facia,face,or plinth.
band', v. a. To unite together
into

To

body or

troop

another

the filletor

for bands

and

box
flight

thingsof

other

fmall

weight.

f.

f.
ban'-dog.

with

of

To

f.
ban'-dy.

of

them

club

; to

little

another

turned

To

beat

to

give and

to

round

at

and
take

fro,

Poifon

ba'ne.v.

BANG,

mifchief,ruin.

To

a.

poifon.

Poifonous;deftrudive.
ba'ne-fal-nls.
f. Poifonouf-

ne-ful.

bang

handle

f.
bang',

own

IS HER,

another

from

EANlSHxMENT,
of

BANK,

a.

v.

knightmade

ban'-ne-rOl.f.

little

To

peafemeal
BANQUET,

one

bank'-kwlt.f.

kind of oaten

hou's. f.

to

the ftaleof

The

uA

beingbanifli-

on
rifing

feafts.

-kw!t-hous.

banquetsare kept.
A

fmall banJc

fmall lifli,
a

at

-ftlkl.f.

each fide

bAn'-tir.v.

To

a.

play upon,

rally.

BANTER,

ban'-tar.f.

Ridicule,raillery.

bin'-te-rur.f.

One

that banters.

"

BANTLING,
BAPTISM,

earth

feafter;

bank'-kwe-tingJ

houfe where

ban

BANTER,

BANTERER,

exile.

bank', f. The

To
to

that forces

ban'-n!{h-mtnt.f.

feaft,

ftickleback.

drive away.

He

To

the foot of the parapet.

countrv.

own

bank

bank-ket'.f.

BANSTICLE,

country

or

feaft.

that lives delicioufly


; he that makes

BANQUET-HOUSE,

Deadly night-

beat, to thump

ban'-nlfli-ur.
f.
his

cake.

BANQIJETING-HOUSE,

blow, a thump.
ban'-nifh.v. a.
To condemn
; to

or
flag

man's undrefs,or

morning gown.
ban'-nik. f.

another
banilhing

ed,

f. A
ban-yan'.

BANNIAN,

a.

roughly.

BANISH,

BAN

ban'-ne-ret.f.

BANQUETTE,

leave his

lance.

bank'-kwlt. v. n.
BANQUET,
to fare daintily.
bank'-kwi-tir.f.
BANQUETER,

fhade.

To

beyond

ftandard

flag,a

the end of

To

nefs,de{trudi\enefs.
b4'ne-wurt.f.
BANEWORT,

BANG,

at

BANNOCK,

legs.

ba
BANEFUL,
BANEFULNESS,

to

ban'-nur. f.

BANNEROL,

ciprocally
re-

tofs about.

to
agitate,

ba'ne. f.

BANE,

To

In debt

of payment.

BANNERET,

flagor

f. A crooked leg.
ban'-dy-leg.
BANDYLEGGED,
a.
ban'-dy-legd.
Having

To

llato

claring
bankrupt;the aft of de-

a.
bank'-rupt.

BANNER,

BANDYLEG,

BANE,

or

ftreamer.

v. a.
ban'-dy.

to

one

crooked

that trafficks in

f. The
bank'-rup-fy.

broken,

man

the power

taining
con-

a ball.
ftriking

BANDY,
or

One

the

in the field.

for

from

for money

note

of which
fight

the

at

paid.
bank'-ur. f.

BANKRUPT,

ftreamer.

bottom

bank,

ftreamer borne

ban'-drul. f.

BANDY,

iiv

money

one's felf bankrupt.

fufficientchargefor

A maftiff.

leather,each

that is

powder
BANDROL,

lay up

bank'-bll'.f. A

BANKRUPTCY,

out-

man

licet.

mu

pcrfons

bank.
To

a.

v.

of

company

inclofe with banks.

in
is

money

ban-d6-l^'rz.
f. Small wooden

BANDOLEERS,
cafes covered

managing a

bank',
to

BANKER,

5" lawed.
ban-dit'-ty.

BANDOG,

; the
occafionally

money.

ban'-dit.

BANDITTI,

in

laid up

ufcd

fillet.

BANDIT,

bank

heapof earth piiedup ; a bench


placewhere money is laid up to be

any

;
"

BANK,
a

over

ban'-d6-let.f. Any flatmoulding

BANDELET,

water

BANK-BILL,

ban'-boks. f.

BANDBOX,

or

To

Somethingbound
roller wrapped

rowers

concerned

band.

member.

wounded

with

over

ban'-didzh. f.

BANDAGE,
over

bind

to

called for

BAND,
one

of
of

f. A
bant'-llng.

hip -tlzm.

water, ?.nd ihat

f.

form
prefcript
S

littlechild.

Baptifmis givenby
of words winch
the

BAR

BAR

ba'r-bar-izm.f. A form of
BARBARISM,
baptifmisoften
norance
fpeechcontrary to the purityof language
fufFerings.
; igof
of
Of
a.
or pertainbap-tiz'-mal.
BAPTISMAL,
arts, want
ing
learning
; brutality,
hardto baptifm.
favagenefsof
manners,
incivility;
cruelty,
the church of Chrift doth ufe ;
taken

for
Scripture

in

f. He
bap'-tift.

BAPTIST,

that adminifters

f. The place
bap'-tif-ter-ry.

BAPTISTERY,
To

bap-ti'ze.a.

BAPTIZE,

adminifter the facrament of

to

that adminifters

BAR,

ba

fageto

f.

r.

hinder entrance

any obftacle ;
harbour

; a

rock

any

that chriftens,

bank

or

laid crofs apaf-

of

the entrance

at

plea; any thing by v/hich the ftrufture is


held together
; bars in mufick,are ftrokesdrawn
acrofs the lines of a pieceof
perpendicularly
the beating
ufed
to
or meafure
mufick,
regulate
or

bar.

BAR,

to

prevent;

faftenor fliutany

To

a.

v.

from

fliutout

exclude from

; to

tohinder
claim; to prohibit
; toexcept;
that
ba'rb.
f.
BARB,
Any thing
grows

BARB,
To

an

arrow

ba'rb. f.
b.Arb.

BARB,
the

beard

; to

jagarrows
BARBACAN,
to

placedbefore

the

horfe.
Barbary

v.

a.

To

of

in the

To

a
drefling
hog

armour

the walls of

town

throughwhich

an

the guns

are

ry. f. A

CHERRY,

tart fruit in the Weft


pleafant

BARBARIAN,

f. A
bar-ba'-ryan.

; a
afavagc;a foreigner

vilized,
unciwithout

bar-bar'-!k.
a.

dreft

ba rbl. f.

hooks.

kind of

fifiifoimd

ba r-biir.f.

v.'ho fhaves the

man

f. Pipperidge
bufh.
ba'r-her-ry.

BARBERRY,
BARD,

ba rd. f.

BARE,

ba

re.

mere

ba

BARE,
ba

covering
;

fimpie;
unadorned,plain,
inrefpecl;
;

united with any

BARE,

poet.

Naked, without

a.

concealment

re.

; not

worn

thingelfe.
v.

To

a.

ftrip.
BEAR.

of To
preterite

re.

poor, without

threadbare,much

ba're-bone.f. A very lean perfon.


ba're-faft.
With the face naa.
ked,

BAREBONE,
BAREFACED,

malted

ad.
bare-fd'ft-ly.
Openly,

BAREFACEDLY,
without
fliamelefly,

tcry, affuranee,

fetched.BAREFOOTED,
Foreign,far-

difeuife.

bare-fa'ft-ncs.
f. EfFron-

BAREFACEDNESS,
r,

fhamelefs,unreferved.

audacioufnefs.

ba re-fut.

a.

Without

ba're-fut-Id.
a.

fhoes.
Without

fhoes.
2

in

beard.

BAREFOO

pity.
BARBARICK,

man

man

Indies.

hog

ba'r-bid.particip.
Furnifhed with
a.

not

tfher'b;\r-ba'-dus

f.

bearded,jaggedwith

BARBER,

ing
open-

for

term

rivers.

levelled.

EARBADOES

bar-bl-ku.

BARBED,

;
plenty

fortification

whole.

To

ba'r-ba-kan. f.

a.

whole.

BARBECUE,

drefs out

hooks.

with

bi'r-be-ku.v.

BARBECUE,

uncovered

armour

contrary

manner

impurityof language;

manners;

without
detefted,

fhave,to

furnifh the horfe with

in the wall

fuit.

the rules of

cruelty.

for horfes.

armour

ad. Without
ba'r-ba-rus-ly.

fpeech; cruelly,
inhumanly.
ba'r-ba-rif-nls.
f. Incivility
BARBAROUSNESS,
to

ward
pointsthat ftand back-

placeof the beard ; the


in

to

to
Stranger

unacquainted

cruel,inhuman.

knowledgeof arts ; in

thing

hinder,to obftruft ;

bar ; to

bolt,or

BARBEL,

of mufical time.

with

arts

for prevention
; the

placewhere caufes of law are tried ;" an inclofed


fits; in
placein a tavern where a houfekeeper
demand
a
law, a peremptory exception
againft

To

with

BARBAROUSLY,

bolt to faftena door ;

thingufed

ba'r-ba-rus.a.

favage,uncivilized
civility,

baptifm.

pieceof wood

fpeech.

chriften, BARBAROUS,

baptifm.

f. One
bap-ti'-zur.

BAPTIZER,
one

To

v.

f. Savagenefs,
bar-bar'-i-ty.

incivility;
cruelty,
inhumanity,
impurityof

baptifmis adminiftered.

of

the facrament

where

nefs of heart.

BARBARITY,'

baptifm.

BARE-

BAR

BAR
ba're-hed-dld.
Uncovered
a.

BAREHEADED,

exchequer;there are alfo barons of


in the lower
cinqueports, that have places
houfe of parliament
; Baron is uf.d in law for

illrcfprcl.
ad. Nakedly,merely,
ba're-ly.
only.

BARELY,

f. Nakednefs
ba're-nls.

BARENESS,
nefs

f. A
bar'-gin.

fale ;
concerning
flipulation.

To

n.

of

ment
agree-

or

make

accepts

of honour

fhe that

or

bargain.

f. The
ba'r-gin-nur.

BARGAINER,

makes

or
proffers
barje.f.

perfon

bargain.
pleafure
; a

boat for

BARGE,

ment

boat

f. The
ba'r-jur.

fmall

BARK,

To

bark.

barge.
coveringof a

or

a.

trees
ftrip

To

n.

; to

ba'r-kur.f.

One

the noife

make

clamour

that barks

or

mours;
cla-

f. A grainof
baV-ly-korn.

barley.
barm.
to

BARN,

f.

make

Yeaft,the ferment put into

it work.

placeor houfe
grain,
hay,or ftraw.

rn.

any fort of

f. A

ba'r-nakl.
f.

BARNACLE,

to
fuppofed
fabuloufly
"

for

on

grow

BAROMETRICAL,
to

to a

cylinder.
BARREL,
in

trees;

it,in

the

order

want

of

made

To

gun;

put any thing

of

to

of

; want

matter

in theology,

fenfibiliry.
bar

bar-ful.

-rin-wurt.

a-

de.
bir-ry-ka

keepoft'an

f.

plant.

Full of obftruaions.

attack

f. A fortification

any

bar,obflop,

ftruclion.

atmo-

To

paflage.
a

Eo

To flop
v. a.
bir-ry-ka'de.

BARRICADE,
up

the barometer.

of the judgesin the

the barrel of

unfruitfulnefs,
procreation;
fterility;

of invention

ba-rcHmet'-trl-l:al.
lating BARRICADO,
a. Re-

vifcount ; Baron is one

vefTel

copious,fcanty;
dull.
unmeaning,uninventive,
ad.
BARRENLY,
bar'-rln-ly.
Unfruitfully.
bar'-rJn-n!s.
f. W.mt
of the
BARRENNESS,

chine
ma-

of nobility
next
degree

wooden

bar'-rin.
ful,
Not prolifick
a.
; unfruit-

fpecies BARRFUL,

chiefly

round

not
fertile,
fterile;

not

changesof the -.veather.

bur'-r'm.f. A

and
wrangler,

barrel.

power

bar'-ril.
v. a.

BARRICADE,

the variaiions in

determine the

veffelcontaining
liquor;

hollow, as

goofe, BARRENWORT,

A bird like a

meafuringthe weight of

and
fphere,

BARON,

any thi

want

ba-rom'-me-tur.f.

BAROMETER,

to

thick
ftrong

f. Foul pra^icein
bar'-ra-tr^.

bar'-ril.
f.
BARREL,
to be {topped
clofe;a

laying
up

ofiliell filTi.

for

atmofphere.
A

bar'-ra-tur.
f.

BARRATRY,

barm.
a.
ba'r-my.
Containing
ba

inftru-

bar'-rak.f. Buildingto ledge

BARREN,

play.

BARMY,

lord-

cncourager of law fuits.

f. A
kind
ba'r-ly-brike.

BARLEYCORN,

drink

weightof the

or

foldiers.

To

BARLEYBRAKE,

BARM,

law.

is made.

of rural

lady.

gree
lowvft de-

knight.

bar'-ra-kan.
f,

BARRACK,

at.

trees.
employedin flripping
ba r-ky.a.
bark.
Confifting^of
f.
of
malt
A
which
ba r-ly.
gram

BARLEY,

fhew the

to

BARRACAN,

of their bark.

one

BARKY,

baron's

that is heredii.iry
; it is below

BARRATOR,
To

v.

dog makes

BARKER,

manager of

rind

fhip.

ba rk.v.

BARK,
which

The

f.

ba rk.

tree ;

A
The

kind of camelot.

BARGER,

To

dignity

f. That honour
BARONY,
bar'-run-y.
fhipthat givestitleto a baron.
bAr -rd-lkipe.
f. An
BAROSCOPE,

for burden.

BARK,

bir'-nm-es.f.
bar'-run-et.
f.

baron and above

f. He
bar-gm-ne'.

BARGAINEE,

The

baron.

BARONESS,
BARONET,

for fale.

contrad

"who

contraft

v.

bir'-rin-ldzh.
f.

BARONAGE,

thingboughtor fold;

ba r-gm.

BARGAIN,

To

the

the hufband in relationto his wife.

lean-

meannefs of clothes.

; poverty5

BARGAIN,

of

court

the

tion,
f. A fortificabar-ry-kl'-do.

bar.

BARRICADO,

To.
bar-ry-kit'-di.
v. a.

to bar,
fortify,

BAR-

obftruftion

place;

to

trenchment
en-

pleadthe

the

as

EARSHOT,

f.

Two

of

by

hand-barrow.

bar-fhot.

bulletsor half-

at fea
joinedby a bar, and ufed chiefly
of fnips.
the mafts and riggings
to cut down
To
ba'r-tur. v. Ji.
To BARTER,
traffick by
another.
exchangingone commodity for
To
ba r-tur.
To. BARTER,
v. a.
give .my
thingin exchange.
ba r-tur.
f. The aft or praflice
of
BARTER,
trafficking
by exchange.
ba'r-te-rur.
f. He that trafficks
BARTERER,

the

BASE,

ba fe.

ba-zil'-lik.
a.
to
Belonging

to

f. An
ba-zil'-y-kon.

BASILIKON,

the ba-

ointment

called alfo tetrapharmacon.


baz -i-l!fk.
f.

BASILISK,
a

faid to
cockatrice,

littleking,from
of
fpecies

for

ba fn. f.

other ufes ;
in

fmall

water

pond ;

rocks ; any hollow


dock

Bafins of

fhips;
building
with

crefton

or

cannon.

placecapaciousof liquids
; a
fame

comb

iscalled

fmall vcfielto hold

or
wafhing,

fcrpent,

He
looking.

his head ;

kind of

kill by

or
Bafilifk,

BASIN,

plant,pellitory.

Mean, vile,worthlefs

bafilickvein.

filica.

modities.
com-

difin-

vein

for

repairing

Balance, the

the fcales.

BASIS, ba'-sis.f. The

foundation of any

thing;
lumn
principal
parts of a coof wedlock;
account
which any thing is raifcd ; the
mean
; bafe-born,born out
; that on
to metals,without value; applied
applied
pedeftal
; the groundwork.
bafk'.v. a. To warm
To BASK,
out
founds,deep,grave.
by laying

genuous,
of

middle

ba-zll'-i-ka.
f. The

and

ba'r-tram.f.

plant.

The

arm.

part of the fea inclofed

f. Exchangeof
bu'r-te-ry.

of

name

BASILICK,

by exchange.

BARTRAM,

The

ba-zll'-i-ka.
f.

BASILICA,

bullets

BARTERY,

b^z-il. f.

BASILICA,

bar'-jro.
moved
f. Any carriage

hand,

bafli'-fal-nis.
f. Modefty;

foolifh or ruftick fhame.

BASIL,

juftice.

BARROW,

niodeitly.

perfonqualified

caufes of clients in the courts

ad. TimorouHy,
bafli'-ful-ly.

BASHi-ULLY,
BASHFULNESS,

blr'-rif-iur.
f.

bafti'-ful.
a. Modefl,fhamefaced,fli

BASHFUL,

the limits

bar to mark

boundary.

BARRISTER,
of

barricade,an

or fl-rong
fortification,
place;

; a

of any

f. A
bar'-ryir.

BARRIER,

flop,an

a.

illiberal,
ungenerous

bafe-barn.

BASE-BORN,

,;

of low

the loweft of the three

ftation,

Born out of wedlock.

a.

in the heat.

BASK,
ba'fe-kort.
f. Lower

BASE-COURT,
BASE

fpi-

rited.

To

lie in

placeto

receive

bas'-kit.
f.

BASKET,

A veftelmade

ruflies, fplinters.
bas'-klt-h;it.
f.
BASKET-HILT,

of

twigs,

or

bafe-vl'-ul.
f.

BASE-VIOL,
ufed in concerts

BASE,

n.

heat.

court.

ba'fe-min-dld.
Mean
a.

iVIINDED,

bafk'.V.

bu'fe.f.

of
pedeftal

An

inftrument

for the bafe found.


The

bottom

flatue ; the

of any

bottom

weapon

thing;
of

cone

the

{o made

as

to

woman

that

at
plies

hilt of

markets

the whole hand.

bas'-klt-wum-iin.f.

BASKET-WOMAN,

contain

with

bafket.

the placefrom which


tiltIn mufick, grave, deep.
racers
or
BASS, bi s.
ftockings;
the
that
bafe
found
f. See BASE-VIOL.
bas-vi-ul.
sives
ers
run
an
a
BASS-VIOL,
;
firing
;
old rullick play.
uf:d
bos.
A
in churches.
f.
mat
BASS,
baf-nj-li'f.
ba fe-ly.
ad. Meanly,diflionourably;BASS-RELIEF,
f.
the
BASELY,
Sculpture,
in baftardy,
of which do not ftaud out from the ground
born.
as bafely
figures
a.

bi'fe-nis.
f.

BASENESS,

vilenefs of metal ;

BASHAW,
of
viceroy

Mcannefs, vilenefs;

of found.
baftardy
; deepnefs

bafh-I'.f. Among the Turks,


a

province.

the

in their full

.ASSET,
1

ASSOON,

proportion.

bis'-sit.f.
baf-fon.

A
f.

of the wind kind, bLwn

game at cards.
A mufical inftrument
with

rccd.

BASTARD,

13 A

BAT
bas -tard. f.

BASTARD,

of wedlock

has -tard.

a.

BASTARD,
;

convict of

of

ad.
In
bas'-tard-ly.

the

dripbutter

upon

a.

To

meat

on

beat with
the

flick;

fpit
;

If.
baf-tjr-nade.

BASTINADO,

baf-ty-na'-do.
J beatingwith

To

ba'-ting.
prep.

BATLET,

bat'-let.
f.

cudgel;

Turkifh

The

an

ufuallyfaced

with

bat', f.

EAT,

bat',f.

fort of fkin which


its young

as

do,

of

v.

a.

n.

forces ;

To

an

army.

to
fatten,

make

bat'n.v.

down

; to

with

wear

To

fat.

grow

To

a.

; to
beating

beat,to beat
with

out

wear

f. The
bat'-te-ry.

BATTERY,
;

mounted

; in

violent

law, a

armies
oppofite

Difputable.Batmain

be the

To

body of

ai

cannons

are

of any
ftriking

an
fight;

man.

tween
be-

encounter

body of forces ; the

; a

army.

bat'l.v.

BATTLE,

is battered

town

which

upon

bat'l.f. A

BATTLE,

ground heretofore
it belongedto England
or

frame

that batters.

aft of battering

the inftruments with which


the

feveral

of

To

n.

contend

in

fight.
batfh'.f.

BATCH,

at a

time ;

bate.

BATE,

f.

b.i te.

retrench ; to

The

quantityof bread
made at once.
any quantity
contention.
Strife,

lefTenany thing,to
demand
fmk the price
;
; to lefTcna
v.

a.

To

ofr.

art

or

nature

; a

f.

Diminution.
or

vefTel of hot

cold,
water,

a foftcr
placedthat requires

another

is

the

naked

than

order of battle.

firo;a

fort of

with

ba the.

v.

a.

To

wafh in

ball

round
or

handle and

open

bill.

weapon,

bat'l-dor.f. An

BATTLE-DOOR,

inftrument

fl.atblade, to firike

fhuttlccock.

bat'1-mcnt. f.

to
places

look

throughor

annoy

wall with
an

enemy.

to a bat.
a.
bat'-ty.
Belonging
f. A kind of cloke.
bav'-a-roy.
BAVAROY,

BATTY,

BAUBEE,

b.V-bc'.f.

In

Scotland, a

penny.
half-

Hebrew

fcven gallons
and fourpints. BAVIN,
meafure,containing

BATHE,

bat'l-aks.
f. A

BATTLE-AX,

BATTLEMENT,

Contentious.'

is either hot

bat'l-lr-ra'.
f. Array, or

BATTLE-ARRAY,

ba'te-ful.
a.
BATEFUL,
bi'te-ment.
BATEMENT,
f. A Bath
BATH, ba'tti.

To

n.

bat'-tur.
v.

fuckles

and

Scotland.

heat

bat

BATTEN,

bat'-fow-llng.

ground feems to
whether
quellion,

in which

body of

BATTER,

f. Birdcatch-

able

either of

troop,

To

It

is extended.

mice

ing in the night-time.


bi'-table. a.
EATABLE,

cut

order

f. Adivifionof
bat-tal'-lyun.

BATTEN,

BAT-FOWLING,

to

f. The
bat-tal'-lya.

army,

them.

To

Warlike,

appearance.
military

fer\'ice.

the

BATE,

bat'-tO-lus,
a.

bat'-tur.f. A mixture
BATTER,
heavyftick.
beaten together.
An animal havingthe bodyof a
ingredients
bat'-tl-rur.f. He
of
with
a
bird,not
feathers, BATTERER,
wings

but with

baked

cheon
trun-

moufe, and

bringsforth

Aftaffor club; a

To

bulwark.

BAT,

from

fods,Handingout

f.

fat ; to fertilize.

To

-do.
beat.
BASTINADO,
baf-ty-ni'
bas'-tfhun.
f.
A
mafs
of earth,
BASTION,
huge

To

in

ba-ton.

BATTALION,
To

a.

wood

battle.

punifhmentof beatingan

) v.
baf-ty-nA'de.

BASTINADE,

rampart,

with

Except.
of
fquarepiece

marfhal's ftafF.

BATTAILLOUS,

aft of

his feet.

on

application

beatinglinen.

ufed in

BATTALIA,

flightly.

offend ;r

BATING,

few

to

BASTINADE,

To

or

ba fte. v.

the outward

to

warm

BATOON,

ner
man-

by

wafh with any thing.


;
liquors
ba'the.
To be in the water.
v. n.
BATfiE,

of

baftard.

begeta

to

To

a.

foficn

fuppleor

to

bartard.

BASTE,
to

of

any

baftard ;

beinga

BASTARDLY,
To

pcrfonbom

bas -tar-dize. v.

BASTARDIZE,

To

thingfpurious.
lock
Begottenout of wedadulterate.
fpurious,fuppofititious,
out

woman

bath ;

in

bav'-in.f.

flicklike thofc bound

faggots.
T

BAWBLF,

up

ba'bl. f.

BAWBLE,

BEACH,

be tfh. f.

BEACHED,
ba'-kik.f.

BAWCOCK,

ba d. f.

BAWD,

To

n.

procurefs.

BAWDINESS,

ba -drlk. f.

