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FALL 2015

Details of courses Mathematics


1

Course code

MTH310

Course Title

Group Theory

Credits

Course Coordinator

Ronnie Sebastian

Nature of Course

L&T- Lectures & Tutorials

Pre requisites

None

Objectives

Group theory is ubiquitous. It can and mostly is useful to people wanting


to major in any area of science. Of course, it is indispensable for those
wanting to major in mathematics or physics. At the end of this course, one
should be familiar with what a group is, the basic constructions, something
about the structure of some groups and with group actions.

Course contents

Basic definitions and examples - 15 lectures


Applications - 15 lectures
Tutorials - 16

Evaluation
/assessment

1. End-sem examination- 30%


2. Mid-sem examination-30%
3. Quiz- 40%
There will be a quiz every week.

10

Suggested readings

Text Book(s)
1. Topics in Algebra - I.N. Herstein, Wiley publications.
2. Algebra M. Artin, Prentice Hall publications.
3. Abstract Algebra D.S. Dummit and R.M. Foote, Wiley publications.

Course code

MTH 311

Course Title

Analysis

Credits

Course Coordinator &


participating faculty(if
any)

Dr. Rama Mishra

Nature of Course
(Please mark or tick
the appropriate one)
Pre requisites

L&T- Lectures & Tutorials

None

Objectives (goals, type


of students for whom
useful, outcome etc)

Goal is to be able to strengthen epsilon-delta techniques to able to understand


the concepts of limit, continuity and differentiability and to able to prove basic
classical theorems.

6
7

This course is a prerequisite for the advanced courses in analysis, topology and
applicable math streams. It is also recommended for students pursuing
theoretical Physics.
8

Course contents
(details of topics
/sections with no. of
lectures for each)

10

Real numbers, l.u.b propert, sequences and series, tests for convergence;
functions on R, continuous functions, IVT, Heine Borel Theorem, differentability
on R^n, total derivative, Implicit Function theorem, Riemann Integration,
Uniform convergence, Weierstrass M-test, Introduction to Power Series.
(*Detailed syllabus can be seen in the Math guide book for fall)

Evaluation
/assessment
(evaluation
components with
weightage, Pl keep
equal weightage for
end sem and mid sem
exams)
Suggested readings
(with full list of
authors, publisher,
year, edn etc.)

a. End-sem examination- 30%


b. Mid-sem examination- 30%
c. Presentation-20%
d. Assignments- 20%

Text Book(s)
1. Principles of Mathematical Analysis: W. Rudin(1976) Tata McGraw Hill
2. Mathematical Analysis: T M Apostol(1974) Addison-Wesley
3. Methods of real Analysis: Goldberg

Course code

MTH 314

Course Title

Statistics

Credits

Course Coordinator

Uttara Naik-Nimbalkar

Nature of Course

L&T- Lectures & Tutorials

Pre requisites

MTH 202 (Probability & Statistics), MTH 201 (Linear Algebra).

Objectives (goals,
type of students for
whom useful,
outcome etc)

Course contents

The course covers the core of statistical inference; the mathematical


development and application of various techniques that are useful in
drawing conclusions about a population based on information obtained
from a sample.
It is useful for a student wishing to pursue advanced mathematical
statistics as well as for a student wishing to analyze commonly collected
experimental data in a scientific manner.
Reduction of data, sufficient statistics, minimal sufficient statistics,
Neyman factorization theorem, complete statistics, exponential families.
Ancillary
statistics,
Basus
theorem.
(7L + 2T)
Estimation of real and vector parameters. Method of moments and
maximum likelihood, Bayes estimation. Methods of evaluating
estimators. Cramer-Rao Inequality, Fisher Information, Rao-Blackwell
theorem, LehmannScheffe theorem.
(8 L + 2T)
Testing of hypotheses, likelihood Ratio tests, Bayesian tests, error
probabilities, P-values, power function, most powerful tests, Neyman-Pearson lemma, uniformly most powerful tests (UMP), monotone
likelihood rat
(8L + 2T)

(details of topics
/sections with no.
of lectures for each)

Confidence intervals, construction of confidence intervals, one sided


confidence
intervals and
its
relation
with
UMP
tests.
(5L + 1T) One and two way analysis of variance, Fstatistics and their null
distributions.
(4L +1T)
9

10

Evaluation
/assessment
(evaluation
components with
weightage, Pl keep
equal weightage for
end sem and mid
sem exams)
Suggested readings
(with full list of
authors, publisher,
year, edn etc.)

