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Vol. 155 No.

12 December 2011

Top Plants:

Six Winning Renewable Plants


BUYERS GUIDE 2012
Building a Regulating
Reserve Plant
Power in South Africa
Flexible Gas Turbines

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Established 1882 Vol. 155 No. 12

December 2011

Quality
Engineering
Services

ON THE COVER

Germany has its first commercial offshore wind farm, the 48.3-MW EnBW Baltic 1, which
sits in roughly 7 square kilometers of the Baltic Sea. Photo courtesy Siemens

COVER STORY: RENEWABLE TOP PLANTS


34 Copper Mountain Solar 1, Boulder City, Nevada
The current holder of the title for largest U.S. photovoltaic plant is a 48-MW installation in the Nevada desert. Its also the first to operate under a unique pseudo-tie
pilot program that allows an out-of-state renewable generator to deliver electricity
as if it were directly connected to the California Independent System Operator.

38 EnBW Baltic 1, Darss-Zingst Peninsula, Mecklenburg Province, Germany


Germany, long a developer of onshore wind power, is now adding offshore wind to
its growing renewables portfolio. This 48.3-MW plant is the first commercial installment in what could be a 25-GW offshore resource within 20 years.

42 Kimberlina Solar Thermal Energy Plant, Bakersfield, California


At 5 MW, this solar plant is small, but it is the first to use direct steam compact linear
Fresnel reflector technology, which enables it to deliver power even during transient
cloud cover. That makes plants using this technology more predictable renewable
generators for grid operators.

46 Martin Next Generation Solar Energy Center, Indiantown, Martin County,


Florida
Another first: This plant is the first in the world to combine a solar thermal plant with
a combined cycle natural gas plant. The shared infrastructure resulted in roughly
20% savings over a solo solar thermal plant.

48 Pelton Round Butte Hydroelectric Projects Selective Water


Withdrawal Project, Oregon
This winning project has proven the value of the worlds first floating surface fish
collection/bypass facility and intake structure. It not only won an engineering award
but is also winning kudos from the fish, over 96% of which are safely making their
way downstream of the dam.

As experts in the power industry,


Structural Integrity works hard to
provide you with innovative, best
quality engineering input and NDE
support including:
Seismic Analysis
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52 Sarnia Solar Project, Sarnia, Ontario, Canada


An 80-MW project in southern Ontario holds first place on the list of the worlds largest operating photovoltaic (PV) plants. Using First Solars thin-film PV technology, its
also winning the race for fastest energy payback for PV technology.

SPECIAL REPORTS
GRID REGULATION

54 NorthWestern Energy Builds a Regulating Reserve Plant


A 150-MW plant in Montana purports to be the first built specifically for electrical
transmission grid regulation duty. The utilitys technology of choice for this task: fastacting natural gasfired simple cycle combustion turbines.

Scan the QR Code for more information

103
|

December 2011 POWER

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www.powermag.com

T:2.125

POWER IN SOUTH AFRICA


MOBIL INDUSTRIAL LUBRICANTS
P R O D U C T I V I T Y A DV I S O RY

65 Restructuring the South African Power Industry


Our partners at Global Business Reports look at the challenges ahead for South
Africas power sector, including capacity expansion, deferred maintenance, climate
and employment policy mandates, and industry competition. The government has a
20-year plan, but it depends upon skittish private investment to put this continental
leader back on solid footing.

Helping you get


the most out of
your wind turbine
When it comes to wind turbines,
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wind turbines operating in top form.

FEATURES
PLANT OPERATIONS

84 Siemens Releases Shaping Power Option for Renewables Integration


Strong and sturdy doesnt cut it anymore. In addition to workouts in the weight
room, todays gas turbines need to add the equivalent of a yoga workout to provide
flexible part-load operation. Spinning reserve capability is another plus. Thats what
the new fast-ramping, hot weathertolerant option from Siemens offers.

90 GE Develops FlexEfficiency 50 for Increased Operational Flexibility


GEs FlexEfficiency 50 was designed to start and ramp up quickly and have deep
turn-down capabilitywhile maintaining emissions levels and without incurring
large efficiency or maintenance penalties. Those features are sure to catch the eye
of developers in the 50 Hz market, especially where large amounts of renewable
generation are being added.

These lubricants can help reduce


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Visit mobilindustrial.com for more.

Its freeif you can access it. Its abundantif you can finance its development.
We look at the policy and technology roadblocks to abundant baseload renewable
power and what it may take to get geothermal power to live up to its potential.

DEPARTMENTS
T:9.5

In fact, Mobilgear SHC XMP 320 is


used to lubricate more than 30,000
wind turbines worldwide and is the
initial-fill gear oil of choice for the
majority of the worlds top 12 wind
turbine builders.

GEOTHERMAL POWER

95 Can U.S. Geothermal Power Fulfill Its Potential?

SPEAKING OF POWER

6 Irrational Exuberance
8
10
12
14
17
18
19

GLOBAL MONITOR

Gas Turbine Makers Gear to Flexibility Needs with New Models


UK Pulls Funding for Flagship Longannet CCS Demonstration
THE BIG PICTURE: Big Biomass
Burma Halts Massive Chinese-Developed Hydropower Dam
Airtight Cover Completed for Daiichi 1
Does Cow Power Pay Off?
POWER Digest
FOCUS ON O&M

22 Tools at Height
24 Microns Matter: Proper Design of Fogging Nozzles
27 Using Temperature-Measuring Indicators
LEGAL & REGULATORY

32 Will San Bruno Be a Game-Changer?


By Vidhya Prabhakaran, an associate at Davis Wright Tremaine

101 NEW PRODUCTS


COMMENTARY

164 Wind Energy: Dealing with Intermittency Challenges


By Becky H. Diffen, an attorney at Vinson & Elkins LLP

Connect with POWER


2012 Exxon Mobil Corporation
Mobil, Mobil SHC, and the Pegasus design are registered
trademarks of Exxon Mobil Corporation or one of its subsidiaries.

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1
2

11/1/11 12:02 PM

If you like POWER magazine, follow us online (POWERmagazine) for timely industry news
and comments.
Become our fan on Facebook
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POWER December 2011

S:7

S:9.5

We can take wind turbines to new heights.

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and greases. Each one is formulated to offer outstanding all-around performance, including equipment protection, keepclean characteristics, and oil life. Take Mobilgear SHC XMP. Used in more than 30,000 wind turbine gearboxes worldwide,
its trusted by builders, proven in the field, and supported by exceptional application expertise. Just a few of the reasons we
dont simply make things run. We make them fly. Visit mobilindustrial.com for more.

2011 Exxon Mobil Corporation


Mobil, Mobil SHC, Mobilgear, and the Pegasus design are trademarks of Exxon Mobil Corporation or one of its subsidiaries.

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POWER December 2011

Small on
size, big
on power.

Impressive size to power ratio.


High in power, yet low in mass, the Rolls-Royce Trent 60
keeps the same dimensions whatever its power output.
With an engine weighing less than 15 tons, Trent 60 arrives
ready to produce 58MW with Dry Low Emissions, 64MW with
Wet Low Emissions and up to 107MW when operating with

www.rolls-royce.com
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a steam turbine. Trent 60 also sports the twin Rolls-Royce


strengths of unmatched reliability and customer service.
For mechanical drive and power generation applications,
onshore and offshore, Trent 60 provides the muscle for
enduring profitability.
Trusted to deliver excellence

SPEAKING OF POWER

Irrational Exuberance

ermanys government has decided to


shutter all 17 of its nuclear plants
(23 reactors); eight plants are now
closed for business, six more will be closed
by 2021, and the final three will close by
2022. What is lacking is an honest discussion of the rising cost Germans will pay
for electricity for what The Economist describes as the greatest change of political
course since unification.
If Germany wants to close its nuclear
plants, so be it. However, it seems to me
that by now the German government would
have provided its citizens an estimate of
future electricity costs that will occur as a
result of that decision. I have not found any
German government estimates, so Im going
to make an estimate. Willem Post, whose
articles appear on theenergycollective.com,
inspired me with his study on the cost of
German carbon reductions.

Count the Cost

German Chancellor Angela Merkels U-turn


on nuclear energy was completed in midMarch with her announcement that all
German nuclear plants will close. Merkel
also proudly stated that the lost electricity will be compensated for by a mix of onand offshore wind and solar, while staying
below Germanys CO2 reduction goals. Her
plan includes putting a lid on rising electricity demand (603 TWh in 2010) for the
next decade.
According to a study by the Breakthrough Institute, the shutdown of Germanys nuclear reactors, meeting CO2
emission reduction commitments, and flat
demand will require the 2010 generation
mix to move from 60% fossil, 23% nuclear,
and 16.8% renewable (101.7 TWh) to 43%
fossil and 57% renewable (343.7 TWh) in
2020. Posts study, with which I agree,
suggests that Germany will also need to
build 5 GW of coal (replacing older plants)
and 5 GW of fast-ramping, gas-fired combined cycle for grid regulation. With the
scenario defined, the costs can now be
estimated.
Pre-Nuclear Shutdown Cost of Electricity. In 2010, German investment in renewables was about $41.2 billion. About
6

$36 billion of that went to building 7.4


GW of solar ($4,878/kW) at a real cost of
about $0.76/kWh (thanks to the generous
feed-in tariffs), which is then automatically rolled into electric rates. In 2010,
the adder to German electric rates for renewables was 8.8% of the average $0.33/
kWh cost of service.
Transitional Costs. I assume that the
decommissioning costs for each nuclear

per year and feed-in tariffs will drop 15%


in 2012, as planned. Extrapolating, I estimate the cumulative impact on electricity
bills in 2020 as $0.07/kWh in 2020.

Sticker Shock

The sum of these costs produces an estimate of $0.533/kWh for electricity in


2020. If demand grows, so will the future
cost of electricity. Stated another way:

Germanys average cost of electricity


will be more than six times that of the
U.S. in 2020.
plant are $1 billion, a total of $23 billion.
Also, I assume that the projected 53 GW
of offshore wind is built at todays prices,
or about $200 billion. Another 0.7 GW of
onshore wind will have a sticker price of
about $1.4 billion, and the new solar systems, projected at 65 GW, will pencil out
to $290 billion, using the 2010 reported
cost of equipment installed. The installed
capacity of each is estimated from the required generation (TWh) estimate using
reasonable capacity factors.
The cost of reorganizing the grid from
central nuclear hubs to one with more interconnectivity with neighboring countries
and capable of bringing offshore wind from
the North Sea to the industrial south will
be expensive. I added a very conservative
$100 billion to complete that work. Building 50 GW of new gas-fired assets to chase
wind and balance solar ($60 billion at
$1,200/kW) and 5 GW of new, replacement
coal capacity ($125 billion at $2,500/kW)
brings the total capital cost investment to
$799 billion, or $0.133/kWh, using a levelized annual capital cost of 10%.
Cost of Electricity in 2020. Extrapolating the 2010 feed-in tariff costs to match
projected wind generation will add $200
billion to German electricity bills over nine
years. In the same way, solar systems will
add another $200 billion to bills through
2020. For this discussion, assume the
feed-in tariff cost is $45 billion average
www.powermag.com

Germanys electricity rates will increase


about 6% per year for the next nine years.
With the country emerging from an economic slowdown, it is reasonable to believe that demand will grow, at least in
the short term, so I believe my overall
estimate is conservative.
In comparison, the U.S. Energy Information Administrations 2011 Annual Energy Outlook 2011 (Table 15) notes that
U.S. average end-use prices were $0.098/
kWh (2009) and are projected to decrease
to $0.089/kWh in 2025. The decrease occurs because growth in demand remains a
modest 1% per year and increased use of
moderately priced natural gas replaces fuels that are more expensive. Germanys average cost of electricity will be more than
six times that of the U.S. in 2020.
In a May 30 press briefing, Merkel
stressed the importance of lifestyle changes to consume less energy in order to flatten demand in the coming years. What
she failed to tell the German people was
the steep price they will pay to become a
nuclear energy-free nation.
There is uncertainty in my estimates,
but the trajectory of German electricity
prices is beyond doubt. As Merkel desires,
the high price of electricity will certainly
flatten German demand for electricity, and
it will suffocate their economy as well.
Dr. Robert Peltier, PE is POWERs
editor-in-chief.

POWER December 2011

P E O P L E

P R O C E S S E S

T E C H N O L O G Y

Congratulations KCP&L

for achieving

performance excellence
General Physics proudly recognizes the success of Kansas City Power & Lights
Hawthorn Generating Station for achieving a 3% heat rate improvement on
Unit #5, which directly resulted in reducing 150,000 tons of CO2 emissions in 2010.
GPs Power Plant Performance Experts worked closely with KCP&L staff to identify
performance improvement opportunities and quantify efficiency gains using GPs
EtaPRO Performance and Condition Monitoring System software.
Hawthorn Generating Plant Manager
Darrel Hensley receives the GP Power
Performance Excellence award presented
by Joe Nasal, Sr. Vice President,
General Physics Corporation

Offices in: North America Latin America Europe Asia


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www.etaproefficiency.com
e-mail: etapro@gpworldwide.com
800.803.6737 716.799.1080

Gas Turbine Makers Gear to Flexibility


Needs with New Models

achieves more than 60% gross efficiency. The plant also features
a spinning reserve for delivering more than an additional 450
MW in 10 minutes in low-load to baseload settings. The full upgrade package has been implemented in the grid-connected GT26
Test Power Plant in Birr, Switzerland (Figure 1). Alstom plans to
manufacture key plant components of the upgraded gas turbine
at its factory in Chattanooga, Tenn.

An Upgraded GT24
Alstoms upgraded product launches came on the heels of its
upgraded GT26 gas turbine and corresponding KA26 combined
cycle power plant for the 50 Hz electricity markets in June. The
French company introduced the original GT24 gas turbine 15
years ago, and even in the early days it was recognized for exceptional operational flexibility, high part-load efficiency, and
fast start-up capabilities, Alstom says in a technical paper.
From the very beginning this gas turbine technology incorporated features such as multiple variable compressor guide vanes
and sequential combustion, which set a new industry standard
regarding operational flexibility.
The upgraded turbines were designed around a heightened
need for high operational flexibility, a trend that is expected to
continue. While demand will continue to vary greatly, the growing portion of renewable sources of electricity production are
expected to require combined cycle plants to be more and more
used to levelize the overall production of electricity in many
power markets, the technical paper says.
Just five years ago, combined-cycle power plant specification
requirements focused on the highest baseload efficiency based
on about 8,000 operating hours per year and the lowest specific
sales price. Todays combined cycle power plant must be based
on the highest overall weighted efficiency based on expected operating hours and load regime, and the lowest cost of electricity
based on both baseload and part-load profiles.
The next-generation GT24 is capable of delivering 230 MW at
40% efficiency (with a heat rate of 8,571 Btu/kWh), the company claims. The KA24 combined cycle plant can achieve 700
MW output in a 2 x 1 configuration, and when fully optimized, it

A New Generation F-Class Turbine


Later in September, MHI announced its own newly upgraded and
more flexible gas turbine design. The F-class M701F5 will operate
at a turbine inlet temperature of 1,500Ca level only reached by
G-class or higher turbines, MHI said.
The M701F5 gas turbine achieves a rated simple cycle power
output of near 350 MW (ISO basis) and 520 MW in combined cycle
power generation. It is designed around the preceding M701F4
and leverages experience with MHIs F-class fleet, which has 182
units in operation around the globe, with more than 7 million
actual operating hours.
The compressor section retains the M701F4s airflow, but midand rear-stage profiles have been modified from NACA1 to CDA2.
MHI also said that the combustion system is based on the verified GAC engine, and the turbine section incorporates turbine
technologies developed for the J Class, including advanced cooling technology and advanced thermal barrier coatings.

Competition among gas turbine makers heated up this September as Alstom unveiled its upgraded GT24 gas turbine and
corresponding 60 Hz KA24 combined cycle power plant, while
Mitsubishi Heavy Industries (MHI) introduced the M701F5 gas
turbinea 50 Hz F-class gas turbine upgrade.

1. A notch above. Alstom in September launched an upgraded


GT24 gas turbine and corresponding KA24 combined cycle power plant
for 60 Hz electricity markets. The turbine was tested at Alstoms gridconnected GT26 Test Power Plant in Birr, Switzerland. Courtesy: Alstom

Small But Flexible Turbine


Also in September, GE launched its FlexAero LM6000-PH (Figure
2), a highly efficient 50-MW gas turbine that couples flexibility and efficiency, reaches full power in just five minutes, and
uses no water. GEwhich introduced the 510-MW FlexEfficiency
50 Combined Cycle Power Plant in May (see GE Develops FlexEfficiency 50 for Increased Operational Flexibility, p. 90) and
claims it has already received more than $1 billion in orders for
its aeroderivative and heavy-duty gas turbines this yearalso
said the FlexAero was launched to meet fast-changing power
generation needs.
The companys customer base has rapidly changed and expanded to include industrial businesses and remote communities, Darryl Wilson, president and CEO of GEs aeroderivative
gas turbine business said. We developed the FlexAero to give
those customers advanced technology, leading in flexibility
and efficiency, which can be shipped and installed faster than

2. Light and lithe. Following the launch of its 510-MW FlexEfficiency 50 Combined Cycle Power Plant in May, GE in September
added the 50-MW FlexAero LM6000-PH to its FlexEfficiency portfolio.
Courtesy: GE

www.powermag.com

POWER December 2011

RARE
partnership.
Responsive, Accountable, Reliable, Effective

Chatham Steel now holds the ASME Quality System Certificate


as a Material Organization (QSC-665).
Chatham Steel has been recognized as meeting or exceeding the strict
standards required to supply safety-critical materials to the nuclear industry.
That means you have a new and better option for your stock and
processed material needs.
Throughout our 96 years in business, we have earned a reputation for
excellence in serving the metal industry. We have proven we are responsible,
accountable, reliable and effective partners for our customers and we will
apply that same diligent service ethic to our safety-critical work for our
partners in the nuclear industry.
With a deep inventory of carbon, stainless, high-strength and specialty
metal products in plate, sheet, pipe, tube, shapes and bar, as well as
complete in-house processing services, Chatham Steel is the new and
better option for all your safety-critical needs. For more information, call
1-800-869-2762 and ask for one of our nuclear sales specialists,
email us at nuclear@chathamsteel.com or visit us online at
www.chathamsteel.com.

- ASME Quality System Certificate (QSC) applies to Chatham Steels Durham, North Carolina location.
- NQA-1 program applies to Chatham Steels Durham, North Carolina and Savannah, Georgia locations.
- ISO 9001:2008 accreditation applies to all Chatham Steel locations except Ironton, Ohio, which is
scheduled for certification in 2012.
A member of the Reliance Steel and Aluminum family of companies.

With NQA-1 Assignation

CIRCLE 6 ON READER SERVICE CARD

any technology in its class and can operate independent from


the power grid.
GE additionally claims that the turbine, operating in a combined
cycle, can reach an efficiency above 80% through cogeneration.
A key feature of the turbine is that it uses GEs innovative
DLE2.0 technology, which reduces NOx emissions to just 15 ppm
without the need for water. The technology allows customers to
save more than 26 million gallons of water per turbine, per year,
which is typically used to dilute CO and NOx emissions in a gas
turbine, GE said.
Today, 30 percent of the worlds population is water constrained. By 2025, the number will reach 60 percent, said Steve
Bolze, president and CEO of GE Power & Water. As global energy
demand increases, so does the stress on our water supplya reality that we take very seriously when we develop new technologies across our portfolio.

The 2,400-MW Longannet Power Station, owned by ScottishPower, is the third-largest coal-fired power station in Europe
(Figure 3). The CCS project being built by a consortium comprising ScottishPower, UK grid operator National Grid, and oil company Shell sought to demonstrate post-combustion technology
using an amine solvent to remove carbon dioxide from flue gas.
The project would also have demonstrated carbon transport and
storageNational Grid had planned a new carbon dioxide pipeline from the power station at Longannet to its existing pipeline

3. Taking the Longannet view. The UK declined to back a flagship carbon capture and storage demonstration project that would have
seen more than 20 million metric tons of carbon dioxide captured from
the 2,400-MW coal-fired Longannet power plant in Fife (shown here)
and pumped under the North Sea. Courtesy: ScottishPower

UK Pulls Funding for Flagship Longannet


CCS Demonstration

Ditching the only project remaining in its 1 billion ($1.60 billion) carbon capture and storage (CCS) competition, the UK government declined to back the much-watched CCS project at the
Longannet power station in Fife, Scotland, in October. The decision balances the UKs low-carbon ambition with the need to ensure that taxpayer money is invested in the most effective way,
the nations Department of Energy and Climate Change said. The
funds are now expected be used to pursue other projects in
both Scotland and England.

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THE BIG PICTURE: Big Biomass


The worlds biomass power facilities, not counting those in the pulp and paper industry, average just 18 MWe to 20 MWe. In the U.S.,
passage of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 ignited development of many existing biomass plants. Greenhouse gas
rules and renewable policies around the world have kindled a new generation of much larger biomass facilities. New announcements
routinely are for plants 50 MW or larger, presumably to leverage economies of scale.
However, the biomass sector is immature and faces numerous potential threats, especially supply chain weaknesses (particularly where woody biomass is the feedstock) and high-energy, high-cost, high-impact fuel transportation concerns.
Here are some of the worlds biggest existing and proposed biomass projects.
Sonal Patel and Dr. Gail Reitenbach

100-MW Gainesville
Renewable Energy Center
(in development for 2013),
Gainesville, Fla. American
Renewables project will use
a bubbling fluidized bed
boiler. Forest residue from
surrounding, heavily wooded
areas of northern Florida and
wood processing residues and
urban wood waste.

140-MW Vaskiluodon Voima Oy


Plant, Vaasa, Finland. Metso is planning a
project it says will be the largest biomass
gasification project in the world using
a circulating fluidized bed (CFB) gasifier
when completed in December 2012.
Mostly forest residue.

12

140-MW New Hope


Power Partnership,
South Bay, Fla. North
Americas largest
biomass power plant.
Sugar cane bagasse
and recycled urban
wood.
180-MW Rodenhuize Power
Station, Belgium. In September,
GDF SUEZ and subsidiary Electrabel completed
conversion of this plant (the largest conversion of
its kind) to 100% biomass. 225,000 metric tons
of wood pellets from a Pacific BioEnergy wood
pellet production facility in British
Columbia, Canada.