BAWDRICK,

bringing whores
fcenity.

and

BEAD,

BAWDY-HOUSE,

by wickednefs

is made

littleballs

any

ba'l.

BAWL,

v.

To

ba'l.v.

BAWL,

; to

cry

To

a.

hoot, to
as a

cry

proclaimas

kind of hawk.

ba'-sln.f.

badger.

BAY,

ba'. a.

BAY,
BAY,

ba'. f.

An

openinginto

ba'. f.

The

ftateof any

out

crier.

b^'dl.f. A

bird

BAY,

ba'. f. In architeiSure,
term
a

the divifionsof
fignify
Baysare from fourteen

BAY,

ba'. f.

BAY,

ba'. f.

An

To

BAY,
to

BAY

barn
to

or

ufed

in

to

twenty feet

long.

To

n.

bark

as

or
a

garland.

dog at

thief;

Salt made

is fo called from

of fea

The

WINDOW,
outward.
jutting

window

fixed at the end of

broughtfrom
BE, be'. V.

f. An
del'-Iyum.

n.

To

Having a

as
cci.dition,
quality,

the

man

fome certain ftate,


iiwif";
) it isthe

beak.

with

cup

fpoutin

bird's beak.

loftsof

pimple.

or

pieceof

main

houfe

that part of

;
a

that

timber

and
any large
to
balance,

long

the ends

the fcales

be'm-tre.f.

be -my.
;

a.

f. The

ben.

Wildfervice.

ting
emitRadiant, fhining,

havinghorns

or

antlers.

gardenbean

common

the

horfe bean.

f. A plant.
be'n-ka-pur.

BEAN-CAPER,

have

gallies
; any thingending

beams

aromatick gum

the Levant.

the

are fufpended
; a cylindrical
belongingto the loom, on which
web is gradually
rolled as it is wove
; the
of light
emitted from fome luminous
body.

BEAN,

niufket.

of

at

wood

BEAMY,
fword

beak, fixed

beak.

BEAM-TREE,

f. A bay horfe.
bd'-yard.
f. A fhort
bag'-un-ner.

BDELLIUM,

ray

with which

horny mouth

billor

be'm. f. The

pieceof
the

ba'-wln'-do.f.

employed

man

be'-ked. a.

of

of which

its brown

be'-kur.f.

pieceof timber

ter,
wa-

prayers.

fmall hound

be'l.f. A whelk

BEAM,

colour.

BAY

To

pointlike

BEAL,

receives its confiftence from the heat

fun, and

BAYONET,

the
fupports

ba'-faIt. f.

SALT,

BAYARD,

the form

honorarycrown

at

pieceof brafs like

BEAKER,

tree.

ba'.v.

which

be'k. f.
a

building. BEAKED,

other

fliutin.

of the

begl. f.

head of the ancient

by enemies.

longing
or fervitor bemeflenger

hunted.

are

BEAK,

thingfurrounded

through,and

prayingfor another.

hares
the land.

tree

be'dz-man. f.

BEAGLE,

colour.

of this

nut

it takes its name.

be mentioned

to

are

BEADSMAN,
in

The

petty officer in parifhes.


h^d-rh]. f. A catalogue
of thofe

BEADROLL,
who

about the neck

worn

perfons,bored
religious

as beads, whence
ftrung

froward child.

f.
ba'-ril.

BAWREL,

BAWSIN,

To

n.

with greatvehemence

an
my
ene-

bodies,
globular

be'd-tre.
f.

to a court

To

on
an

globesor ballsftrung
upon
by theRomanifts to count

for

ornament

approachof

direct navigators.

their prayers

bauchery.
deBEADLE,

and

the

to

thread,and ufed

is, by

f. A houfe
ba'-dy-houfe.

trafHck

erected

be d. f. Small

Obfcene, unchafte.

a.

waves.

Somethingraifed

be firedon

BEAD-TREE,

ba'-dy.

BAWDY,

marks

together; ob-

rogues

the

be'kn. f.

pradice of

wicked

Expofedto

a.

BEACON,

belt.

f. A
ba'-dry.

BAWDRY,

fhore,the ftrand.

a.
be'-tfhy.
Havingbeaches.

procure.

ba'-dy-nls.Obfcenenefs.

The

be-tftied.

eminence, to

f.

is formed
paflive

BEACHY,

ad.
ba'-di-ly.
Obfcenely.

BAWDILY,

where

or

procurer

bl'd.v.

BAWD,

To

fine fellow.

the verb

have exiftence.

exift,to

; to

a. Trifling,
ba'-bllng.
ible.
contempt-

BAWBLING,

verb by which
trifling auxiliary

gew-gaw,

finery.

pieceof

To

BEAR,
convey

or

be

r.

v.

a.

To

carry; to carry

carry
as

as

mark

burden

tcy

of autho-

rity
j

BED

pope, that the

perfonbeatifiedisin heaven, and

therefore may

be reverenced

To

To
v. a.
be-at'-l-fy.

BEATIFY,
the

blefswith

bi'. f.

named

the

An
animal, otherwife
caftor,amphibious, and remarkable

for his

art

in

his
building

habitation

the beft kind ; the part of

helmet

To

BECKON,

To

BECLIP,

To

that

with

bo'-lfh.
a.
a beau, foppifh.
Befitting
bd -tfhus. a.
in
Fair, elegant

form.

teous

bd'-tfhus-ms.f.

(lateof beingbeauteous.
Fair.
BEAUTIFUL,
bii'-tj'-fdl.
a.
bd'-ti-fdl-K.
ad.
BEAUTIFULLY,

to

The

adorn,

grace

pleafesthe

beautiful

BEAUTY-SPOT,

That

of
affemblage

eye;

; to

bed

bed

bc-ka

m.

v.

To

a.

ftill
the elements

motion

BECAUSE,

hl-kVz. conjuna. For

fow,

or

To

To

BECHANCE,
to

happen to.

To

a.

plantin

quiet

to

The

go

rea-

BEDAGGLE,

be

to

partakerof the bed ;

layin

earth ; to

placeof

ilrata.

cohabit.
a.

be-dagl.v.

To

wet,

To

bemire.

BEDCHAMBER,

a.
v.

a.

To

to

much

befpatter.

To

a.

be-daz'l.v.

BEDAZZLE,

To

a.

befinear.
To

make

the

luftre.

bed -tfi.am-bir.
f. The

ber
cham-

tOitcfl:.
appropriated
bed'-cloz.
f. Coverlets fpread
BEDCLOATHS,
over

To

this account.

be-tfliW.

bed with

to

befprijikle.

of Become.
preterite

this

;
a

put the bed in

to

be-dab'l. v.

BEDABBLE,

bed.

BEDDING,

on

v.

fightdim by too

be-ka'me.

for ;

BED,

the

bc-da b.

BECAME,

make

BEDAWB,

keep a {hipfrom

After

BEDASH,

That

ad.
-ming-ly.

To

the mind.

fon

be-kum

be-dafh'.v.

like

elegant
propriety,
graceful.

an

reft;to layin order,in


bed',v. n.
To
To BED,

a fig-pecker.
nightingale,

BECALM,

be-kiun'-ming.
part. a.

To

bird

in

fuitable

be

befit.

To

appear

; to

f. A fpotplaced
bd'-t{'-fp6t.

f.

To

a.

v.

perfon.

heightenfome beauty.
bl-ka-fi-k6.
BECAFICO,

be

of, to

fomething

to

placedin bed ; to be made

particular

to

To

to

by
pleafes

BED,

to

To

a.

embellifh.

graces, which

into

enter

become

order after it has been ufed.

tiful
beau-

be-kum'.

perfon;

child ; To

In

bu'-t!-fdl-n!s.
f.

f.
bd'-ty.

To

becomingmanner.

To

BEAUTY,

To

a.

v.

garden; the channel of a river,or any hollow;


the placewhere any thingis generated
; a layer,
a flratum ; To
bringto BED, to deliver of a

The

manner.

of beingbeautiful.
quality
bd -ty-fy.v.
BEAUTIFY,

be-kum'.
condition

fign.

congruity,
propriety.
f. Something made
to
fleepon
lodging
; marriage
; bank of earth raifed in

manner.

BEAUTIFULNESS,

v.

f. Elegant
BECOMINGNESS,be-kdm'-mmg-nls.

.ad. Inabe.aubu'-tfhuf-ly.

BEAUTEOUSNESS,

embrace.

BECOMINGLY,

BED,

BEAUTEOUSLY,

make

To

n.

a.

BECOMING,

covers

BEAUTEOUS,

To

bek

fuitable

the

to

beaver.

BEAUISH,

n.

v.
be-kl!p'.

BECOME,
manner

hat of

; a

Covered

a.

he.^d,
a nod;

ftateor

fome

which

be'-vurd.

fignwith

the

BECOME,

To

the face.

BEAVERED,

fignwith

the fate of, to be the end of.

be'-vur. f.

BEAVER,

make

a.

nod of command.

of drefs.

man

To

v.

bek'. f.

BECK,

of celeftial
completion
enjoyment.

BEAU,

bek

the head.

f. Corredion
BATING,
be'-ting.
by blows.
ba-at'-i-tude.
f. Bleffednefs,
BEATITUDE,
a declaration of bleffednefs
happinefs;
felicit)',
made
virtues.
by our Saviour to particular

To

BECK,

To

blefied.

as

BEDECK,

f. The
bed'-dlng.

be-dck'. v.

materi.alscf abed.
a.

To

deck,

to

adorn.
v.

n.

To
2

bcial,

BEDEW,

To
as

be-du'.v.

a.

To

moillen

gently,

with fall of dev,:


BED-

BED

B E F

bcd'-fil-l6.
f.

BEDFELLOW,

One

that lies

induftrious and careful

in the fame bed.

bi-di't.
v. a. To
adorn,to drefs.
be-d!in'.v. g. To oblcure,to

BEDIGHT,

To

BEDIM,

To

be-di'zn.v.

BEDIZEN,
A

low

To

a.

drefs

A madhoufe

f. A madman.
bed'-la-mfte.
BEDLAMITE,
bed'-ma-kur.
f.
A perfonin the
BEDMAKER,
it
is
the
make
to
whofe office
univerfities,

which

be'-hive.
f.

bed'-mate.f.

bees.

v. a.
be-drag'l.

BEDRAGGLE,

To

foil

be-drentfh'.
To drench,
v. a.

foak.

bcd'-rld.
a.

BEDRID,

Confined

to

the bed

by

The

of
privilege

with

To

the

ox,

bull,or

cattle prepared

It has

cow.

Beaves.
plural

the

be'f-e-tur.
f.

BEEF-EATER,

guard.
BEEN, bih'.
BEER,
BEET,

The

of

yeoman

of
participle
preterite

bed'-ftid.
f. The frame

bed to make

on

bed'-fwer-vur.
f. One

that

is falfe to the bed.

bed'-time. f.

hour of reft.

v. a.
be-dung'.

To

cover

To

BEDWARF,

wings ;

An

a.

To

heavymallet.
be'tl-browd'.
a.
Having

a.

to ftunt.
little,
bcd'-wirk. f. Work

without toilof the hands,

bed.

To

make

performed

be'tl-ftok,
f.

of

The

Beet.

\f.

To

handle

beetle.

b^t'-rive.
BEETRAVE,
bet'-rad-ifli.
BEET-RADISH,
be'vz.f.

BEFALL,
to come

Black cattle,
oxen.

be-fa'l.v.

To

n.

happen

to ;

pafs.

to

be-fit'.
v.

BEFIT,

a.

To

fuit,to

be fuit-

able to.

with
fprinkle

Toward

be-dwa'rf. v.

BEDWORK,

be'tl-hed'-id.
a.
Logger-

BEETLESTOCK,

To

bed'-ward.ad.

diftinguifhed
by

fheaths,under which he

or

head.
headed, havinga ftupid

To

be-duft'.
v.

Infed

hops.

plant.

prominent brows.

with

duft.

BEDWARD,

cafes

of malt and

of

name

be'tl. f.

BEEVES,
The

dung.
ToBEDUST,

The

folds his

which

it foft.

BEDSWERVER,

BEDUNG,

Liquormade

bet',f.

BEETLEHEADED,

drops.

placed.
bed'-ftra.
f. The ftraw laid unBEDSTRAW,
der

BEDTIME,

be'r.f.

BEETLE,

befprinkle,

the bed is

To

an

BEETLEBROWED,

be-drop'.
v. a.

BEDSTEAD,

To

of
Confifting

fieftiof black

The

for food;

the

marriagebed.
ToBEDROP,

be'f.f.

havinghard

f.
bed'-rite.

BEDRITE,

mark

tree.

of the beech.

BEEF,

ficknefs.

or

be'-tfliln.
a.

BE.

BEDRENCH,

to

be'tfli.
f.

wood

the cloaths.

age

in

the

fellow.

to

cafe,or box,

be'-maf-tur.
f. One that keeps

BEE-MASTER,

ticular
par-

moulding.
f. The poftat the corner
bed'-poft.
BEDPOST,
of the bed, which fupports
the canopy.
f. A heavy lazy
bed'-pref-fur.
BEDPRESSER,

The

kept.

are

BEECHEN,

bedfellow.

f. A
bed'-m6l-d!ng.

BEDMOULDING,

To

bees

BEECH,

beds.

BEDMATE,

f.t

hives of bees in.

man.
mad-

of
fpecies

f. A place
to
be'-gar-dln.

BEE-HIVE,

To

be'-flow-ur.
f.

fool-ftones.

BEE-GARDEN,

bed'-Iam.f.

BEDLAM,

bird that feeds

bees.

upon

out.

term.

perfon.

be'-e-tur.
f. A

BEE-EATER,
BEE-FLOWER,

darken.

cloud, to
To

be', f. The animal that makes honey;an

BEE,

be-fo'l.v.

BEFOOL,

a.

To

to
infatuate,

fool.

BEFORE,
place;

bc-fo're.
prep.
in the front

fenceof; under
in time ; in

of, not behind

the

preference priorto;

in

in the pre-

of
cognizance
to ;

onward

Further

preceding
to.
fuperior

BEFORE,

BEG
be-fo're.ad.

BEFORE,
time;

to;
previoufly
onward

in

SooneT than,earlierin

paft;in

in time

time, hitherto;further

this

to

firltCaufc,or

pall;
lately

time

Ibme

In

ftatc

or
anticipation
preoccupation
; previoufly,
in
ftate
of acof
a
cumulation,
preparation
;
by way

fo

than

that

as

expended;

been

has

more

before any
atfirft,

ceived
re-

To

thing

be-fa

r-tune.

Formerly.

v.

To

n.

BEFOUL,

To

be kind

be-frend'.v.

with

foul,

BEG,

V.
beg'.

n.

V.
beg'.

a.

take any

; to

live upon

afk, to

To

alms;
does

fat

foilor

matter.
v. a.
be-gr!'me.

To

foil with

To impofcupon,
v. a.
be-gy!'l.

BEGUILE,
delude;

to

To

deep imprefied.

that procreates,

to

evade;

deceive,to

One

lives upon

who

affumes what

who

be-ha'f. f.

deceive

to

of BEGIN,
part,paffive

Favour,

fupport.
be-ha've. v.
BEHAVE,

he

To

to

Tq BEHAVE,

caufe

To

a.

cation,
vindi-

carry,

to

conduft.

prove.
v. a.
beg'-gur.

BEGGAR,

The
be-gi,n'.

BEGUN,

BEHALF,

one
petitioner;

not

eat

to amufe.
pleafingly,

f.
beg'-gur.
a

bite,to

v. a.
be-gre'ze.

BEGRIME,

To

produce,

to

begets.

BEGGAR,

To

Go .iway, hence,
be-gon'.
interje6l.

BEGREASE,

dirt

generate, to

f. He
be-get'-tur.

BEGETTER,
or

chief go-

the Turks.

provinceamong
b'--na'.
v.
a.

davvb with

tion
by peti-

accidents.

as

f. The
beg'-ler-beg.

of

away.

alms.

To

fliut in

feek

efFed^s;

produce,as

to

bind with

away.

thingfor granted.

v. a.
be-get'.

BEGET,
procreate;

To
To

To

of
BEGOT,
be-g6t'. ) The part,paffive
verb
the
BEGET.
decorate, BEGOTTEN,
b"e-got'n.

fringes.

BEG,

v. a.
be-gerd'.

BEGNAW,

To

To

any

to beleaguer.
fiege,

vernour

favour;

To
v. a.
be-frlnj'c.

To

To

To

a.

to.

BEFRINQE,
as

BEGONE,

BEFRIEND,
to

To

a.

make

into z"t or being;


ments,
thingfirftis ; the rudifirftgrounds; the firftpart of any

BEGLERBEG,

tide.
be-

foil.

to

To

To

u"-

firftoriginal

girdle;to furround,to encircle;to

To

be-fou'l.v.

an

the entiance

thing.
BEGIRD,
with

be-fo're-time.
ad.

ToBEFORTUNE,
To

caufe

or

is done.

BEFORETIME,

thing;

any

f. The
be-gln'-ning,

the ftatein which

of

or

to
original,

BEGINNING,
or

be-fo're-hand.
ad.

expericncedattcmpter.

place.

BEFOREHAND,

To

reduce

be-ha've.v.

n.

Toad,

to

con-

'

deprive;to
; to
beggary,to impoverifli

ex-

hauft.

beingbeggarly.
a.
Mean,
BEGGARLY,
b";g'-giu--ly.
indigent.

f. Indigence.
beg'-gur-y.

BEGGARY,

thing new
to. enter
to

T"

v.. n.
be-gin'.

BEGIN,

; to

take rife ;

commence

to come

thing;

to

BEGINNER,

upon

have

its

or

fomeftate ;

original;

into a"l.

v.a,
be-gln'.

fuft ground; To

enter

any aflion

upoji exiftence ;" to

BEGIN,
of any

To

trace

beginwith,

thingas

to enter

f. He
be-gla'-nur.

good

or

manner
gefture,

bad

of behaving
; exter-

of adion

j.

eleganceof manners, gracefulnefs


; condud,
general
pradice,courfe of life; To be upon
one's Behaviour,a familiar phrafe,notingfuch
a ftateas requires
great caution.
be-hed'. v. a. To kill by cutTo BEHEAD.,
ting
off"the head.

BEHELD,
any

whether
felf,

be-held'.-parUcip.
from BEHOLD.
paffive

firftaft

Todothe

from

one's

ternal appearance
poor,

f. Manner
be-ha'-vyur.

BEHAVIOUR,
The
beg'-gur-li-n!s.

ftate of

"

one's felf.

f.

BEGGARLINESS,

Tq

dud

that

the

upon.

tlie
gives

bc-hem'-mith.

BEHEMOTH,
potamu-s,

BEHEST,

or

f.

The

hippo-

river-horfe.

bc-heft'.
f. Command,

precept.
BEHIND.

BEL
be-hi'nd.piqj.

BEHIND,

the back

; on

another
of

BEL
the back of

At

ther
ano-

lowing
towards the back; fol-

part ;

cunt

thofj to whom

eruaation^.

liquor.

not

to

block up

to

ther.
ano-

rents

with

BEHOLD,

Id.

v.

To

a.

view,

bells

to

To

b^-h5'ld.interject.
BEHOLD,
See,lo.
bl-hd'ldn. part. a. Bound
BEHOLDEN,

gratitude.
BEHOLDER,
BEHOLDING,
BEHOLDING,
verb Behold.

be-hol-dur.

f.

with

Spectator.

with It.
onlyimperfonally

ad. Profitably,
be-hove-fdl-ly.

ufefully.
be-how'l.v.

BEHOV/L,
BEING, be -ing.

To

a.

howl

at.

Exiftencc,
entity
oppofedto nonIbte or condition ; the perparticular

exifling.
BEING, be'-mg.conjunct. Since.
SO,

phrafe,fuppofcit to
a.

To

BELATvIIE,

BELAMOUR,

bcl'-a-m3r.f.

friend,
A

have

firm

exercifc the theological

to

He

that

believes,

be-like. ad.
Sometim.es in

ax

Probably,
likely,
haps
perfenfe of

or
veflel,

After

irony.
hollow

body of

cail:metal, formed

to

of fome inftrument

it ; it isufed
ftriking
againfl:

thingin

make

noife

the form of

by

the

a(f?ci

bell,as the cups"

of flowers..

BELATED,

be-ll'-tid.
a.

To

be-la'.v.

BELAY,
BELCH,

bcltfh'.v.

Benighted.
To

a.

in
pafTage
; to place

from

To

n.

ad.
bl-le'-vmg-Iy.

bcl'. f.

for any

congallant,

fort.

the

credit upon

put confidence in

to

of Chriftianity.
givescredit;a profeflbr

BELIEVINGLY,
manner.
believing

mate.
inti-

an

To

a.

bg-le'-vur.
f.

BELIEVER,

BELL,
f. A
bel'-a-my.

the

virtue of faith.

beat,

thump.

to

of another
authority

BELIKE,

be-ia'-bur.v.

ourfelves ; the theological

of any one.
veracity
To BELIEVE,
be-le'v.v.
of any thing;
perfuafion

or

be fo ; let it be fo.

BELABOUR,

of

not

faith,or firm confidence of

be-le'v.v.

BELIEVE,

f.

be -It-fo. A

know

we

the

fon

IT

charge

to give a falfecalumniate")

to

the articlesof faith.


creed,a form containing
bi-le'-vibl.
Credible.
BELIEVABLE,
a.

the

To

lie to, to

the bodyof tenets


religion
; religion,
the
held; perfuafion,
opinion;
thingbelieved;

b^-h6'v"-ful.
a.
Ufeful,profitable. To

BEHOOVEFULLY,

to
counterfeit,

givethe

; to

truths of

bl-hd'f.f. Profit,
BEHOOF,
advantage.
To BEHOOVE,
be-haVe. v. n.
To be fit,
to

EEHOOVEFUL,

To

a.

v.

virtue of

the

Seeing,
looking
upon.

LTfed

be-ly

mimick

falfehood ;

which

a.

from

the

of any thing.
reprefentation
be-le'f.
f. Credit givento fomethingBELIEF,

Beholden.
be-h5''l-d!ng.

b^-hol-dmg.part,

placewhere

rung.

BELIE,
to
feign,

in

plant.

cafl:bells.

or

f.

are

that be-

bel'-foun-di'ir.
f. He whol'c

bel'-fry.The

BELFRY,
he-ho

bel'-flowr.
f.

trade it is to found

for-

regardto

fie.

; a

f. One
bele'-gur-ur.

In a
BELFLOWER,
BELFOUNDER,
anticipated
;

are
profits

or

wartlncfs.

be meet.

place.

BELEAGURER,
a place.
fieges

Backward.

equal terms,

upon

inferiour

be-hr'nd-hand. ad.

ftate in which

To

action of

bel'-dum. f. An old woman


remainingafter the departure BELDAM,
; a
death of
hag.
ToB^ELEAGUER,
it belonged
v. a. Tobefiege,
be-le'-gur.
; at a diftance from

BEHIND,
BEHINDHAND,

To

term

The

bd-h!'nd.ad.

BE

for

elfe ; remaining
after the
fomething

fomethinggoing before j

To

beltfh'.f.

BELCH,

block up,

to

flop

f.
BELLE, bcl'..
BELLIGEROUS,

ambufh.
n.

To-ejea the

young

lady.

bel-IIdzh'-e-nVs.
a.

Waging

war.

wind

to iil'ue
out by eructation.
iiicfconiachj

BELLOVv^,

To
as

bull j

to

bdl -16.

mukc

v.

n.

To

m.ilce a noifc

any violent outcry ;. to

vc-

cJfcratC;,,

to clamour
ciferate,

BEN

to roar

fea,or

the

as

the

bel'-lus.
f.

inftrument ufed

The

the fire.

blow

f. That
bel'-ly.

BELLY,

brutal.
Beaftly,

part of the human

reaches from the breaftto the

bodywhich

containingthe

bowels

of

food
requires

which

man

the womb

that

bemire.

to

f. The cholick.
bel'-ly-ake.
a. "Coftive.
bel'-ly-bound.
f. As much
bel'-ly-ful.

BELLYFUL,
fillsthe

the

He whofe

ringinghis

BELOCK,

be-l6ic'.
v.

BELONG,

v.
be-long',

To

a.

bufmefs of;

be-luv'-ed.
a.

high; inferior in

to

relation to ;

attribute of.

be-16'.prep.

Dear.

Under

place,not

in

In the lower

to
earth,in oppofition

regionsof

fo

heaven

; in

place;

on

the

hell,in

the dead.

be-low't.v.