Course code

a.
b.
c.
d.

End-sem examinationMid-sem examinationQuizAssignments-

35%
30%
15%
20%

Text Book(s)
1. Statistical Inference: George Casella & R. L. Berger,
Duxbury, Cengage Learning, edn. 2, 2002.
2. All of Statistics, A Concise Course in Statistical
Inference: Larry Wasserman, Springer texts in
Statistics, 2004.
MTH 318

Course Title

Combinatorics

Credits

Course Coordinator
& participating
faculty(if any)

Kaneenika Sinha

Nature of Course

L- lectures alone

(Please mark or tick


the appropriate
one)
6

Pre requisites

None

Objectives (goals,
type of students for
whom useful,
outcome etc)

The aim of this course is to introduce students to fundamental


enumeration and arrangement principles, which have applications, not
only in Mathematics, but also in Information Theory, Computer Sciences,
Biological Sciences and Physical Sciences.

Course contents
(details of topics
/sections with no.
of lectures for each)

1. Recurrence relations (Binomial


Fibonacci numbers): 10 lectures

coefficients,

derangements,

2. Principle of Inclusion and Exclusion (Counting Surjective Maps,


Stirling Numbers of First and Second Kind): 7 lectures
3. Polya Theory (7 lectures)
4. Block Designs (12 lectures)

10

Evaluation
/assessment
(evaluation
components with
weightage, Pl keep
equal weightage for
end sem and mid
sem exams)
Suggested readings

e.
f.
g.
h.
i.

End-sem examination- 30%


Mid-sem examination- 30%
Quiz- 40 % (4 quizzes at 10% each)
Project work/term paperAssignments-

(with full list of


authors, publisher,
year, edn etc.)

1. A first course in Graph Theory and Combinatorics (by Sebastian


Cioaba and M. Ram Murty), TRIM series Vol. 55, Hindustan Book
Agency

Text Book(s)

Course code

MTH 322

Course Title

Point set topology

Credits

Course coordinator

Supriya Pisolkar

Nature of Course

Lectures & Tutorials

Pre requisites

Set theory is a must. Some familiarity with continuous functions will help
to understand motivation behind the subject

Objectives

One way to describe the subject of Topology is to say that it is qualitative


geometry. The idea is that if one geometric object can be continuously
transformed into another, then the two objects are to be viewed as being
topologically the same. For example, a circle and a square are
topologically equivalent.
Physically, a rubber band can be stretched into the form of either a circle
or a square, as well as many other shapes which are also viewed as being
topologically equivalent. On the other hand, a figure eight curve formed
by two circles touching at a point is to be regarded as topologically
distinct from a circle or square.
A qualitative property that distinguishes the circle from the figure eight is
the number of connected pieces that remain when a single point is
removed.

Course contents

Our first goal will be to define exactly what the geometric objects are
that one studies in Topology. These are called topological spaces. In this
course starting with the definitions and many examples of these kind of
spaces, we will study important properties like connectedness,
compactness, separation axiom which will lead us to understand one of
the important problems in topology : -Determine when two topological
spaces are homeomorphic.
1. Topological spaces and continuous functions 6 L
2. Metric spaces- 6 L
3.Connected spaces , compact spaces 5 L
4.Countability and separation axiom- 4 L
5.Hausdorff spaces, locally compact Hausdorff spaces- 6 L
6. Homeomorphisms 2 L
7. Topological groups ( if time permits) 2 L

Evaluation

a. End-sem examination- 30%

/assessment

b. Mid-sem examination-30%
c. Quizzes 40%

10

Suggested readings

Text Book(s)
1. A first course in Topology James Munkres. Second Edition (2000)
Prentice Hall.
2. Introduction to Topology and analysis G.F.Simmons(2004) Tata
Mcgraw Hill
3.Basic Topology Armstrong(20004) UTM-Springer.