240-MW Alholmens Kraft, Pietarsaari,


Finland. The worlds largest operating
biomass-fired power plant is located at UPMKymmenes Wisaforest pulp, paper and saw
mill. The Metso plant uses a CFB boiler.
Bark and other wood residues from the
mill and nearby forests.

300-MW Tees Renewable Energy


Plant (REP) and Tyne REP, northeast
England (in development for 2015). MGT Power
Ltd. is developing these two plants. Woodchips from
North America and wood harvested from
MGT-developed short-rotation forestry
operations (quick-growing trees
planted on disused and
marginal land).

350-MW, Port Talbot, Welsh


Coast. UK-based Prenergy has proposed to
begin building this plant in 2012. Three
million metric tons of wood chips a year
shipped from North America, South
America, and Europe.

750-MW Tilbury Power Station,


UK. Germanys RWE is converting all three
coal-fired units on the River Thames. Wood pellets
shipped from the companys massive wood pellet factory
in Waycross, Ga., from the end of 2011 until
2015, when a European mandate will
force it to close.

www.powermag.com

POWER December 2011

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Burma Halts Massive Chinese-Developed


Hydropower Dam

Chinas efforts to build the Myitsone Dama $3.6 billion hydropower project planned at the confluence of the Mali and NMai
Rivers at the source of the Irrawaddy River in Burmas Kachin
State (Figure 4)were thwarted in late September after Burmas
President Thein Sein suspended construction to respect the will
of the people.

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4. Sold down the river. Burma in late September abruptly sus-

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pended construction of the $3.6 billion Myitsone hydropower project


it was jointly developing with China on social, environmental, and
political concerns about the projects impact. This image shows the
Irrawaddy River in Kachin State, where the project, which had been
compared to Chinas Three Gorges, would have been built. Courtesy:
International Rivers

- Policy & Legislation


- Clean Technologies
- Multi-Pollutant Control
- Energy & Climate
- Wind, Solar, EV-PHEV & CNG
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near Dunipace, and Shell had been working on providing offshore


transport and storage.
ScottishPower had in May 2009 switched on the UKs first reported 1-MW prototype of a full-scale carbon capture plant at its
40-year-old Longannet station. The prototype employs Norwegian
firm Aker Clean Carbons post-combustion amine solvent process.
The utility said in a statement that the consortium had spent
more than 20 million ($32 million) over four years and completed the front end engineering design study as part of the
competition. As a result, they had submitted the most detailed
and comprehensive design of a commercial-scale end-to-end CCS
project ever conducted in the UK or Europe, the results of which
could allow the government to take valuable research to other
phases of the competition.
The Longannet CCS demonstration remained the only project
contending for 1 billion after E.ON last year shelved plans to
build its controversial Kingsnorth coal-fired plant in Kent. UK
media have since reported, however, that consortium members of
the Longannet project had been concerned about its commercial
viability without more public backing, saying that at least 1.5
billion from the state was required.
The project had yielded some significant advances in technologies associated with CCS, developing it from a concept in a laboratory to a definitive blueprint that could be implemented, said
ScottishPower Generation Director Hugh Finlay. As a result of the
study we now understand how the CCS process works from power
station to storage site. This gives us great insight into the physical
infrastructure that we need to support it, the regulatory framework
it fits within and the organisational model of a CCS business.

www.euec.com for details

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POWER December 2011

The projectwhich has been compared


to the massive Three Gorges Project in
Chinais part of a seven-dam cascade
that represents a $20 billion investment
by China. It was being jointly developed
by the state Myanmar Ministry of Electric Power, privately owned Asia World
Company of Burma, and the China Power
Investment Corp. More than 90% of the
electricity generated by the station,
scheduled for completion in 2019, was expected to be exported to China.
But skepticism about the quality and independence of a submitted environmental
impact assessment and concerns regarding
the resettlement process had made plans to
build the project highly controversial. According to nonprofit group International
Rivers, the project in an earthquake-prone
area would have created a reservoir the size
of Singapore, displaced 12,000 people, and
irreversibly affected Burmas central river
system and rice-growing area. Reports also
allege that plans to build the dam had exacerbated a long-standing conflict between
ethnic Kachin people and the new Burmese
civilian-led military government.
In an interview with the China Daily
following Burmas rejection of the project,
President of China Power Investment Corp.
Lu Qizhou said the company had not been
alerted about a possible suspension of the
project. He said China had diligently fulfilled [its] duties and obligations, hiring
top-notch hydropower design firms and
consultancies to develop the project. Interest in developing the project stemmed
from Burmas immense hydropower resource of more than 100 GW. Only 2.45%
of that potential has been developed or
is in development. In particular, as the
upstream-Ayeyawady hydropower project
is located near the China-Myanmar border,
developing hydropower resources here not
only can meet Myanmars [Burmas] power
demand for industrialization, but also can
provide clean energy for China, he said.
Burma stood to gain economic benefits
of up to $54 billion through taxation, free
power, and share dividendsfar more
than China Power Investments return on
investment during the 100-year life of the
project, he also asserted. The projects suspension meant that the company would
lose a huge sum of money that had been
invested, a loss would go far beyond direct investment and financial expenses.
There would also be tremendous amount
of default claims from contractors, serious
inability of electricity generation of the Construction Power Plant, huge increase of basic
investment spread to other cascade power
stations, and so on, he said.

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Airtight Cover Completed


for Daiichi 1

Tokyo Electric Power Co.s (TEPCOs) Fukushima Daiichi 1 reactora unit that
suffered a core melt and hydrogen gas explosion after the March 11 earthquake in
Japan and subsequent tsunami devastated
the six-reactor facility (Figure 5)was
fully encased in an airtight cover in October (Figure 6). The temporary measure
will prevent diffusion of radioactive materialsincluding those discharged from

water vapor from spent fuel pools, rubble,


and dustand prevent rain from entering
the reactor building, TEPCO said.
The cover is essentially made up of a steel
frame structure covered by vinyl chloride resincoated roof panels and wall panels that
are made of polyester fiber fabric. It measures 54 meters (177 feet) high, 47 meters
(154 feet) wide, and 42 meters (132 feet)
deep and has a ventilation system that filters
out radioactive substances. TEPCO says the
cover, similar designs of which will eventu-

ally be built around Units 3 and 4, is engineered to keep the reactor safe against high
winds and tremors, though it notes it could
be damaged by a huge typhoon.
TEPCO has been building the casing for the
damaged reactor building since June. Major
components were constructed at Onagawa
and shipped to the Daiichi site by sea for
assembly around the reactor building. During
pilot tests, the ventilation system removed
more than 90% of radioactive cesium from
the reactor, TEPCO said. The company is con-

5. The blast in the past. The Fukushima

Daiichi 1 reactor building is seen here on May


24, 2011, surrounded by concrete pumper
trucks that sprayed water on spent fuel pools
and carried airborne contamination sampling
equipment. The reactors core melted just five
hours after the deadly March 11 earthquake,
setting off a hydrogen explosion that devastated its containment building. Similar explosions
occurred at Units 2, 3, and 4. Courtesy: TEPCO

6. A polyester shroud. Plant owner

Tokyo Electric Power Co. (TEPCO) achieved a


milestone in October when it covered Daiichi
1 with vinyl chloride resincoated roof panels
and wall panels that are made of polyester fiber fabric. The structure will prevent diffusion
of radioactive materials and keep out rain,
TEPCO said, adding that the cover marks a
milestone in its restoration roadmap. It will
now embark on a longer-term measure, likely
entombing the reactor in concrete.

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December 2011 POWER

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10125_PowerAd-Radiance.indd 1

17
2/24/11 3:48 PM

sidering installing similar covers over both


Daiichi 3 and Daiichi 4 when debris removal
is completed after next summer.
Covering the reactor building marks a major milestone for TEPCO, which will now begin the detailed design of a more permanent
measure to contain radioactive materials.
Plans involve building a concrete sarcophagus for the reactorpossibly similar to the
one built to protect Chernobyls Unit 4. Analysts point out, however, that the Chernobyl
sarcophagus is aging and crumbling, and that
measures are under way to replace it with a
$1.4 billion steel containment structure.
Meanwhile, according to the beleaguered plant owner, progress is being made
to achieve cold shutdown of Daiichi Units
1, 2, and 3 by the end of the year, in line
with a schedule set in an April-issued restoration roadmap. The company is removing
radioactive materials from Unit 2s containment vessel, a reactor that suffered minor
damage to its containment building, but
whose core saw the most damage. Debris is
also being removed at Units 3 and 4.
Japans Atomic Energy Commission in
late October said it would begin retrieving melted nuclear fuel rods from Units 1,
2, and 3 within 10 years. The commission
also plans to move spent fuel rods from
pools at Units 1 and 4 to another pool in
the plant within three years.
TEPCO continues imploring Japans
government for 900 billion yen ($11.85
billion) in financial assistance to aid
compensation to individuals and entities
affected by the nuclear disaster. The government is already required by the Nuclear
Damage Compensation Law to pay a maximum of 120 billion yen ($1.5 billion) in
compensation. The governments decision
is expected in early November.
Nearly nine months after the devastating earthquake, 44 of Japans 55 existing
nuclear reactors, continue to be in shutdown for regulatory scrutiny. Eighteen
reactors are currently undergoing government-mandated stress tests, and of the 10
reactors still running, at least four are expected to be shut down for routine inspections by the years end. The remaining six
will go offline by early next yearwhich
could leave Japan with the possibility of
having no active nuclear plants next year.

Does Cow Power Pay Off?

Livestock animals in the U.S. produce more


than one billion tons of manure annually
(Figure 7). Its a problem being surveyed critically by climate change advocates, because,
according to standards developed by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change,
18

farm waste emits two potent greenhouse


gases: methane, which has 21 times the
global warming potential of carbon dioxide,
and nitrous oxide, which has 310 times the
warming potential of carbon dioxide over a
100-year timespan. Since a 2008 University
of Texas-Austin study showed that converting farm animal droppings into renewable
power could generate enough power to meet
up to 3% of North Americas consumption,
interest in cow power has been piling up.
According to the U.S. Environmental
Protection Agency, as of September, 169
on-farm anaerobic digester systems were
operating at livestock farms in the U.S. Of
these, 151 systems (mostly at dairies), including 11 in Vermont, generated a total
of 454,000 MWh of electricity annually. An
average of 15 new digesters are expected
to come online annually.
But a new study published in the Journal of Dairy Science suggests that the economics of converting cow dung into power
on farms arent bullish. While researchers
at the University of Vermont and Central Vermont Public Service Corp. (CVPS)
confirm that it is technically feasible to
generate electricity from cow manure, financial returns depend strongly on several
factors, among them: the base electricity
price, the premium paid for converted energy, financial supports from government
and other agencies, and the ability to sell
by-products of the methane generation.
The study analyzed six dairy farms that
were participating in CVPSs Cow Power
Program over a seven-year period. (See
Central Vermont Public Service, Cow Power Program in our December 2007 issue.)
The program essentially helps farms plan
and install anaerobic digesters and generators to generate electricity from manure,
and markets the resulting power to its customers. As part of the program, dairy farms
apply for grants from the corporation, the
government, and other organizations, as
well as use their own funds or bank loans,
to install the necessary equipment.
More than 4,600 of CVPSs 160,000 customers voluntarily agreed to pay a premium
of $0.04/kWh over the regular retail price to
buy 25%, 50%, or 100% of power generated
from cow manure, paying $470,000 in premiums per year. The investor-owned utility
reported that the six dairy farms generated
about 12 million kWh annually, making it a
successful and locally sourced renewable
energy project with many economic and environmental benefits, said the studys lead
author Dr. Qingbin Wang, a professor in the
Department of Community Development and
Applied Economics, University of Vermont.
The study found that a dairy farm with
www.powermag.com

an average milking herd size of 1,212 cows


amassed 69 metric tons of manure that were
fed to an anaerobic digester daily, producing
5,295 kWh. The digester produced revenues
from electricity of about $958 per day (at
$0.181/kWh) as well as fuel savings from
capturing combustion heat for hot water and
space heating. But one critically limiting factor the study found was that farms with 600
to 1,500 milking cows needed a huge average initial investment of about $2 million to
plan the project, obtain permits, and build
the digestermaking grants and subsidies
from the government indispensable.
The price farmers received for their electricity and revenue from by-products of the
system were also important. Scenario analysis presented in the case study also suggests that relatively small changes in the
premium price can have a significant impact
on the cash flow of an average operation.
Waste heat from biogas combustion, which
can be captured and used on the farm, and
by-products from the digester in the form
of animal bedding and compost, contributed
significantly to the farms cash flowup to
26% of the total revenues in 2008.
Dr. Wang noted that the study was based
on data from larger dairy farms and that
most American dairy farms are smaller. More
information is needed to determine whether
cow power is technically and economically
feasible for small farms, he said. He concluded, however, that For any community
interested in a locally sourced renewable
energy project like the CVPS Cow Power

7. Like flies to manure. More farmers


and communities are interested in generating
renewable power from livestock manure, but
a new study shows that the financial returns
from generating electricity from cow dung may
be highly dependent on several factors, among
them: the base electricity price, the premium
paid for converted energy, financial supports
from government and other agencies, and the
ability to sell by-products of the methane generation. Courtesy: University of Vermont

POWER December 2011

Program, the strong commitment and collaboration of utilities, dairy farmers, electric
customers, and government agencies at the
state and local level is essential.
The studyEconomic Feasibility of
Converting Cow Manure to Electricity: A
Case Study of the CVPS Cow Power Program
in Vermont, by Q. Wang, E. Thompson, R.
Parsons, G. Rogers, and D. Dunncan be
found in the Journal of Dairy Science, vol.
94, no. 10 (October 2011).

POWER Digest

Fluor Enters Small Modular Reactor


Market, Backs NuScale. Fluor Corp. on

Oct. 13 announced it planned to invest more


than $30 million in NuScale Power, an Oregon-based small modular reactor (SMR) technology company. As part of its investment,
Fluor has purchased the companys shares
that had previously been in U.S. Securities
& Exchange Commission receivership and
has become NuScales majority shareholder.
Going forward, NuScale will continue to operate as an independent company. Additionally, Fluor and NuScale have entered into a
separate contractual arrangement whereby
Fluor will provide certain services to NuS-

cale as well as have exclusive rights to provide engineering and construction services
for future NuScale SMR facilities. NuScales
SMR technology was developed from 2000
to 2003 at Oregon State University with
funding provided by the U.S. Department of
Energy. With Fluors involvement, NuScale
expects to bring its technology to market in
a timely manner, it said.

Enviva to Supply Wood Pellets for


Dominion Coal-to-Biomass Conversions. Wood pellet manufacturer Enviva on

Oct. 19 signed a contract with Richmond,


Va.based Dominion Virginia Power to
supply biomass to two power facilities in
southeast Virginia. In April, Dominion announced plans to convert three 63-MW
coal-burning peaking plants to 50-MW
baseload power plants using biomass. Enviva will supply two of these plants, located
in Southampton and Hopewell, Va. Dominions application to convert the power stations is pending before the Virginia State
Corporation Commission.

ABB to Develop 1,200-kV AC Transformer for India. Power and automation

technology group ABB on Oct. 24 said it


had signed a memorandum of understanding with Power Grid Corp. of India (PGCIL)

to develop, design, and manufacture a


1,200-kV single-phase ultra-high-voltage
alternating current (AC) power transformer, locally in India. The transformer will be
deployed at PGCILs national test station
currently under construction at Bina in the
central Indian state of Madhya Pradesh.
Indias growing power capacity has
driven the development of transmission
infrastructure on a large scale. A 1,200-kV
transmission system is now being planned
to supplement the existing 400-kV and
800-kV transmission grid with significantly
higher load capacity to carry up to 8,000
MW of power. This will be the highest AC
voltage level in the world. As part of this
initiative, PGCIL is constructing a national
1,200-kV test station at Bina, where it
will carry out field tests and evaluations
of various transmission and distribution
equipment, including ABBs transformer,
before deploying the technology for commercial purposes.

Rolls-Royce to Supply Generator Sets


to Bangladesh. Rolls-Royce on Oct. 31

announced a $22 million contract to supply eight Bergen B32:40 16V reciprocating
engine generator sets to Bangladesh utility
Baraka Patenga Power Ltd. (BPPL). The en-

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December 2011 POWER

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19

gines will power BPPLs 50-MW power plant


under construction at Patenga, south of the
port city of Chittagong in south-eastern Bangladesh. In July 2011, BPPL signed a power
purchase agreement with Bangladesh Power
Development Board to develop the 50-MW
independent power plant project on a buildown-operate basis for a term of 15 years.
BPPL is a 51% subsidiary of Barakatullah
Electro Dynamics Ltd., the Dhaka-listed
Bangladeshi power generation company.

Vogt Power to Supply HRSGs for Singapore LNG Power Plant. Kentucky-based
Vogt Power International, a subsidiary of
Babcock Power, on Oct. 6 said it received
an order from Siemens to supply heat recovery steam generators (HRSGs) and associated
equipment for the GMR Energy Power Plant
project located on Jurong Island, Singapore.
Vogt Power will design and deliver two unfired, three-pressure-level, HRSGs with reheat for use behind Siemens SGT5-4000F gas
turbines. The HRSGs will be Vogts Loose
Harp design, which helps reduce the size
and number of cranes on site, while allowing
for multiple modes of transportation.
GMR Energy is Singapores first foreign
independent power project. The gas-fired
combined cycle power plant is expected to

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be one of the most efficient units in the


country. The project is due to be completed by the end of 2013 and will be fueled
by regasified liquefied natural gas (LNG).

Foster Wheeler Signs Licensing


Agreement for Sale of CFB Steam Generators in India. Foster Wheeler on Nov.

1 entered into a 20-year agreement with Essar Projects India Ltd. (EPIL), a subsidiary
of Essar Group, to provide a technology
license for utility-sized circulating fluidized bed (CFB) steam generators to be sold
in India. The terms of the agreement were
not disclosed. Future royalty payments will
be recorded over the life of the agreement.
EPIL has forecast that CFB technology is
the future for the Indian market given the
constrained fuel supply situation and the
ever increasing environmental concerns.

UK Crown Estate Announces Winners in Latest Marine Power Leasing


Round. The UKs Crown Estate on Oct. 24
announced eight new offshore site agreements for wave and tidal energy projects,
taking the total number of UK projects to
more than 30. Using these agreements,
the project developers will survey the sites
and design projects in preparation for installing generation devices in the future.

Ranging from small technology test


schemes for short-term installation to commercial projects with up to 30 MW potential
generating capacity, selected wave projects
include Pelamis Wave Powers Bernera project and AWS Ocean Energys Moray Firth
project. Tidal stream projects include DP
Marine Energys West Islay project; Nautricitys Mull of Kintyre project; Nova Innovations Bluemull Sound project; Oceanflow
Developments Sanda Sound project; Marine
Current Turbiness Skerries project in Wales;
and Minesto UKs Strangford Lough project
in Northern Ireland.

Saudi Electricity Orders New 1,200MW Gas Plant. Saudi Electricity Co.

(SEC) signed a SR5.4 billion ($1.44 billion)


contract on Oct. 16 with an unnamed national company to build an additional 1,200
MW at the PP10 combined cycle plant power plant in Riyadh, which currently has a
generation capacity of 2,240 MW. The contractor will add 10 steam turbines, which
should be in operation in 46 months, SEC
said in a statement. Saudi Electricity plans
to invest $80 billion to increase its power
generation capacity by 30 GW by 2018 to
meet soaring power demand.
Sonal Patel is POWERs senior writer.

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20

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POWER December 2011

W E S T I N G H O U S E E L E C T R I C C O M PA N Y L L C

For a strong economy,


Westinghouse is focused on safe,
clean nuclear energy.

Nuclear energy, by providing reliable and affordable electricity, helps keep


business competitive and powers future worldwide job growth. Today,
nuclear energy provides 15 percent of total global electricity generation
and accounts for more than 45 percent of the carbon-free electricity in
the world. Westinghouse, and its more than 15,000 global employees, is
dedicated to safe performance.
Thats why the Westinghouse AP1000 nuclear plant is designed to be more
than 200 times safer than U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission requirements
and be able to withstand the most extreme events. It is designed to shut down
automatically, without the need for backup power, and will cool itself for
72 hours before any human intervention is necessary. This is made possible
through the use of gravity, natural circulation, condensation and convection.
As the most advanced design available in the global marketplace, four AP1000
units are under construction in China. Four units are also under construction
in the United States, with an additional 14 units announced as the technology
of choice. Building additional AP1000 units will provide future generations
with safe, clean and reliable electricity.
Check us out at www.westinghousenuclear.com

CIRCLE 15 ON READER SERVICE CARD

Tools at Height
A structure or mechanical system that
requires fasteners also demands tools to
maintain it properly. In power sectors such
as wind, fossil fuel, and nuclear, some work
areas may be several hundred feet in the air.
While working at those extreme heights, or
even just 10 feet off the ground, its simply
unacceptable to drop anything. Thats why
the concept of tools at height is being
embraced as a way to improve safety and
efficiency on the worksite.
Tools at height tools come with integrated safety components that are secured
or tethered to prevent a falling hazard. A
tool security and drop-prevention system
equals superior site safety. In the wind
energy industry, its easy to see how this
is manifest when a worker drops a tool or
the component of a tool. In the confined
cylindrical space of a nacelle or tower, a
ratchet dropped by a worker at height can
do more than merely startle a worker below. It can cause severe injury or death.
The reality is that a mere pound of steel
ricocheting off equipment or flooring 300
feet below can create something akin to
shrapnel. Dropping something that creates debris is as dangerous as actually
hitting someone with an object directly
from above.
And what of the time wasted when a
worker forgets a tool and is forced to make
the walk of deathan unplanned, timesucking trip down a ladder or slow-moving
elevator to pick up a wrench or screwdriver
no one thought to bring on the first trip?
An extra 15-minute trip here and there
leads to a decline in productivity.