BELOWT,

To

a.

treat

wit"i\

opprobrious
language.
BELSW
f. AwhoreAGGER,
bel'-fwag-g"r.
mafter.

BELT,

belt',f.

BELWETHEK,
leads the Hock
To

a cindure.
girdle,
A fheep
which

bel'-weth-ur.
f.
with

bell

on

his neck, hence,

bear the bell.

Tb

BEMAD,

To

BEMIRE,

certain'point
; to

v.

To

make

crooked, to
incline ;

To

n.

be

be incurvated

to
fubmiflive,

which

the ribs

make

; to

bow.

Flexure, incurvation

f.

timbers

bers
mem-

fubmiflive.

to

bend',

a fhip.
BENDABLE,

ben'-dabl. a.

the

fides

or

That

be

may

bc-mi

in the mire.

BENDWITH,
BENEAPED,

a.
bl-ne'pt.

beneaped,when

re,

v.

a.
a.

To
To

make

the

herb.

An

Ihipis
does

water

bringher off the

highenough
be-ne'th.prep.
BENEATH,
place;

thingis bent.

apy

bend'-witR.f.

faid to
flow

not

ground.

Under, lower

lower in rank, excellence,


or

unworthyof.
be-ne'th. ad.
BENEATH,
under ; below, as oppofedto
ben'-c-d!kt.
a.
BENEDICT,

In

in

dignity
;

lower

place,

heaven.

Having m.ild and

falubrious qualities.
f. Bleffing,
ben-6-dik'-{hun.
BENEDICTION,
of happinefs
vantage
a decretory
; the adpronunciation
conferred byblefling
; acknowledgments
for bleflings
received ; the form of inftituting
an

abbot.

BENEFACTION,
aft of

be-mad'. v.

ben'-dur.f. Theperfonwho bends;

the inftrument with which

to

exceldignity;inferior in lence

be-16'.ad.

BELOW,

a.

;
jufrice

fenior

bend', v.

jutover

crooked

be

unworthyof, unbefitting.

BEND,

direct to

bend',

BEND,

BENDER,

be the property

or
province
appendantto ; to have

or
quality

BELOW,

fiiften.

To

n.

be

be the

BELOVED,

To

metal of which

to be the

adhere,or

; to

or

feat of

bench.

the inns of court.

of
fociety

fubdue, to make

to

feat ;

bent.

To

of;

with

of

made.

To

to

gain

bell.

bel'-metl.
f. The

BELMETAL,

and to

Overcome

a.

ben'-tihur.
f. The

BEND,
crook

lean

bufinefs it

proclaimany thingin towns,

attention by

To

perfons
fitting
upon

BENCHER,

To

bel'-man.f.

are

bentfli'.
f.

BENCH,

as

f. A glutton.
bel'-ly-g6d.

BELMAN,

bells

food

belly.

BELLYGOD,

to

be-mu'zd.

mufing.

of the

BELLYACHE,

To

a.

monftrous.

bulgeout.
BELLYBOUND,

bedrabblc,

_,

BEMUSED,

part of any

To

a.

be-mons'-tir.v.

BEMONSTER,
make

thighs,

that part

be-moi'l.v.

BEMOIL,

To

thingthat fwells out into a larger


capacity
; any
placein which fomethingis inclofed.
To BELLY,
To
v.
n.
bel'-ly.
hang out, to

is

lament,(cs

be-m6'-nur.f. A lamenter.

BEMOANER,
To

bcl'-lu-ine.
a.

BELLUINE,

To

a.

bewail.

BELLOWS,
to

be-m6'n. v.

BEMOAN,

To

wind.

ben-*e-fak'-lhun.
f.

a benefit;
conferring

the

benefit

The
ferred.
con-

mad.

drag,or

cumber
in-

BENEFACTOR,
confers

f.
ben-C-fak'-tir.

He

that

benefit,

BENE-

BEN
bcn-c-fak'-trls.
f. A

EENEFACTRESS,
who

confers

ben -e-fis. f.

BENEFICE,
on

This

another.

BENIGN,

man
wo-

ben.'fit.

word

is

ufcd
generally

for all ecclei'iaftical


livings.

bin'-c-flft.
a.

BENEFICED,

PolTeiTed of

benefice.

be-n^f '-I-fJnfe.
f.

BENEFICENCE,

bs-ncf -i-fint.a.

inggood.
BENEFICIAL,

fubordination

in
fomething

of
guilty

fuch

for, is burnt

as
felony

in the

hand,

commiflioner
ordinary's

Legitut
To

man

and

fet

Handingby,

do

the

fay.

clericus.

bin'-e-f!t.
v.

BENEFIT,

are

To

To

Made

bend.

certain

mined
deter-

point;

f. The
ben'-tlng-tlme.

TIME,

pigeonsfeed

bents before peas

on

ripe.
be-num'.

BENUM,
to

To

a.

v.

make

torpid
;

ftupify.
ben-zoi'n.f.

BENZOIN,
refin

importedfrom
called

granted

free,if

the verb To

to

upon.

beingfound

this benefit is

directed

BENTING

f. He that
ben-e-flfh'-a-ry.

clergyis,that

bent',part,of

crooked

time when

is in pofTeflion
of a benefice.
ben'-e-fit.f. A kindncfs,a favour
BENEFIT,
conferred ; advantage,
profit,
ufe; inlaw,

gree
deplication
ap-

Bent-graff.
BENT,

another.

to

beingbent;

of the mind ; inclination,


difpofition
fixed purdetermination,
fomething
;
dency,
pofe; turn of the temper or difpofition
; tenflexion ; a ftalk or grafs,called the

ad.
Adben-e-flili'-al-ly.

BENEFICIARY,

herb.

An

ft.ate
of

The

towards

conferringbenchts, profitable
helpiul,
j

benefit of

bent', f.

of flexure; declivity;
utmoft: power;

medicinal.

fulnefs,profit.
a.
BENEFICIARY,
ben-e-filh'-a-ry.
Holding

f. Gracioufnefs,
be-nlg'-nS-ty.

bcn'-nlt.f.

BENNET,

Kind, do-

helpfully.
vantageoully,
f. UfcBENEFIClALNESS,bln-e-flfh'-al-n!s.

a.

a"liialkindnefs ; filubrity,
wholefome quality,
ad.
BENIGNLY,
be-n!'ne-ly.
Favourably,
kindly.
f. Blcffing,
benedidion.
BENISON, ben'-ni-fun.

ben-e-fllh'-al.
Advanta:;ea.

BENEFICIALLY,

nc.

BENIGNITY,

BENT,

gooJnefs.
BENEFICENT,

ous,

Aaive

Kind, generous, liberali


malignant.

be-ni

whokfoir.e,not

red
Advantageconfer-

medicinal kind of

the Eaft

and
Indies,

garly
vul-

Benjamin.

To

BEPAINT,
paint.
ToBEPINCH,

v. a.
be-pi'nt.

To

cover

with

b^-pmtfh'.
v. a.

To

mark

with

do

pinches.
good to.
To BENEFIT,
ben -e-flt. v. n.
To wet with urine.
To gainadvantage.To BEPISS, be-pis'.
v.
a.
To BEQUEATH,
be-kwe th. v. a.
To leave
To BENET,
be-net'..
To enfnare.
v. a.
by will to another.
be-nev'-v6-lenfe.
bs-kweiV. f. Somethingleft by
f. DifBENEVOLENCE,
BEQUEST,
will.
do
kindnefs
the
to
pofition
;
good,
good done,
the charity
be-rat'l.
To rattleoff.
v. a.
ToBERATTLE,
given; a kind of tax.
bl-niv -v6-lent. a.
ba r-ber-ry.
f.
A
BENEVOLENT,
Kind,
BERBERRY,
berryof a
fharptafte,ufed for pickles.
havinggood-will.

BEi^EVOLENTNESS,
I he fatne with

a.

be-nev'-v6-lcnt-nls.
f.

Benevolence.

BENGAL,
ftufF.
ben-gal.f. A fort of thin flight
BENJAMIN,
f. The
of a
name
Un'.jA.mln.
tree.

To

to

BEREAVE,

be-re

ve.

v.

take away

coming on

embarrafs

be-nitc.v.
To furprifewith
a.
of night; to u.,o\ycin
darknefs,

by want

of

light.

To

a.

of; to
deprive
bc-reft'.
of
BEREFT,
part. paff.
f. A
ber'-ga-mot.

BERGAMOT,

or

perfume,drawn
a

lemon

from

tree

on

flrip
of,to

from.

commonly called Burgamot;

BENIGHT,
the

To

Bereave.
fort of pear,

fort of

eflence,

fruit produced
grafting
by in-

bcrgamot
pear

ftock ;

fort of Ihuff.
X

T"

be-rl'me.v.

BERHYME,

To

celebrate

To

a.

of BESEECH:
BESOUGHT,be-fa't.part.pair,

verfes.

in

rhyme or
ber-Iin'.
f.
BERLIN,

which
coach of

particular

fmall fruitwith many


To

feeds.

BERRY,

ber'-ry.n.

To

ber'-tram.f.

Baftard

v.

BERTRAM,
ber'-rll.
f.
BERYL,

To

pellitory.

entreat,

To

n.

bc-fet'.
v.

BESET,
furround

To

fall upon,

; to

To

To

a.

wlfh

curfe

be-side. I prep.

BESIDE,

At the fideof

BESIDES,

ther, near;
be-si'des.j

above

according
to, though

over

not

; not

and

contrary;

out

be-fe'je.

BESIEGE,

layfiege
to,

to

To

a.

befet with armed

to

To

beleaguer,
a

To

To

to

harden

v.

dry in

be-fmut'. v.

BESMUT,
or

or

ke.

a.

a.

To

a.

To

foul with

BESORT,

rt.

a.

v.

To

BESOT,

bc-fot'.V.

to make
jftupify;

to

a.

doat.

To

feafon with

with

a.

dawb

To

with

mark

with

be-fput'-tur.
v.
Tofputa.

fomething,to

over

beft'. ad.

dawb

thingby fput-

any

fait,"to fit.

lo
inf:ituate,

Moft

good.

In the

of gooddegree
highcft

nefs; fittefl:.
be-fta n.

BESTAIN,

v.

To

a.

ftains,to fpot.
be-fted'.v.
To BESTEAD,

To

a.

with

mark

to
profit;

treat, to accommodate.

bes'-t(hil.
a.
Belongingto

beaft:

brutal,carnal.
BESTIALITY,

f. Thequality
bcf-tflial
'-I-ty.

of beafts.
f.
rutally.
b.V-tfhal-ly.
'

BESTICK,
with

any

be-fllk'.
v.

1"o ftick

over

thing.

To BESTIR,
train.
BESORT,bc-fa'rt.f.Company,attendance,
To

To

BEST,

f.Aninftrumenttofvveepwith.To
bc-U

v. a.
be-fpffe.

v.

BESTIALLY,

z-um.

dawb

bed', a.

blacken with

foot.

BESOM,bc

To

BEST,

foil,

fmoke.
To

mark

v. a.
be-fpu'.

BESPUTTER,

BESTIAL,
be-fmo

BESMOKE,

fmoke

To

difcolour.

fmoke
To

a.

be-fmertfn'.v.

BESMIRCH,
to

v.

bedawb

foul.

foil,to

To

fpittle.
fpots.
be-fpot\
v. a. To
over.
be-fpred'.
BESPREAD,
fpread
v. a. To
BESPRINKLE,
bc-fprlnk'l.
fprinkle

ter

To

BESMEAR,
to

"

be-flob'-bir.
To dawb,
v. a.
To

befpeaks

tering.

fmear.

be-fmcr.

that

over.

forces.

fiege.
ToBESLUBBER,

fpeakto,

to

fhcw.

be-fplt'.
v. a. To

BESPOT,

to

f. One employedin
be-fe'-jur.

BESIEGER,

or

BESPIT,

To
v.

by

way

be-fpek'l.
v. a.

BESPICE,

To

To

above ; not

this clafs.
To

treat
en-

vomit.

To

in this number, beyond


be-si'des.J

BESIDES,

or

fpices.

ano-

To

of, in a ftate of deviation from.


BESIDE, be-si'de. "Jad. Over and

with

or
fpeckles
fpots.

BESPEW,
fpew

To

happen illto.

to ; to

order

make

f. He
be-fpe'-kur.

BESPECKLE,
with

harafs.

to

be-fhro'.
v.

BESHREW,

To

to hem
befiege,
to
perplex
waylay,to
;

dawb

To

; to

to

betoken,to

BESPEAKER,
anything.

to

To

a.

embarrafs, to

; to

thingbeforehand
to

be fit.

in

be-fpe'k.
v. a.

BESPEAK,

addreis ; to

become,

To

v.

previousapology; forebode;

to

a(k.

beg,to

to

be-fe'm. v.

BESEEM,

To

a.

water.

or

bl-fpa'l.a.

BESPAWL,

any

be-fe'tfh.
v,

dirt

fpittle.

fhelter, To

To

a.

with
fprinkle

or

To

kind of preciousftone.

to implore
fupplicate,
;

To

To adorn

To fpot
be-fpat'-tur.
v. a.

BESPATTER,

conceal.

BESEECH,

To

bear berries.

be-(kre'n.v.

BESCREEN,
to

v. a.
be-fpang'l.

with fomething
to befprinkle
fpangles,
fhining.
with

f. Any
feERRY, bcr'-ry.

To

fee.

BESPANGLE,

To

form.

To

be-ft'-'" v-

^-

To

put into

rous
vigo-

adion.
V.
ToBESTO"*^' b'f-to'.

a.

To

give,to

con-

fer

B
in excellence ;

iphereof; To

I D
from,

remote

in

within

not

the

h^-ang'-gu-li-tld.
^a.
^ ingtwo
b^-Ang'-gu-lus.
Hav-

angles.

BIAS, bi-as.
bowl,

The

f.

which

on
weightlodged

it from

turns

bi -as.

BIAS,

v.

fide

f.

fmall

the breaftsof

to

pieceof linen

fome

BIBACIOUS,

bi-ba-fhus.

put upon

Much

a.

blb'-bur.f.

BIBBER,

are

bi bl. f.

The

addicted

to a

BIDENTAL,

in which

That

which

has

of drinking
moifture.
quality
-fii-lar.
BICAPSULAR,
bi-kap
a. Aplantwhofe
is divided
feed-pouch

parts.

colour ufed in

b!-sip'-i-tus.
^ heads;
of the mufcles

one

bSk -kur.

BICKER,
off and
fight

To

n.

it is applied

fkirmifh,to

BICKERER,

f.

An

-A fkirmifter.
iron

endingin

point.
bi'-korn.

BICOrNE,
BICORNOUS,

bi-kar-nus.

BICORPORAL,

Having two

a.

bi-..ar-po-iil.
Havingtwo
a.

f.

r.

To

which

on
carriage

f. The
be'f-tingz.

bif'-fe-rus.
a.

the dead

firftmilk

Bearingfruittwice

out

Openingwith

7a.

blf'-fl'-dl-tld.
5 a cleft.

bl -fdld.

a.

Twofold, double.

bi'-farmd.

Compounded

a.

b!-fur'-ka-tid.
a.

BIFURCATED,

of

Shooting

heads.

into two

bl-fur-ka -fhun. f. Divifion

BIFURCATION,
BIG,

a.
big',

dcfire,
to aflc;to

Great in bulk, large;teeming,

fwoln;
; diftended,
pregnant; full of fomething
great in air and mien, proud; great in fpirit,

com-

f. One
big'-ga-mlfl.

BIGAMIST,

two
a

that

has

bigamy.

big-ga-my.
wives

BIGBELLIED,

at

f.

The

crime

ing
hav-

of

once.

Pregnant.

a.
big-bel-lyd.

f. A child's cap.
BIGGIN, big-gin.
BIGLY, big-ly.ad. Tumidly, haughtily.
f. Greatnefs
blg'-nis.

of

quantity
j

fize,whether greateror fmaller.


BIGOT,

a.

two

forms.

BIGNESS,

horns.

bodies.

BID, bid'.V.

Having

a.

bl'-fid.

BIGAMY,

bik -kurn.

BICKERN,

live,ta

carried to the grave.

committed

forward.

blk'-kc-rir.
f.

dwell, to

place.

brave.

arm.

quiver,to playbackward

; to

on

v.

of the

in

enijre,to fuffer.

To

"

into tv/o.

painting.
bl-s!p'-l-tal.
( a. Having tsvo

BICIPITAL,
BICIPITOUS,
to

into two

n.

year.

two
a.

To

a.

years.
bt

BIFID,

the

v.

order.

givenby a cow after calving.


f. Twofold.
bi-fl'-ryus.
BIFARIOUS,
a

library.

bl fe. f.

v.

bi-den -tal.

BIFORMED,
a. BelongbIb-lyo-tRe'-kal.
ing

bib-u-lus.

pro-

teeth.

BIFOLD,

BIBULOUS,

To

bl de.

BIFEROUS,

tippler.

facred volume

tranfcriber.

and

BIDE,

f. A
BIFIDATED,
blb-ly-6g'-gra-fur.

BIBLIOTHECAL,

To

BIDE,

To

BIESTINGS,_

contained the revelations of God.

BIBLIOGRAPHER,

BICE,

To

are

drinking.

BIBLE,

v/liooffersor

f. Command,
bid'-d!ng.
bi de.

of two

their cloaths.

children,over

One

pofesa price.

BIER,

BIB, bib

manded.
com-

particular BIDING, bl -ding;f. Refidence,habitation.


Of the continuance
a.
BiENNIAL, bi-en -nyAl.

incline

To

a.

one

the llraii^ine ;

fide.

to

b'd'-dur,f.

part. pafl".Invited

inhabit ; to remain

turns
a
to
man
any thingwhich
inclination.
courfe ; propenfion,

To

BIDDER,

BIDDIKG,

vvit'ibezoar.

of

bid n.

to pronounce,

denounce.

to

BIDEN,

be-zo-a'r-dlk.
a. Compounded

BIANGULATED,
BIANGULOUS,

offer,to propofe
;

to

declare ;

antidote,
broughtfrom

an

the Eaft Indies.

or

order ;

to

to

merly
A medicinal flone,for-

highefteem as

BEZOARDICK,

corners

mand,

go beyond,is to deceive.

be'-zor. f.

BEZOAPv,

I G

f. A
blg'-gut.

man

devoted

to

tain
cer-

party.

BIGOTED,

a.
prcpofTeffcJ
big'-gut-id.
Blindly

BIGOTED,
illfavour of

of
judice;the practice

b!l-ar.-dur. f. A f:nall vcffelufcd

rapier,

hil-boz. f.

BILBOES,

bi le. f.

bitter liquor,
thick,yellow,

colle(2ed in
in the liver,
feparated
and difcharged
by the common
bi le. f.

bllj'e.

BILGE,

To

v.

To

n.

der,
gall-blad-

fpring

bll-lya-ry.
a.
Belongingto the bile.
bll-l!ngz-gite.
f. Ribaldry,
BILINGSGATE,

BILIARY,

a.
bl-llng'-gwus.
Havingtwo

b'lk'. v.

bll

BILL, bil

f.

The

f.

point.
bll'.f.

BILL,

account

a.

kind

To

; a

cheat,to
a

defraud.

bandage.

that

The

of

name

fittedfo
telefcope

dillantobjeiSt
may

be

bi-nok'-u-lur.
a.

Having

two

f. A writer
bi-6g'-gra-fur.

of hatchet with

law

to
prefented

f. Writing
bi-cg'-gra-fy.

hooked

lives of

an

the parliament;
adver-

at a

To

carefs,as doves by

the

is called

Biography.
forth
a.
bi'-pa-rus.
Bringing

men

fivo

birth.
a.
bi'-par-titc.
Having two

BIPARTITE,

cor-

refpondent
parts.
f. The
bi-par-tlfli'-un.

BIPARTITION,
n.

of

into
dividing

of

aft

two.

f. An animal with two feet.


bi'-ped.
bi-pe'-dal. Two feet in length.
BIPEDAL,
bi-pen'-na-t!d.Having
BIPENNATED,

BIPED,
To

a.

publilli
by

adver-

an

a.

a.

b!l'-let.L

BILLET,

Billet-doux,
or

fraallpaper,

fmall

dier where

he is

logof v/ood for

bU

BILLOWY,
.

f.

a.

bi nd,

quarter foldiers.
A

kind

v, a.

of

of
a.
bi-pet'-ta-lus.
Confifting

flower-leaves.

bi'-qwa-drate.7 f The
BIQUADRATE,
bi-qv/i-drat'-lk.
BIQUADRATICK,
S fourth
the
from
of a fquara
multiplication
power ariling

play.

by

itfelf.

burtHi'.f.

BIRCH,

Swelling,
turgid.

placev/hcre bread

repofitcd.
bi -na-ry.
E.NARY,

fol-

Awavefwoln.

a.
-16-y.

direct

To

lodge; to
bll-lyerdz.
f.
f.

two

to

BILLIARDS,
bil-16.
BILLOW,

wings,

BIPETALOUS,

the

chimney.
bil'-lk.V.
BILLET,

two

note;

foft Billet,a love letter.

bU'-lit.f.

BILLET,

Bind,

both eyes.

BIOGRAPHY,

tifement.

To

tubes, as

fheavcs;a

bind with.

to

bi'n-okl.f. A

two

binds

lives.

fowl.

prefcription
; an
phyfician's

joiningbills.
BILL, bll'.V.

BIN, bin

man

v/hofe trade it is

man

bi'nd-wcd.f.

BINOCLE,
with

contract,to grow

that

f.
bi n-d!ng.

BIPAROUS,

b'l'.V.

BILL,

To

books;

fillet,
a fliredcut

BIOGRAPHER,

A written paper of any kind ;

of money
a

To

beak of

bile.

tifenient.

To

obligeto
obligeto

to

eyes.
of
a.
bil'-lyu?.
Confiding

BILK,

BILL,

to

wound

obligatory.

BINOCULAR,

tongue?.

BILIOUS,
To

bind

to

feen with

foul language.
BILINGUOUS,

to

over,

To

n.

bi n-dur. f. A

BINDWEED,
plant.

leak.

cover

bind to,

bind

I'o

bi'nd.v.
be

BINDING,

duel.

fwelling.

fore angry

the

one

BIND,

To

BINDER,

fort of (tocks.

faflcn

to

appearance.

to
ftifF;

fword.

cnv/rap

reftrain; To

to

fcrve fome
make

f. Whortleberry.
bll-ber-ry.

bll-bo. f.

BILBO,

BILE,

coftive ;

of goods.
carriage

BILBERRY,

BILE,

bigot.

gird,(o

fallentogether
; to

to

; to compel,toconftrain ; to oblige
withdreffings
to hinder; to make
; to confine,
by ftipulation

a.
Turgid.
b!g-fvvoIn.

EILANDER,
for the

anything;

fomething.

BIGSWOLN,

enchain ; to

to

f. Blind zeal, preb'g'-git-try.

BIGOTRY,

I R

I N

or

wine

is

BIRCHEN,

BI-RD, bi'ud'.f.
kind, a

Two
To

doubfe.
confine with bonds.

To

BIRD,

BIRDBOLT,

tree.

burtfh'-in,S.
A

Made

general

term

of birch.

thered
for the fea-

fowl.

burd', v.

n.

burd-bolt.
Y

To

f.

catch birds.
A

fmall

arrow.

BIRD-

I S

burd'-katfli-ur.
f. One

BIRDCATCHER,
it his

makes

employment

burd'-ir.f.

BIRDER,

take birds

to

that

birdcatcher.

to

flioot birds with.

bird'-lime.f.

BIRDLIME,

ilance fpreadupon
that

twigs,by

them

lightupon

are

The

burdz'-nelhf.

BIRDSNEST,

f. The
burdz'-neft'.

birdz^-fat.
f.

bird

her eggs
l:iys
BIRDSTONGUE,

and

herb.

hatches

weed

placev/here

goofekind.
f.
BIRTH, bertft'.

aft of

by defcent ; the condition in which any man is


forth.
; thingborn ; the a6I of bringing
bertlt'-da.
f
.
The
on
BIRTHDAY,
day which

BIRTHDOM,berth'-dum.
which

any

of birth.
Privilege
The nightin

f. Place where
bertli'-plafe.

f. The
berth'-rit.

BIRTHRIGHT,

to which
privileges

is born

man

and
rights
the right
of

bertfi'-wurt.
f. The

bread,made

to

BISECT,
two

be carried

fea ;

to

bif-fek't.
v.

of

BISHOP,

much

a.