Course code

MTH 417

Course Title

Ordinary Differential Equations

Credits

Course Coordinator
& participating
faculty(if any)

Steven Spallone

Nature of Course
L- lectures alone
(Please mark or tick
the appropriate one)
Pre requisites
None, but see below.

6
7

Objectives (goals,
type of students for
whom useful,
outcome etc)

The laws of physics are written in differential equations, providing an


eternal challenge for mathematicians. In this course we consider ordinary
differential equations (ODEs), those only depending on one parameter
(time). Students are likely to have seen methods for producing explicit
solutions for sanitized classes of ODEs, particularly linear ones with
constant coefficients. But nature usually gives differential equations for
which we do not have explicit solutions. Without having formulas for
solutions, one nonetheless has a robust theory which qualitatively
describes the behavior of common ODEs. We will analytically prove
existence, uniqueness, and stability, and rigorously discuss the dynamic

behavior of solutions to ODEs (meaning their long-term evolution).


All of this demands mathematical sophistication on the part of the
student. We highly recommend that the student has taken a course like
Analysis (MTH 311), but this is not a formal prerequisite.
8

Course contents

Brief review of methods in solving common ODEs. Higher order constant

coefficient linear ODEs, matrix exponentials and the Linearity Principle,


(details of topics
/sections with no. of Wronskian theory, inhomogeneous systems, Sturm-Liouville theory, phase
lectures for each)
plane analysis, stable, unstable and center subspaces,, stability,
asymptotic stability.

Non-autonomous Linear Systems.

Non-linear

Systems: Dynamical Systems, local existence and uniqueness, Peano's


Theorem, Gronwall's Inequality: Continuous dependence of solutions,
Contraction mappings, Picard approximations, Extending Solutions, the
maximal interval of existence, global existence Theorem, Differentiability
of the flow. Linearization, The Stable Manifold Theorem, The HartmanGrobman Theorem, Stability and Lyapunov functions, Introduction to the
Poincare map, Statement of the Poincare-Bendixson Theory.
9

10

Evaluation
/assessment
(evaluation
components with
weightage, Pl keep
equal weightage for
end sem and mid
sem exams)
Suggested readings
(with full list of
authors, publisher,
year, edn etc.)

a. End-sem examination: 30%


b. Mid-sem examination: 30%
c. Quiz/Assignments: 40%

Text Books:
1. Earl Coddington, An Introduction to Ordinary Differential Equations,
Dover Books on Mathematics, 1990.
2. Lawrence Perko: Differential Equations and Dynamical Systems,
Third Edition, Springer (India) Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi, 2010.
3. George F. Simmons, Differential Equations with Applications and
Historic Notes, International Series in Pure and Applied Mathematics,
McGraw-Hill Higher Education; 2 edition, 1991.
4. Hirsch, Smale and Devaney: Differential Equations, Dynamical
Systems, and an Introduction to Chaos, Elsevier Academic Press, USA,

2004.
5. Coddington and Levinson: Theory of Ordinary Differential
Equations, Tata Mc-Graw Hill Publishing, New Delhi, 1987.
6. V.I. Arnold: Geometrical Methods in the Theory of Ordinary
Differential Equations, Second Edition, SpringerScience and
BusinessMedia, 1988.