Managing Tools at Height


One of the key parts of the tools at height
concept is a lanyard or tether (Figure 1).
Tools built specifically to accommodate the
tether allow the tool design to maintain its
strength and structural integrity. The tether can be attached to a wrist or tool belt,
depending on tool weight and the application, such as workers using tools in the
wind energy industry (Figure 2).
Other components include coiled, weldless fittings that are built as an integral
part of a wrench, rather than a modification. The design, which utilizes an anchor
attachment floating across the length
of the tool, provides ease of use, with no
modifications that could compromise its
strength. Lock-on retention safety pins
essentially bind a socket to a ratchet
wrench, a significant improvement over
the conventional ball retention method.
Custom tool kits based on specific applications are another integral part of the
tools at height program. The goal is to help
companies and technicians reduce down
time and work more efficiently by creating
a kit with tools for jobs such as preventive maintenance. Many power plants have
equipment, machinery, and systems that
require regular, ongoing preventive maintenance as part of their operation. A custom
kit can be developed to house all of the
necessary tools required to perform preventive maintenance on specific components.
All the technician has to do is check out the
kit from the tool crib, and all the necessary
tools to complete the job are available.
Along with reducing tool-toting time,
a dedicated kit provides a secure transpor-

tation method and acts an extension of a


comprehensive asset-management program.
Shockproof or waterproof cases are available
with etched foam tool control packing. With
custom packing, every tool has its place, so
the technician knows immediately if a tool
was inadvertently left in a critical component, reducing the likelihood of foreign material being left behind on the job.
Origins of the Tethered Tool Approach
Foreign material exclusion (FME), a term
originated by the nuclear power industry, is
a set of procedures designed to minimize
the contamination of a system by foreign
materials. For example, if a tool falls into
a nuclear facilitys cooling tank, it must be
removed. Thats not an easy thing to do in
a radioactive environment, but the task can
be just as difficult in other segments of
the power generation industry and in other
critical industries. What would a misplaced
socket do in a reactor? And what are the
cost considerations in shutting down that
reactor, not to mention the maintenance
necessary to bring it back online?

2. Safety first. Operating inside a wind tur-

bine, this worker uses a tool that is tethered.


Especially in the wind energy industry, a tool
security and drop-prevention system equals
superior site safety. In the confined cylindrical space of a nacelle or tower, a tool dropped
by a worker at height can easily cause severe
injury or death to another worker. Courtesy:
Snap-on Industrial

1. Tethered tools. Tools built specifically to accommodate a tether or a lanyard allow the
tool design to maintain its strength and structural integrity. The tether can be attached to a wrist
or tool belt, depending on tool weight and application. Courtesy: Snap-on Industrial

22

www.powermag.com

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The idea for the tethered tool was born


of the U.S. National Aeronautics and Space
Administrations requirements in the early
1980s, primarily for work done on satellites. Satellites are extremely delicate, and
a lot of last-minute wrench turning goes
on at launch time. A socket dropped on a
solar panel can create millions of dollars
in damage. In the case of a satellite, it
means sending the entire assembly back
to the manufacturer for a repair that could
have been prevented. It doesnt have to
happen more than once before people are
looking for solutions.
Making Safety Simple
The lanyard is the low-technology workhorse component of any tools at height
program. A good system includes a drop
indicator that opens up if the lanyard becomes overstressed. Usually, the indicator is excess strap material thats folded
over on the lanyard and held in place by
a threaded stitch. It tells the technician
that the application exceeds the capacity
of the lanyard and is therefore pushing the
tether beyond its capabilities.
The socket presents a challenge because it is relatively small and cannot be

tethered. The solution here is to put a pin


in the socket so that its not simply held
in place but is definitively attached to the
ratchet. Then the lanyard is attached to
the ratchet and the ratchet is attached to
the workers wrist or tool belt.
Increasing Workplace Safety and
Productivity
The power generation industries are using tools at height to operate more safely
and efficiently. The lanyard, the socket
pin, and tools tethered to a tool belt
are the components of a comprehensive
tool security program that enhances
workplace safety. Amateur modification
of existing tools is not an option in an
environment where mistakes can cause
system failure or result in worker injury.
Specialized tools with a dedicated tethering system are created specifically for
use in close quarters or at height and to
support foreign material exclusion. The
goals are superior site and worker safety
and increased productivity.
Contributed by Pat McDevitt
(patrick.d.mcdevitt@snapon.com) is
manager, business development, at
Snap-on Industrial.

Microns Matter: Proper


Design of Fogging Nozzles
Inlet fogging systems for combustion turbines achieve their effect at the molecular
level: The cooling effect occurs by converting thousands of gallons of water into
single evaporated molecules suspended in
the air. The right fog pattern comes down
to a matter of selecting the best nozzle
design and proper placement in the inlet
air stream.
Two Types of Nozzles
Two types of nozzles are commonly used for
inlet fogging: impaction-pin nozzles and
swirl-jet nozzles (Figure 3). Both designs
operate on the principle of converting
high water pressure into increased velocity as water passes through a tiny nozzle
orifice. As water exits the nozzle orifice,
it forms a conical sheet of water that gets
ever thinner the farther it moves from the
orifice. Surface tension causes the cone
to first break down into fingers of water,
and eventually, air instability breaks these
fingers down into minute droplets for fast
and efficient evaporation.
Although they operate on the same
principles, the designs differ in how they

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POWER December 2011

CIRCLE 18 ON READER SERVICE CARD

create that cone of water, and this affects


the size of droplets produced. Impactionpin nozzles consist of a smooth, short,
straight-through orifice with a specially
engineered impaction pin in front of the
orifice. A fine jet of water is emitted,
which immediately strikes the pin, causing the water to form a cone of micro-fine
particles. Swirl-jet nozzles, on the other
hand, rely on the nozzles internal geometry to create the cone. An internal swirl
chamber forces the water to exit the nozzle tangentially to the axis of the orifice,
forming a hollow cone.
Both nozzle designs produce droplets
in the sub-50 micron range, and either
one will work for particular, noncritical
applications. For example, when fogging
nozzles are placed near the ceiling to cool
or humidify a factory, greenhouse, warehouse, or restaurant, there is plenty of
time for even the larger droplets to fully
evaporate before falling to the floor. However, in higher precision applications, such
as inside HVAC ducting or for turbine inlet
cooling, droplet size is critical.

The Right Measurement


In discussing droplet size, it is vital to
use the correct system of measurement. In
evaluating a fogging system, droplets below a certain threshold are of no concern.
Those that fall above the threshold, even
if they are only a few, are what one needs
to consider. With fogging systems, the
droplets that fully evaporate as expected
are not an issue, but the few larger ones
that collect on duct walls and floors or
enter the inlet of a compressor can potentially cause costly erosion and corrosion.
In evaluating fogging nozzles, therefore, measuring average droplet size is
useless. If, for example, a volume of water is broken down into 1,000 10-micron
droplets and a single 1,000-micron droplet, the average diameter of the droplets
is 10.99 micronstoo small to cause concern. However, because volume is the cube
of the radius, that single large droplet has
1,000 times the mass of all of the smaller
droplets combined. Even though the average droplet size is 10.99 microns, 99.9%
of the water volume is being converted

3. Two fog nozzle types. Two types of


nozzles are in general use for gas turbine fogging applications: impaction-pin nozzles and
swirl-jet nozzles; impaction-pin designs predominate. Courtesy: Mee Industries Inc.

5. Different fog patterns. The fog pattern of various impaction-pin nozzles operating
at 138 barg, from 457 micron (18 mils) orifice
diameter (left) to 147 micron (5.8 mils, on the
right) are demonstrated. The optimum 152 micron (6 mil) nozzle is in the center. Courtesy:
Mee Industries Inc.

Impaction-pin nozzle

Swirl-jet nozzle

4. Perfect plumes. The plume character-

istics of impaction-pin (left) and swirl-jet type


nozzles (right) are shown at an operating pressure of 137 barg. The smoke-like nature of the
impaction-pin nozzle is evident. The straight
edge of the swirl-jet nozzle is indicative of the
high momentum of the larger droplets, implying a much larger droplet size at the edges.
Courtesy: Mee Industries Inc.

26

6. Each nozzle is unique. The visual


plume shape of different makes of impactionpin nozzles is shown at an operating pressure
of 138 barg (2,000 psig). A Mee nozzle (152 micron orifice, 316 stainless steel construction) is
in the center. Courtesy: Mee Industries Inc.

www.powermag.com

into 1,000-micron droplets. Rather than


using averages, then, two other methods
of measuring droplet size are useful in
evaluating fogging nozzles: Sauter Mean
Diameter (SMD or D32) and Dv90 (also
known as Dv09).
The SMD is calculated by taking the sum
of the cube of all diameters and dividing
it by the sum of the square of all diameters. The SMD shows the average surfaceto-volume ratio of the droplets, which is
important because droplet evaporation
only occurs at the surface. To maximize
evaporation, the SMD should be as low as
possible.
The other figure, Dv90, means that 90%
of the volume of the liquid being sprayed
consists of droplets at or below the Dv90
figure. A Dv90 of 20 microns would mean
that 90% of the volume consists of droplets no larger than 20 microns. By selecting
nozzles based on the right combination of
SMD and Dv90 numbers, you can ensure
that the water will evaporate at the most
efficient rate and that very few large drops
will fall out of the air stream and pool on
duct surfaces or possibly find their way
into the compressor.
With both swirl-jet and the impactionpin designs, droplet size decreases as water pressure increases, up to a maximum of
137 barg (2,000 psig), producing plumes
(Figure 4). The impaction-pin nozzles
produced droplet sizes less than half the
size of those produced by the swirl-jet
nozzles, indicating that fog produced by
impaction-pin nozzles will evaporate more
completely and will contain fewer large
droplets that can damage equipment.
Even Evaporation
Within the class of impaction-pin nozzles,
there is still the issue of determining the
type and size of nozzle to use. All impaction-pin nozzles are not the same. An
ideal nozzle will produce an even plume so
that the water will fully evaporate, producing the maximum amount of cooling
with minimal excess water.
The first factor is the size of the orifice.
Over the past 40 years, Mee Industries has
evaluated a number of different orifice
sizes and has found that a 152-micron (6
mil) opening works best for turbine cooling applications (Figure 5).
The nozzle designs from different manufacturers also vary (Figure 6).
Nozzles must be made of the right material; 316 stainless steel is recommended.
The size and shape of the orifice and pin
must stay at initial design parameters to
continue making the ideal fog. Poor-quality metal will erode or corrode over time,

POWER December 2011

Proper Placement
Once the right nozzles are selected, there
is still the matter of nozzle placement
to produce even evaporation of the water across the entire air stream. This is
particularly important for turbine inlet
cooling applications. Research has shown
that there is little mixing of the inlet air.
Nozzles that are not placed correctly can
result in columns of air entering the turbine at different temperatures, humidity
levels, and relative mass.
One big lesson learned by Mee Industries, with more than 800 installations of
fog in gas turbines, is that the nozzles
cant just be spaced evenly in the inlet duct. Because the airflow velocity is
not constant across the ducts cross section, measurements should be taken to
determine the actual speed at different
locations. Computational fluid dynamic
modeling can be employed to determine
the best design to provide even cooling
at different loads, ambient temperatures,
and relative humidities.
A properly designed fogging array using the right type of nozzles produces
the maximum amount of cooling, power
boost, improvement in heat rate, and lowering of emissions. Just as important, it
will achieve this without creating conditions that lead to unplanned down time or
increases in maintenance expenses.
Contributed by Kerry Rogers, chief
engineer, research & development at Mee
Industries.

more complex transition welds in the shop


under shop conditions, and then replace
the piece in the field by making welds between similar/same base metals.
How Weld Cracks Form
Weld cracking is usually caused by thermal
stresses imposed on the weld metal and
adjacent heat-affected zones. In welding
carbon and alloy steels, cracking often
occurs at the junction. The formation of
hard, brittle regions within the weld oc-

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Correct welding procedures are extremely


important elements of the work done by
the PSEG Central Maintenance Shop (serving Public Service Electric and Gas Co.,
PSEG, a New Jersey utility). We have, for
example, a Critical Weld Inspection Program for high-temperature pressure piping
whose goal is to identify cracks in hightemperature piping welds.
The stations work very closely with the
PSEG Engineering department, based in
Newark, N.J., to complete the inspections,
and the Servco maintenance shop then
makes the repairs. The shop commonly
fabricates new spool pieces with dissimilar welds to replace existing ones.
There is always a high potential for failure cracking with transition welds joining dissimilar metals such as chrome and
stainless steel. The weld procedure is to
cut above and below the transition, do the

23
commissioning,

Using TemperatureMeasuring Indicators

December 2011 POWER

curs as the result of rapid cooling during


welding. The presence of hydrogen can
also cause weld problems.
Stress builds in the assembly as the
weld metal shrinks as it cools and the
weld metal is restrained by the surrounding colder metal. Also, heat is drawn away
from the weld zone by the surrounding
colder metal, accelerating stress formation. The rate of heat flow away from the
weld is greater during welding of thick
sections and in metals having a high ther-

Founded in 1988

resulting in excess water and oversized


droplets.

www.powermag.com
PIC 16135 PM_4.5625x7.5_4C.indd
1

outages, mechanical services and


technical services. Combine these
capabilities with our responsive
approach and global resources,
and its easy to see why those who
know choose PIC.

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CIRCLE 19 ON READER SERVICE CARD


11/3/11 27
2:32 PM

mal conductivity. In metals susceptible to


quench hardening, such as high-carbon
and alloy steels, the rapid movement of
heat away from the weld area can result in
the formation of hard, brittle regions.
The Importance of Preheating
One approach to reducing those thermal
stresses is through controlled preheating of the pipe. Preheating is frequently
required when welding metal parts used
in the power industry. A successful weld
unites the welding filler metal and the
base metal into one solid part. A good
weld is at least as strong as the base materials that are being joined.
With many materials, bringing the
base metal up to heat before welding
improves the chances of achieving a successful weld by reducing the danger of
cracking and other flaws as well as achieving a suitable metallurgical structure and
mechanical properties. As a result, rework
is minimized and the integrity of the finished piece is enhanced.
Preheat temperatures are based on the
type and composition of the metal being
joined. The amount of preheating must be
properly controlled in order to be effective.

Preheating can help to minimize thermal


gradients in the weld area, thereby reducing the resulting thermal stresses.
Preheating also reduces the rate of heat
flow away from the weld, allowing more
time for redistribution of thermal stresses,
thereby reducing the tendency for cracking. In some steels it helps to minimize
the formation of hard, brittle areas in the
weld and heat-affected zones, improving
ductility and crack resistance.
The presence of hydrogen greatly increases the possibility of cracking in the
weld metal or heat-affected zone when
welding carbon and alloy steels. Root
cracks, toe cracks, under-bead cracks, and
transverse cracks are all common, given
sufficient thermal stress and the presence
of hydrogen. In welding these materials, it
is important to keep hydrogen away from
the weld area. Hydrogen can come from
electrode coatings, fluxes, base-metal
contamination, and even hydrogen in the
atmosphere.
ASME B31.1 lists preheating requirements for power piping. In general, as
noted above, steels with higher carbon
and alloy content, and greater thickness,
need preheating. In some cases, the re-

quired temperature is only 50F minimum


(a consideration for outdoor applications,
but usually not important indoors). In
many cases, however, preheat temperatures ranging from 175F to 400F are suggested.
Preheating is not necessary for 300 series stainless steels and nonferrous metals
(such as nickel and nickel alloys such as
monel, inconel, aluminum, or copper alloys). However, warming those metals as
high as 200F may be desirable to remove
moisture condensation and contamination. Preheating may be desirable for thick
sections of high conductivity metals such
as aluminum and copper.
Preheating can be very helpful in preventing the presence of moisture on the
base metal surfaces and allowing hydrogen
to escape from the weld area. Sometimes
a post-weld bake (450F to 600F) is conducted to ensure that absorbed hydrogen
is removed from the weld joint.
The need for preheating increases with
the presence of these 10 factors:

Thickness of parts being welded


Lower temperature of the pieces to be
welded

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POWER December 2011

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7. Marking temperatures. The welder is marking the metal with a Tempilstik temperature-calibrated indicator that is applied like a crayon. When the marker material melts, the metal
has reached the specified temperature. More than 100 temperature range markers are available.
Courtesy: Tempilstik

Low ambient temperatures


Lower heat input
Higher speed of welding
Higher carbon content of the steel
Higher alloy content of the steel
Difference in mass between the pieces
being joined
Complicated shape or section of the parts

How to Preheat
Oxy-fuel gas torches are the usual method
of preheating large welded assemblies.
Where more precise control of the preheat
temperatures is required, furnace heating
or use of electric resistance heating blankets or induction coils may be employed.
With local torch heating or other rapid
heating methods, it is important to not
overheat the assembly.
It is also important to allow sufficient
time to reach the desired uniform temperature throughout the thickness of the weld
joint and surrounding metal. When using
gas torches, it is important to prevent deposits of incomplete combustion products
on joint surfaces or adjacent areas.

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CIRCLE 22 ON READER SERVICE CARD


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PowerMag_TC_Nov10.indd
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www.powermag.com 11/1/10 3:39:38 PM

Accurate Temperature Measurements


The preferred method for determining that
a joint has reached the desired preheat
temperature is a simple one: a temperature
indicator made of materials with melting
points calibrated to a guaranteed accuracy
of 1%, such as Tempilstik (Figure 7).
The welder strokes a mark on the metal
with a Tempilstik crayon as the metal is
heated. The temperature indicators are
made of materials with calibrated melting
points. When the temperature rating of
the selected indicator is reached, the dry
opaque mark undergoes a phase change
to a distinct melted appearance. Phasechange temperature indicators are preferred because they are accurate, simple
to use, inexpensive, and make good thermal equilibrium contact with the surface
of the material.
With Tempilstik temperature-indicating
markers, no equipment set-up time, calibration, or recalibration is required to
measure pipe preheat temperature, and no
operator training or experience is necessary. The indicators are accurate within 1%
of their stated temperature ratings measured in accordance with MTL-STD-45662.
The materials used are calibrated on apparatus traceable to the National Institute
of Standards & Technology.
Contributed by Louis A. Chismar,
Servco maintenance supervisor, PSEG
Central Maintenance Shop, and Kenneth
R. Stockton, PSEG training and development specialist, Sewaren, N.J.

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CIRCLE 23 ON READER SERVICE CARD

Will San Bruno Be a


Game-Changer?
By Vidhya Prabhakaran

nergy professionals and the general population are


both acutely aware of the explosion of a Pacific Gas &
Electric Co. (PG&E) natural gas pipeline in San Bruno,
Calif., that led to the death of eight people and the total
destruction of 38 homes in September 2010. The tragic accident garnered immediate national attention, thrusting the
natural gas industry into the spotlight. The California Public Utilities Commissions (CPUC) Independent Review Panel
neatly encapsulated the sentiment surrounding the event:
The fact that a large segment of pipe literally blew out of
the ground in an urban neighborhood and the residents were
generally unaware of the proximity of a high-pressure natural
gas transmission system to their homesraises significant
public safety concerns.
In the aftermath of the explosion, the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) and the CPUC each launched an
independent investigation to gather facts and make recommendations for the improvement of the safe management of
PG&Es natural gas lines. Each investigation took nearly an
entire year to conduct, and the resulting reports were widely
expected to make recommendations and findings that would
have a nationwide impact on the conduct and future of the
entire natural gas industry.
In communications with the media, many regulators have
routinely identified San Bruno as a game-changer. In addition, CPUC Executive Director Paul Clanon has been quoted as
saying that the CPUC has not rested one day in improving
what we do since the San Bruno explosion. Regulators for
other public utility commissions have made similar commitments of renewed commitment to safety. Has San Bruno been
the game-changer promised? Have regulators improved
their oversight?

Testing Is Long Overdue


Hydrostatic pressure testing of a natural gas pipeline involves
shutting down a pipeline for approximately 8 hours, removing
any natural gas, and then filling the line with water at much
higher pressures than the pressure at which the natural gas pipeline will be operated. If this costly test does not highlight any
weaknesses in the pipeline, the pipeline is deemed safe and restored to service.
Mandatory hydrostatic pressure testing of all pipelines by itself
is a game-changer. In some cases, as with the San Bruno pipeline, pipelines have been installed without any prior hydrostatic
pressure testing and have never been subject to testing in the
field. Moreover, before San Bruno, exemptions at both the state
and federal level had allowed some older natural gas pipelines to
continue operations, despite never having been pressure-tested
in the field.
The NTSB identified the exemptions of existing pipelines
(historically granted by the CPUC and U.S. Department of
32

Transportation) from the regulatory requirement for pressure


testing, which likely would have detected the installation
defects as a major contributing factor to the San Bruno
explosion.
In the immediate aftermath of the San Bruno incident,
California regulators and those at the national level moved
swiftly to repeal these exemptions and thus require hydrostatic pressure testing for all pipelines. In addition, the CPUC
required all California natural gas utilities to submit a comprehensive pressure-testing implementation plan by August
2011, setting the stage for hydrostatic pressure testing to
become a game-changer.

Who Pays for Testing?


PG&Es implementation plan includes not only pipeline pressure
testing but also for pipeline replacement, inspections, a valve
automation program, and a pipeline records integration program.
PG&Es cost estimate for just Phase 1 of its overall implementation plan is approximately $2 billion. Without offering a value
judgment on the merits of PG&Es specific implementation plan,
the utilitys proposal shows that the necessary increase in safety
of the nations natural gas pipeline system will require a significant investment of ratepayer money.
The CPUCs response to PG&Es request for substantial rate
increases to enhance natural gas pipeline safety will provide
an initial barometer of whether regulators are prepared to
use San Bruno as a regulatory game-changer. Substantially
granting PG&Es request, or at least acknowledging that increasing safety will lead to increased rates, would demonstrate that the CPUC has learned the lessons offered by San
Bruno and is prepared to respond to any criticism from those
consumer groups and politicians whose natural instincts are
to oppose any rate increase.
Such positive action by the CPUC will likely spur other regulators around the country to authorize similarly targeted investment in infrastructure and processes designed to enhance safety,
despite the likely associated increase in rates. One can only hope
that we will then see the beginning of a long-overdue era of
significant investment in safety and infrastructure improvement
around the country.
All too often in utility rate applications, the opportunity to
reduce the amount of the requested increase by deferring maintenance has been the easy option for regulators. However, as
San Bruno sadly demonstrates, deferring maintenance and cutting costs by foregoing investment in safety and infrastructure
improvements is ultimately much costlier. The San Bruno tragedy demands that all market participantsutilities, regulatory
commissions, and consumer groupschange the game they each
play in regulatory proceedings when it comes to safety.
Vidhya Prabhakaran (vidhyaprabhakaran@dwt.com) is an associate in Davis Wright Tremaines Energy Practice Group.

www.powermag.com

POWER December 2011

CIRCLE 24 ON READER SERVICE CARD

TOP PLANTS

Copper Mountain Solar 1,


Boulder City, Nevada
Owner/operator: Sempra Generation

The current largest photovoltaic plant in the U.S., the 48-MW Copper Mountain
Solar 1, utilizes approximately 775,000 solar panels to generate emission-free
electricity for about 14,000 homes without the use of water. The facility was
constructed in less than a yearan unprecedented achievement for a project
of this size.
By Angela Neville, JD

Courtesy: Sempra Generation

evada is a sparsely populated state


that contains large expanses of desert dotted with sagebrush and tumbleweeds. Because the southern Nevada
desert offers intense year-round sunshine,
there are few places in the world better
suited for solar energy development.
The ample solar resource in southern
Nevada was a main reason that Sempra
Generation chose to build the Copper
Mountain Solar 1 plant on a 380-acre tract
in Boulder City, which is about 20 miles
southeast of Las Vegas (Figure 1). Additional factors that made this location optimal for solar development were expansive
available land and close proximity to major transmission lines that provide access
to major markets, Scott Crider, director of
external affairs, Sempra Generation, told
POWER in October. (Boulder City sits
34

between the Hoover Dam Powerplant and


Las Vegas.)
When the facility entered service in December 2010, it was the largest photovoltaic
(PV) plant in the U.S. The 48-MW installation produces an estimated 100 GWh of
emission-free electricity on an annual basis.
The new plant is located adjacent to Sempra
Generations 10-MW El Dorado Solar installation (a 2009 POWER Top Plant). Power
generated from the project is sold to Pacific
Gas & Electric under a 20-year contract.
On March 18, Nevada Governor Brian
Sandoval, Boulder City Mayor Roger Tobler,
Sempra Generation President and CEO Jeffrey W. Martin, and other dignitaries gathered
to officially dedicate the new solar plant.
In his comments, Governor Sandoval
praised Sempra Generation for its commitment to Nevada and for creating hundreds of
www.powermag.com

local construction jobs during building of the


solar facility: This project exemplifies my
goal of making Nevada into the renewable
energy capital of the country. Projects of this
magnitude provide hundreds of jobs and invest millions of dollars in our state.
Copper Mountain Solar 1 was named Solar Project of the Year by Renewable Energy
Magazine.