To

as

is put into

the

halfpenny.

venpence

BIT, bit

To

V.

To

a.

put the bridle upon

horfe.

bltfh'.
f. The

To

of

name

BITE,

reproachfor a woman.
bi'te.
To crufh
v.
a.

teeth ; to

painwith

female of the doo kind ;

giv"pain by

reproach

cut,

; to

fmart with

to

with
pierce

or

cold

hurt

to

wound

; to

acrid tafte;'to

an

or

make

cheat,

to trick.

BITE,

b! te. f.

The

feizure of any
a

thing by

that takes the bait ;


fifli

take the bait ;

a
tricker,

blt'-takl.f.

fifhapt to

deceiver.
A

frame

of timber

tafte,
likewormwood; fharp,cruel,fevere;

divide into

calamitous,miferable

fatirical
reproachful,
;

or hurtful.
unpleafing

bif-fek'-fhun.
f. A geometrical BITTERGROUND,

quantity

f.
b!(h'-up.

One

of the head order of

f. A
bit'-tur-ground.

plant.
With
ad.
blt'-tur-ly.

BITTERLY,

equalparts.

clergy.

meat

at once;
a fmall pieceof
any thing;a
SpanifhWeft India filver coin, valued at fe-

hard

fugar.

the divifion of any


fignifying

into two

the

name

parts.

BISECTION,
term,

As

in the fteerage,
where the compafsis placed.
dry
bit'-tur.
ing
a.
compofition BITTER,
Havinga hot,acrid,bit-

of

kind

of fine flour,almonds, and

To

bit',f.

BITTACLE,
bis'-kit,f.

BISCUIT,

iron part of the bridle which

cheat,a trick ; a fliarper.


f. He that bites ;
BITER, bi'-tur.

beingborn.

EIRTHWORT,
a plant.

fnake-

a.
a
bertfi'-ftrangld.

BIRTHSTRANGLED,
in
Strangled

The

f.

the teeth ; the act of

the firftborn.

plantcalled

f. A furgeon's
inftrubis'-tur-y.

the mouth

is bor"..

one

biV-tort. f.

mouth

the

is born.

one

BIRTHPLACE,
any

f.

benh'-nit. f.

EIRTHNIGHT,

year.

ufed -in making incifions.

BITCH,

is born.

one

Leap

Blind.

is put into the horfe's mouth.

life;

born

bif-feks'-tU.
f.

bis'-fiin.
a.

BIT, bit

is inherited

which

rank

extraftion,lineage
;

coming into

diocefe

ment

BIT,
The

ture
mix-

Mifnia.

at

BISTOURY,

her young.

f. An herb.
burdz'-tung.
f. A fowl of the
ber'-gan-dur.

BIRGANDER,

any

found

BISSEXTILE,
BISTORT,

plant.

An

Soup, broth.
biz'-muth. f. Marcafite,
EiSMUTH,
a hard,
mineral
of
white,brittle,
fubftance, a metalline
nature,

for

f. A plant.
blfh'-up-wcd.

BISHOPWEED,
BISK, bifk'.f.

BISSON,

plant.
BIRDSFOOT,
EIRDSNEST,
a

of

name

word

cant

wine, oranges, and

fugar.
f. The
BISHOPRICK,
bifh'-up-rlk.
of a bifliop.

birdcatcher.

burdz'-i.f.

BIRDSEYE,

the birds

which

entangled.

burd'-man. f.

BIRDMAN,

fubglutinous

f. A
blfh'-up.

BISHOP,
of

f. A gun
burd'-ing-.pes.

BIRDINGPIECE,

I T

tafte; in

bitingmanner,

bitter

calamiforrowfully,

toufly
feverely.
; fliarply,
BITTERN,

bk'-tcrn.f. A bird with longlegs,

JBITTERN,

bitter

of temper ; fatire,piquancy,
nelV, feverity
keeniK'fs of reproach
; forrow, vexation,affliaion.
f. An apple
b!t'-tur-fwet.
compounded tafte.

BITTERSWEET,
which

has

bl-tu'-men.f.

BITUMEN,

dug

matter

the

of

out

earth,or i'cummed oft'

bi-tu'-ml-nus.
a.
ed
Compound-

a.

valves

Havingtwo

that
ufed of thofe fifli
fhutters,

bramble

or

To

biz'-.in-tine.
f.

To

v.

blak'n. v.

BLACKEN,

a.

To

make

To

n.

blak'-!(h.
a.

of

blik'-mor. f.

of

'

black.

grow

Somewhat

black.

A negro.
Black colour;

blak'-nls.f.

To

a.

blak'-fmlilT.
f.

BLACKSMITH,

great piece
the

in

iron,

To

n.

BLAB, blab', f. A teltale.


blab'-bur.f.
BLABBER,

king

ought to

blak'-tRorn.
f. The floe.
blad'-dur.f.

BLADDER,

tattler,a

veffel in the
a
blifter,

blad'-dur-nut.
f.

BLADDER-NUT,
tale.
tel-

That

contains the urine;

puftule.

to tell tales.
tattle,

being very

fmall fifli.

body which

blab'.V.

called from

fo

BLACKTHORN,

tellwhat

A fmith that

blak'-tal.
f. TherufForpope.

BLACKTAIL,

keptfecret.

BLAB,

name

fmutty.

highfeftivaldays.

blab',v.

BLAB,

negro.

fpecksof

The

darken, to defame.

to

BLACKMOOR,

herb.

An

goldvalued at fifteenpounds,which

be

blak'n.

BLACKEN,

To

works

bllc'f-wurt.
f.

BIZANTINE,

To

bird.

vah-es.

offereth upon

black, to

darknefs.

hi-val'-vu-Iar.
a.
Havingtwo

BIVALVULAR,

of

make

blak'-bird. f.

BLACKBIRD,

oyfters.

BIXWORT,

is

the fruit of it.

fhells, BLACKNESS,

have two

To

a.

f. A
blak'-ber-ry.

BLACKISH,

bi -valv.

BIVALVE,

mourning;

of tiieeye which

blak'-a-m6r.f.

black colour

of bitumen.

as

bhlk'. v.

BLACKAMOOR,
BLACKBERRY,

lakes.

BITUMINOUS,

f. A black colour ;

blacken.

fat undluous

black.

tafte;
fliarp- To BLACK,
malice,grudge,hatred,implacability;

BITTERNESS,

blackamoor; that part

blt'-tur-nls.
f. A

blak

BLACK,

fifli.

feeds upon

which

plant.

blad'-dur-fcn-u.f.

SENA,

BLADDER

plant.
blak'. a.

BLACK,
dark ;

of
cloudy

Of

the

colour

of

night;

wicked; difmal,mournful.

name

of

A dirty
low.
fela.
blag-gi'rd.

blak-led'.
f. A mineral found

in the lead mines, much

BLACK-PUDDING,

to

ufcd for

of blood and

blak-rod'.f.
the

longing
ufher be-

order of the garter; fo called

parliament.

He

bla

chargewith
crime

fcapula,

v.

a.

or

blifter.

nls.
bla'-mabl-

f. Fault.

Culpably.
To

ccnfure,to

fault.

bla'me. f.
;

-ma-bly.ad.

blame.

BLAME,

BLAME,

Havingblades

ABLENESS,

BLAMABLY,
To

grain.
The

the black rod he carries in his hand.

is ufher of the

either

fpircs,
purtule,
bla'-mabl. a. Culpable,
faulty.

bhVn. f.

BLAMEABLE,
BLAME

pencils.

blak-pdd
-ding.f.

kind of food made

BLACK-ROD,

briflcman,

bla'de-b6ne.f. The
bla'-d!d.a.

BEADED,
BLAIN,

term.

BLACK-LEAD,

bone.
fcapular

or

low

or

weapon

or flriking
fliarp
part

The

inftrument ;

BLADEBONE,

cows.

green

fierceor gay.

blak'-katl.
f. Oxen, bulls,

BLACK-GUARD,

from

of

of grafs,
the
fpire

corn.

bli'de. f.

BLADE,

plant.

BLACK-CATTLE,
and

{hoots of

f. The
blak-bri-6-ny.

ELACK-BRYONY,

bla'de.f. The

BLADE,

countenance, fullen ; horrible,

Imputationof

f.-nilt
;

hurt.

bl.Vmc-ful.
a.

BLAMEFUL,
1

Criminal,guilty.
BLAME-

bla'me-lL-.a.

BLAMELESS,

nocent. To
inGulltlefs,

ad. Innocently.
b!i'me-lif-ly.

ELAMELESLY,

bbl mc-lef-nls. f.

BLAMELESNESS,

plague;

invalidate;

ta

cence.
Inno-

blaft'.V.

BLAST,
fudden

cenfurer.

a.

To

blant'fh.v.

BLANCH,

or
ftrip
peelfuch thingsas

whiten

hufks;

have

to

; to

BLANDISH,

blan'-difli-ment.
f. Aft

foft words, kind fpeeches;kind

blank', a.
without

which
the

which

point

to

and

blank

woven
loofely

blanket

To

with

To

To

an

To

blank

of

roar.

river lifli;

flame,the lightof
white

mark

the
a

upon

blaze,

v.

To

n.

flame

be

to

cover,

In

-ly.

a.

deck,

to

fliow ;

v.

blaf-fc'm.v.

To

a.

fpeak

of God

n.

blaf-fe'-mir.f.
God

in

to

To

impiousand

ble k. f.

wicked

irreverent

Cjod.

irreverence.

f. Blafphemy is
blas'-fe-my.

BLASPHEMY,

of fome indignity
God hiitifelf.
unto
offering
f. A guft, puffof wind; the
BL"V'5T,blaft'.
an

or

by

the firoke of

fet out

to

blaze

about,

art

zoning.
of bla-

ble

BLEAKY,

ble

of

Dim

a.

ble'-red-nis.f.

any inftrumentof wind

malignantplanet.

mufick;

ble

To

ble

run

t.

with

To

BLEED,

To

BLEMISH,

or

water

v.

To

n.

The

ftate

a fheep.
deep or lamb.

cr}'as

cry of

blifter.

; to

ble d.

The

rheum.

blc'd. v.
blood

with

t.

f.

bl^b'.f.

BLEED,

with rheum

general.

beingdimmed

BLEAT,

Bleak,cold,chill.

-ky. a.

r,

dim, obfcure in

To

fmall river fifh,

ble k-nls. f. Coldnefs,chilnefs.

BLEAKNESS,

wretch

regard
bias -fJ-muf-ly.
ad. TmBLASPHEMOUSLY,

made

to

bletfh. v. a.
To whiten.
BLEACH,
ble'k.
chill.
a.
Pale;
cold,
BLEAK,

blas'-fc-m'is.
a.
Impioufly BLEB,
to

explain^in

f. The
blaz'-un-ry.

BLEAT,

irreverent with

To

a.

publick.

make

to

fpeak

terms.

BLASPHEMOUS,

ports.
fpreadsre-

on

BLEAREDNESS,

fpeaksof

fire.

to

that

armorial ;
figures enfigns
fet to
em.bellifli
to difplay,
to
;

to
celebrate,

to

v.

the

terms,

BLEAR,

BLASPHEMER,

One

blaz'n.

BLAZON,

BLEAK,

blafphemy.

with.
pioufly,

f.

to make
publifli,

To

blank manner,

confufion.
blaf-fe m.

bla-zur.

To

inflame

with

cover

blanket.

; to

BLAZONRY,

To

a..

blazon

; to

proper

loft,

kind of pear.
a.

bla'ze.v.

BLAZE,

fnot is direiled.

impious irreverence

fpeakevil of.
BLASPHEME,

found

calf.

con-

unwritten;

paper
or

-it.f. A woollen

with
palenefs,

terms

that

known

fpace;a lot,by

void

arrow

; a

BLASPHEME,
in

f.

a
publication
;

BLAZE,

To
A

tofs in

; to

BLANKLY,

unwritten

blank -It.v.

BLANKET,
a

n.

fmall whitifn

blaze,

BLAZER,

treatment.

rhime.

nothingis gained;a

BLANKET,
To

White

blank', f.

BLANK,

To

horfe.

of tendernef? by gefture
offondnefs,expreffion
j

fufcd

ftroke

confpicuous.

BLANDISH".l"NT,

BLANK,

BLATTER,
bla'. f.

flame

foften.

to

ter-

bleak.

whitener.

Soft, mild, gentle.


blan'-dlfli.
To fmooth,
v. a.

to

as
Bellowing

blat'-tur.v.

BLAY,

bland',a.

BLAND,

bhV'-tant.
a.

BLAZE,
f.

blan-tfhur.

injure,

to

ftrikewith

blafl'-ment.
f. Sudden

BLATANT,

terate,
obli-

pafsover.

to

BLANCHER,
To

To

a.

confound,

to

ftrikev/ith fom^

wither;

to

of infecl'ion.

To

blameable.

To

a.

rour.

pable,
Culbli'me-wur-thy,

BLAMEWORTHY,

make

to

BLASTMENT,
bla'm-ur.f.

ELAMER,

v.

To

n.

drop,as
a.

To

blem -ifh^ v.

loft

blood, to

blood.
let blood.
a.

To

mark with

; to defame, to tanifh, with reany deformity


to
fpedt reputation.
blun'-ifli.
f. A mark o deformity,
BLEMISPI,
a

fear

rep!o.;th,
dif^^race.
To

blentfh'.v.

BLENCH,

To

To

n.

fhrink,to

confound

to

mingletogether;

to fpoil.
pollute,
of
obfolete participle

to

To

a.

v.

blent'. The

BLENT,
Blend.

BLINK, blink',v. n. To
fcurely.
bl!nk'-erd.
f.
BLINKARD,
To

bles

To

a.

v.

make

happy,

wiflihappinefs
to another

profper
to
glorifyfor
bles
BLESSED,
; to

; to

to

praife
;

benefits received.

-scd. particip.
a.
joying
Happy, enheavenlyfelicity.
ad.
bles'-sed-ly.
Happily.

BLESSEDLY,

fmall vi-

wink

One

fee ob-

to

that has bad

twinkling.
fomething
BLISS, blls'.f. The highefl:
nefs
degreeof happieyes

BLESS,

To

venomous.

per,

blend

BLEND,

bli'nd-wurm. f.

BLINDWORM,

ftart back.
To

L I

of bleffedfouls ; felicity
in
happinefs
general.
a.
BLISSFUL, blls'-ful.
Happy in the highcit
the

degree.
ad.
blls'-fol-ly.
Happily.

BLISSFULLY,

blls'-fdl-nls.
f. Happi.-efs.
Happinefs, BLISSFULNESS,
blis'-tur.
f.
A
Divine
BLISTER,
puftuleformed by
fanclity
felicity
felicity;
;
heavenly
;

blcs'-sed-m's.
f.

BLESSEDNESS,

the
raifing

favour.

bles'-sur.f.

BLESSER,

happinefs
; Divine

of

BLEST,

bleft'.
part.a.

BLEW,

blu'. The

To

Blow.

.iny thingnipping,

from

blaft,to hinder

To

a.

blind,

Without

a.

dark
tclled:ually

dark;
fight,

unfeen, private
; dark,

inob-

fcux-e.

To

BLIND,
darken

; to

blf'nJ.v.
obfcure

to

To

a.

the eye

make
; to

blind

obfcure

; to

the

to

underftanding.
bli'nd.f.

BLIND,

fight;
fomething

Somethingto

to

To

from

hinder

the

miflead.

bli'nd-fdld.
To hinder
v. a.

BLINDFOLD,

the
by blinding
feeing

eyes.

blind-fold. a.

BLINDFOLD,

fome

by
BLITHE,

Having theeyes

ment

or

play in

examination

To

which
and

fome
hunt

one

out

is
the

to

have his eyes

rell of

the

blf'nd-nls.
f. Want

of fi-ht ;

BlInDSIDE,
blind-side. f. Vv^eakiicfs,
fo:bk'.

The

v.

To

a.

Gay,

cheerful.

fwell.

fwelling.
blob'-bir.f. A bubble.
BLOBBER,
f. A thick lip.
blib'-bur-llp.
BLOBBERLIP,
? a. Havbl6b'-bur-lipt.
BLOBBERLIPPED,
BLOBLIPPED,
bK^b'-lipt.
Jingfwci;

thick

or

fea

A fhort heavypiece
of timber;

rough pieceof marble;


hats

criminals

To

lips.

blok'. f.
a

vered,
co-

intclleflualuarknefs.
ignorance,

manner.

?f.

are

term

for

pully;a

blok'.v.

a.

on

on

v/hicli

blockhead.

To

(hut up,

to

cnclofe.

f. A fortrcfs
bl6k'-hcuf.-,

built to obftruft or block up

BLOCK-TIN,

wood

beheaded; an obflrudion,a flopj

are

BLOCK,

the

formed ; the wood

BLOCK^HOUSE,
BLINDNESS,

blithe

bli'th-fum-nls. quality

bKVte.

BLOAT,

nefs

pany.
com-

blo'te.v. n.
To grow turgid.
BLOAT,
blo-tcd-nls. f. TurgidBLOATEDNESS,

juflg-

blind-manz-buf'.f.

In

blith-nls.

To

which

BUFF,

Gay, airy.

a.

ad.
bli'th-ly.

beingblithe.
bli'th-fum.a.
BLITHSOME,

plicitly,BLOCK,
imfight;

without

raifcblifters

To

of

direftion.

BLINDMAN'S

blithe,

Y,

BLITHSOMENESS,

led
ad. Without
bli'nd-ly.
without

rife i:i

To

hurt.

BLITHE

covered.

BLINDLY,

or

n.

blls'-tur.
v.
a.

BLISTER,

BLITHENESS,

fertility.

BLIND,

any fwellrng
fkin from

film

blls'-tur.v.

BLISTER,

Happy.

from
preterite

bli't.v.

BLIGHT,

of
feparation

the

blifters.

blafring.

or

by

the other parts.

To

favour.

bli't.
f. Mildew;

BLIGHT,
To

made

f. Benediction; the
bles'-sing.

BLESSING,
means

that blefTes.

He

cuticle from the cutis

blLk'-tln'.
f.

pafs.
Tin

pure

or

ua-

mi.xcd.
Z

BLOCK.

B L O

BLOCKADE,
by

(hutting
up the

dolt, a

bl6k'-hed.f.

blo'm. v. n.
To
Tofluitup. To-BLOOM,.
bringor yiehl
as
to be in a
blofToms;to produce,,
fellow,
bloiroms;
(lupid
ftateof youth.

hlok'-hed'-ki.
a.

BLOCKHEADED,

Full
blo'-my.
a.
Stupid, BLOOMY,
blos'-sum. f.
BLOSSOM,,

dull.

blok'-lfii.
a.
Stupid,dull.

BLOCKISH,

ad.
In
blok'-a'h-ly.

BLOCKISHLY,

A blolTom ; the ftatenf immaturity,

,,

a.

"without parts.

man

hlo'm.f.

BLOOM,

place.
blik-ka'de.
v.

BLOCKHEAD,
a

caified'
on
fiege

b!ck-kade. f. A

BLOCKADE,

To

B L U

To

bloom.s,
flowery;

The

flower

that

any plant.

on

grows

ftupid

of

blos'^um.-v.

BLOSSOM,

put forth

To

n.

bloffoms.

manner.

blot'-.
blok'-Iih-nls.
f. Stupidity. To BLOT,
To obliterate,
V.
a.
to make
BLOCKIS'HNESS,
bliid'.
that circulates
invifible; to eftace,
f. The red liquor
to erafe ; to blur;BLOOD,
v/riting
in the bodies of animals j child; progeny;
to disfigure;
to darken.
todifgrace,
blot'.f.
An
of fomething
obliteration
BLOT,^
kindred;defcent,
high
lineage
; birth,family,
written ;. a blur,,
in
extraftion ; murder, violent death; temper of
a fpot
a
;
fpot reputation.
blotfh'..
of
f. A' fpotor puftule
mind, ftateof the paffions
BLOTCH,
; hot fpark
; man
upoiv
fire.

the fkin.

blud'.V.

BLOOD,

To
to

to

enure

blood,as

ftain with blood

To

a.

hound

; to

heat,to

To

blud'-bol-turd.
a.Blocd

blid'-ftone.
f.

ftone is green, fpotted


with

blood-

The

To

blud'-flowr.
f.

plant.

by the

bl6'.V.

flyinto

of the wind

beingbloody.
blud'-lls.
a.
BLOODLESS,
dead ; without flaughter.

wind

blud'-fhed.f.

blood,or murder
ELOODSHEDDER,

blood,

mufick;

fpreadby

crime

of

flaughter.
blud'-fhed-dur.f. Murderer.

To

blow

To

blow

blow

^LOODSHOTTEN,
blood

from
burfling

a.

blud'-fhot'n.

Fill-

a.
blud'-^.

murderous,
ciuel,

rent
cur-

im-

blow

force of gunpowder.

the

ed with

to

blow
up,
up,
to

drive

by

the

warm

to

infect with
to

fwell,

inftrument

an

with

out,
to

found

the force

; to

breath; to
the eggs of

extinguifli
by wind;

raife or

fwell with breath ;

with gunpowder; To
deftroy

to

make

ftale.

blow'ze.f. A ruddyfat-faced wench

female whofe

of

hair is

diforder.
ii^

BLOWZY,

loured.
a.
Sun-burnt, highcoblow'-zy.

BLUBBER,

blub'-bur.f.

its proper vefllls.

blud'-fuk-ur.
f. A leech,
BLOODSUCKER,
blood
murderer.
that
fucks
a fiy,
a
;
any thing
BLOODY,

by
To

a.

to

report;

upon,

BLOWZE,
blud'-fliit'.

BLOODSHOT,

efFedi ; To

inflame with wind

; to

pufFinto fize;

to

To
fliej;

The

with

move

is ufed fometimes

the air

bl6',V.

BLOW,

To

fcent.

a.
blud'-i-ly.
Cruelly.
f. The
ftate of
BLOODINESS,
blid'-y-nls.

BLOODSHED,

To

n.

fly,,

hound

BLOODILY,

Without

a-

in flefh.

pafsaway without

to
to

up,

blud'-hound.f.

lodges
eggs

aiTl:
of

the

with It;,to pantytopuff;


to breathe
perfonally
hard ; to found by beingblov/n ; to playmuficallybywind;tobloom, tobloflbm ; To blow

Murder.-

BLOOD-HOUND,

event

of air ; this word

f.
blud'-gllt'-y-nis.
over,

BLOODGUILTINESS,

he

BLOW,

brightblood-red.

firous to fhed blood.

BLOOD-FLOWER,

fmoke, or dryby

ftroke ;" the fatal ftroke ;

action,
fingle

Dea.
blud'-tlTurf-ty.

BLOOD-THIRSTY,

To

a.

fudden

by which

fprinkled.
BLOODSTONE,

that follows

bio. T,

BLOW,

afperate.

BLOOD-BOLTERED,

blo'te.
v.

BLOTE,
the fmokc

cx-

Stained with

blood;

partof

The

whale

that contains the oil.

To

BLUBBER,
fuch

manner

blub'-bur.v.
as

to

n.

To

weep

fwell the cheeks.

BLUDGEON,

in

To

BOIL,

notch.

bob'-tfher-ry.
playamong

BOBCKERRY,

f. A

which

children,in

the

cherryis hung fo

the mouth.
againft
bob'-tll.
f.
BOBTAIL,

to

as

Gut

tail.

f. Afliortwig.
b6b'-vv!g'.

To

bo de.

BODE,

To

a.

to
portend,

bcd'zh.

be ihe

multuoufnefs

whalebone,

a body.
bod -i-ly.
BODILY,
a.
Corporeal,
containing
the
body; relating^o body,not the mind ; real,

adual.
ad.
bod'-i-ly.
Corporeally.

BODKIN,

bod'-kin. f.

fmall blade and

draw

to

animal

part ;

for horfes that

BOLDLY,

bog
BOG-TROTTER,
.

the

condition

BOGGLE,

bog 1.

v.

To

To

bog'-lur.

to fly
flart,

doubter,a

rous
timo-

wounds

To

iOIL,
to

be

f. A
bog'-houfe.

boi 1.

hot,

vvatcr:

to

to be

f.
V.

n.

To

be

fervent ; to

be in hot

houfe of office.

of
fpecies

liquor.

by
agitated
move

heat ;

like boiliig

bold

manner.

