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FACULTY OF ENGINEERING AND THE BUILT

ENVIRONMENT
DEPARTMENT OF CHEMICAL AND METALLURGICAL
ENGINEERING

STUDENT COURSE GUIDE

NAME OF COURSE

Applied Mineral processing III


NQF
LEVEL

NQF
CREDIT
S

0.083

QUALIFICATION & SAQA ID

National Diploma:
Metallurgical Engineering
(NDMY03)
SAQA ID no: 72578

COMPILED BY: RAMAKOKOVHU MM


(2014)

COURSE
CODE

ANP301T

COPYRIGHT: Tshwane University of Technology


Private Bag X680
PRETORIA
0001
Apart from any quotation for the purposes of research criticism or review as
permitted under the Copyright Act, no part of this book may be reproduced or
transmitted in any form or by any means, electronically or mechanically,
including photocopy and recording, without permission in writing from the
publisher.
All rights reserved.

Printed and distributed by:


FACULTY OF ENGINEERING AND THE
BUILT ENVIRONMENT
Tshwane University of Technology

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ORGANISATIONAL COMPONENT CONTENTS:

1.

Welcome..................................................................................................................5

2.

Staff..........................................................................................................................5
2.1

Contact Details..................................................................................................5

2.2

Staff availability..................................................................................................6

3.

Requirements, resources and recommended material........................................6


3.1

4.

Code of conduct....................................................................................................8
4.1

Attendance.........................................................................................................8

4.2

Classroom behaviour.........................................................................................8

4.3

Responsibility of students..................................................................................8

1.

Overview of the course.........................................................................................8


1.1

Purpose of the course.......................................................................................9

1.2

Links to other subjects.......................................................................................9

1.3

Course outcomes..............................................................................................9

2.

Assessment...........................................................................................................9
2.1

Assessment methods and criteria....................................................................9

2.2

Assessment rules..............................................................................................9

2.3

Marking system..................................................................................................9

2.4

Year mark...........................................................................................................9

2.5

Moderation...................................................................................................10

3.

4.

Requirements for the course.............................................................................6

Course content and schedule of tests and assignments....................................10


3.1

Course structure and schedule of tests and assignments..............................10

3.2

Learning outcomes and assessment criteria...................................................13

3.3

Generic outcomes and critical cross-field outcomes.......................................17


Glossary of terms................................................................................................17

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5.

Appendices.........................................................................................................18

SECTIO
N

ORGANISATIONAL
COMPONENT
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1.

WELCOME

Welcome to Applied Mineral Processing lll semester course. This is a practical course in
metallurgical engineering. It is offered via compulsory lectures for over 14 weeks. This
course is designed to give the engineering student an adequate practical knowledge and
understanding of the operations carried out in mineral processing. At the end of this
semester you would have acquired the practical knowledge and understanding you need
to pursue a career in minerals processing .

2.

STAFF

2.1

CONTACT DETAILS

NAME

CAMP
US

ROOM
NO

Ms M.M.
Ramakokov
hu

Pretoria

3-725

012 382 4902


ramakokovhum@tut.ac.za

Ms. R. Ngaka

Pretoria

3-707

Ms. M. Mashilo

Pretoria

Library
Building
20

Dr. N Naude

Pretoria

3-729

2.2

CONSULTAT
ION TIMES

ACADEMIC
FUNCTION

By appointment

Lecturer

012 382 3514

Available

Departmental
administrator

012 382 6121

Available

Eng. Librarian

By appointment

Moderator

TEL NO and E-MAIL

012 382 3597


mbayaR@tut.ac.za

STAFF AVAILABILITY

If, after attending class and making every effort from your side to master the subject
content, you still have problems with understanding key concepts or principles or their

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application, the lecturer is available for consultation (by appointment only, or in class but
during office hours!).
OFFICE CONSULTATIONS: STRICTLY BY APPOINTMENT

3.