Operations Overview
The landmark solar installation was built
in less than a year, which required an innovative approach to development in order
to achieve this scale and construction efficiency, said Crider.
First Solar supplied the thin-film PV solar
panels and served as the engineering, procurement, and construction contractor for
Copper Mountain Solar 1.

POWER December 2011

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To find your nearest representative,


visit cleaverbrooks.com or call 800.250.5883.

2011 Cleaver-Brooks, Inc.


CIRCLE 25 ON READER SERVICE CARD

TOP PLANTS
1. Hitting the jackpot. The 48-MW Copper Mountain Solar 1 is located in Boulder City,

approximately 20 miles southeast of Las Vegas. The facility is currently the largest photovoltaic (PV) solar plant in the U.S. Its PV modules do not require the use of water to produce
emissions-free electricity. Courtesy: Sempra Generation

Boulder City, Nev., is using the land lease


revenue from the project to fund essential
city services like police, fire, and park
maintenance.

Looking Ahead: Copper Mountain


Solar 2

First Solars PV modules have a number


of key design features:

The front (superstrate) and back (cover)


glass laminated sheets are heat-strengthened to withstand handling and thermally
induced stresses, while avoiding breakage
over the 25-plus-year module life.
The semiconductor stable cadmium telluride (CdTe) compound semiconductor material, applied in a very thin layer,
forms the active photovoltaic cells, which
convert sunlight into electricity.
Laminate material is used to bond the cover glass to the substrate and thereby seal
the PV device from the environment.

The PV module specifications are as


follows:



Length: 1,200 mm (47.24 inches)


Width: 600 mm
Weight: 12.0 kg (26.45 pounds)
Thickness: 6.8 mm

Crider pointed out that Copper Mountain Solar 1 is the first renewable power
plant to operate under a unique California
Independent System Operator (CAISO)
pseudo-tie pilot program. The pseudotie transmission arrangement allows an
out-of-state renewable resource generating
plant to deliver electricity as if the generator were located in, or directly connected
to, CAISO. He emphasized that the pilot
program is providing critical data to help
CAISO test and validate its systems and
36

procedures for the management of out-ofstate variable resources.


In support of CAISOs new interconnection initiatives for renewable power
generators, Copper Mountain Solar 1 was
also among the first solar power plants
to implement a customized plant control
system that allows active power management, Crider explained. This functionality
allows the plant operations team to quickly
respond to system requirementssuch as
limiting power outputfrom a consolidated control center, rather than manually
shutting down individual units distributed
throughout the facility.

Copper Mountain Solar 1 represents Sempra Generations commitment to developing world-class alternative energy projects
that generate a new source of clean power
and create jobs, said Sempras Martin.
But the success of Copper Mountain Solar 1 can be directly attributed to the vision
and support of Boulder City, Pacific Gas &
Electric, and many state and federal officials in Nevada. Their leadership is accelerating our countrys transition to a more
sustainable energy future.
In keeping with its goal of promoting solar
energy, Sempra Generation is now planning a
major expansion of its landmark solar installation in Boulder City. The new facility will
be called Copper Mountain Solar 2, and it
will further solidify Sempra Generation and
Boulder City as sustainable energy leaders,
Crider said.
Construction on the 1,100-acre site is expected to begin in early 2012. Power generated at the new 150-MW solar plant will be
sold to Pacific Gas & Electric under a 25year contract.
The first 92 MW of solar panels at Copper Mountain Solar 2 will be installed by
2013; the remaining 58 MW are expected to
be completed by 2015. The new facility will
deliver the following benefits:

Boosting the Nevada Economy


Sempra Generation received federal and state
tax incentives for the development of Copper Mountain Solar 1. These incentives play
a critical role in the ongoing development of
utility-scale solar projects in the U.S., according to Crider. However, this project is a net
revenue generator for taxpayers. Crider noted
that for every $1 in tax incentives received,
Copper Mountain Solar 1 will generate $2 in
new land lease and tax incentives for federal,
state, and local governments. Additionally,
the project created hundreds of new construction jobs and is helping move Nevadas clean
energy economy forward. Eight full-time
maintenance and operations employees currently operate the plant.
Over the life of the project, the facility will generate about $135 million in
new revenue for state, local, and federal
governments, Crider said. For example,
www.powermag.com

Create about 175 construction jobs, plus


five positions to operate the facility.
Generate approximately $150 million in
new revenue for state and local governments over the life of the project.
Require no water to generate electricity.
Produce a new source of clean, emissionsfree electricity.
Be located near existing power plants and
transmission lines.

In addition to Copper Mountain Solar


2, Sempra Generation is expanding its renewable energy portfolio throughout other
parts of the U.S. Southwest. It recently
broke ground on a massive new solar facility in Arizona called Mesquite Solar, which
could produce up to 700 MW of electricity at full build-out. The company also is
pursuing additional solar installations in
California. Sempra Generation has a solar
development pipeline that could ultimately
exceed 1,300 MW.

Angela Neville, JD, is POWERs


senior editor.

POWER December 2011

CIRCLE 26 ON READER SERVICE CARD

TOP PLANTS

EnBW Baltic 1, Darss-Zingst


Peninsula, Mecklenburg Province,
Germany
Owner/operator: EnBW Energie Baden-Wrttemberg AG/EnBW Renewables GmbH

Germanys first commercial offshore wind farmthe 48.3-MW EnBW Baltic


1consists of 21 Siemens wind turbines, each with a capacity of 2.3 MW and a
rotor diameter of 93 meters. Siemens constructed the facility in an area covering
about 7 square kilometers in the Baltic Sea.
By Angela Neville, JD

roviding a reliable power supply from


offshore wind turbines can be daunting because, typically, winds at sea are
much stronger than onshore winds. Consequently, the logistics of installing ocean wind
energy facilities and connecting them to the
grid are much more challenging than carrying out similar operations on land. Despite
such hurdles, Siemens recently completed
successful installation of EnBW Baltic 1,
an offshore wind farm located in the Baltic
Sea approximately 16 kilometers (km or 9.94
miles) north of the Darss-Zingst peninsula.
The project, owned by EnBW Energie
Baden Wrttemberg (EnBW), the third-largest energy company in Germany, was officially put into operation in May 2011. (A 60-MW
offshore pilot project went into operation in
late 2009. See our Feb. 2010 Global Monitor
for coverage.) The wind farms electricity is
transformed at the projects transformer platform from 33 kV to 150 kV; the transformer
is connected to the land grid by the company
38

Courtesy: Siemens

50Hertz Offshore GmbH. With a projected


output of approximately 185 GWh a year, the
project will supply more than 50,000 German
households with clean energy.
This is an important milestone in the
use of German offshore wind power. Onshore, Germany was a pioneer in wind
powerand now its important to rapidly
tap the huge offshore potential, said Ren
Umlauft, CEO of the Renewable Energy
Division at Siemens, in May. He projected
that by 2030, wind farms with total capacity
between 20,000 MW and 25,000 MW will
be operating off Germanys coasts and delivering electricity to German customers.
He added, Well soon be introducing
a new wind turbine with a capacity of six
megawatts. The new turbine will be gearless
and well-suited for offshore wind farms.

The German Energy Sector


Its not surprising that Germany is a world
leader in the use of wind power. In rewww.powermag.com

cent years, the country has aggressively


promoted the use of renewable energy
through its governmental policies. For example, on December 5, 2007, the German
government unveiled its Integrated Energy
and Climate Program, which aims to set a
global example in the fields of energy and
climate policy and is suited to the needs
and capabilities of a modern national
economy, according to the German Federal Ministry of Economics and Technology. The launch was timed to coincide with
the kick-off of the United Nations Climate
Change Conference in Bali, which was
held in December 2007.
The program is based on the conviction
that energy must be used with much greater
efficiency than is currently the case and that
much higher priority must be placed on the
use of low-carbon energy.
The adopted measures aim to prove
that climate protection is both affordable
and compatible with economic growth.

POWER December 2011

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CIRCLE 27 ON READER SERVICE CARD

TOP PLANTS
For this reason, the German government
is pursuing policies that deliver favorable results in keeping carbon dioxide
(CO2) emissions low but that are also as
cost-effective as possible. The German
governments goal is to achieve positive
environmental outcomes without having a
negative impact on consumers or German
business competitiveness.
Experts in the German Energy Agency
believe that new wind farms with an installed capacity of between 20 GW and 25
GW will need to be built in the North Sea
and the Baltic Sea over the next 20 years
to help meet the countrys demand. Moreover, an additional 850 km of new highvoltage power lines need to be built, and
400 km need upgrading in order to transport the wind power to households, even in
remote regions, according to a 2005 grid
study produced by the agency.
But improving the grid is just one aspect
of the governments policy. In the future, it
will also be important to network residential
customers, large industrial consumers, and
urban and rural areas with differing power
generation capacities in an intelligent manner, using smart grid technologies.

Triumphing over Construction


Challenges
Each of the 21 wind turbine units at the
EnBW Baltic 1 wind farm measures approximately 125 meters (m, 410 feet) from
the foundation to the blade tip (Figure 1).
In order to anchor these giant wind power

units in the sea and connect them to the


grid, suppliers, logisticians, technicians,
and engineers had to work hand-in-hand
on land and water. Production, transport,
installation, and other operations involved
in building the wind farm had to be coordinated under challenging conditions. When
difficult weather conditions developed,
construction had to be stopped.
The wind farms components were produced in several places: substation platform in Bremerhaven, Germany; monopiles
(foundations) for the platform and wind
turbine units in Rostock, Germany; transition pieces in Aarlborg, Denmark; cable
rolls in Cologne; and wind power units in
Denmark.
At the beginning of the offshore project,
the construction team probed the ground at
the site and then determined the positions
of the individual wind energy units. Next,
engineers dealt with the scour protection,
which consisted of two layers of stones
placed around each foundation base to
protect it against washing caused by waves
and currents. Then the monopiles were
driven into the ground with a gigantic ram
on a special ship. It took approximately
3,000 impacts to drive the approximately
37-m-long steel pipe about 20 m into the
seabed.
Next, the transition pieces, the monopiles, and the wind power units were connected with each other and placed over the
monopiles. The steel towers of the wind
turbines were then placed on the transi-

1. Doing the heavy lifting. The floating crane Matador brings the 900-ton transformer
substation to the construction site of the 48.3-MW EnBW Baltic 1 offshore wind farm, which is
located in the Baltic Sea north of Germany. Courtesy: Siemens

tion pieces with huge cranes. The heavy


cars with the generator, drives, and massive rotor blades were mounted next. Once
these units are put in place, neither wind
nor waves can move them.
After installation of the wind turbines,
the approximately 61-km-long deep sea
cable was laid and connected to the grid
onshore.
The substation platform was also
fixed to the ground using monopiles. The
450metric ton heavy steel platform rests
on just one monopile; when fully equipped,
it weighs almost double that. The foundation of the monopile and transition piece
with a total weight of 1,415 metric tons is
therefore three times as heavy as the foundation of the wind power units. The structure is protected against drifting ice by an
ice cone.
Underwater currents can cause continual
changes to the seabed. Therefore, to make
sure that no sand drifted away, causing destabilization of the foundations, another
stone ring was deposited around the base
of the foundations to protect against washing. This scour protection also holds the
cables, which are connected to the deep
sea cable of the internal electricity grid.

On the Horizon: EnBW Baltic 2


Siemens has orders for four more offshore
wind power plants in German waters: EnBW
Baltic 2 (288 MW), Borkum Riffgat (108
MW), DanTysk (288 MW), and Borkum
Riffgrund 1 (320 MW).
In June 2010, EnBW and Siemens Energy
entered into an agreement requiring Siemens
to supply 80 wind turbines, each with a capacity of 3.6 MW and a rotor diameter of 120
meters, for the EnBW Baltic 2 project (previously Kriegers Flak).
EnBW Baltic 2 is a wind park with dimensions that clearly exceed EnBW Baltic 1,
said Stefan Kansy, EnBW project manager of
offshore wind energy. A great distance to the
shore, great water depths, and a varying construction soil need an experienced team. We
have such an experienced team, which implements this project with great commitment
this is the best guarantee for success.
EnBW Baltic 2 will be located approximately 32 km north of the island of Rgen in
the western Baltic Sea and will cover an area
of approximately 27 square km. Projected to
commence as early as 2012, the project will
generate 1,200 GWh of electricity annually
for approximately 340,000 households and
reduce CO2 emissions by 900,000 metric
tons. The new offshore wind farm is scheduled to come online in 2013.

Angela Neville, JD, is POWERs


senior editor.

40

www.powermag.com

POWER December 2011

When It Comes to Validation,


We Put It All On the Line
At Mitsubishis T-Point Demonstration Plant,
We Test Our Gas Turbines the Way You Run Them
On the Grid, and Under the Gun

From advanced steam


cooling to state-ofthe-art blade and
vane designs and
coatings that let gas
turbines run hotter
and more efficiently,
T-Point makes the
difference between
concepts that look
good on paper, and
innovations that work,
for real.

Reality Is Better than Simulated Validation


Its one thing to mimic dynamic load conditions in a controlled test environment.
But its a whole different game when youre outputting real, on-demand power to
a grid thats got a mind and priorities of its own.
At T-Point, were not just the turbine OEM were the Owner/Operator of a power
station with our leading edge technology serving an industrialized city of nearly
100,000. That means our tests arent just rehearsals theyre as real as it gets.
And since 1997, weve tested every milestone in the evolution of our G- and
J-Series engines the same way, under the very same conditions youd expect them
to perform for you.

Testing That Pays for Itself Twice


Cost of fuel not hardware and manpower is the limiting factor in most OEM
testing protocols, but not for ours. Because T-Point generates real purchased
power for real customers, our testing process is self-sustaining.
That gives us the freedom to run longer, run harder and test more comprehensively
-- including parallel testing on integrated gear such as steam turbines, condensers,
generators and static frequency converters. And the result, to date, is a highly
reliable installed G-Series fleet thats logged more than 1.3 million hours and
13,500 starts.
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Thats testing that pays off for us in faster development of better, more dependable
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CIRCLE 28 ON READER SERVICE CARD

TOP PLANTS

Kimberlina Solar Thermal Energy


Plant, Bakersfield, California
Owner/operator: AREVA Solar

The 5-MW Kimberlina Solar Thermal Energy Station is the first to use compact linear Fresnel reflector technology developed to generate continuous superheated
steam, a key element for higher-efficiency power generation and integration with
new and existing plants. The facilitys innovative technology helps deliver power
even during periods of transient cloud cover.
By Angela Neville, JD

Courtesy: AREVA Solar

ituated in central Californias breadbasket region, Bakersfield is a key agricultural center and a center for petroleum extraction and refining. Now this area
is harvesting another abundant resource: the
suns energy.
The Kimberlina Solar Thermal Energy
Plant, (initially developed by Ausra, which
was purchased by AREVA Solar in February 2010), began operation in 2008 with its
first three solar steam generators (SSGs),
which used saturated steam boilers. Since
2009, the plant has operated with approximately 96% availability. In 2010, AREVA
Solar constructed, commissioned, and began operating its fourth solar steam gen42

erator (SSG4) at the 5-MW Kimberlina


facility in Bakersfield (Figure 1), which is
the first to use direct steam compact linear Fresnel reflector (CLFR) technology, a
type of concentrating solar power (CSP).
It uses the most advanced CLFR technology in the world, Katherine Potter, vice
president of communications for AREVA
Solar, told POWER in October. The result is
lower costs for stand-alone CLFR plants and
easier integration of solar resources with fossil-fired power plants for solar augmentation
and solar/hybrid power applications.
AREVA Solar was able to achieve direct steam generation through a proprietary
model predictive control system that overwww.powermag.com

came the challenge associated with parabolic


trough systems of temperature gradients in
the absorber tubes and controllability of the
two-phase water/steam flow.
At full capacity, Kimberlinas solar steam
generators can generate up to 25 MW of
thermal energy or up to 5 MW of electricityenough power to supply 3,500 central
California households, according to Potter.
Field trials during September 2010 consistently demonstrated steam flow exceeding
predictions during steady and transient conditions, while maintaining exit steam conditions at 60 3 bar and 370 20C. The SSG4 is
expected to generate up to 450C superheated
steam by year-end.

POWER December 2011

If a jobs worth doing,


its worth doing with
Roberts & Schaefer.
WITH MILLIONS OF DOLLARS ON THE LINE, WHY
TRUST YOUR PROJECT TO ANYONE BUT R&S?

Since 1903, Roberts & Schaefer has been a world leader in the
design, engineering, procurement and construction of bulk material
handling, coal preparation, and fuel blending systems. We provide
total solutions for fuel handling, as well as limestone handling
and grinding for CFB boilers, limestone and gypsum handling
for FGD scrubbers, and ash handling systems. Weve successfully
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Whether its complete system development, upgrades,
or modifications, its worth making a call to R&S.

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312.236.7292
www.r-s.com

Offices also in Salt Lake City,


Pittsburgh, Australia, Indonesia,
Poland, India, Chile and Africa
CIRCLE 29 ON READER SERVICE CARD

TOP PLANTS
Kimberlinas SSG4 proved that AREVA
Solars CLFR technology can help deliver
power even during periods of transient cloud
cover. During lights out testing, SSG4 had
sufficient solar thermal inertia to supply more
than 18 minutes of superheated steam.
Kimberlina is designed to help meet California peak demand and has operated with
high availability since it entered commercial
operation. Its peak production comes during Central Californias peak demand times,
when fossil-fired electricity is most expensive. A key benefit of solar energy is that the
cost of its fuelsolar radiationwill remain
consistent while the price of fossil fuels will
remain volatile.

Technical Innovations
In order to generate solar power, CLFR technology uses long, thin segments of mirrors,
or reflectors, to focus sunlight onto a fixed
receiver. These rows of reflectors can concentrate the suns energy up to approximately 50
times. With AREVA Solars technology, concentrated energy is transferred through boiler
tubes in the receiver, ultimately generating
high-pressure superheated steam. Unlike
some solar thermal technologies, AREVA

1. Solar light and heat. The Kimberlina

facility in Bakersfield features the first oncethrough, direct steam compact linear Fresnel
reflector (CLFR) superheated solar steam
generator. This major technology advancement drives down costs for stand-alone CLFR
plants and improves the integration of solar
resources with fossil-fired power plants for
solar augmentation and solar/hybrid power
applications. Courtesy: AREVA Solar

Solars CLFR uses water as a working fluid,


thus eliminating the need for costly synthetic
oils and heat exchangers. And to maximize
water conservation, CLFR uses a closed-loop
system. Once heated, the superheated steam

A key benefit of solar energy is that the cost


of its fuelsolar radiationwill remain
consistent, while the price of fossil fuels will
remain volatile.
powers a steam turbine.
The SSG4 delivers sustained, superheated
steam in a quick and cost-saving manner,
Potter explained. The design improves steam
production performance by eliminating
steam separation and recirculatory systems.
Once-through direct steam generation greatly
simplifies the overall system design by eliminating vessels, tanks, pumps, heat exchangers, and ancillary equipment. The tube bundle
incorporates multiple passes, with superheater tubes arranged in the high flux regions
and economizer/evaporator tubes arranged
in lower flux regions. This ensures sufficient
heat flux to sustain superheated steam temperatures throughout the operating day and
reduces the average bundle temperature to
reduce radiant heat losses. By eliminating the
recirculatory systems, the once-through SSG
reduces cost and startup time substantially,
while enhancing performance.
Kimberlina served as the testing ground
for AREVA Solar being named the first solar
steam power boiler manufacturer to receive
the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) S Stamp Certificate of
Authorization, Potter said. An ASME S
Stamp is considered the industry hallmark of
acceptance and certification.

Plant Profile
The reflectors and receiver tubers used at
Kimberlina were manufactured at AREVA
Solars Las Vegas manufacturing facility.
Construction management was provided inhouse. Subcontractors were engaged for
civil, structural, mechanical, and electrical
activities, and the SSG4 boiler assembly was
performed by AREVA Solar.
Kimberlinas SSG4 demonstrated the
rapid erection of AREVA Solars CLFR design. Construction was accomplished over a
six-week period within budget, Potter said.
Unique for field-erected boilers, the SSG4
tube bundle was welded at grade. After being inspected, the receiver and tube bundle
support structure was placed over the bundles, secured, and then the entire receiver
structure, with boiler tubes, was hoisted to
its operating position, 60 feet above grade.
44

One of the most significant successes of the


project was the scheduling and sequencing
of commissioning activities. Overallfrom
permits, procurement, preparation and issuance of contract documents to construction

www.powermag.com

and commissioningthe entire project took


just six months.