Courage,bravery;

of

containing

corn

ball,
great f^ery

throughthe air,and generally

tail after it.


A

ftalkor flem.

round

l-fliir.
1".

Somethinglaid in the
head ; a pad, or quilt
;

wound.
bo 1-ftur.v.

bolfler;

a.

To

the
fupport

afford a bed

to
a

to

to ;

comprefs
;

to

hold

fupport,

maintain.
bo It. f. An
;

Bolt

the bar of

door ;

bolt;

to

fifr,
or
try out
.

blurt out;

with
feparate
;

dart ;

bolt
thunder-

upright,that is,uprightas

fpotor (tain.
bo'lt.v. a.

arrow,

BOLT,

legs;
To

tea.

Bolis is

with
together

BOLT,

Marfhv, fwan ipy.

bo-he

meafure

fupport the

to

head with
n.

bo'-lls.
f.

BOLSTER,

man.

BOHEA,

of earth ;

comprefsfor

to

f.

BOGGY,
BOGHOUSE,

kind

drawinga

back ; to hefitate.

BOGGLER,

bo Id-nis. f.

fwiftlyhurried

that

Impudent.

a.

In

boid-ly.ad.

BOLIS,

boggy country.

Impudence, fau-

fix bufhels.

moraf?.

f. One
bog'-trot-tur.

bold.

make

exemptionfrom caution ; alTurancc,


impudence.
bo le. f. The body or trunk of a tree^
BOLE,

bed,

marfh, a fen,a

To

n.

bdld-fiH.

BOLDNESS,

an

dieted.

are

f.

v.

to

take freedoms.

to

bold-fife. f.

BOLL, bo'l.f.
f. Cloathing BOLSTER,
bo
bod'-y-cluz.

BODY-CLOATHS,
BOG,

army,

bold,

bo Idn.

BOLDEN,

out
flanding

licentious ;

make

BOLDFACED,

collecilion
a general
pandeft,
;
of a good body.

as wine
ftrength,

lives in

a
to

fubllance of

material

corporation
; the outward

the main

To

the view ; To

matter,

collective mafs ; the main

battle ;

The

ture
na-

cuted
a.
Daring, brave, llout ; exenot
fpirit
fcrupulous
;
; confident,

impudent, rude

a perfon;
oppofedto fpirit;
being; reality,
oppofedto reprefent-

human

ation ;

inftrumcnt with

An

drefs the hair,

f.
bod'-y.

CODY,
a

with

To

the

cincfs.

(harppoint;an inftrumcnt
ribbon througha loop;
or

thread

inflrument

an

bold.

BOLDFACE,

CODILY,

"

bole.

BOLD,

out
witha.
bod'-y-lls.
Incorporeal,

BODILESS,

"

boi'f-tl-ruf-nis.
f. Tu-

turbulence.

of
a.
bo'-la-ry.
Partaking

To

n.

unwieldy.

tumiiltuoufly.

BOLARY,
boggle.
bod'-dis.
f. Stays,
of
a vvaiftcoat
quilted
V.

Violent,loud,

a.

ad.
lently,
Vioboi'f-te-ruf-ly.

BOISTEROUSLY,

bo'de-ment.f. Portent,omen.

BODICE,
with

boi f-te-rus.

BOISTEROUSNESS,

BODGE,

boiling

perfonthat boils any


any thingis boiled.

The

furious ;
roaring,
flormy
; turbulent,

of.

BODEMENT,
To

v.

drefs in

to

the veffelin which

BOISTEROUS,

Havinga tail c^t.

BOBWIG,

feeth;to heat hy

boilingwater

boi'-lur.
f.

BOILER,

thing;

bob'-tald. a.

BOBTAILED,

To

a.

V.

water.

bob

omen

boil.

puttinginto

bob'-b'.n.
f. A fmall p'm of wood,

BOBBIN,
v/ith

to

to
purify,

an

To
to
a

iron

fbut

to

or

to
fetter,

an

row
ar-

fallen the

faflenwith

(hackle;to

fieve; to examine, to

purge.
'^"

BON

BON
bo It.

BOLT,

To

To

n.

fieve to

fajl-tur. f. A

Hnion ;

any

is obliged.

meal
fcparate

BONDAGE,

bo'lt-hed.
f.

longftraitnecked

veflel, matrafs,
glafs
bo I-tlng-houfe.
f. The
BOLTING-HOUSE,
placewhere meal is fifted.
a

or

BOLTSPRIT,

or

receiver.

f.
b6'-fpnt.

BOWSPRIT,

runningout at the head of a (hip,not


upright,but aflope.
ftanding
bo'-lus.
f. A medicine,made up into
BOLUS,
than pills.
a foft mafs, larger
bim'. f.

Aloudnoife;

niftiedwith

for

vent

filledwith combuftible
out

fufee,or
matter

wooden
be

to

cheft filledwith bombs,

BONE,
of

thrown

of

To

BOMB-VESSEL,

bom'-ves -sll.
ifhip,ftrong!/ To

built,to bear the fhock of


bim -bard.

mortar.

f.

bom-ba'rd.

BOMBARD,

great gun
To

a.

v.

bound

for

f. A

woman

The

folid parts of the

fragmentof

flefh as
make

adheres

it ; To

to

body

bone

with

make

no

fcruple
; dice.

no

bone.

meat,

v.

a.

take out

To

the bones

the flefh.
f.
bo'ne-lafe.
bo ne-k"s.a.

BONELESS,

Flaxen lace.
Without

bo'ne-fet.v.

BONESET,

bones.

To

n.

reftorea

; a

attack

bone out of joint,


or joina bone
bo ne-fet-tur. f. One who
BONESETTER,
makes a practice
bones.
of fetting
umph..
bo'n-fire.f. A fire made for triBONFIRE,

bombs.

bom-bar-de'r.f. The engineer,

BOMBARDIER,
whofe

fhoot bombs.

employmentit is to

bim-bi rd-ment.

BOMBARDMENT,
attack made

f.

An

bom-ba-ze

f.

n.

filken
flight

ftufF.

bom-baft',f. Fuftian,bigwords.

BOMBAST,

bdm-bift'.

BOMBULATiON,

High founding.

a.

bom-bu-la

-fhin. f. Sound,

noife.

OB

f.
A, bo'-na-ro'-ba.

BONCHRETIEN,

bOn-krct

-t%cn.

f. A

fpe-

cic";of prar.

on

hat, a

bcn'-nits. f.

Small

the mizz;n,

cap.
fails fet on

mainfail,and

fore-

ad.
bon'-ny-Iy.

BOXNILY,

Gaily, hand-

fonicly.
f. Gayety,handbon'-ny-nls.

BONNINESS,

is bound

a.
bon'-ny.

Handfome, beautiful ;

gay, merry.

BONNY-CLABBER,bon-ny-klab'-bur.f.Sour
butccrmilk.

b.'nd'.f. Cords, or chains,with which


holds any

; ligamentthat

thingtogether
; union,
ment,

the courfes

BONNY,

whore.

bo-ni'-f'is.
f. A kind of buffalo.

BGNASLS,

any

bon'-nlt.f.

fomenefs.

AR

one

the forehead.

BONNET,

f:il.

BOMBAST,

BOND,

f. A coveringfor
bo'n-gras.

BONGRACE,

BONNETS,

by throwingbombs.

BOMBASIN,

BON

One

broken.

barrel for wine.

with

bo'ne. f.
animal

BONE,
from

b6m'-ket{h.

To

an

BONELACE,

"^

f.

bond'-wum-un.

much

as

placedunder-ground,
f. A kind of

in fla-

flavc.

BOMB-KETCH,

BOMBARD,

bond'z-m'm.

BONDWOMAN,

fur-

up in the air.

blow

Slavery.

man

another.

tube,

kind

vcry.

bones, to
bom'-tflieft.
f.

bond'-flave.
f.

BONDSMAN,

mortar.

BOiMB-CHEST,

to

CapUvity,im-

bond'-fer-vis.
f.

BONDSERVICE,

BONDSLAVE,

hollow iron

ball,or fhell,filledwith gunpowder,and

from

bon'-didzh. f.

bond'-mad. f. A woman
flavc.
BONDMAID,
bind'-man.
f.
A
flave.
man
BONDMAN,
bond'-fer-vint.f. A flave.
BONDSERVANT,

maft

BOMB,

one

prifonment.

bran.

BOLTHEAD,

of obligation
; law by which
writing

with

fpringout

fuddennefs.

fpeedand
BOLTER,
from

V.

cement
captivity;

connexion

MAGNUM,

BONUM
A

f.
-num-mag'-num.

great plum.

imprifon- BONY,

of union, caufc of

bo

bo -ny.

a.

Confidingof bones;

full

of bones,
A

BOOBY,

BOOBY,

dull, heavy, ftupiJ BOOT,

f.

bo-by.
bo k. f.

BOOK,

write

in which

volume

particular
part of

; a

in which
gifter

read

we

work;

trader keeps an

account

kind remembrance

books, in

the

In

Without

re-

book,

BOOK,

bok.

in a
regifter

To

a.

V.

book.

The
bd'k-kep-lng.
f.

BOOK-KEEPING,
of

art

bo k-bm-dur.

BOOKBINDER,

bind

it is to
profeflion
bo k-fal.

BOOKFUL,

f.

man

bok-ler'-nld.
Verfed
a.

in

f. Skill in
bSk-ler'-nlng.

BOOKLEARNING,

with
literature,
acquaintance

bo'k-man. f.

BOOKMAN,

ftudyof

is the

it is
profeflion

To

holes in

the

f. A

whofe

man

too

mite

that

fixed
clofely

bafkets,fet up

or

harbour, to keep out


v.

m.

to

fteer;

BOON,

bon.

BOOR,

bo'r.f.

a.

as

bar laid crofs

To

or

rufli with

fea

play Bopeep, is

to

drawback, as if frighted.
bo-rat'-tfho.
f. A drunkard.
That
A

plant.

artificialfait,prepared

An

f.

may be bored.

from fal armoniac,nitre,calcined


fait,and alum, diflblved in wine.

bor-del'. f.

EORDEL,

tartar,

brothel,a bawdy-

houfe.

ba'r-dur.f. The

BORDER,

bank

edgeof

outer

part or

edge

country ; the outer


garment adorned with needlework;
the

thing;

part of

raifed round

garden,and

to

fet with

to adv.,nprofit,

on

n.

To

confine upon

To

adorn

He

that dwells

approach nearly

to.

ba'r-dur. v.

BORDER,
a

of

ba'r-dir.v.

BORDER,

To

manners.

enrich,to bqncSt,

and

b6-raks.

border; to reach, to

BORDERER,

a.

To

bo-pep. f.

BORAX,

To

Clownifli,ruftick,

To

by

flowers.

merry.
lout,a clown.

bo't. V.

lofe

playbooty,to

BORAGE,

lence.
vio-

bd'r-Lli-nls.
f. Coarfencfs

Ufelefs,unavailing;

bo'-rabl.a.

ad. Afteraclowni/h
bor-IIh-ly.

BOORISHNESS,

t- lis.a.

bir'-ndzh. a.

of any

manner.

to

A houfe built of boards

BORABLE,

mark

Gay,
A

bo r-ifli.a.

BOORISHLY,

J
fcige

In boots.

f. Plunder, pillage;
bo'-ty.
things

BORACHIO,

bo'n. f. A gift,
a grant.

BOOT,

per-

pulloff"the

defign.

the enemy.
n.

bo

look out,

language,a longpole
clue of the ftudding
fail;

(hew the failcrshow

bo

whofe profeflion

man

To

inn is to

an

fuccefs.

BOOTY,

In fea

f.

out
fpread

BOORISH,

at

bo't-id.a.

BOPEEP,

books;,a fludent

polewith bufhes

BOON,

ferve

like
fiiaped
for ftretching
them.

bo t-katlh-ur. f. The

bufinefs

BOOTLESS,

Schoolfellow.

f.

bo k-wurm.

BOOM,

placeunder

bo't-tree.
f. Wood

; To
gotten by robbery

fell books.

to

BOOKWORM,

to

bo k-feUur.

BOOKSELLER,

to

leg,ufed

bo't-hoze.f. Stockings
to

bo th. f.

BOOTH,

books.

books.

bok-mite.

BOOKMATE,

bom.

booy

pafiengers.

without

books.

"

box.

BOOTED,

Overfludl-

the

Coach, bo'r. f. The

fon whofe

books.

upon

for
covering

be driven into boots

leg,to

books.

to

boughs.

BOOKLEARNED,

of

boots of
Given

above

for boots.

dioufnefs.

BOOM,

BOOT-HOSE,

with undi-

f.
bo -kifli-nls.

BOOKISHNESS,

f.

t.

BOOTCATCHER,

books.

Crouded

a.

bo -kllh. a.

BOOKISH,

ufed

and

by horfemen.
BOOT

knowledge.
gefted

eats

bo

BOOT,

BOOT-TREE,

keepingaccounts.

whofe

To
Profit,gain,advantage;

plunder.

or

the coach

by memory.
To

f.

bat.

over
boot, with advantage,

fellow.

or

BOO

a.

with

touch.

ba r-de-rir. f.

the borders.

To

BORE,

bo're.v.

To

BORE,

bore.

to
for\yards
pufla

v.
a

a.
n.

To
To

in
pierce

make

hole.

hole;

to

certain point.

BORE,

bo're.,f. The hole made by boring;the

BORE,

which

with

inftrumcnt

hole is bored

; the fize

b6

BORE,

re.

The

bo'-re. f.

BOREE,

ba

BORN,
BORNE,

b6

into

ftepin dancing.

into life.

Come

rn.

in the entrailsof

worms

A fmall vcfTelof glafs,


or
quantityof wine ufuaily
put
bottle,a quart ; a quantityof hay or

grafsbundled

Carried,fupported.
bur'-ro.f. A town
with a

To

rne.

BOROUGH,

two.

bot'l.f.

other matter;

winds.

north

The

a.

bijt's.
f. Small

BOTTLE,

a.

bo -ryas. f.

BOREAS,

bo tn.

ba'tS. conj. As well.

horfes.

bo'-ryil.Northern.

BOREAL,

BOTH,

of Bear.
preterite

The

BOTH,
BOTS,

of any hole.

up.

bot'l.

BOTTLE,

To

a.

v.

inclofe in

bottles.

poration.
cor-

BOTTLEFLOWER,bot'l-flow-ur.
To

bor'-ro.v.

BORROW,
the ufe of

fomethingfor a time
to
thoughnot belonging

one's own,

ufe

he that takes what

EOSKY,
BOSOM,

bo

The

f.

-zum.

the innermofl: part of

an

the

the

drefs that

cover

thread wound

To

bo'-zum.

BOSON,

bo fn. f.

v.

To

a.

inclofe in the

privacy.
Corruptedfrom

BOSS, bos',f. A ftud ;

the

thing; a thick body of


f. Any
BOSSAGE,
bos'-saje.

the midil

any kind.
flone that has

of
fpecies

bo-tan'-i-kal.
in'-i-kal.
I a.
I'-nlk.
bo-tan'

crowfoot.

Relatingto

plants.

bot'fh. f.

ill fini(hed;

BOTCH,

an

build upon,
wind

fupport
; to

bct'-tum.v.

upon

reft upon

To

n.

bot'-tumd.a.

Havinga

bot'-tiim-lls.
a.

f. The
bit'-tum-ry.

BOTTOlVIRY,
BOUD,

on

bou'd.

To

bottom.

Without

f.

ad of borrowing

bottom.
ftiip's

infea which

An

v. n.
bo'uje.

BOUGE,

BOUGH,
a

bou'. f.

breeds in

To

or
eruptive
fwelling,

adventitious

botfli'.
v.

a.

part in any work


added.
partclumfily

To

mend

or

patch

bou

againft
any
BOUNCE,

or

arm

fv.ell cut.
a

largefhoot

nfe.

v.

n.

of

buy.
To

fall or

thingwith great force; to


to

fly

make

boaft,to bully.

bou'nfe. f.

fudden crack

BOUNCER,
an

To

ta't. prcter.of To

BOUNCE,

An

tree.

fudden leap;

difcoloration of the (kin; a

To

To

a.

its fupport.

BOUGHT,

bit'-a-nlft.
f. One ftlHed-inplants.
BOTANIST,
f. A difBOTANOLOGY,
bo-tan-ol'-o-jy.

BOTCH,

v.

bottom, fathomlefs.

herbs,flcilled

in herbs.

courfe upc.i

as

BOTTOM,

money
a

utmoft of

malt.

boz'-vil.
f.

BOTANICAL,
BOTANICK,

fix upon

BOTTOMED,

projecture.
EOSVEL,

to

To

Boatfwain.

in
partrifmg

of any

dale,a valley
;

limit ; the

bot'-tum.

BOTTOMLESS,

in

the

together.

up

BOTTOM,

as

conceal

water

fomething.

friend.

BOSOM,
bofom ; to

the

for
capacity
; the laft refort; a veflTel
navigation
fecurity
; a chapce, or
; a ball of

compofition,
my

ground
ground-work;

deepeft
part; bound,

fections
breaft;the tender afin

to

any man's

breaft,the heart;

inclofure ; the folds of

implies
intimacy,confidence,fondnefs,as
To

plant.

fcrew

lovveft part of

The

f.

under

the
foundation,'

woodlands.

or

bot-tum.

any thing; the

the

defire;
inclination,

BOTTOM,

is another's.

f. Wood,
bos'-kaje.
a.
bos'-ky.
Woody.

bofom

as

one.

f. A

l-fkrci.
f.

bot

the cork.

pullout

ther
ano-

bor'-ro-ur.f. He that borrows

BORROWER,

"BOSCAGE,

; to

BOTTLESCREW,

fome-

credit ; to afk of

another upon

from
tliing

take

To

a.

6r

fudden
ftrong

noife ;

bou'n-fur. f.

empty threatener ;

boaft,a
A

blow;

threat.

a bully,
boafter,

li.ar.

cloaths

f. A limit,a boundary;a
to
bound,
clumfily;
put togetherunfuitably,BOUND,
mark
limit
with
botches,
to
which
wnfliilfully
;
by
any excurfion is reftrained; a
EOTCllY,
Marked
with
botches.
a.
bot-tfhy.
leap,a jump, a fpring;a rebound.
or

To

BOX

BOW
BOUND,

To

bou nd.

v.

limit,to

confine

to
reftrain,

; to

To

a.

minate
ter-

malce

to

flexure ;

to

bou'nd.v.

BOUND,

n.

Tojump,

to

fpring
;

rebound, to flyback.
bou'nd. participle
of Bind.
BOUND,
paflive
bou'nd. a.
BOUND,
Deftined,intendingto
to

BOW,

to

a"Stof

f. An

reverence

fub-

or

bo

inftrument of

f. An

which

war

rainbow ;

; a

ftring-inftruments

in a.
playedupon ; the doubling6f a firing
knot
Bow
of a Ihip,
that part of her which
flip
;
beginsat the loof,and ends at the fl:ernmoftparts

Bind.

of the forecafl.le.

BOUNDING-STONE,bou'n-dlng-ft6ne.
bou'nd-ft.ke.

BOUND-STONE,
A

ftoop
;

to

fuffer

to

are

f. Limit, bound.
bou'n-da-ry.
bou'n-den. participle
of
paflive

BOUNDARY,
BOUNDEN,

the inftruments with

place.

any

bend,

reverence

miflion.

to

come

To

n.

prefiTure.

bow',

BOW,

V.

make

to

fink under

bound.
To

bow'.

BOW,

To

ftone

BOW-BENT,

BOW-HAND,
draws

playwith.

to

limits.

and

a.
bou'n-tyus.
Liberal,kind,

generous.

BOUNTEOUSLY,

The

hand

that

the bow.
a.
bS'-legd.
Havingcrooked

in Spenfer,
a blow,
fignify,

bow'-ur. f.

BOWL,

b6 1.

to

flroke.
fo called.

Full of bowers.

vefl"el
to hold

f.

Anchor

a.
bow'-ur-ry.

f. Munificence,
BOWERY,
bou'n-tyuf-nis.

liberality.

vefl'els

the inner parts of

body ;
compaflion.
thing; tendernefs,
bow -ur. f. An arbour ; it feems
BOWER,
BOWER,

generoufly.
BOUNTEOUSNESS,

the
Inteftines,

the

organs within

any

ad. Liberally,
'n-tyif-ly.

bo

bow'-Ils.f.

BOWELS,

Unlimited,un-

confined.

BOUNTEOUS,

f.

legs.

bou'nd-h's.a.

BOUNDLESS,

Crooked.

a.

bd -hand.

bou'nd-lef-ms.f. Exemption BOW-LEGGED,

BOUNDLESSNESS,
from

bo -bent.

liquids
; the

hollow part of any thing; a bafin,or fountain.


BOUNTIFUL,
a.
bou'n-ty-fdl.
Liberal,generous,
mafs rolled along the
bo 1. f. Round
munificent.
BOWL,
ad. Liberally.
bou'n-ty-fdl-ly.

BOUNTIFULLY,

ground.
BOWL,

To
f. The
bou'n-ty-ful-nis.

BOUNTIFULNESS,

of beingbountiful,
quality
generofity.
BOUNTIHEAD,
7f.Goodnefs,
bou'n-ty-hed.

BOUN

biu

ho

fprout,

f.

rn.

a brook,
bound, a limit-;

BOM

bou
is

BOW,
bend

the

t.

f.

turn,

d at
perfoiini

bow'.

bodyin

V.

drink

bowls

to

playsat

bowls.

rope faftened to the

a.

one

To

token of

as

the bow

much

of

an

tion
ac-

bend, or

inflfct ;

or fubmiffion
rcfpeiSl;

to
bend, or incline,
in condefceniionito
prefs,to-crufh.

BOX,

boks

BOX,

buks.

to

matter,

is

to

deTo

for bowlers.

archer.

kept bent.

f.

f.

tree ;

archer

the

thing;

whofe

; one

v.

a.

of the

of wood,
thccaf-

or

tree.

ovher^

ot ihe

chefl: into whicli

feat in the
,

the wood

cafe made

hold any

givenis put ;
BOX, boks

An

bows.

compafs;

An

bo -yer. f.

trade is to make

time.

f.

-man.

which fee.
f. Boltfprit,
bd-fprit.
bo -firing,
f. The
by
firing

laviflily. BOWYER,

Drunken.

h6-zy. a.

as

To

n.

bo

AN,

which

bo'ze.v.

BOUSE,

BOUT,

pieceof ground,keptfmooth

BOWSPRIT,
BOWSTRING,

torrent.

BOUSY,

To

vel

To

fhoot into branches.

BOURN,
To

He that

bow'-lln.f.

BOWLINE,

playat

^ virtue.
n-ty-hfid.

v. n.
bur'-jun.

BOURGEON,

To

a.

thing.

any
bo-lur. f.

BOWLER,

munificence.

to

V.

at

middle part of the outfide of a fail.


b6 -I'ng-gren.
f. -A lebou n-ty. f. Generofity,
BOWLING-GREEN,
liberality,

TYHOOD,

BOUNTY,
To

bo 1.

throw bowls

riners
ma-

money

playhoufe.

To

mclofc

in

box.

BOX,

BRA
boles',
f.

BOX,

BRA

blow

tlie head

on

To

givenwitli

boks'.V.

BOX,

To

bok fn.

BOXEN,

v.
brag',

BRAG,

To

n.

with
fight

Made

a.

f.
brag',

BRAG,

the M.

the

box, rell-mbling

of

bc'ks'-ur.f.

who

man

boaft,a proud exprefllon


;

f. A puffbrag-ga-d6'-ih6.
ing,

fellow.
boafling

with
fights

a.
brig'-gart.
Boaftfui,
vainly

BRAGGART,

his fills.

boy',f.

BOY,

to difplay
boaft,.

thingboaftcd.

BRAGGADOCIO,

box.

BOXER,

To

n.

oftentatioufly.

the hand.

male

child,not

girl;

oftentatious.

one
"

in the ftate of adolefcence


word

older

of contempt

than

for young

BOYISH,

To

ifh,trifling.
ad.
triBOYISHLY,
boy'-ifli-ly.
Childifhly,
Childifhncfs,
boy'-l"h-n!s.

brib'l. f.

BRABBLE,
BRABBLE,

brabl.

clamorous
To

v.n.

brab'-lur. f.

BRABBLER,

contell

noify

brafe.

bandages;

v.

To

a.

bind, to

tie clofe

ftrain up.

to

holds any

thingtight
;

ftrapsof

leather

Braces of

which

on

in

printing,crooked

as

in

coach, thick

BRACE,

r,

An

BRACH,

bra-fur.' f.
brat ft. f.