REQUIREMENTS,

RESOURCES

AND

RECOMMENDED

MATERIAL.
3.1

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE COURSE

3.1.1 PRESCRIBED RESOURCES


The following tables indicate what literature and other resources are essential for
successful completion of this course.
COMPULSARY LITERATURE
myTutor
Notes

M.M
Ramakokovhu

Lecture
notes
discussed in classes

3.1.2 RECOMMENDED RESOURCES


The following recommended resources will enhance your understanding and knowledge in
this course, and you are encouraged to use the following additional resources.
PRESCRIBED RESOURCES
CATEGO
RY

AUTHOR(s)

NAME

PUBLISH
ER

ISBN NO

BOOKS

B. A. Wills and
T.J Napier-Munn
(Ed.)

Minerals Processing
Technology. 7th Edition

Butterwort
hHeineman
n

978-0-75064450-1

RECOMMENDED RESOURCES
BOOKS

AL Mular , DN
Halbe and DJ
Barratt (eds)

Mineral processing Plant


design, practice, and
control (Volume 2)

Society for
Mining
,Metallurg
y
and
Exploratio
n (SME)

978-087335223-9

BOOKS

MC Fuerstenau

Principles of Mineral

Society for

978-0-87335Page

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and NH Han

Processing

Mining
,Metallurg
y
and
Exploratio
n (SME)

167-6

Books

MC Fuerstenau,
G Jameson and
RH Yoon (eds)

Recent advances in Mineral


processing plant design

Society for
Mining
,Metallurg
y
and
Exploratio
n (SME)

978-087335252-9

CALCULAT
OR

Scientific

Any bookshop

COMPUT
ER

Average speed
personal
computer
or
laptop

I centre or departmental
computer room.

4.

CODE OF CONDUCT

Please take note of the following regulations. These regulations are in addition to the
standard rules and regulations as determined by the TUT. Please familiarise yourself with
the TUT rules and regulations as set out in the student diaries received on registration.

4.1

ATTENDANCE

Regular attendance of the Applied Mineral Processing III, lectures is important. It is the
learners responsibility to sign the register each week in class. A minimum attendance of
80% is mandatory for all courses. In a 30 week year, 8 classes that have not been
attended and for which you have not furnished a valid doctors letter or other proof of
extenuating circumstances, amounts to 20% absenteeism. This level of absenteeism will
lead to exclusion from the final moderation (final written examination) at the end of the
year, which means that you will fail the course and will have to repeat it the following year.

4.2

CLASSROOM BEHAVIOUR

4.2.1. USAGE OF CELL PHONES IN CLASSES

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Students are required to arrive on time for lectures. Make sure that cell phones are off in
the class. Cell phones will be confiscated if a student is caught using it. No disorderly
behaviour will be tolerated.

4.3

RESPONSIBILITY OF STUDENTS

It is your responsibility to make a success of learning in this course. To this end you are
encouraged to attend all classes, write all set tests and hand in your assignments/projects
on the set due dates. Please make sure that you have access to myTutor to access all
electronic notes. You are most welcome to consult with the lecturer if you feel you are
struggling with any learning concept in this course. Please make sure to make an
appointment in advance!

SECTIO
N
1.

LEARNING
COMPONENT

OVERVIEW OF THE COURSE

This course is continuation of Applied Mineral Processing II. It covers aspects of general
minerals processing technology not touched in the earlier course, while representing some
concept in greater details. The core of the work is concentrating techniques principles,
operation, equipment and design. Ancillary operations related to water management in
mineral processing, agglomeration processes and typical mineral processing flow sheets
with more comprehensive metallurgical material balance and accounting will also be
covered. Laboratory sessions will complement the theoretical classes for adequate
practical grasp of the concepts. Successful completion of this course is a prerequisite for
Applied Mineral Processing IV project course.

1.1

PURPOSE OF THE COURSE

This course completes the broad foundational understanding necessary for career pursuit
in mineral processing operation as well as for further studies.