Overcoming Obstacles
Although Bakersfield has a good solar resource during the peak summer demand
period, it experiences less-favorable and lessconsistent solar conditions in the fall and
winter, Potter explained. This challenge provided AREVA Solar with a good opportunity
to test superheated steam production during
interim cloud coverage.
Unlike PV facilities, whose output is immediately interrupted by cloud cover, Kimberlina was able to sustain up to 18 minutes
of superheated steam production during a
period of cloud coverdemonstrating the
benefits of solar thermal power and AREVA
Solars CLFR technological advancement,
according to Potter.
The environmental and visual impacts
of power project development can often be
of concern to the local community. Potter
emphasized that AREVA Solar designed
its CLFR to minimize its environmental
footprint. The technology uses water as its
working fluid, which eliminates the use of
flammable synthetic fuels or expensive molten salts used in other CSP technologies. Its
closed-loop system helps ensure maximum
water conservation. CLFR is also the most
land-efficient solar technology, using up to
2.6 times less land compared with other solar
technologies. And, unlike fossil-fired power
plants, solar power has no emissions.

Bright Future for CLFR Technology


AREVA Solars success at Kimberlina is
leading to other commercial ventures. For
example, the company is constructing a solar power augmentation project at the Kogan
Creek coal-fired power plant in Australia and
has been chosen as the preferred solar thermal provider for the Solar Dawn project in
Australia. Potter said the company also is exploring product development advancements
that would use CLFR for enhanced oil recovery applications.

Angela Neville, JD, is POWERs


senior editor.

POWER December 2011

OUR BUSINESS IS PROVIDING


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TOP PLANTS

Martin Next Generation Solar


Energy Center, Indiantown,
Martin County, Florida
Owner/operator: NextEra Energy Inc., a subsidiary Florida Power & Light Co.

Courtesy: Florida Power & Light Co.

The 75-MW Martin Next Generation Solar Energy Center is the first hybrid solar facility in the world to combine a solar thermal array with a combined
cycle natural gas power plant. Because the facility uses a steam turbine,
transmission lines, and other infrastructure from an existing combined
cycle unit, financial savings of approximately 20% were achieved compared to what a similar stand-alone solar plant would have cost.
By Angela Neville, JD

ocated in a region that has abundant


wetlands, wildlife, and bald cypress
trees, the new 75-MW Martin Next
Generation Solar Energy Center is protecting the environment by harnessing the
power of the sun to generate zero-emission
electricity. By using solar energy to supplement the power production of an adjacent
gas plant, the plants innovative technology helps reduce Floridas carbon footprint.
The plant will decrease fossil fuel usage
by more than approximately 41 billion cu46

bic feet of natural gas over the projects


lifetime. The mirrors used in the parabolic
trough arrays require no fuel or additional
cooling water and produce no waste.
The Florida Power & Light (FPL) facility
was completed on schedule and more than
$75 million under budget. It entered commercial operation in December 2010 and
is projected to produce 155,000 MWh per
year, which is enough to serve almost 11,000
homes or 26,000 people.
The solar trough technology FPL is
www.powermag.com

using at the new Martin facility is an advanced version of the proven technology
being used by NextEra Energys other major subsidiary, NextEra Energy Resources,
at the Solar Energy Generating Systems
(SEGS) in Californias Mojave Desert,
Timothy Bryant, Martin Next Generation
Solar Energy Center production manager,
told POWER in October. SEGS is the
largest solar thermal site in the world, and
the new Martin facility is the largest in the
eastern United States.

POWER December 2011

TOP PLANTS
1. Catching rays. The new Martin Next Generation Solar Energy Center consists of more

than 190,000 mirrors arranged in solar troughs. Centered in the 284 rows of assemblies totaling
almost 53 miles are heat-collection elements20,000 vacuum-sealed, stainless steel tubes,
each more than 13 feet long. Inside the tubes are nearly 800,000 gallons of a highly specialized
heat-transfer fluid that runs between the solar field and the steam plant within more than 18
miles of carbon steel piping. Courtesy: Florida Power & Light Co.

Costs
The most recent estimated cost of the solar generation component for the Martin Next Generation Solar Energy facility is approximately 27
cents per kWh, which is higher than the 11 cents
per kWh cost of generation from a new combined cycle gas fired unit, according to Bruce
Kullman, Martin Next Generation Solar Energy
Center senior operations specialist.
The Martin solar plant qualified for a
federal investment tax credit of about $120
million, which will be passed on directly
to customers to help lower the construction
costs of the project.

Regional Economic Growth

Facility Overview
Bryant explained how the solar and combined cycle technologies are tied together so
that when the sun is shining, plant operators
can effectively take their foot off the gas and
allow the sun to help generate power.
Spanning more than 500 acres on the companys 11,300-acre Martin Plant site, the new
solar facility consists of more than 190,000
mirrors carefully placed in trough alignments
to capture the sun, similar to the way a magnifying glass operates (Figure 1).
The mirrors are arranged in 6,816 solar
collection assemblies (SCAs) consisting of
28 mirrors per assembly, he said. Advanced
tracking technology maximizes the efficiency of the troughs as the sun moves across the
sky over the course of a day.
Centered in the 284 rows of assemblies totaling almost 53 linear miles are heat-collection elements20,000 vacuum-sealed, stainless steel
tubes, each more than 13 feet long. Inside the
tubes are nearly 800,000 gallons of a highly specialized heat transfer fluid that moves from the
field to the steam plant and back again within
more than 18 miles of carbon steel piping.
The fluid is heated by the sun to approximately 740F and then pumped over to a heat
exchanger at a steam plant. There, energy
from the heat transfer fluid is extracted to
create steam that is then integrated into a
steam cycle at one of the natural gasfired,
combined cycle generation units at the site.
Of the approximately 300 contracts
awarded on the project, more than half went
to Florida companies, Bryant said. Materi-

December 2011 POWER

als managers purchased recycled aluminum


from a company in St. Augustine, steel pylons from an Orlando firm, road material
from a quarry in Port Mayaca, and lumber
from Indiantown. The primary construction
contractor was Lauren Engineers and Constructors, Inc., of Abilene, Texas.
When the section of the site where the solar arrays are located was originally licensed in 1989,
it was intended to be used for a coal-powered
generation unit. The wetlands easement license
made sure that all impacted areas were properly
mitigated and created a 1,130-acre conservation
easement and preserved 291 acres of surrounding area. FPL has protected the easement and
preservation areas for more than two decades.
Now the area is being used for clean, renewable
solar energy instead of coal-fired generation.

Technical Challenges
Differences between conditions in the California desert, where the large SEGS facility is
located, and those in Florida led FPL to adopt
a number of structural innovations during construction of the Martin facility, Bryant said.
The arrays, which stand nearly 30 feet tall,
were developed to withstand 130-mph winds
by anchoring them with foundations larger
than those used at the SEGS facility. The more
than 6,800 frames that support the mirrors and
heat-collection elements are complex trussed
structures. Due to the potential for high winds,
the SCA frames were designed and constructed to be much more rigid than desert-based
frames, minimizing wind-related distortion
and the likelihood of breakage.
www.powermag.com

At a time when Florida is suffering from the


aftermath of the worst economic downturn
in decades and has an unemployment rate in
the double digits, the Martin Next Generation
Solar Energy Center is having a significant
positive economic impact on customers and
local economies.
Approximately 1,100 jobs were created during the construction phase of the project, and
FPL matched the skills of local workers with
project needs as much as possible. As a result,
more than half of the construction jobs were
filled by workers from Martin County and
nearby Okeechobee and St. Lucie counties. Six
permanent employees now work at the Martin
solar site. Other employees have been added to
the Martin crews to handle solar field operational and maintenance activities, which include
52 preventive maintenance procedures, 16 new
operating procedures, six operational reliability
checks, and 26 major maintenance work packages. Additional contractors have been hired to
perform other tasks, including mirror washing,
grass cutting, and weeding.
It is estimated that the investment of approximately $400 million in capital spending
on the project will generate tax revenues for
Martin County schools and other public services of approximately $78 million over the
plants lifetime.

Future Goals
Not content with their past successes, employees at the Martin Solar Energy Center are
focused on increasing the plants energy production, improving operational performance,
and demonstrating to the electric power industry that this first-of-its-kind facility in the
world can be a more cost-effective way to
produce solar power.
We continue to learn how to optimize the
performance of the facility and its technological infrastructure to ensure that we are capturing the most energy possible from Floridas
plentiful sunshine, Kullman said.

Angela Neville, JD, is POWERs


senior editor.
47

TOP PLANTS

Pelton Round Butte Hydroelectric


Projects Selective Water
Withdrawal Project, Oregon
Owners: Portland General Electric and the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon
Operator: Portland General Electric

Courtesy: Portland General Electric

In December 2009, construction of an underwater tower and fish collection


structure was successfully completed at the 465-MW Pelton Round Butte
Hydroelectric Project. The first-of-its-kind fish bypass and intake structure
returns temperatures in the lower Deschutes River to historic patterns and
restores downstream passage of Chinook, steelhead, and sockeye salmon
while maintaining existing generating capacity.
By Angela Neville, JD

esting in a high desert setting in


Central Oregon, Lake Billy Chinook is surrounded by high basalt
cliffs and hillsides covered with sagebrush
and juniper. The lake was formed by the
construction of Round Butte Dam in 1964
and is fed by the Deschutes, Metolius, and
Crooked Rivers. With its scenic views and
large populations of bull trout and other
fish species, the lake for years has attracted large numbers of anglers, boaters, hikers, and sightseers.
The new bypass and intake structure
for the Pelton Round Butte Hydroelectric
Project was one of the main components
of a historic 50-year relicensing agreement
signed in 2004 by co-owners Portland General Electric (PGE) and the Confederated
Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation
of Oregon (CTWS), Steve Corson, spokesman for PGE, told POWER in October. A
license with the U.S. Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) for the proj48

ect was issued in 2005, incorporating the


agreement. Officially known as the Selective Water Withdrawal Project (SWW), the
structure is the worlds only known floating surface fish collection facility coupled
with power generation (Figure 1). It was
designed to reflect the latest scientific data
about fish migration patterns. Construction wrapped up in 2009, and the project
was certified as complete in early 2010.

Challenges with Original Fish


Passage System
When the Round Butte dam was built in 1964,
it had negative impacts on certain fish species in the area, even though it incorporated
a juvenile and adult fish passage system. The
original system included a downstream juvenile skimmer (capture facility) in the forebay
of Round Butte Dam, an adult capture facility
with associated upstream fish ladders, and a
gondola that transported adult fish upstream
over Round Butte Dam.
www.powermag.com

Unfortunately, the passage system failed,


primarily due to downstream migration problems in Lake Billy Chinook, the reservoir behind Round Butte Dam. In 1966, when it was
apparent that fish passage for downstream juvenile fish wasnt functioning well, the system was abandoned. As a result of the failed
fish passage system, Chinook, steelhead, and
sockeye salmon were unable to make their
migration to the Pacific Ocean, and their populations dwindled. Consequently, kokanee
(landlocked sockeye salmon) and other nonmigratory fish species ended up populating
the reservoir.

A Unique Collaboration
The Pelton Round Butte Hydroelectric Project
is the only U.S. hydroelectric project jointly
owned by a Native American tribe and a utility. Currently, the project is two-thirds owned
by PGE and one-third owned by the CTWS,
through Warm Springs Power Enterprises.
The uppermost dam is Round Butte; Pelton,

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TOP PLANTS
the middle dam, forms Lake Simtustus; the
lowermost dam, the re-regulating dam used to
balance river flows to meet peak power demands, is owned by CTWS. The three-dam
project has a total net capacity of 465 MW.
CTWS purchased their first interest in
the hydroelectric project from PGE effective Jan. 1, 2002. They have the option
to purchase additional interests up to a
maximum of 50.01% as early as the year
2029, according to the ownership agreement. The re-regulating dam powerhouse
remains wholly owned by the tribes.
While PGE and the CTWS had great
confidence that the science behind the
SWW project was sound, it required a
significant commitment to environmental
stewardship. At a cost of $108 million, and
with no historical precedent to confirm
that the system would successfully resolve
migration problems, moving forward with
the SWW represented a leap of faith.
As complicated and difficult as the engineering challenges of this project were,
PGE and the CTWS faced an equally
daunting task: obtaining support for this
project from more than 22 stakeholder
organizations and agencies with a diverse
and sometimes competing range of objectives, including the National Marine
Fisheries Service, the Oregon Department
of Environmental Quality, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and the U.S.
Department of the Interior.

An Innovative Solution
Following issuance of the new license by
FERC, the next challenge was for CH2M
HILL, the company selected to handle the
unprecedented engineering project, to take a
concept to design, and ultimately to operation. The SWW and associated fish facilities
at Round Butte Dam had to be designed to
attract and capture migrating salmon, steelhead, and sockeye salmon. The fish then
needed to be transported safely downstream.
In order for the SWW to achieve these
goals, the projects engineering team had to
meet the following major objectives:

Reorient the subtle surface currents toward


the dam to allow downstream-migrating
fish to find their way to the SWW.
Safely capture downstream-migrating salmonids attempting to leave the reservoir
using the SWW structure while excluding
fish from the turbine intakes.
Provide for the safe and efficient sorting,
enumeration, tag detection, marking, and
loading of downstream migrants for transport below the dam.
Manage the downstream water quality during late summer and fall by mixing surface
and deep waters to control the discharge
temperature and dissolved oxygen levels
mandated by the federal Clean Water Act.
Meet seismic standards, as well as wind,
wave, and hydraulic loading that an underwater structure is subject to.

1. Award-winning design. The first-of-its-kind fish bypass and intake structure at the Pelton Round Butte Hydroelectric Project is shown while under construction. The Selective Water
Withdrawal Project, which was designed and constructed by CH2M HILL, won the 2011 American
Council of Engineering Companies national Grand Award. Courtesy: Portland General Electric

Achieve all of the above while maintaining hydroelectric generating capacity.

The size of the structure was driven by


the location of the original powerhouse
intake structure nearly 270 feet below
the surface of the reservoir. This structure needed to be connected to the original intake structure to supply water for
power generation while attracting fish and
withdrawing water from the upper 40 feet
of the reservoir. Adding to the challenge
was the fact that the reservoir could not be
drawn down to allow construction in a dry
area and thereby required the assembly of
components on site in a size-constrained
construction area.
Construction of the 273-foot tall SWW
tower was completed in December 2009.
The bottom structure of the tower is coupled to the historic deep intake. The vertical flow conduit and top structure rises out
of the bottom structure about 700 feet upstream of Round Butte Dam. It is capped
with a rectangular-shaped intake structure
that draws in generation water and fish.
Once the SWW tower became operational, it began collecting migrating fish.
The fish are collected in two V-screens located on either side of the two intakes. The
fish are then pumped to a fish-handling facility before being transported downstream
of the project, where they can continue
their migration to the Pacific Ocean. Water
from the tower passes separately through
turbines at the base of the dam to generate
electricity.

Successful Results
Biologists predicted that, in the long term,
at least 96% of the juvenile fish collected at the water withdrawal tower would
be safely transported downstream of the
project and, to date, those numbers have
already been exceeded. In 2011, the first
few adult salmon and steelhead began their
return trip from the Pacific Ocean, up the
Columbia and Deschutes Rivers.
The towers draw of warmer water off
the surface of Lake Billy Chinook helps
to keep the reservoir cooler in the summer, creating a healthier environment
for fish. The tower has an intake near its
bottom, so it can draw cold water during
summer and fall to mix with warmer surface water. This helps maintain appropriate downstream temperatures in the lower
Deschutes River. The modified reservoir
environment provides a better habitat for
bull trout, kokanee, and the rearing of juvenile sockeye salmon.

Angela Neville, JD, is POWERs


senior editor.

50

www.powermag.com

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TOP PLANTS

Sarnia Solar Project,


Sarnia, Ontario, Canada
Owner/operator: Enbridge/First Solar

The 80-MW Sarnia Solar Project is the worlds largest operational photovoltaic
plant, with 1.3 million solar modules. The facility utilizes First Solars proven thinfilm photovoltaic (PV) technology, which has the lowest environmental footprint
and the fastest energy payback of current PV technologies.
By Angela Neville, JD

Courtesy: Enbridge Inc.

word-class solar plant in Canada?


No doubt some readers may be
caught off guard by this Top Plant
choice. Well, forget about the Frozen
North stereotypes of polar bears, dog sled
races, and ice fishing that are sometimes
associated with Canada. The Sarnia Solar
Project is located in the southernmost part
of Canada, just north of Detroit.
The Sarnia Solar Project has good solar
resource, favorable access to the grid, strong
community support, and low environmental
impact. It also has compelling commercial
features, including use of a proven technology, long-term power purchase agreements,
and long-term operations and maintenance
contracts, John Maniawski, Enbridges senior
director, power generation business development, told POWER in October.
The Sarnia plant complements Enbridges renewable portfolio in Ontario,
52

which includes three wind projects and


two other solar projects, and builds on
the important community relationships
that have been established with our crude
oil terminal in Sarnia, he said.
In 2009, Enbridge entered into an agreement with First Solar, a leading solar player, to expand the Sarnia facility from 20
MW to 80 MW, thereby creating what is,
for now, the worlds largest photovoltaic
(PV) facility. First Solar constructed the
project under a fixed price engineering,
procurement, and construction contract
and provides operations and maintenance
services.

CdTe PV Technology Benefits


The Sarnia Solar Project uses solar modules made with First Solars thin-film
cadmium telluride (CdTe) PV technology,
which has been used in more than 4,000
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MW of installations in the U.S., Europe,


and Canada. The panels are constructed
for durability and easy installation and can
be recycled at the end of their lifecycle
(Figure 1).
CdTe PV has one of the lowest environmental impacts of any PV technology and
the fastest energy payback of current PV
technologies: under a year. (Energy payback is the time required for the output
of an energy system to pay for the energy
required to manufacture it.) The modules
are manufactured in a state-of-the-art facility whose management systems are certified to ISO 9001:2008 quality and ISO
14001:2004 environmental standards.
This technology is one of the lowestcost technologies in the industry, said
Maniawski. The cost of solar electricity
continues to decline through improvements
in technology and competition.

POWER December 2011

TOP PLANTS
1. Leading the PV pack. First Solars thin-film cadmium telluride photovoltaic (PV) technology has one of the lowest environmental
impacts of any PV technology and the fastest energy payback of current PV technologies. These attributes allow the technology to easily scale
up. Courtesy: Enbridge Inc.

Financing Ontarios Solar Energy


Projects
Enbridges three solar projects (the other two
are in Tilbury and Amherstburg, Ontario)
take advantage of the Ontario Governments
Renewable Energy Standard Offer Program
(RESOP), which guarantees Enbridge a fixed
price for the power that it sells to the Ontario
Power Authority (OPA) under its 20-year
power purchase agreements.
The price paid to solar power generators
accounts for the cost of building solar facilities. The Government of Ontario recognized
that cost when it decided to include a mix of
renewable energy projects under the Green
Energy Act.
The Environmental Commissioner of Ontario (ECO) is the provinces independent
environmental watchdog and is appointed
by the Legislative Assembly. According to
ECO sources, in 2010, OPA paid electricity resource costs of C$317 million for conservation programs and C$269 million for
renewables. (The Canadian and U.S. dollar
were very near parity as this was written.)
This amount is recovered over a total Ontario
consumption in 2010 of 142 terawatt-hours
(142 billion kWh), which amounts to 0.4
cents per kWh (split roughly equally between
conservation and renewable subsidies).
According to OPA, that was 0.4 cents of the
13 cents per kWh that Ontarians paid on average (residential rate). In fairness, it must be acknowledged that this amount will rise as more
green energy comes online in future years.
Enbridges Ontario solar projects will not require an input cost from OPA once Enbridges
agreements under RESOP have expired.

December 2011 POWER

The Sarnia Solar Project makes good business sense for Enbridge. Maniawski noted that
it is an important implementation of our strategy to invest in renewable and alternative energy
sources that complement our core operations
and provide attractive returns to our investors.
He explained that the solar project has risk and
return characteristics that are fully consistent
with the companys low-risk business model
and similar to its crude oil pipeline business.

Promoting Environmental Success


Our neutral footprint plan also ensures that
the land and environment in and around our
projects are protected and improved, Maniawski noted. Under that plan, Enbridges
goal is to maintain its environmental footprint at January 2009 levels by taking the following actions:


Planting a tree for every tree the company


must remove to build new facilities.
Conserving an acre for every acre of natural habitat the company impacts.
Generating a kWh of renewable energy for
every kWh of energy its operations have
consumed since January 2009.

The Sarnia Solar Project helps Enbridge


meet its commitments in two ways. At the end
of the projects life, the company will fully
restore the 950 acres of land that the project
occupies, helping the company to meet its
acre for acre commitment. More immediately, the PV project generates about 120,000
MWh per year of emissions-free power and
prevents the production of more than 39,000
metric tons of carbon dioxide per year, which
www.powermag.com

helps the company to meet its kilowatt for


kilowatt commitment.

Community Impacts
At the peak of construction, the Sarnia Solar Project employed about 800 workers
and provided indirect benefits to dozens of
businesses in the Sarnia area, including engineering and design firms, construction subcontractors, suppliers, and service providers.
In addition, locally sourced materials for the
project were used whenever possible. Now
that its operating, the Sarnia Solar Project
employs two full-time employees.
Likewise, during construction, the 5-MW
Tilbury Solar Project generated about 300 construction jobs, and the 15-MW Amherstburg II
Solar Project employed about 350. As with the
Sarnia project, the Tilbury and Amherstburg II
projects provided indirect benefits to dozens
of businesses in southern Ontario. All three
sites have numerous contracts with local businesses for ongoing services such as landscape
maintenance, security, and snow removal.
In addition to contributing to the well-being
of local communities and the environment, the
Sarnia Solar Project has helped solidify Ontarios reputation as a world leader in renewable
and sustainable energy as the province moves
towards a cleaner future, Maniawski said.
The project also advances the Ontario
Green Energy Act, under which the Ontario
Government is aiming to increase investment
in renewable energy projects, improve conservation, create 50,000 jobs for Ontarians, and
create economic growth for the province.