BRACHIAL,

brak

cinclure,a bandage.

Belongingto

the

f. The
bra-kig'-gra-fy.

BRACHYGRAPHY,
or

bra

BRAIN,
out

of writingin
practice

BRACK,

brak

f.

fixed forthf-

fhort

piece of

wood

v.

n.

To

a.

bra'-mfh. a.

velTels

fenfe and

kill

by beating

Hotheaded, furious.

bra'n-lls.a.

BRAINPAN,

bran-pan. f.

Silly.
The

fkuU containing

the brains.

brri'n-slk.
a.
Addleheaded,giddy.

BRAINSICK,

ad.
bran-slk-ly,
Weakly,

BRAKE,

brd'n-slkn!s.

Indif-

f.

of Break.
preterite

The

bnVk.

BRAKE,

bnVk. f.

Fern,

BRAKE,

bra k.

f.

An

flax

the

handle

or

baker's

brambles.

inftrumcnt for
of

dreffing

fhip's
pump

kneadingtrough.
bra -ky. a.
rough.
Thorny, prickly,

BRAMBLE,

bram

bl. f.

berry
buih, dewBlackberry

bufh
bufh, rr.fpbcrry

any

fort of nail

to

f.
brim'-blmg.

BRAMBLING,
alfo a mountain

BRACKiSH, brak-i";h.a. Salt, (omethingfait.


brak'-ifn-nif.
f. S.dtnefs.
BRACKiSHNESS,
BRA;J", brad

of

which

roughprickly

fhrub.

fupportof fomt .hinp-.

f.

head,

BRAINLESS,

compafs.

breach.

brik'-kir.f.

BRACKET,

colkaion
from

the brain.

BRAKY,

arm.

wicn.

To

hemp

bitch hound.

-yal. a.

through

crction,giddinefs.
for

ornament

arms.

BRACER,

knot.

Small ropes reeved

BRAINSICKNESS,

pair,a couple.

bras -lit. f.

together.

weave

underftanding.

arife ; the

BRAINSICKLY,
hangs; Braces
a
inclofingpaflage, headily.

triplet
; tenfion,tightnefs.
hri'fe. f.

a.

texture,

That

in the

it

line

BRACELt

art

organs

motion

bra'fe.f. Cincture,
bandage; that which

BRACE,

bra'n. f.

BRAINISH,

BRACE,

the

and

noifily.

clamorous

To

v.

bra Iz. f.

BRAIN,

conteft.

fellow.

with

bra d.

bra d. f.

boaft.

Finely.

blocks.

f.

triflingncfs.
f. Puerility,
childifhncfs.
BOYISM,
boy'-izm.

To

BRAID,

BRAILS,

flingiy.

To

brag-ly.ad.

BRAID,

boafler.

boafter.

Without
a.
brag'-lls.

BRAGLY,

BOYISHNESS,

f.
brag-giir.

BRAGGER,
BRAGLESS,

men.

ftateof a boy.
f. The
boy'-hud.
to
boy'-Ifn.
a. Belonging
boy ; child-

BOYHOOD,

f. A
brag'-gart.

BRAGGART,

fant
in-

an

floor rooms

BRAN,

bran.

BRANCH,
one

bird called

chafiinch.
f.

The

hufks of

brantfh : f. The

of the main

boughs ;

any part that fhoots

out

B b

ground.

corn

fiioot of

tree

from the reftj

from

article;

any diuant
a

intaller
river

BRA
river runninginto

BRA

larger
;

part of

any

mily
fa-

collateral line; the oft-

defccndingin a
fpring,the dtfcendant

the antlers

{hoots of

or

branches

fpread into

to

fpeakdifFufively
; to have
To

brantfli

BRANCH,
into branches

ERANCHER,

in

out.
ihooting

To

a.

brant -fhur. f.

into branches

out

divide

BRAVADO,
as

To

BRANCHLESS,
BRANCHY,

brant

fpreadin^.
brand', f.
BRAND,
be

made

To

by burningwith

BRAND,

brand

lighted,

thunderbolt

tation

mark

To

a.

with

f. A
brand'-gos.

kind

to

bran'-d!fh.
v.

BRANDISH,
fhake

playwith,

to

BRANDLING,

brand

To

a.

wave

or

flourifh.

to

f.
-ling.

BRANDY,

BR

liquordiilijied
ftroiig

f. Squabble,
brang'l.
wrangle.

brang 1.

v.

n.

To

fquabble.
brank'. f. Buckwheat.
BRANK,
a.
BRANNY,
bran'-ny.
Havingthe
bra-zhur.

in brafs
or

f.

pan

BRAZIL,

to

for

To

n.

quarrelnoifily
indecently
j

wrangler.

or
flefhy

bulk, mufcular

boar

bra

-nur.

mufculous

fo called from

the arm,

its

flrength
j

boar.

f.

boar

killed for

the table.
f. Strength,
hardbra'-ny-nls.

nefs.
appearance

manufaflurer

bra-ze'l.f.

denominated, becaufe

bra'-ny.

BRAWNY,

that

Mufculous, flefhy,

a.

An

To

BRAY,

bra',v.

To

BRAY,

bra',

afs ;

rican
Ame-

have

been

firftbrought from

copper

with

yellowmetal, made
lapiscalaminaris ;

with

bra

pound,or grindfmall.

To

a.
v.

To

n.

make

noife

as

an

ofFenfivenoife.

Noife, found..

-ur.

One

f.

an
printers,

that

brays like

inftrum.nt

lo

aii

temper

the ink.

by

dence.
impu-

an

bra',f.

BRAYER,
afs ;

bras', f.

make

to

BRAY,

Brafil.

mixing

murders

who

man

The

body ;

BRAWNINESS,

hold coals.

wood, commonly fuppofedto

BRASS,

brave manner,

bulky.

BRASIER,

thus

lenge
chal-

Quarrel,noife,fcurrility.

f.

bran.

BRAWNER,

of bran.

BRASIL,

bra'-lur.f.

being mufculous

wrangle,

to

works

In

fpeakloud and

to

bral. f.

the flefh of

ANGLE,

defy,to

noife.

particular BRAWN,

wine.

BRANGLE,
To

indecently
;
make

part of the
f. A
bran'-dy.

To

a.

boafting
appearance.

bra'l. v.

BRAWLER,
A

v.

bra -v6. f.

BRAWL,

worm.

from

carry

BRAWL,
and

of

wild fowl.
To

boafl,a brag.

hire.

To

of infamy.
note
BRANDGOOSE,

f.

bravado, boafl.

BRAVO,

hot iron.

v.

tempt
con-

f. Courage,magnabra'-ve-ry.
nimity
fplendour,
magnificence
; fhow, often-

mark

in

Courageous,
daring,bold ;
mien
noble
; magnificent,

a.

ad.
bra've-ly.

BRAVERY,

called

"iFspring.

courageoufly,
gallantly.

fitto

or

the

brave,

to

Full of branches

flick

fword

lighted
;

BRAVE,

BRAVELY,

-fhy. a.

child,fo

brave, f. A hedor, a man


yond
daringbeprudence or fitnefs; a boaft,a challenge.

fhoots

naked.

hard

grand; excellent,noble.
BRAVE,

of branches.

boughs;

bi-a ve.

having a
gallant,

hawk.

brantlh'-lis.
Without
a.

bra-va-do.

BRAVE,

Ojie that fhoots

a young
falconry,

f.

the progeny,

brafs

impudent.

brat',

f. Fullnefs
brin'-tfhy-nls.

BRANCHINESS,

or

brafs ;

BRAT,

writh needlework.

adorn

; to

fpreadin
feparateparts ; to

horns
v.

To

n.

of
a.
bras'-sy.
Partaking

BRASSY,
as

brantfo'.v.

BRANCH,

appearance

.likebraf^.

horn.
flag's

To

f. An
bras'-sy-nls.

BRASSINESS,

To

bra'ze.v.

BRAZE,
to

harden

to

a.

To

folderwith brafsi

impudence,^
BRAZEN,

the ftem,and
"helpto ftrengthen
of the fliip.

of ribbands

by

worn

forepart

To

the

knot

women

breaft.

of

f. Armour
breft'-plate.

BREASTPLATE,

paringturf,driven by the
breft'-wurk.
BREASTWORK,

Works

any

bretfi'.
f.

The

of the

air drawn

in

To

to

throw
to

the air

out

take breath

To

n.

tions

draw in and

or

that

prayer

breathes,

of

BRED,
BREDE,

bre d. f.

breeches

The

To

pieceof
To

fit any

britfh'.
v. a.

thingwith

To

put into breeches

breech,

as

to

breech

wear

f. The
brit -tflilz.
the

over

the

lower

breeches,is,

of
authority
To BREED,
; to

garment

part of the
in

wife,

to

bre d.

v.

a.

fclf, to

give birth

to;

to

qualifyby education; to bnng


of.

bro'. v.

body ; to
ufurpthe

bro

BREWING,

to

to

taKC

-ur.

f. A

whofe

man

of various

profeffion

beer.

bro'-houfe.f.

BREWHc;USE,

houfe

propriated
ap-

brewing.
f. Quantityof liquor
bro'-inj;.

brewed.

produce

edi cate,

make

to

bro-Idzh. f. Mixture

it is to make

; to

up,

To

a.

brewer.

things.
BREWER,

worn

procreate, to generate
to

A fhort compendium.

f. Concifenefs,fhortbrev'-i-ty.

to

To

containingthe daily

of Rome.

liquorsby
ing
ingredients
;
prepare by mixto contrive to plot.
thingstogether;
bro'. v. n.
To
BREW,
performthe office

the hufband.

occafion,to caufc,

plural of

f. An abbreviation.
fare'-vya-ture.

BREWaGE,

contrive,to hatch, to plot;to producefrom


one's

book

bre-vyat.f.

BREW,

of

gun.

BREECHES,
men

the

mixing feveral

ordnance.

ToBPvEECH,

The

f.

-ren.

nefs.

breed.

part of

gales.

breath,

lower part of the

the hinder

with

f. An
bre'-vya-ry.
abridgment,

BREVIAT,

See BRAID.

brltlh'.f.

BREECH,
body ;

breth

BREVITY,

from To
palT.
particip.

bred,

Fanned

fiihof the turbot kind.

BREVIATURE,

Out

flinging
fly.
gentlegale.

bra -zy. ad.

bret'.f.

epitome;

an

breathing
place,vent.
bretlt'-lls.
a.

knowledgeof

Brother.

fpentwith labour; dead.

care

f.

z.

BRETHREN,

f. Afpiration,
febre'-th!ng.

BREATHLESS,

by

bre

fervice of the church

BREATHING,

to

BREEZE,

BREVIARY,
bre'-thur.
f. One

which

nurture.

br^'z. f.

BRET,

That

qualifications
manners,
;

BREEZE,

lives.

cret

BREEZY,

by the lungs; to live ; to reft;


inject
by breathing
; to ejedt

to

to.

BREATHER,

that breeds

f. Education,inftrucfare'-dlng.

ceremony;

adluate
or
by breathing
; to exercife;to move
breath
by
privately
give air or
; to utter
; to
vent

f. One

raife a breed.

BREEDING,

and

life;

bre'th.v.

BREATHE,

duced
pro-

produces
ther;
perfonwhich bringsup anothat is prolifick;
that takes
one

the

female

ejefted
refpiration
body ;
; repaufe,relaxation;breeze, moving air;
fpite,
a fingle
aft,an inftant.
out

number

hatch.

bre'-dur.f.

thing;

care

BREATH,

caft,a kind, a fubdivifion

quarrels.

the breaft of the defendants.

highas

as

up

; to

produced,

be

breed.

bred-bate.

BREEDER,

breaft.
f.

bringyoung

fpecies
offspring
; progeny,
; a

BREEDBATE,

ufed for

raife

f.

at once,

f. A plough
breft'-plow.

To

n.

produftion

; to

bred.

for

the breaft.

BREASTPLOUGH,

thrown

by

v.

; to

new

birth

BREED,

the

on

have

to

or

bre^.

BREED,
increafe

breft'-not.f.

-BREASTKNOT,
bunch

allthe

EREWIS,

bra is. f.

pieceof

fat pottage, made


boiling

BRIBE,
thi

bri be.

f.

ot

bead

foiktd in

faltcdmeat.

reward

given to

pervert

ud^meiit.
To

bribe,

BRIBE,

To

v.

bri -bur.

BRIBER,

B R

One

for

that pays

rupt
cor-

f. The
bri'-be-ry.

rewards for bad

fhapedlike

taking

clay}

loaf

brick.

To

a.

f.
brlk'-bat.

BRICKBAT,

colledlion

ufed

Clay

which

brlk'-dift.
f.

Duft

made

by

burn

f. Abrick-mafon.
brik'-li-ur.

BRICKLAYER,
trade is to make

Belongingto

a.

wedding,

f.

the

the

at
guefts

BRIDEMEN,

S ^el,T^ch
brig'-an-tine.

cake diftri-

has been

wedding.

the

1{.

attendthe

on

ground,

dance

portfet in

water

bridzh'.f.

houfe of

rection.
cor-

part of the nofe

the

buildingraifed over

pafl'age
; the upper
in
of the firings
fupporter

for the convenience

of

inflruments of mufick.
flringed
To

BRIDGE,
over

any

To

BRIDLE,
to

To

raife

; to

make

to

make

To

make

luminous

make

gay,

or

alert ;

bright,
by light
to

make

acute.

britn. v.

n.

To

grow

bright,

clear up.

BRIGHTLY,

with
ad.
bri't-!y.
Splendidly,

luftre.

bri't-nis.f.

BRIGHTNESS,
;

Luftie,fplen-

acutenefs.
f. Luftre,fplcnbril'-lyan-fy.

bridge BRILLIANCY,

hcadftalland reins

governed;

by
re-

check.

bri'dl.v.

a.

rcihain, to govern.
bridl. v.
BRIDLE,

head.

To

; to

dour.
The

horfe is reflrainedand

ftraint,
a curb,
To

a.

britn. v.a.
fhine

BRIGHTEN,

dour

place.
bri'dl.f.

BRIDLE,
which

bridzh'. v.

to

without

from

to

BRIDGE,

make

illuftrious;
A

fullof
glittering,
Shining,

BRIGHTEN,

To

round.

br!de-wel. f.

BRIDEWELL,

bri't.a.

as a
bright
light;clear,evident; illuftrious,
reign; witty,acute, as a brightgenius.

to

bri de-ftake. f.
to

of mail.

coat

The

as

ufed by corfairsor pirates


formerly
; a

BRIGHT,

ried
mar-

new

bridegroom.

BRIDESTAKE,

majorgeneral.

BRIGANTINE,

bride-madz.i ants

BRIDEMAIDS,

ficer,
of-

Marriage-bed.
f.

bri'de-men.

: f. Alightvefbrig'-an-dine.

man.

bride and

f. An
General, br!g-a-de'r.
in order below

BRIGANDINE,

f. A
bride-grom.

BRIDEGROOM,

divifion of forces,

married.

new

bri de-kake.

BRIDECAKE,
to

woman

bride-bed.

BRIDEBED,
buted

briers.

men.

BRIGADIER
next

bride, f.

plant.

bri-gadc.f.

body of

nuptial.
BRIDE,

few

Concifely
; in

a.
bri'-e-ry.
Rough, full of

BRIGADE,

bricks.

bri-dal.

BRIDAL,

up.

bref-nis. f. Concifenef;,fhort-

bri'-ur.
f.

BRIERY,

brik'-ma-kur. f. Onewhofe

BRICKMAKER,

many

tity,
quan-

in beating

nefs.

BRIER,

bricks in.

as

ftrokesdown

two

words.

kiln,a place

mufick,a meafure of

bref-ly.ad.

BRIEFNESS,

brik'-kil.f.

in

contains

time, and

for

poundingbricks.
to

bre'f.f. A fhort extrait,or epitome;


the
containing
writinggiventhe pleaders,
cafe ; letters patent, givinglicence to a charitable

BRIEFLY,

BRICK-KILN,

contradcd,

the

pieceof brick.

making brick.
BRICKDUST,

riding.

Short, concife

a.

hand

narrow.

bricks.

laywith
A

brlk'-klif.

BRICKCLAY,

bref.

The

BRIEF,

of burnt

mafs

brik'.v.

BRICK,

To

crime of

praftices.

brlk'.f.

BRICK,

holds the bridle in

which

BRIEF,

praiStices.
BRIBERY,

bridl-h.'md. f.

BRIDLEHAND,

givebribes.

To

a.

f.

BRILLIANT,
BRILLIANT,

To

guideby

bridle;

a.
Shining,fparklbnl'-lyint.

ing.
f. A
bril'-lyant.

To

hold

up

of

f. Splendour,
brll'-lyant-nls.

BRILLIANTNESS,
n.

diamond

the fineftcut.

luftre.

the

BRIM,

brim', f.

edge of

The

any

thing;

the

upper

edgeof

upper

the bank

of

liquor
;

any veffcl; the top of any

To

BRIM,

brim', v.

To

BRIM,

brim

a.

To

fillto the top.

n.

To

be full

to

Full

the top.

v.

brim -ful'.
a.

BRIMFUL,
BRIMFULNESS,

to

f.
brim -ful'-nls.

To

Fulnefs

brim'-mur.

f.

full

bowl

to

To

BRIMSTONE,

brIm'-ftSne.
f.

BRIMSTONY,

brlm'-fto-ny.Fullofbrim-

BRINDLE,

brind 1. f.

brind Id.

flate of

The

being

To

bring',
v.

place; to
to

;
to

to

; to

come

put into any

induce,

to

in one's

convey

caufe

To

a.

to

faitwater.

fetch from

ftate;
particular
prevailupon ; To

bringoff, clear,
To
bringon, to
;
bringover, to draw to
to

to

bring out,
to

party; To

new

kind

the

near

city

fifh.

Fragile,
apt

to

break.

Aptnefs

to

the

Having

bra d.

bri'-niHi-nis.
f. Saltnefs.

or
precipice

f.
a

The

edgeof

any

To

fpit,to pierce

veffel in order
to

to

giveout,

a.

fpit;

an

er,
open-

thing.

Wide, extended

grofs,coarfe

in breadth ;
;

obfcene,

BROAD

of cloth.
To

brl'dn. v.

BROADEN,

BROADLY,
from

Togrow

n.

bra'd-ly.

In

ad.

brid-nls. f.

broad

broad.

manner.

Breadth, extent

fulfomnefe.
fide to fide ; coarfenefs,

bra'd-slde. f.

of
fiiip
; the volley
fideof a fhip.

fword, with

fhot firedat

broad

from

once

bra'd-ford.f.
a

fide of

The

the

cutting,

blade.

bra'd-wize. ad.

Accordingto.

the diredlion of the breadth.

place,as

BROCADE,

bro-kd de.

filken fluff variegated.

river.

bri-ny.f. Salt.
vivacious,
Li\e'y,
gay

brlflc.a.

a.

notreferved.
bold,not delicate,
bra'd-clo'tlT.
f. A finekind
CLOTH,

fulfome

BROADWISE,

brine, fait.

of any

BROADSWORD,
taftc of

fpit.

v.

open any ilore;

large; clear,open

BROADSIDE,

bringsany thing.
bri-nlfli.a.
BRINISH,

gadfly.
A

thing.

utterer

bringup, to
bring up, to bring
that

The

br6'-tfhur.f.

BROADNESS,

To
fubdue, to reprefs;

BRINISHNESS,
BRINK, brink

any

bring

To

f.

liquor;to

BROAD,

quitted
ac-

pcrfon

BROCADED,
;

erful,
pow-

fpirituous
; vivid,bright.
brls'-klt.f. The
brcaft of
BRISKET,
anin^al.

of

name

bro tfh.

BROACHER,

bring
bring
bring
gain;

pr.-idice.
f.
The
BRINGER,
bring'-ur.

BRISK,

rock

fpit;to pierce a

utter

or

into

BRINY,

in

bro tfh. f.

the

or

in adlion

engage
a

not

to con-

be

to

procure

exhibit,to fhew

to

educate,toinftruft;To

as

fet with briftles.

brlt'l-nls.
f.

brlze.

with

draw

draw

attrad,to

forth,to givebirth to, to produce; To


in, to reclaim ; To bring in, to afford

of

The

BROACH,
as

ther
ano-

hand,

own

about, to bringto pafs,to efFedt; To

under,

in bridles.

ftand erecl

brls'-t6-ft6ne.
f. A

brlt'l.a.

BRITTLENESS,
BRIZE,

Brinded,ftreaked.

f. Pit of
bri'ne-pit.

BRING,

To

n.

found

brlt'.
f.

with f.ilt; BROACH,


impregnated

; tears.

BRINEPIT,

To

v.

ered

To

Thick
a.
brls'-ly.

BRITTLE,

Streaked,tabby.

a.

brine, f. Water

To

break.

BRINDLED,

along;

ftiffhair of fwine.

a.

of Briftol,

brinded.

fend

v.

STONE,

BRIT,

BRINDED,

dudl

BRISTLE,

brls1.

of foft diamond

a.

brln'-dld.
a.

to

BRISTLE,

BRISTLY,

Sulphur.

ffone.

To

The

brls1.

BRISTOL

the top.

the fea

brls1. f.

briftles.

BRIMMER,

BRINE,

brific'-nSs.
f. Livelinefs,
vigour,

qu'xknefs
; gaycty.
BRISTLE,

the brim.

the top.

to

ad.
brllk'-ly.
A"tivcly,
vlgoroudy.

BPJSKLY,

BRISKNESS,

fountain.

; woven

BROCAGE,
an

bro-ka'-dld.a.
in the

manner

bi(i'-kldzh.f. The

promotingbargains
;

Dreft in brocade

of brocade.

gaingottenby

lawful
givenfor any unin
old
things.
dealing

the hire

office ; the trade of

BROC-

brok'.f.

To

badger.

A red deer,hvo
br."k'-kit.f.

BROCKET,
BROGUE,

f.

brog.

years old.
kind of fhoej a corrupt

broi'-dur.
v.

BROIDER,

To

a.

broi

from

f. Embroidery,
flower-de-ry.

broi'l.V.

BROIL,

drefs

To

a.

cook

or

by

To

BROIL,

broi 1.

To

BROKE,

broke,

which
n.

v.

v.

n.

be in the heat.

BROOMY,

To

contract bufiiiefs

BROTH,

brd'kn. part. palT.


of Break.
r-t'd.
brd'kn-ha
BROKEN-HEAR'i'ED,

BROKENLY,

Without

brC. kn-ly. ad.

f.

does bufmefs for another

goods;

BROKERAGE,

any

pimp, a

f.

or

The

or

pay

brin'-ko-kel.
f. A

The

that

ftafFto

flefh is

in which

the

opens

windpipeby

fion,to prevent fufFocation.


bro'nze.f. Brafs
BRONZE,

ation

the

in

man

BROOCH,

bro tfh. f.

jewel,an

any

BROOD,

To

n.

confider any

thingby
brod.

fit on

chickens under

; to cover
or

brat.

eggs,

to

the

wing ;
thinganxioufly
; to

the forehead
the

weapon
To

a.

chcrifh

by

care,

or

; the

edgeof

of

arch

to

brother.

Bring.
hair

the

over

air of the
general

tenance
coun-

highplace.

any

brow'-bet. v.

To

a.

brow'-bound. a.
brow'-s!k.a.
brown,

BROWNBILL,

care.

v.

The

Natural

befeems

de-

ftern looks.

BROWSICK,
BROWN,

The

kind.

of
part, paffive

brow', f.

prefswith

ornameat

guage,
lantheological

bruth'-er-had. f.

becomes

as

BROWBOUND,

jewels.
bro'd. v.
BROOD,

form,

general.

To- BROWBEAT,

medal.

of

hatch them

eye

of the

in manner,

a.
bruth'-er-ly,

BROUGHT,

baw-

united
clofely

is ufed in

of the fame

men

fuch
brothers,

inci-

of beinga brother ; an afTociquality


of men
for any purpofe,
a fraternity
; a

clafs of

BROW,

any

born

f.

or

;
a

One
one

refemblinganother

BROTHERHOOD^

tumour

called
afperiaarteria,

the

mother

or

BROTHERLY,

operationwhich

to

Land

f.

Full of broom.