Course code

MTH 415

Course Title

Probability

Credits

Course Coordinator
& participating
faculty(if any)

Anup Biswas

Nature of Course
(Please mark or tick
the appropriate one)

L&T- Lectures & Tutorials

Pre requisites

MTH 311 (Analysis)

Objectives (goals,
type of students for
whom useful,
outcome etc)

This course gives an introduction to the probability theory. The goal of this
course is to start with some basic notions in probability and then move to
some important topics like Martingales, Markov chains etc. The topics
included in this course are essential for those who are interested to learn
advanced probability theory, mathematical Finance, mathematical biology,
Time series analysis etc.
This course is meant for 1st semInt-PhD students. This should also be open
for 7thsem BS-MS students.

Course contents
The Probability Space, Events, properties of probability measures,
(details of topics
independence, Bayes formula, Kolmogorov 0-1 law. (5 Lectures)
/sections with no. of
lectures for each)
Random variable, distribution functions, examples of discrete and
continuous distributions, joint distributions, independence of random
variables, Borel-Cantelli lemmas. (4 Lectures)
Limits theorems: Weak/Strong Law of Large numbers, Central limit
theorem. (4 Lectures)
Conditional probability, Martingales, Stopping time, Azumas inequlity,
Doobs inequality. (10 Lecutres)
Discrete time discrete space Markov chain, Chapman-Kolmogorov
equation, classification of states, and limit theorems. (10 Lectures)

Evaluation
/assessment
(evaluation
components with
weightage, Pl keep
equal weightage for
end sem and mid
sem exams)

10

Suggested readings
(with full list of
authors, publisher,
year, edn etc.)

Course code

MTH 410

Course Title

Galois Theory

Credits

Course Coordinator
& participating
faculty(if any)

Vivek Mohan Mallick

Nature of Course

L- lectures alone/ L&T- Lectures & Tutorials/ P-Lab sessions alone, L&PLectures& Lab sessions

(Please mark or tick

a. End-sem examination- 35%


b. Mid-sem examination-35%
c. Quiz + Assignments- 30%

Text Book(s)
1. Sheldon M. Ross - Introduction to Probability Models
2. Allan Gut - Probability: A Graduate Course (Springer Texts in
Statistics)
3. Rick Durrett - Probability: Theory and Examples (Cambridge Series in
Statistical and Probabilistic Mathematics)

the appropriate
one)
6

Pre requisites

MTH 310 (Group Theory), MTH 320 (Vector Spaces, Rings, and Modules)

Objectives (goals,
type of students for
whom useful,
outcome etc)

Galois theory arose from the study of adjoining roots of polynomials to


the rational numbers to generate larger number sets, such as the
Gaussian numbers. These larger fields of numbers enjoy the group of
symmetries of the irrational roots of these polynomials, which is called
the Galois group. Such fields correspond inversely to their Galois groups in
a beautiful correspondence beloved to algebraists. A clear understanding
of Galois theory allows one to settle classical questions such as whether
we can or cannot use radicals to express the roots of various polynomials.
It is also prerequisite to modern questions in number theory and algebraic
geometry.

Course contents

Fields and extensions, examples, algebraic extensions and algebraic


elements, transcendental elements, existence of algebraic closure,
separable extensions, normal extensions, automorphisms, main theorem
of Galois theory, finite fields, Galois groups of finite fields, cyclotomic
extensions, impossibility of solving polynomial equations of degree 5 or
more by radicals.

(details of topics
/sections with no.
of lectures for each)

Evaluation
/assessment
(evaluation
components with
weightage, Pl keep
equal weightage for
end sem and mid
sem exams)

10

a. End-sem examination- 30
b. Mid-sem examination-30
c. Quiz- 40 (= 4 x 10)
d. Project work/term papere. Assignments-

Suggested readings

Text Book(s)

(with full list of


authors, publisher,
year, edn etc.)

1. Algebra: Serge Lang, Springer.


2. Abstract Algebra: Dummit and Foote, Wiley India.
3. Field and Galois Theory: Patrick Morandi, GTM Springer
4. Galois Theory: Ian Stewart, Chapman Hall/CRC Math. Series.