Angela Neville, JD, is POWERs


senior editor.
53

GRID REGULATION

NorthWestern Energy Builds a


Regulating Reserve Plant
Stable grid operation is challenging, especially when intermittent and unpredictable renewable generation is added to the generation mix. For NorthWestern Energy, the best solution was adding fast-acting gas-fired generation
to its Montana electricity grid to meet required reliability standards while
replacing expensive third-party contracts for ancillary services.
By William T. Rhoads, PE, Dr. John S. Fitzpatrick, and Richard P. Walsh, NorthWestern Energy and Gary T. Wiseman, PE, The
Shaw Group

orthWestern Energys (NWEs) Dave


Gates Generating Station (DGGS), formerly the Mill Creek Generating Station, was constructed as a regulating reserve
plant to provide highly flexible reserve capacity for a grid with increasing nondispatchable
renewable energy sources. The $185 million
plantpurportedly the first built specifically
for electrical transmission grid regulation
dutyhas increased grid reliability, provides
a rapid ramp rate resource, and can operate at
low loads, which minimizes fuel costs.
The 150-MW natural gasfired plant
which was renamed in March 2011 in honor
of the late Dave Gates, NWEs vice president
of wholesale operationsbegan commercial
service on January 1, 2011 (Figure 1). It is
located at Mill Creek, near Anaconda, Mont.,
northwest of Butte.

Defining the Need


NWE is an electric and natural gas utility that
serves approximately 656,000 customers in the
western two-thirds of Montana, eastern South
Dakota, and central Nebraska. The company
is headquartered in Sioux Falls, S.D.; its Mon-

tana general office is located in Butte.


In 1997, the Montana legislature enacted
Senate Bill 390 (SB 390), the Electric Utility
Industry Restructuring and Customer Choice
Act, to deregulate the states electricity markets. To promote development of merchant
generation, SB 390 required Montana Power
Co. (MPC) to functionally separate its generation resources from its transmission and
distribution (T&D) assets. MPC sold its generating capacity to PPL Montana in 1999,
and NWE acquired MPCs remaining T&D
assets in 2002. At that time, NWE did not
own any generation assets in Montana, so it
relied on contracted power purchases from
outside its service territory. By 2005, quickly
rising power prices caught the attention of
the Montana Public Service Commission and
state legislators.
The Montana legislature passed House
Bill 25 (HB 25) in May 2007, which allowed
NWE to build and add new generation to its
rate base as part of the states move back
toward the regulated utility model. Also in
2007, NWE was faced with two problems
that threatened its grid-balancing authority

1. Regulating reserve plant. NorthWestern Energys Dave Gates Generating Station consists of three Pratt & Whitney Power Systems 50-MW Swiftpacs. Also shown is the
500,000-gallon raw water storage tank on the right and the 500,000-gallon demineralized water
storage tank on the left. Courtesy: NorthWestern Energy

54

www.powermag.com

responsibilities: Purchased ancillary services


were becoming more costly, and renewal of
those contracts was just a few years away.
A self-assessment found that NWEs most
important generation need was not baseload
or peaking power, but regulating reserve
power. The Shaw Group was retained to perform an independent engineering assessment
of technology and plant siting options for a
plant designed to provide regulating services
to NWEs Montana grid.
Shaw completed site and technology recommendations in December 2007. The generation
technology options were quickly narrowed
to fast-acting natural gasfired, simple cycle
combustion turbines (CTs). The turbine selection process began in January 2008 and ended
in July 2008 when an agreement was reached
with Pratt & Whitney Power Systems (PWPS)
for three Swiftpacs, based on the FT8 combustion turbine (Figure 2). In addition, Shaw was
retained as the owners engineer for the project in the fall of 2008.

Supplying Regulating Services


Unlike other regional grid-balancing authori-

2. The race goes to the swift. A close-

up of the Pratt & Whitney Power Systems


FT8 combustion turbine inside the enclosure
shows how the output shaft on the right connects with a double-ended generator. Another
FT8 is attached to the other side of the generator. The entire package is a 50-MW Swiftpac.
Courtesy: Pratt & Whitney Power Systems

POWER December 2011

CIRCLE 33 ON READER SERVICE CARD

GRID REGULATION
ties (a transmission system operator responsible for balancing electricity supply with
system demand at all times to meet strict
transmission system operating and reliability requirements), NWE operated its transmission control area in western and central
Montana without the benefit of owning or
operating company-owned generation. Consequently, before building DGGS, NWE
relied on several short-term contracts for balancing power, also called ancillary services,
to balance on a moment-to-moment basis the
differences between scheduled electric supply and demand within its assigned region.
The instantaneous measure of this balance
is known as the Area Control Error (ACE),
which is calculated every 4 seconds. The Control Performance Standards are a measure of
how well NWE manages its ACE. Generally,
NWEs main focus is to manage the magnitude of the ACE within prescribed limits.
Design requirements for grid regulation are
stringent because grid balancing requires a
plant to rapidly and continuously change load,
usually within seconds to minutes. Demands
on ancillary service providers in areas, like
Montana, with growing amounts of nondispatchable generation are expected to grow.
Nondispatchable resources for NWE

include about 150 MW of wind plus small


roof-top photovoltaic systems that are net
metered. Because wind is very difficult to
accurately schedule and can be highly volatile on a moment-to-moment basis, it is difficult to integrate into the transmission grid.
For example, generation from the Judith Gap
Wind Farm in south central Montana frequently ramps up from 0 MW to 131 MW in
10 minutes and ramps back down to 0 MW
in the same length of time. DGGS was sized
and designed to accommodate load changes
of this magnitude and speed.

Combustion Turbine Requirements


The technology assessment completed by
Shaw considered a wide range of generating
options for providing electrical transmission
system regulating service. The PWPS FT8 natural gasfired CT was the logical selection because of its many advantages, outlined below.
High Availability. Regulation service is
needed continually on the transmission system, so high availability is necessary.
Rapid Ramp Rate. The generating equipment must quickly respond to variations in
system generation and system load. NWEs
system needs were an aggregate ramp rate of
30 MW/minute.

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56

www.powermag.com

Maximum Unit Turndown. A low minimum load keeps the offset of relatively inexpensive baseload power to a minimum yet
positions the plant to immediately respond to
system disturbances. Each of the three 50-MW
rated Swiftpacs consist of two CTs driving a
single, double-ended generator. Maximum
turndown is achieved with one of the two CTs
operating at about 3.5 MW.
Right-Sized Regulation. The size of the
plant will meet existing regulation capacity requirements, estimated at 127 MW in 2015. The
projected increase in wind generation is relatively large compared to existing system load.
The 3 x 50-MW Swiftpac plant will provide
the regulation response and capacity needed
for the system for the near term. DGGS has
provisions for a fourth unit, if needed.
Quick Construction. The plant had to be
constructed quickly to reduce NWEs future
market risk related to grid reliability, cost of
contracted regulation service, and contract
renewal dates.
Secondary Fuel Option. To avoid costly
upgrades to the gas transmission system, gas
supply to the plant can be interrupted in the
cold extremes of winter, when gas demand is
high. On-site storage for ultra-low-sulfur diesel fuel allows continuous operation during
periods when gas is not available. The ability to use alternative liquid fuel improves the
general reliability of plant operations.

Regulatory Details
As part of the original project assessment, NWE
identified a dozen potential sites in Montana
where the plant could be located. Shaw developed a matrix of important siting parameters,
such as availability of natural gas, transmission
congestion, land use, and other similar factors.
A first cut reduced the dozen sites to a final four.
A more definitive list of 35 selection criteria
was then developed to assess the four sites. The
final analysis indicated that the best site was at
Mill Creek in southwestern Montana outside
of Anaconda. This site had minimal electrical
congestion and was near an existing substation
and a main natural gas trunk line. The site was
an existing brown fieldspecifically, a Superfund siteso permitting and land use issues
were minimized as long as the site was properly
remediated prior to construction.
The application for approval to construct
the plant was filed with the Montana Public
Service Commision (MPSC) in August 2008.
A provision of HB 25 allowed the MPSC up
to 270 days after receipt of an adequate application to issue a decision, with the option of
an additional 90 days. If an air quality permit
is required, MPSC is required to hold a public hearing on the application at least 30 days
following the issuance of an air permit. These
published regulatory lead times did not match

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GRID REGULATION
well with the practical need to have the plant in
service by the time contracts with third-party
ancillary service providers expired. The first
MPSC hearings were held in February 2009
and, despite several interveners, the MPSC
granted project approval in May 2009.
In addition, an application for an air quality
permit was filed with the Montana Department
of Environmental Quality (MDEQ) in August
2008. The MDEQ required additional air dispersion modeling that was completed three
months later. The final, complete application
was submitted on Dec. 1, 2008. The MDEQ
approved the permit in January 2009. The air
quality permit includes the future, fourth unit.

Construction Plan
While the regulatory process continued, the
selection of the engineer, procure, and con-

struct (EPC) contractor continued. Fifteen


pre-bid qualification inquiries were sent out
in October 2008. Seven bidders were invited for a formal presentation, and four bidders were then selected to submit proposals.
Those proposals were received on February
20, 2009, concurrently with the MPSC hearings. NewMech, a Corval Group company,
was selected as the project EPC contractor.
NewMech subcontracted the engineering
work to Zachry. A full project release was
contingent on the MPSC approval. MPSC issued a final order on May 19, 2009, allowing
the project to go forward.
The form of the EPC contract was a guaranteed maximum price (GMP), excluding
change orders. As part of its owners engineer responsibilities, Shaw instituted a robust
change order review process to ensure that

3. New Year, new start. This photograph was taken on January 1, 2011, the day that DGGS

entered commercial service. The louvered boxes on the package are the air inlet filters, one for
each of the two combustion turbines that constitute a Swiftpac. Courtesy: NorthWestern Energy

4. High plains plant. The three Swiftpacs are located in the center of the plant site, each

with a single, 90-foot-tall stack, approximately 15 feet in diameter. The gas compression building
is in the center, and the back-up diesel storage tanks, the ammonia storage system, and the fuel
transfer building are on the right. The water treatment building and water storage tanks are on
the left. Courtesy: NorthWestern Energy

added project costs were closely managed.


On the upside, if NewMech brought the project in for less than the GMP, then the contractor shared in 50% of the difference between
actual cost and the GMP. The project was
brought in under budget, which resulted in a
split in the savings.
DGGS was designed to be constructed in
two stages. The first phase entailed installation of the three Swiftpacs by the end of 2010
(Figure 3). The second and future phase is the
addition of a fourth Swiftpac, which could
occur between 2012 and 2015, depending
upon NWEs need for additional regulation
service in Montana.

Resource Sourcing
Natural gas to fire the CTs was obtained from
an existing NWE pipeline running between
Morel, which is about a mile north of Warm
Springs, and Anaconda. A new 24-inch natural gas pipeline, approximately 2.5 miles
long, connected the plant with the pipeline.
To control pressure in the pipeline, a compressor station, using three, 1,100-horsepower compressors, was located about 2.5 miles
from the facility near State Highway 48.
The fuel gas line to the plant also has an
important second use: It is designed to provide instantaneous storage (line packing) in
order to respond to rapid changes in gas demand caused by the CTs responding to grid
regulation needs.
Water for DGGS is sourced from the Silver Lake pipeline, a 34-inch-diameter line
that carries water from areas west of Anaconda to Butte. The pipeline crosses the southern end of NWEs property. Only 600 feet of
small-diameter pipeline was needed to bring
water into the plant, where it is stored in a
500,000-gallon raw water storage tank.
From that storage tank, water is filtered in
multimedia filters and then sent through cartridge filters before entering the reverse osmosis unit to remove dissolved minerals. The
reverse osmosis effluent is further processed
through an electro-deionization skid to meet
the water injection purity requirements of the
combustion turbine manufacturer and then
stored in a second 500,000-gallon demineralized water storage tank. The water injection
flow rate to each CT for NOx control is approximately 26 gpm. Wastewater produced
at the plant is primarily reverse osmosis reject water that is transported to the City of
Anacondas wastewater treatment plant via a
2-mile-long sewer line (Figure 4).

Unique Air Quality Permits


The emissions control system for DGGS was
atypical Best Available Control Technology
(BACT) in its analyses and determinations.
Typical BACT analyses define an emission
58

www.powermag.com

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GRID REGULATION
5. Follow the leader. This figure shows

the automatic generation control (AGC) signal requested from NorthWestern Energys
System Operations Control Center (pale blue
line) and the output from Dave Gates Generating Station following that signal (green line)
over a typical 24-hour weekday. Engines are
started and stopped as required to follow
the AGC signal. The vertical scale is 100 MW,
maximum. Wind power capacity of 150 MW
is connected to this system. Courtesy: NorthWestern Energy
100
90
80
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0

limit based on the historic best control technology and emission rates associated with
steady state operation. DGGS, however, was
designed to operate in a highly fluctuating

power generation mode to balance the grid.


A change in the standard BACT analyses and
compliance testing methods was required.
Bison Engineering, located in Helena,
Mont., prepared the air permit. Given the very
tight schedule for the project, the most stringent yet proven air quality control systems
were proposed as BACT for this installation:
water injection and a selective catalytic reduction system for NOx control, and catalytic
oxidizers for carbon monoxide (CO), volatile
organic compounds (VOC), and particulate
matter (PM2.5) control, based on fuel selection (natural gas). With the best control
methods proposed in the air permit application, the remaining question was what to propose as practical emission limits, given the
units unusual operation regime. Estimated
fuel consumption for the plant is 3,500 million standard cubic feet per year of natural
gas and approximately two million gallons
per year of ultra-low-sulfur fuel oil.
The levels of NOx and PM produced by
a typical CT are a function of turbine load,
but those of CO and VOC are not. At this
plant, emissions of CO and VOC were found
to vary significantly over its operating regime. For example, as turbine load increases,
mass flow rates of pollutants increase, yet

the concentration of those pollutants drops.


Conversely, as the turbine load drops, mass
flow rate drops, but concentration increases.
The concentration of emissions varies as the
turbine load changes, yet the maximum mass
emissions do not necessarily occur at maximum generation and turbine loads.
An analysis incorporating these and other
site and operating variables resulted in annual emissions (concentration and mass rate)
estimates for more than 30 possible operating scenarios. To determine the most likely
annual plant emissions, a probability distribution was assigned to the 30 scenarios, also
based on three years of site ambient temperature measurements. A conservative analysis
of the mathematical simulations using these
probability distributions determined that the
plant was not required to obtain a Prevention
of Significant Deterioration permit.
NWE proposed BACT emission rates at
the peak values found during operating simulations, irrespective of maximum generation
capacity. NWE requested as long an averaging period as possible, to account for periodic
nonsteady state operations. As emissions
vary greatly between fuels, BACT emission
rates are fuel dependent. Originally, NWE
proposed a concentration-based BACT rate,

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How Would You Like to Work for POWER ?
POWER has an immediate opening for an Editor/
Content Manager in Houston, Rockville, Md. or Norwalk,
Conn. (telecommuting is also an option from anywhere
in the continental U.S.). As part of a multi-platform
publishing team, you will enjoy working for a firmly
established print brand that is also making the best use
of current and emerging publishing platforms. This is
an ideal position for an energetic mid-career individual
looking for excellent advancement potential.
This position will be primarily responsible for writing
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JOB REQUIREMENTS
Candidates should have a four-year degree in
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power industry OR have a four-year journalism or
communications degree with experience writing about
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to demonstrate their ability to clearly communicate
technical ideas in writing to both a technical and
nontechnical audience, with minimal editorial
assistance. Strong oral communication skills are also
necessary, as the selected candidate will interact with
industry executives and decision makers as well as
speak at industry events. Expertise in a particular area
of the power generation industry (especially gas-fired
technologies) is preferred.

Please submit resume and cover letter with salary requirements, along with
writing samples or links to writing samples, to apply@accessintel.com or
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60

www.powermag.com

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GRID REGULATION
as PWPS could guarantee a fairly constant
emission rate across most operational loads,
down to approximately 6% of maximum
turbine load. In order to provide the emissions guarantees at the low turbine loads,
the turbine vendor provided a slight derate
in emissions reduction at maximum generation. This derate provided predictable water
injection control and flame stability at the
low loads the turbines would typically experience at DGGS.
The application for the air quality permit was submitted in August of 2008 with
emission rates approximately two to four
times higher than current BACT levels for
aeroderivative turbines operating at steady
state. NOx and CO were proposed as concentrations (ppm) as a reasonable assurance
that the plant was meeting BACT at all operational loads, including low turbine loads.
Thirty-day averages were proposed on all
pollutants; PWPS was also willing to guarantee the emissions on an hourly basis.
The MDEQ requested that modeling of
PM2.5 be expanded to include additional
sources, most of which had never been
modeled or fully inventoried before. The
models, which included nine years of meteorological data, were modified to include
more than 300 additional sources. The new
models were then run several dozen times,
each run requiring more than 400 computing hours. Several months were required to
develop the inventories, rerun all modeling,
and modify the application.
The revised application was resubmitted in
December 2008 and was determined administratively complete. The final air quality permit
was issued on Jan. 22, 2009, in support of the
MPSC hearings in February 2009.

Offsetting Carbon Emissions

CIRCLE 38 ON READER SERVICE CARD


62

One of the more unique provisions of HB


25 is the requirement that a utility generating electricity from a new facility using
synthetic or natural gas offset its carbon
dioxide (CO2) emissions by implementing
cost effective carbon offsets. Cost effective carbon offsets are defined as any combination of certified actions that are taken
to reduce carbon dioxide emissions or that
increase the absorptions of carbon dioxide,
which collectively do not increase the cost
of electricity produced annually on a permegawatt-hour basis by more than 2.5%.
Unlike other carbon offset programs,
Montanas law does not require offsetting a
quantity of CO2. Instead, the statute requires
spending a sum of money, to be determined
by the MPSC, for offset activities. NWE
elected to implement the carbon offset requirement through a grant program, making
funds available to third-party providers who
www.powermag.com

will implement the programs. Possible program types in which the investment can be
made include agriculture and forestry (such
as tree planting and reforestation), general
conservation (adding parks within 25 miles
of the plant, funding conservation easements, or permanently protecting lands that
support critical wildlife species), and energy conservation (building energy efficiency
and other energy lossreduction projects).
A request for proposals from carbonoffset providers was circulated in the spring
of 2010. The 26 applications received were
evaluated by an advisory council consisting
of representatives from MPSC, the conservation community, and NWE. A project
priority list and recommendations for funds
was submitted to the PSC for a final decision. A compliance hearing with the MPSC
is scheduled for November, during which
carbon offsets will be discussed. The final
decision is pending with the MPSC.

Third-Party Operator
When its plants were sold to PPL Montana
in 1999, most of NWEs expertise in plant
operation was lost. Because the May 2009
MPSC order approving DGGS required
NWE to operate the plant with its own
personnel after three years, in early 2009,
NWE solicited bids from three third-party
operators. NAES was selected in June 2009,
and the plant operations contract was in
place by the end of 2010. Having the plant
operator on board early was helpful during
discussions with the potential CT and other
major equipment suppliers regarding plant
operations and spare parts inventory needs.
As of September 30, 2011, the six engines
at the DGGS have operated 16,488 hours,
producing approximately 251,000 MWh
net. Two-unit availability has been 99.38%,
which provides sufficient regulation capacity except in extreme temperature conditions
when three units are needed. An impressive
5,465 engine starts have occurred since commercial operation. The plant has served as a
reliable replacement for third-party contracts
for regulation service by consistently meeting a monthly control performance standard
(CPS2) greater than 90%, the required reliability standard (Figure 5, p. 60).

William T. Rhoads, PE (william.rhoads@


northwestern.com) is general manager,
generation; Dr. John S. Fitzpatrick (john
.fitzpatrick@northwestern.com) is executive
director, state and local community relations; and Richard P. Walsh (richard
.walsh@northwestern.com) is environmental manager, large projects for NorthWestern Energy. Gary T. Wiseman, PE (gary
.wiseman@shawgrp.com) is a project
manager for The Shaw Group.

POWER December 2011

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POWER IN SOUTH AFRICA

Restructuring the South African


Power Industry
South Africa is at a critical turning point. An uncertain environment for private investment, escalating electricity prices, and a lack of available power
threaten South Africas position as an attractive investment destination for
many of the countrys most important industries. Power has been placed
at the forefront of the governments agenda, but South Africa needs a collaborative effort to meet the countrys energy demands and diversify its
generation portfolio in order to drive economic growth.
Sharon Saylor, Begum Agilonu, and Sidonie Pichard, Global Business Reports

ntil the late 1980s, South Africa enjoyed a surplus of some of the cheapest electricity in the world. However,
in 2008, after almost no investment in the
countrys power infrastructure for 20 years,
and facing escalating electricity demand,
South Africa found itself in the middle of
an electricity crisis. (See Whistling in the
Dark: Inside South Africas Power Crisis in
the November 2008 issue of POWER.)
The result was persistent power cuts
through programmed load-shedding in periods where short supply threatened the integrity of the national grid system, thereby
impacting the countrys mainstay industries.
The National Response to South Africas
Electricity Shortage policy document, released in January 2008, issued a plan to open
the national power infrastructure to private
investment, aimed at achieving supply-demand stability by 2012. Thus far, progress on
the national plan has lagged behind initial expectations, and access to electricity remains a
major inhibiting factor for economic growth.
The electricity market is dominated by Eskom, South Africas vertically integrated public
utility. Established in 1923, Eskom is responsible for 95% of the countrys generation. Today,
Eskom is the largest power producer in Africa,
providing more than 40% of the electricity used
across the continent, and the 10th-largest utility
in the world by generation capacity. Eskoms
fleet includes 27 operational power stations (including one nuclear plant) with a net maximum
capacity of 41,194 MW (as of Mar. 31, 2011).
The utility owns and operates the countrys national transmission system and provides electricity to about 45% of all end users in South
Africa. The other 55% is resold by redistributors
(including municipalities). South Africas electricity network consists of 395,419 kilometers
(km, 245,702 miles) of power lines and cables
(all voltages).