Liquor

profeflion
; Biother

ftate

BRONCHIAL,
a.
brcn'-kyal.
throat.
\
BRONCHICK,br"'n-k!k.
f. That
BRONCHOTOMY,
brcn-k6t'-t6-my.

To

fo called

is bound.
a.

for

Belongingto the

mature

abcfom

bro'm-ftif. f.

br^'-my.

father

maker.

match

broker.

part of

watch,

fort of water;

br^ m-Iind.

bratlT. f.

one

any

deals in old

who

; one

Bronchos.

to

be

to

it is made.

dy-houfe.
bruth'-ur.f.
BROTHER,

that

faclor,one

bro -kur-idzh.

ERONCHOCELE,

To

endure,

brith'-ll.
/
BROTHEL,
bruth'-!l-houfe
fe.
BROTHELHOUSE,
]

fame

ferics.
regular
bro-kur.
BROKER,

houfchold

a.

fear.

crufhed by grief
or
Havingthe fpirits

of that

endure.

boiled.

BROKEN,

of

Afhrub,

of which

the broom

To

for others.

reward

bro'm. f.
the matter

BROOMSTAFF,

the coals.

layingon

To

n.

rivulet.

io

bears broom.

tumult, a quarrel.

v.

bear,

bro'k-lime.
f.

BROOMLAND,
broi'l.f.

BROIL,
To

bro k.

l^o

a.

herb.

an

BROOM,

work.

runningwater,

content.

adorn with

of needle-work.
figures

BROIDERY,

To

br.i'k.v.

BROOK,
BROOK,

BROOKLIME,

dialect.

To

bro'k.f.

f.A fpecies
of cabbage. BROOK,
brok'-ko-ly.

BROCCOLI,
BROCK,

13 R

of the

BROWNNESS,

The

a.

Crowned,

Dcjecled.
name

brow'n-bil.f.

of

The

colour.
ancient

Englifhfoot.
brow

n-n!s. f.

brown

lour.
co-

h::tch.

BROOD,

bro'd. f.
; a

Offspring,
progeny

hatch,the

number

Hatched

at once

the adl of coverin2 the


eggs-

BROODY,
the

e2:25.

bro

-dy. a.

In

To
Ihte of

f. Gloomy
brow'n-flud'-y.

nerationBROWNSTUDY,
gemeditations.
;

on
fiuing

BROWSE,
or

brow

zc.

v.

a.

To

eat

branches,

flirubs...
To

bro'ze.v.

BRUISE,

To

with

BUD

To cruftior

a.

mangle

bro'ze. f.

BRUISE,

hurt

with

fomething

and heavy.
bro'ze-wurt.f. Comfrey.
BRUISEWORT,

BRUMAL,

to

the

bri-nit'. f.

BRUNETT,
brown

complexion.

BRUNT,

brunt', f.

To

with

woman

brufli'.
f.

brufli'.
v.

BRUSH,
brufli;

inftrument for

An

rubbing;

bib'l.v.

To

a.

ftrike with

to

quicknefsj

to

paint

are

bubbles;

To

a.

cheat.

cheat.

breafi:.

A woman's

groinfrom the

binding

all tumours

in

called Buboes.

are

buk-a-nerz.

BUCANIERS,
BUCK,

rub with

fweepor

rife in

the fcrotum

thigh to

for the

To

gentlenoife.

f.
bub'-by.

of the

a fhock.
aflault,

perfoncheated.

n.

bu'-bo.f. The

BUBO,
Shock, violence;blow,

v.

bub'-blur. f.

that part

BRUSH,
To

BUBBLE,

BUBBY,

ftroke.

rude

with

run

BUBBLER,

winter.

bib 1.

BUBBLE,

firmnefs ;

and
folidity

wants

falfe fliow ; the

cheat, a

To

bro't.f.

Rumour, noife,report.
bro'-mal. a.
Belonging to

thingwhich

any

blunt

BRUIT,

bub', f. Strong
malt liquor.
bub'l.f. A fmall bladder of water;

BUB,

BUBBLE,

heavyblow.

f.

word

cant

of
or
privateers,
pirates,

America.

buk'. f.

which

The

liquorin

cloaths

waflied ; the cloaths waflied in the liquor.


'

with

To

brufli'.
v.

BRUSH,

To

n.

with

move

the male

hafte;

to fly
over, to flcim lightly.
brifli-ur. f. He that ufesa brufli.
BRUSHER,
brifli'-wiid.
f. Rough, flirubBRUSHWOOD,
by thickets.
like
BRUSHY,
a.
brufli'-y.
Rough or fliaggy,

To

brufli.

brus'l.v.

BRUSTLE,

bro-tal.

a.

To

BUCK,

buk'.

To

BUCK,

biik'.v.

which

in which

churliflinefs.

BRUTE,
BRUTENESS,

out

of

well

biik'l.f.

To

BRUTIFY,
a

man

creature

bro

v.

make

to
a

buckle

to, to

br"^'-t!fli.
a.
Beflial,
a
refembling

ferocious
rough,favage,
ignorant,
untaught.

carjial;
grofs,

brute.

BRUTISHNESS,
nu-a;-Ti;.

br^ -t!fli-n!s.
f.

of the beech

BUCKRAM,
linen

ad. In the manner


bro'-tlfli-ly.

BRUTISHLY,

velTelin which

ter
wa-

v.

metal, with

fallen one

to

the

thing

crifpedand

hair

faflen with

To

a.

to

To bend, to bow;

n.

apply

to ;

buckle with,

To

engage with.

BUCKLER,

buk'-lur.f.

fruitor mafl:

tree.

buk'-rum.

f.

cloth,fiifFenedwith

fort of

f.

buk'-t'ncrn. f.

bii-kol-Ik.

ftrong

g\mi.

buks-hirn.

BUCKSHORN,
BUCKTHORN,

Brutality,BUCOLICK,

fliield.

bik'-mirt. f. The

BUCKMAST,

beaft ;

To

a.

biik 1.

BUCKLE,
To

brute.

BRUTISH,

of

To

Brutality.

-tl-fy.

fort of

the veflelsin which

link of

made

catch

without reafon.

bro't-nls.
f.

plant,a

is carried,
to quencha fire.
particularly

water

To

rough,ferocious.
A

buk'-kit.f. The

is drawn

BUCKLE,

f.

bucks

carried to the wafli.

are

BRUTALIZE,
tongue or
grow
another ; the flate of
or favage.
ad. Churliflily,
humanly. curled.
inBRUTALLY,
bri'-tal-ly.
buk 1. v.
To BUCKLE,
bro't.a. Senfelefs,
unconfcious ; favage,
buckle ; to confine.
BRUTE,
t.

as
copulate

biik'-ben.f.

brutal

bro

wafli cloaths.

To

n.

buk'-baf-ki't.
f. The baflcet

cloaths

BUCKET,

favage,cruel,inhuman.
f. Savagenefs,
BRUTALITY,
bro-tal'-!-ty.

irrational;

deer,

other animals.

To

a.

the fallow

of

trefoil.

belongsto

brd'-ta-llze.
v. n.

V.

BUCKBASKET,

brute ;

To

male

and does.

crackle.

To

n.

That

The

of rabbets and

BUCKBEAN,

BRUTAL,
a

biik'.f.

BUCK,

brufli.

a.

plant,
A

tree.

Paftoral.

'

BRYONY,

bry -o-ny.

BUD,
f.

plant.

bud', f.

The

fi-ftfliootof

plant,a

To

B
To

hud

BUD,
or

To

To

put forth young

gems

bud

To

a.

V.

budzh'.

BUDGE,

v.

budzh'. a.

BUDGE,

bud-jur.f.

BUDGET,

bid

carried
eafily

BUFF,

buf

of the
a

To

f.
-j!t.

ftir.

that

ftirs.

jnovesor

bag fuch

as

may

BULBOUS,
To

from the fkin


prepared

the

ftrike.

bif -fl-l6.f. A

BUFFALO,
or

To

a.

V.

kind of wild bull

'-fit.
f.

BUFFET,

buf

BUFFET,

buf-fjt'.f.

A
A

blow

BUFFET,

buf'-flt.V.

n.

To

BUFFET,

baf

-fit. v.

n.

the fifr.

with

kind of

To

cupboard.

To

box,

To

bulk', f.

bufl. f.

BUFFLE,

to

beat.

bulk', f.

BULK,

fion is

The

acrofs

or

in water,

take

Magnitude,fize,quantity
;
A

part of

fabrick.

building
jutting

to

make

low

Dull,
profef-

and
jefts
that

man

antick

buffoon

bug',f.

tice
prac-

fcurrilemirth.
jefts,
infedl,bred in
ftinking

old

a
frightful
objecl,

falfe terrour.
The
f.
bug'-g!-nls.

ftate of

beinginfected with bugs.


BUGGY,
a.
bug'-gy.
Abounding with bugs.
; f. A hunting
bu'gl."
BUGLE,
BUGLEHORN,
bu'gl-horn. horn.
f.
bead of black glafs.
BUGLE, bu'gl. A fliining
BUGLE,
bu'gl.f. A plant.
f. The
BUGLOSS,
herb ox-tonguc.
bu'-glos.
To BUILD,
blld'.
To make a fabrick,
V. a.
or

to
edifice;

raifc

any

thingon

fupportor

foundation.

BUILD,

v.

n.

To

blunder.

dogs.

f. A dog of
bul'-dog.

BULL-DOG,

remarkable

of

name

BULL

ACE,

the

depend on,

to

bil'-Iis.f.

four

round

plum.

ball of n-ictal.

Gold

filver in

or

lum.punwrought.
bul-llfh'-un.
f.

BULLITION,
of

Knapweed.

wild

A
A

f.
bul'-Iyun.

BULLION,

fellow
ftupid

bal'-wurt.f. Bi(hops-weed.
bul'-lit.
f.

BULLET,

particular

fifh.

bul'-wed.f.

BULL-WEED,

for his courage.

bCil'-hcd.
f.

BULL-HEAD,

T.hc aft

cr

ftate

boiling.
bdl'-luk.f.

BULLOCK,

young

bull.

f. A noify,
bluftering,
bul'-ly.
relling
quar-

BULLY,

fellow.

bul'-rufti.
f.

BULRUSH,
citadel;

BUM,

bul'-wurk.f.

BULWARK,
blld

powerful,and

of the zodiack
figns

f. Something
bdl'-beg-ur.

BULL-WORT,

BUGGINESS,

cattle;in

f. The fport
bul'-bi-ting.

bulls with
baiting

the
A

one

black

enemy

of the twelve

BULLBEATING,

form,

low

f.
big'-b5r.

of

terrible.

houfchold ftuff.

BUGBEAR,

fenfe,an
fcriptural

prailifes BULL-BEGGAR,

raillery.
f. The
BUFFOONRY,
bif-f^'n-e-ry.

Of great fizeor ftature.


male

The

letter publifhed
by the pope ;

of

made
partition

bul-k!-nis. f. Greatnefsof fta-

a.
bul'-ky.

violent ;
a

fize.

biil'.f.

the

with buffalo.

indecent

refton.

fame

fhipwith boards.

BULKINESS,

BULL,

boxer.

fame

fport,by
poftures,a jackpudding; a

To

7'o

bulk'-hed.f.

BULKHEAD,

ing-match.. ture,
box-

playa

buf 1-hed-id. a.
BUFFLEHEADED,
ftupid.
buf-f(^'n.
whofe
f. A man
BUFFOON,

an

The

Containingbulbs.

n.

grofs,the majority
; main

BULKY,
buf -f !-tir.f.

BUFFETER,

BUG,

root.

out.

cow.

of

bul

jc. v.
founder,to jutout.

to

body,or

biLl'-bus.
a.

BULGE,

BULK,
.

builds,
an

Bulbous.

with

Leather

coat.
military

hif

that

bul-bi'-fhus.a.

BULBACEOUS,

be

ufed for waift belts,


"c.
buffalo,
pouches,

BUFF,

bulb', f. A round

BULB,

ftore,
or ftock.

; a

f.

To

One

He

f. A fabrick,
edifice.
BUILDING,
an
bll'-drng.
bllt'.
The
f.
BUILT,
form, the ftruaure.

Stiff,formal.

BUDGER,

architciit.

inoculate.
n.

bll-dur. f.

flaoots, BUILDER,

; to be in the bloom.

BUD,

To

n.

V.

bum.

largerufh.
A

fortification,
a

fecurity.
f.

The

part
d

on

which

we

fit;it
is

BUR

for any thingmean


or
ufed, in compofitlon,
bumbailiff".
low, as
bum-ba'-llf.f. A bailiffof
BUMBAILIFF,
is

the meaneft

that is

kind, one

employedin

ar-

f.
bway'-"n-fy.

BUOYANCY,
of

bom-ba'rd. f. Bombard.

BUMBAST,

bom-baft', f.

a. Which
BUOYANT,
bwoy'-.int.
BUR, bur',f. A rough head of

biir'-but.
f.

BURDELAIS,

Bombaft.

BURDEN,

ruftick.

or

BUNCH,

appearance

buntlh'. f.

aclufter;a

number

thingbound into
BUNCHBACKED,
bunches

of
a

of

hard

the

clown.

lump,

knob;

thingstied together;
any

buntfh'-bakt.a.

Having

biin'dl.f.

number

of

things

To

a.

fong.

load,to

cumber.
in-

loader,an

bur'-dok.f.

BUREAU,

bu-ro.

To

a.

flopup.

f.
bung'-hdle.

The

hole

at

the barrel is filled.


v.
bung'l.

BUNGLE,

n.

To

perform

v. a.
bung'l.

BUNGLE,

To

botch,to

BUNGLE,

f.

botch, an

proper

towns.

f. A
bur-ga-mot'.
fpeciesof

or

bur'-g5-net'

BURGONET,

kind of helmet.

f. A
bur'-jis.

citizen,a freeman

of a city
of a town
; a reprefentative
corporate.
buF.-r6. f. A corporatetown
row.
or burBURGH,
,

BURGHER,
A

tenure

nage
ma-

clumfily.
f.
bung'l.

See BURROW.

pear.

BURGESS,

clumfily.

See DOCK.

A cheft of drawers.

f, A
bur'-g'dzh.

cities and

BURGANET,

v.

f.

bur'-ro.f.

BURG,

To

bur'-d!n-fum-n!s.
f.

Weight, uneafinefs.

BURGAMOT,

bung

Grievous,

troublefome.

bun'dl.v. a. To tie in a bundle.


BUNDLE,
for a barrel.
BUNG,
bung',f. A ftopple
BUNG,

Grievous,
op-

bur'-dln-fum.a.

BURDENSOxME,

to

BUNGHOLE,

bur'-dln-us,
a.

cylindri- BURGAGE,

To

To

in
repeated

biir'-dln-ur,
f.

BURDENOUS,

BURDOCK,

a.
bun'-tfhy.
Growinginto bunches.

together
; any thingrolled up

which

bur'-dln.v.

fort of grape.

load; fomething

birth ; the verfe

BURDENSOMENESS,

knot.

cally.

To

f. A
A

preffivc
; ufelcfs.

the back.

on

BUNCHY,
BUNDLE,
bound

fink,

not

oppreflbur.
a.
bump'-kln-ly.
Having

BUMKINLY,
manner

bur'-din, f.

will

plant.
fiftfull of prickles.

bur-de-la.

bump',f. A fwelling, protuberance.


grievous
; a
To BUMP,
bump',v. a. To makea loud noife. To BURDEN,
f. A cup filled.
BUMPER,
bum'-pur.
f. An aukward heavy
bump'-kin.
BUMPKIN,
BURDENER,
BUMP,

quality

floating.

BURBOT,

refts.

BUMBARD,

The

awkward-

to

certain

ncfs.

f. One
bur'-gur.

who

has

right
place.
f. The
vilege
pribur'-gur-ftilp.

in this
privileges

or

that

BURGHERSHIP,
f. A bad workman.
of a burgher.
BUNGLER,
bung'-lur.
ad. Clumfily, BURGLARY,
f. Robbinga houfe
BUNGLINGLY,
bur'-gla-ry.
bung'-l!ng-Iy.
in
with
intent to rob.
or
awkwardly.
by night, breaking
bun', f. A kind of fweet bread.
f. One
BUNN,
BURGOMASTER,
bur'-gS-maf-tur.
bunt.
f.
of
An
in
the
BUNT,
a city.
increafing
cavity.
employed
government
bun'-tur. f. Any low vulgarwof.
att of burying,
The
PUNTER,
man.
BURIAL,
ber'-yal.
f.
The
biin'-ting.

BUNTING,

name

of

bird.

BUOY,

interment ; the
fepulture,
thing under earth ; the

zQ. of
church

placingany
fervice for

funerals.
bwe

f.

pieceof cork or wood


a weight.
bway v. a. To keepafloat.
.

tied to
floating,

To

BUOY,

BURIER,

f. He
bcr'-ry-ur.

BURINE,

bu'-n'n.f,

BURLACE,

bur'-lafe,
f.

that buries.

gravingtool.
A

fort of gr.ipc.

To

BUT

BUZ

a.
biz'-zy.
Employedwith

BUSY,

earncfbief?;

v.
b'z'-zy.
employ, engage.
f. A vain, mtdblz'-zy-bod-y.

BUSY,

To

a.

BUSYBODY,

To

which
introduces the
particle
;
a fyllogifm,
only,nothingmore
now;

of

than

; not

than

otherwife

if it were

than

for this

not

beit; otherwife than;


than

yet it may be

by

no

but'-cnd.f.

that is

longerago

fell their Hcfh

great broad

that is

bdt'-tfaur.v.

To

a.

kill,to

manner.
butcherly

barous.
barbut'-tfher-ly.
bloody,
a.

a.
but'-ta-r)'.
Having

f. The
trade
biit'-tflie-ry.

BUTCHERY,

hatcher; murder,

cruelty;the

of

blood is fhcd.

the
furnijfhing

employedin

table.

joinsit to

f.

That

break

their

f.

the

hundred

and

man

To

oil with

butter

the

to

a.

An

but'-tur.v.
; to

incrcafe

a.

the head.

unduous
of

milk, till

the

or

Ibkes every

ijicbittourn.

fupportanother

Todrefs, tocloathj

prop,

buk'-fum.
brifk
lively,

caught.
a

wall built

a.

To

prop.

Obedient,obfequious;

a.

wanton,

loopin

fupport.

but -tris.v.

jolly.

ad. Wantonly,amobuk'-fum-ly.

bik'-fum-nis.f. Wantonncfs,

BUXOMNESS,
amoroufnefs.

To

To

BUY,
BUY,

BUYER,

throv/.

BUTTERBUMP,

hall; the

or

but-trls. f. A prop,

by',v.

To

a.

by paying price
fmear,

a.

of the cloaths is

; to

To

knob

but'n-h6le.f. The

the button

BUXOM,

fub-

Any

but'n. v.

BUTTRESS,

gay,

flrike with

To

the part

rump,

plant.

barrel

the cream
by agitating
from the whey.
feparates

BUTTER,

whom

upon

ftance made
the oil

BUTTRESS,
To

The

faflen with buttons.

which

jefts.

bit'-tir. f.

BUTTER,

of

containing BUXOMLY,
of wine.
twenty-fix
gallons
roufly.

but', v.

BUTT,

; a

a
vellel,

bit'n. f.

BUTTON,
to

part of the

uprightpier.
but',f, The placeon which the mark
BUTT,
to be (hot at is placed
the
; the pointat which
is diredled

but'-uk.f.

BUTTONHOLE,

but'-man.

arch which

fcrvant

where

room

up.

the tail.

bud

To

but'-lir.f. A

BUTMENT,

f. The
but'-te-ry.

BUTTON,

place where

the appearance

of butter.
qualities

BUTTOCK,
near

To

bit'-tur-wurt. f. A plant,

laid
are
pro^'i^lons

BUTCHERLY,

one

The

bit'-tur-wiim-un.f. A

BUTTERY,
or

but

butter.

foretooth.

f. A
BUTTERY,
bdt'-tfher-ly-n's.

BUTCHERLINESS,

company

mark

to

fanicle.

BUTCHER,

endeavour

whey

butter is

that fellsbutter.

woman

murder.

BUTLER,

cream

but'-tur-tcitJi.
f.

delighted BUTTERWORT,

blood.

BUTT,

ufed

of carved wood,

that kills animals

One
one

The

when

f. A piece
but'-tur-prlnt.

BUTTERPRINT,

not

BUTTERWOIMAN,

BUTCHER,

To

the

from
fcparated

made.

thing.
bat'-tfnir.f.

horfe.

but'-tur-mllk.
f.

BUTTERMILK,

blunt end of
any

Th:

beautiful

inftrument of

An

foot of

paringthe

BUTTERTOOTH,

BUT-END,

with

but'-t3-rls.f.

fteelufed in

this been.

to

f. A
bit'-tur-fly.

BUTTERIS,

how-

for,had

but

inf-cl.

means

however,
not

even,

objeded;

than

other

plant.

May.

BUTTERFLY,

minor

the

but'-tur-flow-ur.
f.

yellowflov/er of

to

dlins;,fantafticalpsrfon.
but', conjuiift.
BUT,
Except; yet, nevertheJcfs

but'-tur-bur.
f.

BUTTERBUR,
BUTTERFLOWER,

aftive,
meddling.
buftling,

by',v.

To

n.

f.
by'-ur.

to acquire
purchafe,
manage by money.
treat about a purchafe.
He
that buys, a pur-

chafer.

f. A
but'-tir-bimp.

fowl,

To

BUZZ,

buz',

noifc like bees

to

v.

n.

To

hum,

whifpcr,

to

to

make

prate.
BUZ-

of hawk. ;
fpecics

mean

7 prep.
by'.

^y* J

of

or
degenerate

blockhead,

fecret

It notes

for the
than

whifperer.

the agent ; it notes

inftrument;it notes

the Cdufe;

not

f. By-laws are
by'-l;i'.

BY-LAW,

dunce.

good of thofe that make

the

publicklaw

orders made
further

them,

binds.

f.
by'-name.

BY-NAME,
BY-PATH,

nickname.

f.
by -pdtti.

path.
by which any thingis performed;
the
it
notes
in,
or
BY-RESPECT,
at,
notingplacej
view.
the difference between
or
two
pared
thingscomthe

it notes

the

f,

buz'-zur. f.

BUZZER,
'

buz'-zird.

BUZZARD,

fum

privateor

obfcurc

means

than,"notmg time

later

befide,

to, in prefence,noting
; near
notingpafiage
it notes the abfence
proximity
; before Kimfelf,
of all others ; it is the folemn form of fwearing
;
athahd; it is ufed in forms of obteftingj
by
proxy of; notingfubftitution.

f. Private
by'-rcs-pekt'.

by -rd m.

BY-ROOM,

f. A

within.

room
private

BY-SPEECH,'
f. An
by'-fp(i't{h.

end

incidental

or

cafual

fpeech.
f. A looker-on,
BY-STANDER,
by'-fUn-dur.
one

unconcerned.

f. An obfcure flreet.
BY-STREET,
by'-flre't.
BY, by',ad. Near, at a fmall diftance ; befide, BY-VIEW,
by -vu'. f. Private felf-intercflcd
purpofe.
; in prefence.
paffing
ad. In a fhort time.
BY AND
BY-WALK,'
bf-wa'k.f. Private walk, not
BY, by -and-by'.

by',f. Somethingnot

BY,

obje6tof

regard,as by

affairwhich

An

is not

by -end.
advantage,

f.

BY-END,

the main

mediate
im-

road.
f.
by'-wa'.

BY-WAY,

by.

the main

bufinefs.

kab'. f.

ingabout

bf-wurd.f.

BY-WORD,

Hebrew
clofe

To

Pafl.

rabbins ;

meafure,contain-

pintsEnglifh.
The

of

a term

the

to

faying,a

verb
pro-

reproach.

ka-bal'. v.

To

united in fome

men

n.

form

kab'-bldzh.

CABBAGE,

plant.

v.

a.

ftealin

To

cuttingclothes.
kib'-bldzh-tre.
f.

CABBAGE-TREE,
cies of

To

kab'-bi'dzh.f.

CABBAGE,

fecret fcience of the

body of
defign
; intrigue.

CABAL,

obfcurc

CAB

Hebrew

three

ka-bal'.f.

CABAL,

privateand

weft of.

CAB

C"^AB,

a.
by-weft',
Weftward,

BY-WEST,

Private intercllr,
fecret

a.
by'-gon.

BY-GONE,

the

by"-k6n-fern'-ment.way.