1.2

LINKS TO OTHER SUBJECTS

Applied Mineral Processing form the basis for all metallurgical extraction processes. Water
chemistry, general Mathematics, fluid mechanics, spreadsheet and drawing applications
are relevant requisite knowledge.

1.3

COURSE OUTCOMES

The course outcomes are detailed under 3.2

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2.
2.1

ASSESSMENT
ASSESSMENT METHODS AND CRITERIA

This is a continuous assessment course and will include formal written tests, assignments,
and compulsory practicals. The various assessment methods therefore will focus on
criteria that will enable the lecturer(s) to determine whether you have achieved the
learning outcomes. The assessment criteria relevant to each learning outcome are
detailed in section 3.

2.2

ASSESSMENT RULES

The general rules of TUT regarding assessment apply. You are advised to familiarise
yourself with these rules, as they are applied stringently. If a student misses a test due to
illness, hospitalisation, death of an immediate family member, a valid doctors or death
certificate must be submitted within 3 days, at the lecturers discretion, a student will then
be granted a sick test to make up the mark.

2.3

MARKING SYSTEM

All tests, practicals, assignments / projects will be marked out of 100%. See attached
weights in the appendices.

2.4

YEAR MARK

The Predicate (PM / year mark) will be calculated as per attached continuous assessment
sheet in my Tutor. (See attached weights in the appendices)
Final semester marks are put on the departmental notice boards. If you have any queries
about your mark, you must immediately consult the subject lecturer (contact details
provided on page 5), before the final publication day!

2.5

MODERATION

The examiner is the lecturer of the subject, an external moderator is also appointed to
ensure that the assessment was fair.

3.

COURSE

CONTENT

AND

SCHEDULE

OF

TESTS

AND

ASSIGNMENTS
This course comprises of theory, calculations and practical component. Your mastery of
that theory and application is assessed at regular intervals by the tests , practical sessions
,projects and/ or assignments in the form of assessments.

3.1

COURSE STRUCTURE AND SCHEDULE OF TESTS AND ASSIGNMENTS

The following outline provides an overview of the content to be covered in this course and
the ways in which your progress will be assessed.
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DURATIO
N
Week 1-2

Week 3

THEME
UNIT 1: HYDROCYCLONE
Design features
Operating principles (equilibrium orbit
theory)
Operating variables
Efficiency of separation in hydro
cyclones: The partition (or Tromp) curve

Effect of hydrocyclone variables on


operation
Empirical hydrocyclone models:
o The Plitt model (brief discussion
and application)
o The Krebbs model (used in
calculations)

UNIT 1 : GRAVITY CONCETRATION


General principles
o The concentration criterion
o Particle settling rates
Jigging
o Operating Principles
o Types of jigs
o Operating parameter
Shaking table
o Operating principles
o Types of shaking table
o Operating parameters
Flowing Film concentrators
o Pinched sluices, cones and spirals
Operating principles
Operating parameters

Week 4-5

Assessments

Project

Assignment 1

Centrifugal gravity concentrators


o Operating principles
o Types of centrifugal
Concentrators
o Operating parameters

UNIT 2: DENSE MEDIUM SEPARATION


General operating principles
Medium
o Laboratory liquids
o Industrial suspensions
Types and characteristics
required for solid material

Class test 1

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DURATIO
N

THEME

Week 6-7

used
Pulp properties
Gravitational dense medium separators
o Drum separator, cone separator,
drew boy bath
Centrifugal separators: DMS cyclone
DMS circuits
Gravity separation process performance
o
Sink Float analysis: Washability
curves
o Efficiency of dense medium
separation: partition curve