Course code

MTH 421

Course Title

Measure Theory and Integration

Credits

Course Coordinator
& participating
faculty(if any)

Diganta Borah

Nature of Course
L- lectures alone
(Please mark or tick
the appropriate one)

Pre requisites

MTH 311 Analysis

Objectives (goals,
type of students for
whom useful,
outcome etc)

The goal of this course is to develop the basics of measure and integration
theory. We will learn to associate size to suitable subsets of an arbitrary
set that generalises the concepts of length, area and volume of Euclidean
geometry. On such sets we will define an integral which is much richer
than the Riemann integral and behaves very well with limiting process.
This course would be useful for students interested in analysis, statistics,
probability, ergodic theory, differential equations etc.

Course contents
1. Construction of Lebesgue measure, Lebesgue measurable sets,
(details of topics
abstract measure spaces, classes of sets, pi-lambda theorem (10 Lec)
/sections with no. of 2. Measurable functions, approximation by simple functions, Littlewoods
lectures for each)
three principle, Lebesgue integration, Monotone convergence
theorem, dominated convergence theorem (10 Lec)
3. Convex functions and inequalities, L^p-spaces (4 Lec)
4. Product measures, Fubinis theorem, integration in polar coordinates,
convolution, mollifiers (8 Lec)
5. Signed measures, Radon-Nikodym theorem, differentiation on
Euclidean space, absolute continuity, functions of bounded variations
(10 Lec)

Evaluation
/assessment
(evaluation
components with
weightage, Pl keep
equal weightage for
end sem and mid
sem exams)

d.
e.
f.
g.

End-sem examination:30
Mid-sem examination: 30
Quiz-30
Assignments:10

10

Suggested readings
(with full list of
authors, publisher,
year, edn etc.)

Text Book(s)
1. H. L. Royden, Real Analysis (1997) Prentice-Hall
2. W. Rudin, Real and complex analysis, McGraw Hill
3. E. M. Stein and R. Shakarchi, Real Analysis (2005) Princeton University
Press

Course code

MTH 413

Course Title

Algorithms

Credits

04

Course Coordinator

Ayan Mahalanobis

Nature of Course

L- lectures alone

(Please mark the


appropriate one)
6

Pre requisites

None

Objectives (goals, type


of students for whom
useful, outcome etc)

To learn about algorithms.

Course contents

Algorithms and Analysis of algorithms

Evaluation
/assessment

a. End-sem examination- 30%


b. Mid-sem examination- 30%
c. Quiz- 40%

10

Suggested readings

Text Book(s)
1. Algorithms by Dasgupta, Papadimitriou and Vazirani
2. Introduction to Algorithms by Cormen, et. al MIT press

Course code

MTH 422

Course Title

Algebraic Topology

Credits

Course Coordinator

Chandrasheel Bhagwat

Nature of Course

L- lectures alone

Pre requisites

MTH 322 Point set topology or the consent of the instructor

Objectives

The central theme in Algebraic Topology is to attach an algebraic object


(e.g. a group) to a topological space which remains invariant when the
space undergoes certain geometric/topological transformations. There is
a beautiful interplay between topological properties of the space and the
algebraic properties of the object we have attached. You will learn about
two such invariants namely fundamental groups and homology groups of
topological spaces.
Among other things (on a lighter note!), you will also learn why:
A donut is not `same as a pastry but it is `more like a medu vada.
At any point of time there must be a cyclone somewhere on the
surface of our earth.
Balinese cup trick works.
The equation V+F = E+2 holds for any polyhedron
This course is essential for a mathematics student. Much of the
modern mathematics uses the language of categories and functors and
this course provides a glimpse into the world of categories and functors
through the study of algebraic invariants associated to topological spaces.
This course will be useful for any student who wants to learn the
algebraic aspects of topology and geometry.