BY-CONCERNAIENT,
f.

the direft and

fpe-

palm-tree.
kab'-bldzh-wiirm.
f.

clofe intrigues.CABBAGE-WORM,

An

infea.

CABALIST,

kab'-a-l!ft.
f. One

/killedin the

CABIN,

traditionsof the Hebrews.

kab'-bin.f. A

chamber

in

fliip
;
cottage,

CABALLISTICK,
that has

an

CABALLER,

occult

thing

ka-b-il'-lur.
f.

CABIN,

To

n.

v.

kab'-bin.

v.

live in

To

a.

; a

fmall

fmall houfe.
a

cabin.

confine in

cabin.

meaning.

in clofe deflgns,
an

To

room

or

kab -bin.
To CABIN,
CABALLISTICAL,kab-a-lis'-t!-kal.^a.Some-

kab-a-lls'-tlk.5

fmall

He

intriguer.

that engages

CABINED,

kab -bind.

CABINET,

kib'-in-ct.f.
E

a.

Belongingto
A

cabin.

fet of boxes

or

drawers

CAD

for curiofities; any

drawers

thingsof value

hidden

are

CABINET-COUNCIL.
council held in

f.

CABINET-MAKER,
'

ku'bl.f.

CABLE,

in wood.

great rope of

fhip

an

illhabit

f. Such
ka'-kek-fy.
of the

humours,

the vital and animal

kak'l.v.

CACKLE,

functions.

kak'l. f.

CACKLE,

fifh.

To

n.

make

of
a

To

noifeas

fowl,that cackles

from

Hate.

found

ka-ku'-ml-nate.
v.

make fiiarp
or pyramidal.
ka-dav'-e-rus.a.
CADAVEROUS,

of

kind of

worm

a.

To

ka'ke.f.

A
or

kind

Having

fwigsorwire,

placefor wild beaftsj

of t.ipeor

ka'de. a.

Tame, foft,as

CADE,

ka'de.f.

kindof

To

cage.
name

Hatter,to.

delicate bread

rather flat than

ka'ke. v.

CAKE,

n.

To

any

high.

harden

as

dough

oven.

kal'-a-bafh.f.

CALABASH,

TREE,

CALABASH

of
fpecies

cups,

as

bon
rib-

cade lamb.

barrel.

kal'-a-bafh-tr6".
f. A

the fhellsare

ufed

alfo for inflruments

by

tree

for

the negroes

of mufick.

kal-a-mank'-6.f.

kind of

woollen fiuff.

kal'-a-mine. f.

CALAMINE,

grub.

CADE,

form

CALAMANCO,

dead carcafs.

kid'-dis. f.

kept;

v. a.
ka-j6'le.

CAJOLE,

of which

the appearance

inclofureof

An

are

larger
gourd.

bad found

of words.

CACUMINATE,

veflel,
containing

crocodile.

in the

f. A
k;V-k6-f6-ny.

CACOPHONY,

thingof
To

corrupted.

of the humours

wooden

or

cable knave.

f. A depraka'-k6-k!m-my.
vation

CACOCHYMY,

birds

^'

ka-ka-klm'-ik.
humours

barrel

fivegallons.

'

7
ka-k6-k!m'-y-kal.

CACOCHYMICK,

or

f.
ka'je.

CAKE,

CACOCHYMICAL,

CADDIS,

f.

f. Flattery.
CAJOLERY,
ka-jo-le-ry.
f, A mean
a defpiCAITIFF, ka'-tlf.
villain,

goofeor

a tatler.
teltale,

Having the

ment.
gar-

{. A flatterer,
awheedler.
CAJOLER,ka-j6'-lur.

voice of

The

k;ik'-lur.
f.

CACKLER,

or

footh.

fowl.

To

kag

prifonfor petty malefadlors.


To CAGE,
kaje. v. a. To inclofe In
ka -man.
American
f. The
CAIMAN,

laugh,to giggle.

; to

A Perfian veil

it is ufed for the noife of

fometimes

goofe;

complete foot

paufein X'erfe.

kaf'-tan.f.

in which

nutrition,

ka-kln-na'-lhun.f. Aloud

kak'-e-rll.f.

CACKEREL,

CAG,

diftempe- CAGE,

hinders

as

laughter.

hen

'long
;

four

CACHINNATION,

fiiortfyllable
after

CAFTAN,

ka-kek'-tlk.

and weakens

To

is made

body.

rature

commilTion.

la. Having
ki-kek'-ty-kal.

CACHECTICK,
CACHEXY,

voluntier in the
army, who

of a
expedtation

by which
to

is faftened.

CACHECTICAL,

of

; a

huckfler.
CADGER,
kab'-in-et-kou"n-s!l. CADI, ka -dy.f. A magiftrate
among the Turks.'
privatemanner.
CADILLACK,-ka-dil'-lak. f. A fort pf pear.
kab"-in-et-ma'-kur.f.
fe-fu'-ra.
f. A
CiESURA,
figurein poetry,

The

the anchor

which

ferves in

f. A
kad'-jur.

fmall nice work

that mnkes

One

brother
youngeft

held.

confulrations are

which

place in which
in
room
private

bituminous

earth, which

kind of foffile

being mixed

copper, changesit into brafs.


kal'-a-mint. f.
CALAMINT,
plant.

The

name

with

of

ka-lam'-!-tiis.
a.
Miferable,

CADENCE,

k^'-dens,7f. Fall,ftateoffink-

CALAMITOUS,

CADENCY,

ki'-den-fy.
i ing,decline; the

diftrcfs,
unhappy,wretched.
ka-lam'-i-tuf-nls.f.
CALAMITOUSNESS,

fallof the voice


the

tone

CADENT,
CADET,

or

the flow of

or periods
verfes,
;

found.

ka'-dcnt.a.
ka-dct'. f. The

involved

in

Mifery,difirefs.
Fallingdown.
younger brother ; the

CALAMITY,
caufc of

f.
Misfortune,
ka-lam'-I-ty.

mifery,
CALAMUS,

k'.l'-A-mus.
f.

CALAMUS,
fweet-fcented

wood,

ka-lafh. f. A

CALASH,

fort of reed

mentioned

in

fmall

or

To

prefsin which
kdl'-fa^-tld.a.

f. A kind
kil-ffi-do'-nyis.

f. Such
kdl-fy-na'-fhun.

their cloth.

prcf-,a

perfon

be

every

amoiig the Remans.

in hot
to

hot

kal'-Indz.
f. The firft
day of
kal'-m-ture. r,

CALENTURE,

by fire,as fenders them


pulverization.
powder; chymifcal

reducible to

calenders.

month

of bodies

management

drefs

clothitrs fmooth

kul'-In-drur. f. The

CALENDS,

preciousfione.

CALCINATION,

To

a.

kal'-ln-dur.
f.

CALENDRER,
who

CALCEDONIUS,
of

Shod, fitted

fiioes.

with

kal'-In-dir.
v.

CALENDER,

CALENDER,

furc.

CALCEATED,

cloth.

fcripture.

of pleacarriage

diflcmper
they imaginethe fca

climates,wherein
green fields.

"

f. A
CALCINATORY,kal'-sin-na-tir-y.

vef-

CALF,

To

CALCINE,
fireto
;

To

kal-si

v.

ne.

To

a.

reduced
calx,or fubilance eafily

burn

to

in the

burn
to

kil-si'ne.v.

To

n.

become

of the barrel of

CALICE,
CALICO,

calx

by heat.
CALCULATE,

To

to

pute,
com-

for any
to proje(St
adjuft,

certain end.

kal-ku-ia'-fhun.
f.

CALCULATION,
or

of

manner

kal'-!s.f.

tice,
prac-

homet

kal'-kule. f.

Reckoning,compute.
I a. Stony,grit-

k;il-kii-l6
fe.

"

kal-kd-lus.

f.
ki'l-drun.

a.
Obfcure,
ka-lidzh'-y-nus.

pot,

heatingany thing; the


CALEFACTIVE,kal-e-fak

in the

To

boiler,a
The

afl

beingheated.

-tiv. a. That

which

thinghot,heating.
Ths.t
a.
kal-e-fik'-tur-y.

heats.
n.
kal'-c-fy.

To

v.

grow

hoi,

be heated.

CALENDAR,
ye.;r, in which
are

ftateof

marked, as

kal'-In-dur,
f.
the

months,

fcftivalson

and

har-

qutbufe, an old.mufket.

khUl-fik'-{hnn. f.

CALEFACTORY,

f.
ka-lidzh'-y-nuf-n!s.

f, A handgun, a
kal'-y-vur.

CALIVER,
CALK,

of the
regifter

ftated times,

holidays.

ka k.

v.

CALL,

To

a.

ka-kur.

the leaks of

To

of

to

chalice.

Indian fluffmade

Darknefs.

CALKER,

CALEFY,

An

dim.

ty.

kil'-ku-lus.
f. The ftone

CALEFACTION,

To

cup,

f. Darkncfs,
ka-ly-ga'-fliun.

CALIGINOUSNESS,

calculation.

kettle.

which

cloudincfs.

puter.
com-

bladder.

makes any

meter
dia-

the Saracens.

among

CALIGINOUS,

CALDRON,

bore, the

gun.

kal-y-k6. f.'

CALIGATION,

longing
Bea.
kdl"-ku-la-tur'-y.

CALCULATORY,
to

The

thick,

CALID, kAl-Id. a.
Hot, burning.
f. Heat.
CALIDITY,
ka-lld'-di-t^.
title affumed by
^A
",
CALIF,
I ,yi''' ,'r S
fucceffors
^^^
of Ma'H, \
CALIPH,
2

bering;
num-

operation.

kal'-ku-la-tur.f.

CALCULATOR,

reckoning,the art of

the refult of arithmetical

CALCULE,
CALCULOSE,
CALCULOUS,
CALCULUS,

the

of cotton.

kal'-kd-late.
To
v. a.

reckon;

to

ka-le'-biir.
f.

CALIBER,

der
pow-

up.

CALCINE,

ka'f.f.

The young of a cow;


bulbous
plump,
part of the leg.

fel ufed in calcination.

flopthe

f. The

leaks of

workman

that

fhip.
flops

fhip.

ka'l.

v.

a.

invite; to convoke

To

name

; to

fummon

fum'mon

judicially
;
with ardours
fcnfe,to infpire
theological
of piety
to; to proclaim,
; to invoke,to appeal
to publifh
to excite,to
a Ihort vifit;
; to make
put in action,to bring into view ; to fligmatize with fome opprobrious
denomination
; To
or

; to

in the

call

back,

to

revoke; To

call in, to

refume

money at intereft; To call over, to read aloud


call our, to challenge.
a liftor mufter-roll ; To

CALL,

ka'l. f.

divine vocation

A
;

vocal

fummons

addrefs;requifition
;
to true

religion
; an
impulfcj

CAM

command
impulfe; authority,

claim

inrtrument

an

vocation, employment;

CALLAT,

demand,

call birds ;

to

calling,

flander.

and

malicious
,,.

,,

f. A
ka-lum-nyi'-fhun.

CALUMNIATION,

nomination.

To
v. a.
ka-lum'-nyate.

CALUMNIATE,

To

falfe

,,

^^'"""CALLET,r^^^-''^-^-

of words
reprefentaiiou

or

actions.

f.
A
ka-lum'-nya-tur.
kal-ling.f. Vocation, profefllon, CALUMNIATOR,
trade ; proper ftation,
of accufation, a flanderer.
or employment; clafs of
forger
ous,
Slanderka -lum'-nyus.
a.
CALUMNIOUS,
perfonsunited by the fame employmentor profeflion J divine vacation,invitation to the true
reproachful.
falfely
f.
Slander, falfe
CALU.ViNY,
kal'-um-ny.
religion.
f. Compafleswith
CALLIPERS,
kal'-ly-perz.
charge.
kalk's.f. Any thingrendered reducible
bowed
thanks.
CALX,
kind
of
f.
A
to powderby burning.
CALLOSITY,
kal-l6s'-s!-ty.
kal'-ikl.
without pain.
f. A fmall bud of a plant.
CALYCLE,
fvvelling
kil'-liis.
f. A ftone with vaa.
rious
CALLOUS,
Hardened, infenfible. CAMAIEU,
ka-ma'-yo.
kil'-luf-ms. f. Induration
of landikiiss,
CALLOUSNESS,
and reprefentations
fiffiires

CALLING,

of the fibres ;

infenfibility.

kdl'-lus.f.

induration of

An

broken

the

bones

united.

CALM,

ka

k;Vme.

CAME,

ka'm.

f.

ftillnefs
Serenity,
; quiet,re-

CAMELOT,7

To

ka'm.

CALM,

v.

a.

To

f.

The

to quiet;
ftill,

to

pacify,to appeafe.
CALMER,
which

ka

m-ur.

has the power

CALMLY,

ka

m-ly.

violence ; without

of

thing

givingquiet.

ad.

Without

ftorms,or

f.

feTranquillity,

from

kal'-6-mel. f.

kai-6-r!f'-Ik.
a.

of
quality

ever

cap

f.
kal'-trops.

CALTROPS,

three

with

it falls to

That

which

producingheat.

ka-l6t'.f.

or

An

fpokei;of
J

cow.

n.

To

ufed

by
now

in

darkened

lightcoming onlythrough
are
reoppofite
glafs,
objects

kum'-rade. f.

kam'-er-a-t!d.
a.

bofom

panion.
com-

way

fo-

CAMERATION,

points

bringforth

calf,

in the

Arched.

kam-er-a'-fhun.a.

ing
A vault-

arching.
f. An
kam-y-fa'-do.

CAMISADO,

inflrrument

fo that which
fpikes,
the ground,one
of them

ka'v. v.

CALVE,

is

prefentedinverted.

or

coif.

in Virgil's
Gcorupright
; a plantmentioned
of tribulus.
gick,under the name

To

hair; it

that the

convex

CAMERATED,

CALOTTE,
made

double

fluff

of

Mercuryfix times

fublimed.

CALORiFICK,
has the

An

kind

made
originally

kam'-e-ra-Db-fkd"-rL

opticalmachine

CAMERADE,

pafTion.

camels

OBSCURA,

chamber, fo
a

5 f-

mal
ani-

An

fo thick.

not

wool and filk.

with

CAMERA
f.

paflions,
quietly.

renity
; mildnefs,freedom
CALOMEL,

perfon or

''"

of filk and

mixture

made

kam-nis.

CALMNESS,

f.
-e-l6-pard.

,.
"

CAMLET,

come.

beaft of burden.

elephant,but

an

'""

pofe.

kam

taller than

To

of
preterite

The

kam'-!l. f.

Quiet, ferenc;undilturbed, CAMELOPARD,

a.

unnifHed.

CALM,

kam'-brik. f. A kind of finelinen.

CAMBRICK,
CAMEL,

m.

cut

arch-wife.

fibres; the hard fubftance by which


are

nature.

klm'-bur. f. A pieceof timber

CAMBER,

featlicrs.

CALLUS,

by

formed

kir'-lcj.
ing
a.
Unfledged,naked,want-

CALLOW,

which

dark, on

attack made

occafion they put their

fliirtsoutward.

CAAIISATED,

Dreffed
kam'-y-fi-tld.
a.

with

thcfiiirt outward.

kam'-l!t..f.See CAMELOT.

CAMLET,

CAMMOCK,
whin,

or

kam'-muk.

f.

An

herb, petty

rcftharrow.

CAMP,

CAN

CAN

kamp'.f.

CAMP,

armies

by
CAMP,
CAMPAIGN,

kamp'.

To

keepsthe
ufed of

To

placed

To

large,open,

time for which

any

flowers,which

in the

are

(hapeof

kam-pes'-tral.Growing
a.

f. A
kdm'-f^T.

kind of refin produced

chymicalprocefsfrom

the

being
kan'-krine. a.
CANCRINE,

tree

with

kam'-pyun.f.

kan'. f.
k.an

A
v.

nated
Impreg-

To

kan'-d!-det.f.

any courfe of

as

of

any of the

in

by art
of
juices

f.

the

fine kind

kan-a-l!k'-u-la-tld.
a.

To

a.

obliterate in

ting
crofs a wri-

was

wax

or

cotton.

klnd'l-ber-ry-tre

kand'l-lite.
f.
kand'l-mus. f.

He

The

light
feaft of

The

BlelTed Virgin,which

of the
purification

celebrated
formerly

with

many

in
lights

churches.

kand'l-ft!k.
f.

CANDLESTICK,

The

ment
inftru-

CANDOCK,

fijlftice
; a

of
A

an

crabfilh; the

virulent

CANDOUR,

kan'-dik.f.

kan'-dur. f.

Gweetncfs of

purityof

fignof

or
fwelling,

weed that ^-.ows

in rivers.

An

inftrument.

kandl-wa'f-tur.f.

WASTER,

fpendthrift.

Crofs-

kan-fel-la'-fliun.
f.

kand'l-ftuf.
f.Greafe,tallow,

CANDLESTUFF,
CANDLE

general.

kan'-fel-la-tld.
a.

out
expungingor wipiajj
kan'-fur.
'f.
CANCER,

foJiC.

of
or

candle.

CANDLEMAS,
the

barred.

fummer

of flax

that holds candles.

kan -sll.v.

CANCELLATION,

lightmade

kandl-ho'l-dur.f.

CANDLELIGHT,

pipeor gutter.

efface,to

make

Sweet-willow.

bird.
finging

; to

To

that holds the candle.

ka-na-ry.f. Wine brought from


the Canaries,
fack.
f. An exCANARY-BIRD,
cellent
ka-n^'-ry-burd.

CANCELLATED,

CANDLEHOLDER,

CANARY,

CANCEL,

kand'l.f.

CANDLEBERRY-TREE,

of

like

Ingenuouf-

v. a.
k.^n'-dl-fy.

a wick
tallow,furrounding

of coal.

CANALICULATED,

competitor,

kan'-did-ms. f.

CANDIFY,

CANDLE,

people.

water

made

water

white,

do it.

can

loweft

ken'-ml-kol.f.

CANAL-COAL,

have power

able,to

genuous.
in-

ad. Fairly,
kan'-did-ly.
ingenu-

oufly.
CANDIDNESS,
To

be

White; fair,
open,

nefs,opennefsof temper.

cup.

n.

palTage
throughwhich
body How.

the

a.

that folicitcs advancement.

one

plant.

it exprelles
the potential
mood,
ka-na'l. f. The
CANAILLE,
ka-nal'.f. A bafon
CANAL,

Made

Hot.

kan'-dy-kant. Growing
kan'-did.a.

CANDID,

from

camphire.

CAMPION,

To

kan'-dcnt.a.

CANDENT,
CANDICANT,

CANDIDLY,

camphire is extrafted.
kam'-fd-rate. f.

CAMPHORATE,

garden;

lities
qua-

crab.

CANDIDATE,
f. The
kam'-fyr-trl.

CAMPHIRE,

CAN,

Having the

camphire

tree.

To

kan'-fe-ruf-nls.
f. The

cancerous.

white.

CAiMPHIRE,

which

rulence
HavingUie vi-

cancer.

ftateof

in fields.

CAN,

CANCEROUSNESS,

of

paniform.

CAMPESTRAL,

ing
grow-

kan'-fa-rus.
a.

CANCEROUS,

Cama.
kim-p:in'-u-Iate.

CAMPANULATE,

kan-fe-ra'-fhun.
f. A

cancerous.

of

A
a.
kam-pan'-ny-firm.

To be-

cancer.

field.

bell.

by

CANCERATION,

tents.

kan'-fc-ratc,
v. n.

CANCERATE,
come

lodgein

f.

kam-pan.
ground; the

CAIvIPANIFORM,
term

orJcr of tents,

n.

v.

level tract of

army

The

theykeep the field.

when

To

CANDY,

fugar;

to

per,
tem-

mind, ingenuoufncfs.

v. a.
kan'-dy.

form into

To

confervc with

congelations.
F

Ty
.

CAN

CAN

kaii'-dy.n.

CANDY,

To

To

v.

cathedral churches ;

gealed.
con-

grow

largefort

of

printing

letter.
ka

CANE,

f.

ne.

the
yields

plantwhich
To

kind of

ka'ne. v.

CANE,

fugar;
To

a.

beat with

the

cular

cane

ka-nlk'-u-Iar.
a.
Belongingto

of

kan'-If-tur.
f.

fmill veflelin which

and

baftet ;

fmall

fruits ;
deftroys

preys

flythat preys upon

thingthat corrupts

-kur.

kank

confumes

or

the

To

n.

grow

rupt.
cor-

To

a"l of

corrode ;

to

kank'-ur-blt. part. ad.

envenomed

CANNIBAL,
of

manner

be managed by
CANNON-BALL,
CANNON-SHOT,

To

f. A

-nun.

gun

Callipers.
than can
larger

kan-nun-fti6t'.

de.

great guns ; to attack

v.

or

that manr.ges the

CANNOT,
To

kan

v.

n.

of

Can

and

Not.

CAi\OE,5
a

CANON,

,,

\
I

A boat made

tingthe

trunk

by
of

cuttree

hollow vefTel.

with

cover

dialeft

corrupt
a

form

of

kant'. v.

To

talk In the

particular
profefiions
; to

fpeakwith

n.

jargon
a

ticular
par-

kant'. v.

CANT,

CANTATA,

kan-ta

a.

-ta.

To

tofs

f.

or fling
away,
fong.

kan-ta'-fhun.f.

acl of

The

finging.
CANTER,

kan'-tur.f.

hypocrite
; a

fliort

gallop.

kan'-6n. f. A rule,a law; law made

by ectlefiafticalcouncils ; the
the great rule j
or
Scripture,

To

auSion.

CANTATION,
f.

coveringfpread

tone.

To

cannon.

-not.

ka-no'-rus.a. Mufical,tuneful.

CANT,

engineer

be unable.

CANOA,7
in.o

The

kan'-6-py.
v. a.

kant'. f.

To

of

kan-n6-n^'r.f.

with

ufed by
fpeaking
peculiar
to fome certain clafs or body of men
; a
barbarous
to
gon
jarwhiningpretenfion goodnefs
;

cannon.

CANNONIER,

Covered

canopy.

To

n.

-6-py.f.

beggarsand vagabonds;

balk

batter with

kan

CANOPY,
a

great guns.
kan-n6-na

clare
de-

church.
collegiate

or

a.
kan'-6-pyd.

CANOROUS,

The

To

a.

the head.

over

CANT,

kan'^un-ba'l. 7

CANNONADE,

play the

the

the hand.

fhot from

cathedral

CANOPY,

man-eater.

To

kan'-ni-purz.f.
kan

are

v.

canopy.

cannibal.

CANNON,

which

Hempen.

ad.
In
kan'-ny-bal-ly.

CANNIPERS,

in fome

-no-nize.

faint.

kan'-un-ry.1 f. An eGclefii aftical.benefice


kan'-un-lhip.

CANOPIED,

-ny-bal.f.

kan

CANNIBALLY,

kan
a

one

CANONRY,

Bitten

tooth.

kan'-na-bme. a.

CANNABINE,

a faint.
declaring

CANONSHIP,

infedt, pollute.

to

CANKERBIT,
an

corrupt,

of
profefTor

f.
kan-n6-ny-za'-fhun.

CANONIZE,
any

To

a.

law.

canon

The
v.

canon.

of beingcanonical.
quality
kan'-no-nlft.f.
CANONIST,

virulence
corrofion,
CANONIZATION,

kank'-kur. v.

CANKER,

with

ad. In
ka-non'-y-kal-ly.

to the
agreeable

manner

difeafe in trees.

; a

CANKER,

rega-

f. The
CANONICALNESS,ka-n6n'-y-kal-nis.

up.

that

worm

humour
eatingor corroding

to

the canon
conftituting

ecclefiaflical.
ritual,

properties

thingis laid

any

kank'-kur.f.

fruits ; any

To

CANONICALLY,

CANKER,

an

the

Having

dog.

upon,

a.
kan-on'-y-kal.
According

canon

lar,flated,fixed by ecclefiaflicallaws; fpiri-

ka-ni'ne.a.

CANISTER,

tries,
popifhcounexample of fe-

canons.

the

to

In

livingafter the

women

dog-ftar.

CANINE,

kan'-6-nes.f.

CANONESS,

CANONICAL,

CANICULAR,

Te

the

lance; arced.

ftick.

or

ftrongreed

books
a

of

Holy

in
dignitary

CANTHARIDES,
flies,ufcd

CANTHUS,

to

f. Spanilh
k.in-tfiar'-y-dcz.
raife blillers.

kan'-ttlis.