December 2011 POWER

Since 2008, Eskom has been under significant pressure to boost generation capacity and provide a stable supply of power.
In 20082009, as a result of the recession,
we saw a dip in demand, which allowed us
to push forward maintenance on existing
plants, explained Thava Govender, divisional executive of generation for Eskom. But in
20102011, the demand is reaching the levels that we saw before the recession, and now
the system is running very tightly. Our total
capacity is 42,000 MW, and we have a 15%
reserve margin and an operating reserve margin between 5% and 10%, which is not sufficient. If you take out gas generation, there
are days when we have no operating margin,
depending what is on maintenance, what is
on forced [outage], and the demandthat is
how tight the system runs.
Since 2008 we have added 1,000 MW of
diesel-fired gas turbines to the overall capacity, and they are exceptionally expensive to
run. For instance, the burning costs for the
most expensive coal fleet are 180 rand (R)
to R220 [$22.50 to $27.50] per MWh, compared to R2,000 per MWh for gas turbines.
Our biggest challenge at the moment is
to meet our demand and continue our maintenance schedule. Our fleet is middle-aged,
which means they need extensive maintenance (shutting down for 60 to 120 days),
and ideally, we would like 10% planned
maintenance of our fleet per year, but we are
not in a position to do this, and last year we
succeeded in only 8%. We have a plan to shut
down some of our units over the next five
years to make them compliant with environmental requirements. We also need to reduce
forced outages, but with a middle-aged fleet,
this is a challenge. On average we have 3,600
MW of unplanned maintenance.
The completion of the Kusile coal-fired
power station is expected late 2017/early
www.powermag.com

Thava Govender, Divisional Executive,


Generation, Eskom

2018 and will constitute the last stage of


Eskoms committed capacity expansion program. There has been no approval of or commitment to any new generation after that.
Eskom must raise capital to pursue its
committed capacity expansion program and
improve and refurbish its current operations.
Capital expenditure is expected to grow to
more than a trillion rand by 2026 and to be
funded from operating cash flows, shareholder loans, and debt financing (raised locally
and internationally), as well as the proposed
R20 billion government equity recapitalization over the next three years. Eskom also
successfully secured a $3.75 billion loan
from the World Bank, the biggest loan that
the bank has ever given to a South African
company. Clauses attached to the loan for
Eskoms new-build program insist on new
generation from cleaner energy sources.

A 20-Year Plan
Long-term underinvestment in the South African electricity industry for new generation
65

POWER IN SOUTH AFRICA


capacity, further compounded by an aging
fleet and the need for upgrades in the transmission and distribution sector, have resulted
in significant project bottlenecks. However,
the governments Integrated Resource Plan
2010 (IRP 2010) and subsequent Policy-Adjusted IRP set out a 20-year electricity plan
(20102030) for South Africa to increase
capacity and change the nations energy mix
and competitive landscape within the context
of global warming and globalization. As reflected in the IRP 2010, the power supply crisis accelerated the need to diversify Eskoms
energy mix and move toward more diverse
energy sources such as nuclear power, natural
gas, and various forms of renewable energy.
The IRP 2010 also outlines the efficient
use of existing resources, such as coal, while
ensuring continued investment in clean coal
technology, intensifying energy efficiency
measures, and aligning the countrys power
strategy with objectives set in the long-term
mitigation scenarios and climate change
commitments made at Copenhagen.
These goals, of course, add to the complexity of South Africas power supply mix. With
85% of its generation capacity from coal,
South Africa is one of the top global polluters and the14th highest emitter of greenhouse
gases. At the moment, coal is supplemented
by a few small hydro plants (1.5%), pumped
storage (3.5%), gas turbines (5.8%), one nuclear plant (4.4%) in the Western Cape, and
a few very small wind turbines. In light of
South Africas commitment to reduce emissions, Eskom has said it will reduce coals
current share of the countrys primary energy
mix to 70% by 2025 by obtaining 42% of new
generating capacity from renewable energy,
including concentrating solar power (CSP)
and photovoltaic (PV) power and wind, plus
an additional 23% from nuclear.
Although this document is the first of its

1. Much-needed baseload power.


Medupi Power Station is shown here under
construction. The six-unit supercritical plant
(Eskoms first) will have a total installed capacity of 4,788 MW. The units are expected
to be commissioned between 2012 and 2015.
Medupi means rain that soaks parched lands,
giving economic relief. Courtesy: Eskom

66

kind, as pointed out by Thiru Pillay, director at Deloitte, there are some elements that
require clarification: The first gap is a country-level holistic strategy, similar to the 1998
white paper, that talks to the full value chain,
including liquid fuel, primary energy, electricity, energy source mix, as well as the way
that we deal with the market structure all the
way down to how we deal with distribution.
Secondly, we need stronger leadership about
how we manage the role of private capital in
the sector. We have made a lot of progress
over the past two years, but we have been
slower than we should be in the sense that
we need the power on the ground. This is not
a private versus state intervention, but what
is the best solution for the country to ensure
the continuous investment of capital and infrastructure that the country needs.

Not So Cheap
South Africa led the world in low electricity
prices for many years, providing investors
with a very low energy tariff that was only
in 2011 surpassed by Canada as the cheapest electricity in the world. At $0.0855/kWh,
South African electricity is now 7% more expensive than Canadian electricity on average,
having risen by 26% in 2011, largely driven
by the need for financing extra capacity.
Thembani Bukula, full-time regulator for
the National Energy Regulator of South Africa (NERSA), says that the impact on the
countrys industries was taken into account
and that this increase wont make South Africa uncompetitive: From the perspective of
the Energy Intensive User Group, the good
years have passed and the years that we are
going to have are years where the price of the
electricity is going to be very much related to
the cost of producing that electricity. . . . It is
a known view that in the past it was not really
related. When you look at the whole infrastructure, we had a generation fleet that was
depleted and depreciated over a very short
space of time. It was producing at levels that
are not related to the cost, and when you look
at the increases that are projected, these are
increases that will bring the price of electricity to the mid-point of the price of electricity
in the different countries worldwide. We will
still be competitive, but the gap is not going
to be the 40% that it was. It will probably be
20%, but we have other advantages, such as
the reliability and security of our resources.
To align with the countrys goals to reduce
carbon emissions, the South African government has introduced a 2/kWh environmental
levy, which rose to 2.5/kWh, to be applied
to electricity generated from nonrenewable
energy sources. In addition, the South African National Treasury issued a discussion paper in December 2010 to look at the issue of a
www.powermag.com

carbon tax. The proposed Carbon Tax is still


be finalised. . . . but could potentially make
South Africa uncompetitive and be detrimental to the economy, believes Michael Meeser, Investec Capital Markets head of project
and infrastructure finance. The carbon tax
is nice to have, but there are more pressing
things to be done at this time.
South Africas aspiration is to achieve a
peak in national greenhouse gas emissions between 2020 and 2025, followed by a plateau
in emissions and, ultimately, a decline in absolute emissions, conditional upon international
financial support, technology transfer, and a
global agreement on a climate change regime.
To upgrade and expand the countrys
electricity infrastructure, in 2005, Eskom decided to embark on an aggressive new-build
program. An estimated R343 billion will be
spent to fund a new generation of power stations, including two of the largest coal-fired
power plants ever built, Medupi (Figure 1)
and Kusile, as well as Ingula pumped storage. Eskom expects to build 17.1 GW of new
generation capacity by March 2018, followed
by a new nuclear plant to come online in
2023. But major funding decisions, technology issues, and localization concerns need
to be resolved very soon to ensure achieving
this goal. Ultimately, Eskom plans to double
its total generating capacity to 80,000 MW
over the next two decades. In addition to all
existing and planned power plants (including
10 GW committed coal), the plan includes
new generation from the following sources:
9.6 GW of nuclear, 6.3 GW of coal, 17.8 GW
of renewables, and 8.9 GW of other generation sources.
To fund the capital costs and rising operating costs, Eskom applied to NERSA for a
35% increase in electricity tariffs. The regulator awarded Eskom a second multi-year
price determination plan (MYPD2) of electricity price increases of approximately 25%
year on year from 2010 to 2013, which were
designed to cover expansion and operation
costs and provide a reasonable rate of return.

A Slow Road from Monopoly to


Competitive Market
Partly due to the lack of a cost-reflective
electricity tariff, as well as a well-established
regulatory and legislative framework, South
Africas attempts at creating an enabling environment for private participation were largely
unsuccessful. Instead, South Africa has seen
the failure of various privatization attempts.
However, despite these setbacks, the IRP
2010 clearly formulates the need for private
investment and calls for 30% of new generation to be procured from independent power
producers (IPPs). The Department of Energy
(DOE), NERSA, and the treasury have issued

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POWER IN SOUTH AFRICA


a clearer framework for the upcoming first
round of renewable energy procurement in an
attempt to change the record for successful
private participation. Together with a higher
electricity tariff, private investors may finally
see the change they have been waiting for.
As Omar Vajeth, head of power and energy
at Absa Capital, notes: In South Africa, we
are trying to move from a very large monopoly utility with an abundance of cheap power
to a mindset of a competitive market. For 15
years we have been battling to get the concept
of competition in the country, and largely we
have not been successful at implementing the
processes to bring us to those stages. Now,
there is a need for private power to assist in
meeting South Africas capacity demand. . . .
and this need will drive investment.
Despite an extremely tightly balanced energy system, demand-side management focused on encouraging consumers to conserve
power during peak periods, a voluntary energy conservation scheme targeting industry
to reduce electricity consumption by 10%,
improved plant performance, and the return
to service of mothballed power stations have
helped the country avoid emergency loadshedding since 2008, even in the wake of the
2010 FIFA World Cup. Nevertheless, South

68

Africa is at a critical point for power development and economic growth.


Despite efforts to increase participation
by private players, Eskom has and will most
likely continue to hold its monopoly for decades to come. Govender explains Eskoms
position on the role of private players in the
market this way: There is the perception that
Eskom is trying to block IPPs, but this is certainly not the case. We battle every day for
extra megawatts. Every megawatt available
in South Africa has been signed up. For every
megawatt you add on or bring back into the
system, you negate the use of a gas turbine
that runs at R2,000 per MWh, so we will sign
on whatever we can.
Sheila Galloway, is group CEO of Utho
Capital (PTY) Ltd., which was previously
focused on the telecommunication sector
across Africa and has now seen high activity in the power industry. The company has
evolved into a leading public private partnership firm within Africa. Galloway notes that,
Across the continent and in South Africa,
utilities and government departments are
cash-strapped, so inevitably there is the need
to introduce private players to facilitate development in the power industry in the fastest
timeframe possible.

www.powermag.com

However, the environment has been less


than attractive for private players. The historical price point for electricity has not been
viable for private investment, and that is the
number one constraint, explains Deloittes
Pillay. The return on assets for Eskom needs
to be at least 8%, but is currently 4%. With a
further three rounds of 25% increases, it will
reach 8%. This means that the state is willing to invest in the electricity sector with a
return on assets of an expectation of 8%. The
public and business have difficulty in accepting a truly cost-reflective tariff for electricity. If you continue hiking the tariff, there is
a macroeconomic inflation issue. We have an
inflation-targeting strategy, and if you significantly increase the price of electricity, we
will have challenges to maintain the 3% to
6% inflation range, and that is the tradeoff.
Are we able to manage the more than doubling of pricing of services?
Currently, the buying and selling of power
lies within one single entity: Eskom. Establishing an Independent Systems and Market
Operator (ISMO) is a step toward promoting
private investment in the industry through
a more open and transparent process. The
Cabinet has agreed to bring up an ISMO bill
for discussion in parliament. As Ernst Venter

POWER December 2011

Improved schooling and recreational facilities

3 531 km Transmission Powerlines Built

Camden Power Station Recomissioned

17 920 MVA New Substation Capacity

New 100MW Wind Farm

5 381 Megawatts Added

10 664 local Jobs Created

7 632 People Trained

25 437 Jobs Created


78% Local Content

POWER IN SOUTH AFRICA


2. Kelvin Power Station. This 600-MW coal-fired plant near Johannesburg was commissioned in 1957 and is owned by a consortium of private owners, one of the few independent
power producers in South Africa. Courtesy: African Infrastructure Investment Managers

from Exxaros clean energy division says, If


we want to draw investors into the energy
landscape in South Africa, then we need to
put an enabling environment in place. For instance, we need to establish an ISMO; you
cannot have the same person as the jury and
the judicator. There are many working models internationally, for example, in Korea and
the UK there are IPPs operating successfully
with a state-owned generation company.
There is currently a debate about separation
of the system operator from Eskom. Though
there is merit in separating the single buyer
and the market operator, an ISMO means that
you no longer operate a vertically integrated
utility in Eskom and, thus, the system operator carries the risk of the power system.
As Pillay notes, If you take out the sys-

tem operator, you have increased the level


of risk in the system; then you need another
board, and a different management team, and
more handshakes between the different parts
of the value chain. . . . Over a period of time,
you are dealing with 30% of IPP generation
with 70% still from one player. Invariably,
80% of that 30%, by virtue of the funding
agreements, will be long-term bilateral contracts, and the other 20% may be traded in
the market. It would therefore appear that we
are reengineering an industry to secure the
dispatch of 20% of 30%.
Alastair Campbell, director of CIB mining,
energy, and infrastructure finance for Standard
Bank, points out that market conditions are
perhaps more favorable now than they have
ever been: There is considerable anticipation

NET#WORK BBDO 8012299

www.webberwentzel.com

70

Theres their thinking. Then theres our thinking.

www.powermag.com

around renewable energy, and because of the


current energy shortage and the 180 billion
rand funding gap, Eskom is not in a position to
continue building power plants to supply the
countrys power. Even with the completion of
Medupi, Kusile, and the Ingula pumped storage scheme, we will still have an energy crisis,
which creates the economic prerogative and
justification for IPPs.
An initial glance would show little to no
movement toward private participation, but
in light of recent decisions around the renewable energy procurement progress, it appears
that although progress was slow, South Africa is finally moving forward.
South Africa has had an abortive start into
the IPP market, says Brigette Baillie, head of
project development and finance at Webber
Wentzel, one of the leading law firms involved
in amendment of the legislative frameworks
in early 2011 for private participation in new
generation. We were involved in advising
AES in the cancelled IPP peaker bid, and we
have also been involved in advising Kelvin
Power Station [Figure 2], which is one of the
few IPPs in the country. . . . But we will have
a whole host of generators in South Africa on
a long-term basis apart from Eskom. Whilst
some [power purchase agreements] were
signed pursuant to the [Medium Term Power
Purchase Programme], there were very few,
and they are short-term, and the cogeneration
projects were very small. We are now talking
about a substantial amount of megawatts coming from the private sector. We are also seeing
captive bilateral power deals being developed.
Anglo, for instance, has a tender at the moment looking for discard coal to be used to
generate power to be supplied back to Anglo,
and we expect Exxaro and Xstrata to begin
something similar soon.
She adds, DOE is a very new creation, it is
only 18 months old . . . it really is the embryonic stage of the South African power sector.
Andrew Johnstone is managing director
for African Infrastructure Investment Managers, a joint venture between Macquarie Bank
and Old Mutual to provide institutional capital and equity. He commented on the influence of risk appetite in attracting foreign and
private players into South Africa as compared
with the booming demand for them elsewhere
on the African continent: It depends on the
location of the investor, and their perspective
of return opportunity and the associated risk.
The South African jurisdiction provides a
far lower risk profile than other African jurisdictions, so there is likely to be a greater
inclination to favor South Africa for those
who are new to Africa. South Africa offers
greater certainty than other jurisdictions, a
lower risk profile, but also lower returns than
other African options. The period over which

POWER December 2011

POWER IN SOUTH AFRICA


the investor is comfortable to invest will also
influence his choice of jurisdiction.
Over the last three years or so, the interest
in Africa has grown enormously on the back
of the emerging markets theme, greater
availability of high-quality information such
as publications highlighting the attractions of
Africa as an investment destination, which is
improving both data and also credibility. The
large investor markets such as the U.S. and
Europe are starting to look at Africa, and that
is creating momentum.
Most other African countries are operating
in a dollar market, which Absa Capitals Vajeth says is more attractive for some foreign
investors than South Africas rand market: If
investors can be comfortable with taking more
risks in those countries, then there are opportunities. . . . South Africa can continue to play
a large role in providing the stability and governance framework for African countries to
grow. In the future, we may need to go to foreign markets, but in South Africa for now we
are operating in a rand offtake market, and we
have the capacity to fund our own projects.
This is a time of much activity for South
African financial institutions, and Nedbank
Capital cautions developers to be selective
in their choice of financial institutions. If
the institution is overexposed, the development of the entire project can be at risk. This
is why we are selective in the mandates that
we sign, and we carefully gauge our capacity to structure, close, and participate in those
projects, says Sakkie Leimecke, lead principle for energy at Nedbank Capital. There
is room in the market for a combination of
international and local banks. In time, as
the renewable energy sector becomes more
developed, new financial instruments will
become available, and financial institutions
such as pension funds will start to create appetite for involvement.

Coal
In 2006, Eskom received a license to build
the first new coal-fired power station in more
than 20 years. It is called Medupi, meaning
rain that soaks parched lands, giving economic relief. The station comprises six units,
to be commissioned at nine-month intervals,
totaling 4,788 MW of installed capacity. The
first unit is scheduled to be commissioned
late 2012 and the last by 2015. The plant has
a planned operational life of 50 years.

This project boasts a number of firsts. Medupi will be Eskoms first supercritical plant, enabling operation at higher temperatures and
pressures than previous generation boilers, with
greater efficiency. It will also be the biggest drycooled power station in the world. Additionally,
the boiler and turbine contracts were the largest
Eskom had ever signed. Hitachi Power Africa
will supply the boiler plant and auxiliary equipment to both 6 x 800-MW coal-fired plants, and
Alstom S&E has the turbine contract.

Andrew Johnstone, Managing Director


for African Infrastructure Investment Managers

December 2011 POWER

www.powermag.com

71

POWER IN SOUTH AFRICA


Kusile is the second most advanced coalfired power plant project after Medupi, consisting of six units, each rated at approximately
800 MW for a total of roughly 4,800 MW. The
first unit is planned for commercial operation
in 2014. Other units will be commissioned at
approximately eight-month intervals, with the
last unit expected to be in commercial operation by 2018. It will be the first power station
in South Africa to be installed with flue gas
desulfurization, state-of-the art technology in
line with current international practice.

Contracts for the new-build program stipulate levels of localization and job creation.
With a 25% unemployment rate, South Africas industries remain focused on skill development and employment opportunities.
Hitachi has spent more than R1 billion on
the resuscitation of the boiler industry on localization investment; this includes upgrading
of facilities that were in existence and building new ones for boiler pressure part manufacturing, explains Johannes Musel, CEO for
Hitachi Power Africa (Pty) Ltd. Eventually,

after the completion of Medupi and Kusile,


the factories can be used to export to global
markets. Together with our partners and subcontractors, we employ 4,500 people.
Localization varies by technology. For
coal-fired plants, the advantage is that over
60% is local content, as Hitachi has reestablished an entire boiler manufacturing industry which had completely disappeared. This
has created a lot of jobs in the process. For
nuclear there will be a much larger portion of
import content, Musel notes.
The Murray & Roberts Group is currently
engaged as one of the most significant players in the construction of Medupi and Kusile
stations, and through a joint venture they are
responsible for Medupis civil work and have
a contract with Hitachi to do the mechanical
work for the boilers. Availability of skills
and maturity (or lack thereof) in our industrial market space are key challenges in South
Africa, comments Mile Sofijanic, senior executive director, Murray & Roberts Group.
South Africa needs some form of South
African industrial revolution to be ready to
face the high level of technical skills, knowledge, processes, and structure required for the
implementation of the nuclear program, Sofijanic continues. In our opinion, new power
plants need to be completed in a cost-effective
manner in line with world norms for productivity, quality, and safety. . . . and unlike many
other countries, we have objectives that run in
parallel to executing projects, including alleviation of poverty, localization, and empowerment of previously disadvantaged peoples.
In addition to the lack of development
within the industry, there has been a mass
exodus of qualified engineers over the years,
which makes attracting and retaining personnel a huge obstacle. Unique to South Africa
is the lack of skilled artisans, explains Ute
Menikheim, head of energy Southern African operations for Siemens. Now with the

Johannes Musel, CEO for Hitachi

Power Africa

72

www.powermag.com

POWER December 2011

POWER IN SOUTH AFRICA

Eskoms Financial Position


Paul OFlaherty, Eskoms finance director
responsible for the new-build program,
discusses Eskoms financial status and the
effects of new pricing and possible tax legislation on the economy.
You have taken Eskom from a place of
tremendous funding uncertainty to securing one of the largest loans from the
World Bank. Can you outline some of the
key objectives achieved since your appointment in January 2010?
We looked at a number of funding solutions for Eskom, because at that stage
the board of Eskom decided not to place
any further contracts for Kusile because we
did not have a funding plan. We looked at
45 funding options for Eskom, including
selling off assets and selling off interests
in Kusile. Ultimately, we agreed with the
National Treasury and the DPE [Department of Public Enterprises] in September
2010 thatas our cash flows were pushed
out because of Kusile and the crunch of
our funding, which around the next three
years was not as severe as we thought
to extend the government guarantees from
R174 billion to R350 billion and to allow
Eskom to tap various forms of funding with
the aim not to do this solely on the guarantees, but to only use them when absolutely required.
We figured out that, to the end of
Kusile (2017/18), taking into account operational cash flows, we needed R300 billion, and today we have secured, signed,
and sealed around 72% of that. At of the
end of June 2011 we have drawn down
R80 billion of it.
Our sources are diverse, and we see export credits as a big opportunity, having
already secured R32 billion from export
credits, R28 billion from the World Bank,
R21 billion from the African Development
Bank, R15 billion from the Development
Bank of South Africa, and we also intend
tapping the local and international bond
markets for approximately R90 billion
from which last year we got R28 billion.
There are still unidentified sources of
around R25 billion that we are looking at
across a variety of funds locally and internationally. There is potential for more
export credits and for future international

December 2011 POWER

bonds. Where we sit today we are very


comfortable that we can fund the entire
R300 billion, so we are very confident we
can complete Kusile.
With a clear funding path to see you
through to the completion of Kusile,
what do you envision post-Kusile to fulfill the remaining 70% of new generation to be commissioned by Eskom?
Post-Kusile is another ballgame. We are
busy working with the DPE to figure out,
where in the 40,000 MW required by 2030
does Eskom fit in? Governments intent is
that Eskom does 60% to 70% of that, and
the question remains how we fund it.
For instance, if Eskom had to build the
entire 9,600 MW of nuclear, funding would
be an issue, but not the major issue. There
are plenty of funds out there and plenty of
opportunities for funding, so while it was
our number one constraint in the past, we
do not see it as our number one constraint
anymore. We see execution and project
management skills as the number one constraint, and we are encouraged to hear the
minister talk about private partnerships;
we cannot do this on our own.

our plans are coming together. In order to


get to that investment grade, we cannot get
away with anything less than 15% to 18%
increases over the three years post-MYPD 2
[the second multi-year price determination
plan], but that is excluding nuclear, and
more expensive solar and wind; therefore,
it is going to be a very tough conversation
determining the right number. The regulator says 25% for the next two years, and
we are saying we can tone that down but
extend the price increase for a longer time.
What is that number? is what we are trying
to figure out.