Course contents

Fundamental groups and covering spaces

(24 lectures)

a) Homotopy of paths, Closed paths based at a point, Fundamental


groups: Definitions, examples and functorial properties
b) Covering spaces and lifting properties, Deck transformations,
Galois theory of covering spaces, Examples
c) Van Kampen theorem, Computation of the fundamental group of
spheres, projective spaces and special orthogonal group SO(3).
d) Applications of the theory of fundamental groups: Fundamental
Theorem of algebra, Brouwers fixed point theorem, Free groups,
Trees and Cayley graphs.

Homology theory

(12 lectures)

a) Cell complexes, Simplicial, Singular and Cellular homology,


chain complexes, cycles and boundaries, definition of

homology groups and their functorial properties, Hurewicz


isomorphism theorem
b) Axioms of homology (Statements), Computation of homology
groups of spheres using axioms of homology.
c) Applications of homology: Euler characteristic, Invariance of
domain theorem, Hairy Ball theorem.
9

Evaluation
/assessment

End-sem examination:

25%

Mid-sem examination:

25%

Quizzes, Assignments, Reading projects etc.


(continuous assessment) :

10

Suggested readings

50%

Main textbook: Algebraic Topology by Allen Hatcher


Other reference books:
Topology and Geometry by G. Bredon, GTM Springer, 1995
Elements of Algebraic Topology by J. Munkres, Westview Press,
1996

Course Code

MTH 430

Course Title

Topics in Algebra: Representation Theory of Finite Groups

Credits

Course Coordinator
& participating
faculty(if any)

A. Raghuram* & Krishna Kishore.

Nature of Course

L&T lecture and tutorials. (Two lectures and one tutorial per week.)

(Please mark or tick


the appropriate one)
6

Pre requisites

MTH 310 (Group Theory) Or consent of instructor.

Objectives (goals,
type of students for
whom useful,
outcome etc)

The idea of symmetry is captured by the mathematical notion of a group.


Whereas some groups arise in a concrete fashion, but most groups arise
in an abstract fashion. To concretize an abstract group, one studies the
action of this abstract group on vector spaces, which leads to

representing elements of the group in terms of matrices. This is the


essence of representation theory. The course aims to study basic notions
of representation theory of a finite group.
Representation theory of finite groups captures the core ideas of all
kinds of other representations. This is a very central area of mathematics
drawing upon Algebra, Geometry and Analysis. Besides, representation
theory is fundamental many branches of Physics (standard models, etc.)
and Chemistry.

Course contents
(details of topics
/sections with no. of
lectures for each)

Evaluation
/assessment
(evaluation
components with
weightage, Pl keep
equal weightage for
end sem and mid
sem exams)

10

Review of some basic group theory including conjugacy classes; basic


notions of representation theory: definitions, unitary representations,
complete reducibility theorem; character theory, Schurs orthogonality;
modules over the Group algebra; dimension of an irreducible
representation divides order of the group; Induced representaitons,
Frobenius reciprocity, Mackey theory, Clifford theory; Examples: abelian
groups, dihedral groups, A_4, S_4, A_5, S_5, GL(2) over a finite field;
Glimpses into relevance of representation theory in other sciences.
a. End-sem examination: 35%
b. Mid-sem examination: 35%
c. Assignments: 15% (Every week there will be a list of exercises and
students are expected to turn in a couple of these for grading.)
d. Quiz: 15%. (Quizzes will be somewhat easy variations of weekly
assignments.
Quizzes and weekly assignments are part of continuous assessment.

Suggested readings

Text Book(s)

(with full list of


authors, publisher,
year, edn etc.)

1. Raghurams notes on Representation theory. (pdf file will be sent


to everyone.)
2. J.-P.Serre, Linear representations of finite groups. Springer Verlag,
GTM Vol.42, 1977.
3. Fulton and Harris, Representation Theory: A first course. Springer
Verlag, GTM Vol. 129, 1991.
4. Martin Isaacs, Character Theory of finite groups, Dover
Publications, 1994.