UNIT 3: FROTH FLOTATION

Week 8-9

Assessments

Introduction
o Mineral polarity, water polarity,
hydrophobicity
o Surface properties and the
thermodynamics of flotation
(intro)
Reagents
(surfactants):
Collectors,
Frothers , Modifiers and depressants
Flotation Equipment
Flotation models
o The kinetic model of flotation
o Flotation probability
o Bubble surface area
Plant floatation applications

UNIT4 : MAGNETIC AND ELECTROSTATIC


SEPARATION
Magnetic separation
o Magnetic properties of different
minerals
o Magnetic field and force
Low intensity magnetic separators
o Drum separators ( Countercurrent, counter-rotation,
concurrent)
o Cross belt separators
High intensity magnetic separators
o Induced roll magnetic separators
o WHIMS: The Jones separator

Major Test 1

Practical
Assignment 2
Class test 2

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DURATIO
N

THEME

Week
12

3.2

10-

Assessments
Electrostatic separation
o
Corona and true type
electrostatic separators
o Operating principles

UNIT 6: DEWATERING
Water balance in mineral processing
Dewatering techniques
o Gravity sedimentation
(thickeners)
o Centrifugal sedimentation
o Filtration
o Thermal Drying
Flocculation
Agglomeration

Thickener design
o Design features
o Operation of thickeners( batch
and continuous operation)
o Thickener circuits

Major test 2

LEARNING OUTCOMES AND ASSESSMENT CRITERIA

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The following tables clearly indicate what you have to achieve (the learning
outcomes) and how you will be assessed (assessment criteria) to determine
whether you have achieved the required knowledge and competences.

UNIT 2: DENSE MEDIUM SEPARATION

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UNIT 3: FROTH FLOTATION


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UNIT 4: MAGNETIC AND ELECTROSTATIC SEPARATION

UNIT 5: HYDROCYCLONES

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UNIT6: DEWATERING

3.3

GENERIC OUTCOMES AND CRITICAL CROSS-FIELD OUTCOMES


Perform procedural design of mineral processing equipments to meet
desired needs within applicable standards, codes of practice and legislation.

Communicate scientific information technically, using appropriate language


and terminology, structure, style and graphical or mathematical support.

Apply engineering principles to systematically diagnose and solve welldefined engineering processing problems.

Demonstrate the application of mathematical, science and engineering


knowledge in an engineering environment.

4.

GLOSSARY OF TERMS

The technical terms used in this course, will be made clearer on reading of all class notes.
You should ensure that you are familiar with these terms and their meanings. If you have
difficulty with grasping / understanding of any single term, please consult the lecture for a
better explanation thereof.

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5.

APPENDICES

FACULTY OF ENGINEERING AND THE BUILT


ENVIRONMENT
CHEMICAL,METALLURGICAL AND MATERIAL ENG.
DEPARTMENT
Weights 2014

SUBJECT DISCRIPTION:
SUBJECT CODE:

Applied Mineral Processing III


ANP301T

Lecturer
Initials and
Surname
M.M
Ramakokovhu

Offeri
ng
Type

Block
Code

EP

CT

PR

Staff
num
ber

EXAMPLE

Gro
up

AS
11.2
5

ASSESSMENT 1

WR

11.25

5.63

5.63

11.25
22.5
0

ASSESSMENT 4
(ASSESSMENT 5) VETO

10.00
16.8
8

16.88

TOTAL
22.50

22.5
0

ASSESSMENT 2
ASSESSMENT 3

Red:
AS:
AT:
CT:
EV:
GP:
HM:
OP:
PA:

PJ

11.25

10.00

45.0
0

22.50
22.50
22.50
10.00
100.0
0
100.0
0

To be complete by Subject
Head
Assignments
Attendance
Class Tests
Evaluation
Group Presentation
Group Presentation
Oral Presentations
Practical Evaluation
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PJ:
PR:
WR:

Projects
Practicals
Written Tests

SUBJECT HEAD

DATE

FACULTY ADMINISTRATOR:

DATE

CAPTURED BY DEPARTMENTAL ADMINISTRATOR

DATE

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