NERSA [the energy industry regulator]


agreed to a tariff increase of 25% for
the next three consecutive years, although this was below the amount requested by Eskom. What would be the
optimal increase to enable a profitable/
cost-reflective return for Eskom without
compromising the competitiveness of
some of South Africas mainstay industries such as mining?
That is very difficult. From an Eskom
company point of view, currently, on a
stand-alone basis, we are not investment
grade; we are B at best. We get an investment grade rating because of the government uplift, being a sovereign-owned
company; therefore, we depend highly on
government support.
Ultimately, our view is that over time
Eskom needs to be a stand-alone investment grade and wean itself off government
support. We think we can be there in four
years time, and the fact that we were able
to raise international bonds off our own
balance sheets means that people can see

What will be the impact of a carbon tax


on Eskom and the economy, and how do
you see this coming to fruition?
We are busy having these debates with
the National Treasury. There are effectively
two options. The first is a pass-through for
Eskom, which means we will not bear any
cost, the same as the environmental levy.
The second is that Eskom bears the tax,
which means we make less profit, and if we
do not get an increase in tariff we would
be even more dependent on government
because we would struggle to get to the
right credit ratings, and we would struggle
to raise debt off our own balance sheet.
It is a two-edged sword. I think we need
to look at a grandfathering approach, that
all new emitters with carbon content pay
more. It is an historical inheritance for Eskom, and you should not penalize Eskom
because of its legacy. We are in discussions
with the National Treasury on the issue. It
seems certain it will be introduced, and we
need to give our input as to how it should
be introduced.

www.powermag.com

73

POWER IN SOUTH AFRICA


new-build program, the challenges were
massive; you could not find welders, fitters,
and drillersthe market was completely depleted. At Siemens, we decided to train our
own artisans to be able to serve our needs
and develop the industry. Siemens has developed 600 skilled artisans, and about 80%
have been placed in local industry.
While President Jacob Zuma has set job
creation as one of the governments fundamental priorities, Yokogawa South Africas
managing director, Herman van den Berg,
remarks that this has not affected the readiness within the South African marketplace to
adopt leading-edge technologies and move
further toward automation. Obviously,
there are technologies that cannot be applied
immediately. Some process enhancement
systems, asset automization systems, asset
maintenance systems, or process optimization software are not necessarily applicable
to South Africa because we are still struggling to get everybody employed. Its better
to give people jobs than to make a factory so
efficient that there is no need for manual labor anymore. However, there are many areas
were we can apply direct benefits to South
Africa, such as transmitters.

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On any electricity system operating as close


to the margin as the South African system,
fast-dispatching generation resources are a
must, so the country is building pumped storage and peaking plants.
Ingula Pumped Storage Scheme consists of
an upper and a lower dam, both of approximately 22 million cubic meters water capacity (777
million cubic feet). The plant is scheduled to
come into full operation in 2013 with a planned
capacity of 1,352 MW. The dams are 4.6 km
apart and are connected by underground waterways that house 4 x 333-MW pump turbines.
Water is released during peak energy consumption from the upper dam through the pump turbines to the lower dam to generate electricity.
In addition to the Ingula project, GDF
Suez was awarded the contract for two diesel-fueled peaker projects (750 MW in Kwazulu-Natal and 330 MW in Eastern Cape),
estimated at R5 billion.
Clive Ferreira, director of Fieldstone Africa (Pty) Ltd. was involved in the first failed
attempt at private participation in the peaker
projects. He says, The first peaker project
was a failure. When they should have done
it, they didnt do it, and now they are doing
it and they probably should not. If capital is
a scarce commodity, we should rather build
cheaper baseload stations that can be run. The
fact that they are considering those expensive
peakers is an indication that we have failed in

POWER December 2011

POWER IN SOUTH AFRICA


proper planning. If you are in trouble today,
it is because you didnt plan five years ago,
and the only way to do it is to build expensive
peakers that run at 10 times higher cost.

Gas
South Africas deposits of natural gas are
small. The second round of adjustments,
which led to The Policy-Adjusted IRP, included securing a minimum 711 MW from
combined cycle gas turbines (CCGT) between 2019 and 2021 to improve security
of supply by providing back-up for planned
renewable generation as well as additional
CCGTs later in the IRP period.
But Sasol, the biggest local company listed
on the Johannesburg Stock Exchange (JSE),
responsible for producing synthetic fuels from
low-grade coal and a small amount from natural gas, awarded a contract to Wrtsil in early
2011 to provide the complete turnkey solution
for its gas-fueled combustion engine plant.
This is part of a new initiative developed under
Sasol New Energy Holding, the company responsible for low-carbon electricity in Sasol.
This will be a first for South Africa and the
largest of its kind on the continent.

Arnaud Gouet, head of South African operations for Wrtsil, comments: Our intention is to grow in South Africa. We recently
signed the 180-MW Sasol gas project [Figure 3], which is an extremely important project for us. Gas is becoming more and more
important. . . . it is flexible, affordable, and
clean energy. There are many projects for developing gas in South Africa as well as in the
region. There are gas opportunities in Mozambique, and there might be other opportunities for [liquefied natural gas] and other gas
fields offshore on the west coast. This project
will be a landmark project.
The project south of Johannesburg, at an
altitude of 1,700 meters (5,577 feet), is not
without its challenges. Wrtsil, a leading
global supplier of flexible power plants and
services to the global power generation market, will use 18 20V34SG generating sets running on natural gas to generate 180 MW of
baseload capacity for the companys own use;
excess production will be wheeled through the
national grid. In addition to enabling a reduction in Sasols operating costs, the new power
plant will notably reduce the companys carbon footprint in the area. Another key envi-

3. Industrial gas generation. Wrtsil is supplying Sasol with a 180-MW gas engine power
plant for baseload power under a turnkey contract for its Sasolburg operations. Courtesy: Wrtsil

4. Solo station. The 1,800-MW Koeberg Nuclear Power Station near Cape Town is the only
nuclear plant in South Africa. Courtesy: Eskom

76

www.powermag.com

ronmental factor is that the Wrtsil solution


operates with a closed-loop cooling system,
thus consuming absolutely no water, which is
critical to a country with water scarcity.
Sasol is only one of many energy-intensive users that are looking into generation for
their own use. Many of the mining houses
are following suit, including Anglo American and Xstratas Lesedi project, both in an
attempt to secure energy supply and reduce
their carbon footprint.
Exxaro has also seen the opportunity: As
the second-largest coal producer in South
Africa and the largest coal supplier to Eskom
. . . we have identified a massive opportunity
for value creation by entering into the energy
industry, and we are currently establishing an
energy company, says Ernst Venter, executive general manager, business growth, for
Exxaro. He cited three reasons for the move:
the need for reliable baseload power supply
to support growth, price hedging, and a desire to move toward being the first carbonneutral company in South Africa.

Nuclear
Currently South Africas only nuclear plant,
Koeberg in the Western Cape comprises two
900-MW units (Figure 4). It was constructed
and commissioned in the 1980s, and the country has not added any additional nuclear capacity since then, despite many ongoing plans.
The Koeberg plant was built by Framatome
(now Areva) using pressurized water reactors
and is owned and operated by Eskom.
Several years ago, the Board of Directors of
Eskom approved a plan to expand the companys
nuclear fleet to more than 25% of the countrys
generation by adding 20 GW of new nuclear
capacity. The first unit was to be commissioned
in 2016. The environmental assessment process
for this Nuclear-1 project considered several
sites in the Western Cape. Technology options
considered were Arevas EPR and Westinghouses AP1000. Eskom later confirmed that,
due to lack of finance, it would not continue
with the nuclear program at that time.
Now South Africas energy policy plans to
increase nuclear from 5% to 15% of overall
capacity, which means 23% of new generation will come from nuclear. Based on the
natural resources available in South Africa,
wind and solar renewable energy should be
exploited meaningfully, but this needs to be
balanced by the need for energy security,
said managing director of Westinghouse,
Bultie Nel. Without substantial hydro being
available, nuclear is the only bulk option for
non-carbon-emitting power.
The IRP2 allows for the first 1,600 MW
of new nuclear capacity to be introduced in
2023, followed by five more 1,600-MW units
between 2024 and 2029. Energy Minister

POWER December 2011

POWER IN SOUTH AFRICA

Renewables
It was no surprise that in 2009, national and international renewable energy companies rushed

to the South African market with high hopes of


becoming profitable thanks to what appeared to
be one of the most attractive tariffs for renewable energy in the world. However, much to
the dismay of private investors, the renewable
energy feed-in tariff (REFIT) has since been
revisited, and a tender process with a competitive bid on price has prevailed. The objective
is to build a sustainable renewable industry
that contributes 42%, or 17,800 MW, of South
Africas new generation capacity by 2030. The
projects for onshore wind (1,850 MW), solar
photovoltaic (1,450 MW), concentrating solar
power (200 MW), biomass (12.5 MW), biogas
(12.5 MW), landfill gas (25 MW), small hydro
(75 MW), and other small projects of less than
5 MW (100 MW) are expected to involve foreign and domestic investment of between $10
billion and $12 billion.
The renewable energy target is based on
achieving a large portion of the 10,000 GWh
from solar water heating, as it is the most costeffective and easiest renewable option to implement. The current tender for the first 3,725
MW of renewable IPP projects will be released later in 2011 (after this report was completed) at the 17th Conference of the Parties to
the United Nations Framework Convention on
Climate Change, hosted in Durban.

Supporting South Africas


Nuclear Industry
Now and into the Future
Westinghouse AP1000 Sanmen Unit 1, under
construction and on schedule in China.

This is the fourth attempt at involving the


private sector, and we hope it will be successful, said Fieldstones Ferreira. There still
remains a lot of optimism from South African companies, but from international investors there is a difference of opinion. A lot of
them have spent significant time and money
to prepare their bids, and there is an air of
skepticism as a result of the uncertainties surrounding [the renewables framework].

Elizabeth Dipuo Peters, Energy Minister

Westinghouse technology is the basis for approximately one-half


of the worlds nuclear power plants. From our offices in Cape
Town and Centurion, Westinghouse supports Eskoms Koeberg
facilities, the local nuclear industry, and projects in China, UK,
Germany and the USA.
Today, the Westinghouse AP1000 nuclear power plant is the most
advanced design available in the global marketplace. More than
200 times safer than the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission
requirements, it is designed to automatically shut down and cool
itself for 72 hours before any human intervention is necessary.
Westinghouse is at the forefront of advanced nuclear power
options to meet the worlds diverse energy needs technology
that will also help provide South Africa with safe, clean and
reliable electricity.
Check us out at www.westinghousenuclear.com

W E S T I N G H O U S E E L E C T R I C C O M PA N Y L L C

Elizabeth Dipuo Peters has indicated that the


government will need to make decisions on
nuclear power by the end of 2011 if the 2023
deadline for the first nuclear unit is to be met.
Localization and skill development are key
considerations for South Africa, but they will
require time to put in place.
Dr. Yves Guenon, head of Areva South Africa, says, South Africa needs to develop its
localization strategy well ahead of its nuclear
build program. It is important that the country is
ready to procure and develop the right skills at
the tight time, particularly engineering and technical skills to support the nuclear industry. The
French industry is ready to support the South African industry by teaming with them to obtain a
quick and sustainable know-how and technology
transfer, like we did in China 20 years ago.
Technology partners in the running include
Generation III designs by Areva (ERP), Westinghouse (AP1000), and Generation II designs
from Korea and China. However, in light of
the Fukushima disaster in Japan, approval of
a Generation III design by South Africas National Nuclear Regulator is most likely.

ENERGIZING THE WORLD FOR 125 YEARS

WEST_SouthAfrican_power_mag_Ad_F2.indd 1
December 2011 POWER

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POWER IN SOUTH AFRICA

Eskoms Chief Nuclear Officer, Clive Le Roux, on Restarting a Nuclear Program


As South Africa makes its second attempt
at reinstating a new nuclear program, can
you provide us with an overview of the current situation for the planned 9,600 MW
of new nuclear capacity?
In 2006, because very little nuclear construction was being done in the West, the
market prices for nuclear power plants were
not well established. Therefore, Eskom made
a decision to go into the market and negotiate a commercial deal with all terms and
conditions before finalizing an investment
decision. We completed these negotiations,
and we had a recommended technology and
supplier and a full set of legal terms and
conditions and prices ready for our board in
2008. At that time the global financial crisis
hit and the board decided we could not do
nuclear with our balance sheet.
Eskom has not been instructed by government to do the new nuclear program, and how
this will be done will be a function of the balance sheet and technical capabilities in the
market, which have not been clarified.
What steps are currently under way to
prepare for the development of a new
nuclear fleet in South Africa?
We are completing the development work
for the new nuclear program. Approximately
eight years are required for execution, but
eight years are required for pre-planning. We
are working on the pre-planning, including
the EIA [environmental impact assessment],
the site safety report, the geotechs, the seismic hazard analysis, the land purchasing, and
these are saleable items and could be sold if
the government wishes a private partner to
be involved. The commercial process has to
be completed by 2015, and in my view this
is a three-year process and we need to start
in 2012.
At this point, we do not know the commercial process that the government would
like to run. One possible approach is to
first choose a technology and, second, to
issue a technology equity partnership enquiry and then to determine a shortlist for
negotiations to choose the final partner.
We completed this process previously in
only one year, but we did not have to deal
with the complexities of government and
equity partners. The markets comments from
the 2008 pre-planning was that it was the

78

fastest and best process for a nuclear power plant they have ever seen, and this was
shared by the American chief executive of
Westinghouse and French chief executive of
Areva with our Minister [of Energy].
Do you offer suggestions to the government on the type of technology you
would like to see implemented for the
new nuclear program?
We have to deal with the public perception
of the Japanese Fukushima event on the current design plans. We have done a detailed
study of our Koeberg plant based on the lessons learnt from Fukushima, and we have
come up with a number of improvements to
be made. Informally, there was major surprise
from other large utilities about the number of
issues we identified, and we have received a
lot of accolades on how we have completed
the analysis. It has been said that ours was
one of the leading analyses in the world.
This has informed us of modifications necessary for the requirements of a new plant.
We have also completed our EIA, and this has
assumed an envelope for the plant (not an exact design). The envelope covers a particular
approach towards a pressurized water reactor design and would probably exclude some
of the older generation designs, but we are
trying not to pin it to a specific generation
type. Our proposal is that we must use the
EIA envelope as our criteria; otherwise, we
must redo the public participation, and after
Fukushima, the public will not support us to
downgrade our EIA. We will backfit Koeberg,
but we do not want to backfit our new build.
Does South Africa have a well-defined legislative framework to support new nuclear
development?
South Africa is not ready for a large nuclear program. Many things in legislation and
many liabilities have not been adequately
addressed in terms of our protocols. For example, in a typical nuclear program, a government will pick up the liability beyond a
certain level from the utility, and the South
African legislation says the government
may pick up this liability.
What are the key challenges to establishing a local manufacturing industry for the
nuclear sector?

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During Apartheid, because sanctions were


placed on South Africa, many industries established local manufacturing capabilities as
an import replacement program. For a local
manufacturing industry to happen, government needs to strategically invest significant public funds, as it is not sustainable
with the local market. Because of sanctions,
South Africa could not export, and most of
those local industries collapsed. The same
will happen on the new nuclear program.
If we do not embed a local manufacturing
industry into the global supply chain, it will
not be sustainable.
If it were commercially competitive,
someone would invest without pressure
from the government. Therefore, the governments intention for pushing a local
manufacturing industry for job creation
comes at a price tag, which might make it
nonsustainable, and it depends how deeply
they interfere in the free market.
We have done a lot of groundwork to understand the implications of a transfer of technology and transfer of know-how. For large
industries it would not happen without initial
strategic investment and a guarantee on the
debt based on the market and a reduction of
the [black economic empowerment] involvement to a minor share in order to get a big
international player to commit to use South
Africa as part of their global supply chain.
We completed a study five years ago called
the Tsapro project to look at nine countries
that have had national strategic supply
projects and have successfully implemented
a local program. A typical example are the
French, Koreans, and Japanese taking over
Westinghouses technology, and the common
factor to their success was their governments
strategic decision to back a specific technology. Government needs to interpret these
studies to enable legislation and to start the
process of developing and training people.
If we look at the nuclear step-change
growth from one nuclear power station (Koeberg) to three power stations, this is a 300%
growth, and the human resource skills needed
are immense. The government has not enabled the sponsorship and the changes at
the university level to allow this to happen.
Because of our financial difficulty, Eskom is
reluctant to take on additional burdens until
instructed by the government.

POWER December 2011

POWER IN SOUTH AFRICA


Regulator Bukula addressed the issue by saying, While we can
be criticized for the time delay, we wanted to make sure that what we
decided to implement was correct and sustainable. We are going to
have a regulatory environment that is second to none or comparable
to a first-world country.
Johnstone of African Infrastructure Investment Managers is in
agreement: Another challenge is the pursuit for short-term gains. Infrastructure is a long-term asset; it lasts a long time and takes a long
time to put in place. One needs to be purposeful, but also patient.
With a clearer framework, investors can finally move forward. Now
that the documents have been issued and it has been confirmed that the
bidders would have to bid a tariff subject to a cap, the market can digest
this and plan appropriately, says Meeser of Investec Capital Markets.
Im not averse to a competitive procedure, if the adjudication process
is clearly defined and transparent. I think it would be interesting if the
actual tariffs were published. The obvious benefit is that the consumer will
benefit through lower electricity prices. One of the pitfalls of a competitive
process when looking at international precedent in the renewable energy
sector is the potential of projects not to meet financial close, as the tariffs
bid could be unrealistically low as a result of aggressive assumptions.
As with the coal and nuclear industry, the renewable energy industry
is set to create employment opportunities. Although the selection is 70%
weighted toward price, a bidders price would only be considered once the
bidder had met the other economic development criteria, which carry a 30%
weighting in the final selection and include job creation, the involvement of
historically disadvantaged individuals in the project, community development, and economic spinoffs, such as the localization of components used
in development of the facilities. Foreign investors need to embrace South
Africas Black Economic Empowerment (BEE) legislation to involve historically disadvantaged individuals in all phases of their project.
In 2011, the International Development Corp. (IDC) launched its
green industry unit with a focus on renewable energy (non-fuel-based
green energymainly wind, PV and CSP, and small hydro), energy
efficiency and demand-side management, emission and pollution
management (waste management and recycling, water management,
and air pollution control), fuel-based green energy (waste to energy
and cogeneration), and biofuels (mostly bioethanol). IDC will invest
R22 billion over the next five years and contributes to the development of broad-based BEE in the industry.

We play a significant role in funding and developing projects where


BEE players are involved, commented Rentia van Tonder, head of
Green Industries SBU, IDC. We are not there to source BEE players
for companies. We prefer them to come to us with BEE partners, and
we can fund them to be a part of that project. We prefer to look at Broad
Based Black Economic Empowerment (BBBEE), like community and
workers trust, especially in the renewable energy field, as it lends well
to facilitate the involvement of the communities.
For Siemens, BEE means ramping up resources and skills locally.
Our wind division will be the hub for the whole of Africa and all of
the Middle East. This means we will have the center of competence
located here, says Menikheim. In renewables we will look for partnerships in the industry, for instance in local manufacturing of wind
towers, and we are looking into a local setup with a civil company on
all the structuring for solar CSP and PV. . . .This means job creation
and training of people out of the local communities.
Though in its infancy, the renewable energy industry is set to take
shape. As Davin Chown, managing director, Mainstream Renewable
Power South Africa cautions, Our big challenge is to show government
that renewable energy will work. We cannot afford to have cowboys in the
market; we need players to prove that this is a sector that is sustainable.

Transmission and Distribution


A 20-year backlog in investment means that urgent and dramatic solutions are required for South Africas transmission and distribution
system. The transmission industry is in desperate need of investment,
projected to exceed R80 billion over the next five or six years and
extending to over R116 billion by the end of 2020, including needed
investment to strengthen connection to the Western Cape (Figure 5).

5. Continental connection. South Africas transmission system has interconnections with all of its neighboring countries. These
lineworkers are performing maintenance on part of Eskoms nearly
400,000 kilometers (nearly 248,548 miles) of power lines in South Africa. Of that total, the transmission network consists of 28,790 km of
lines with voltages ranging between 132 and 765 kV and a network of
160 substations. Courtesy: Eskom

December 2011 POWER

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POWER IN SOUTH AFRICA


Mongezi Ntsokolo, divisional executive
for transmission at Eskom, explained that
major focus areas have been identified
to strengthen the network and allow for
flexibility if there is a failure, and plans
for expansion have been outlined: South
Africa has more lightening activity than
many other countries, and with our high
towers at these high altitudes, our lines

Mongezi Ntsokolo, Divisional Executive


Transmission, Eskom

80 17420 Exxaro Energy Ad 124x178 Eng Final Pths.indd 1

are prone to lightening strikes. The second problem is birds, and their excretion.
. . . they account for more than 50% of our
faults. The third is fires; during winter, we
have runaway fires because of sugar canes,
and part of their harvesting involves burning the sugar, which dries the atmosphere
above them and ionizes and reduces the
air insulation between the lines, and the
lines actually flash over.
But to achieve the overall expansion
needed to meet demand as new generation
and diversification of generation sources
come online is not a quick process, as Ntsokolo points out: One of our key challenges is acquisition of land. We do not
have a quick process of resolving our
negotiations. We need to negotiate on a
wheeling buyer, wheeling seller, and this
takes a long time. Knowing that Eskom is
strengthening our networks, the prices are
higher than the normal commercial prices.
Even when those negotiations fail, there is
a legal process that, if it is the best line,
you can build, and that if it is in the best
interest of the country, you can invoke a
legal price for the owner to sell to you.
But it takes two years for this process to
happen.

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South Africas electricity infrastructure


connects to all of its neighboring countries, largely because of excess demand
in the past that allowed it to supply much
of the needed demand to other countries
in the region. However, as a consequence
of South Africas energy supply crisis, and
because the energy supply contracts are
coming to an end, other countries in the
region are building their own power capacity to become self-sufficient. But the
Southern African region offers significant
clean generation capacity and growth opportunities both for Eskom and for South
Africa in hydro and wind, as well as coal
and gas reserves.
As Standard Banks Campbell commented: Ultimately, [the Inga Dam] in
the DRC [Democratic Republic of Congo]
will eventually go ahead, but most likely
on the back of large industrial customers
as the anchor customer to make it bankable. Once the Tete corridor, the various
IPPs, and REFIT take off, we will have the
beginnings of a properly deregulated free
market power sector.
Now, however, the basis of connections are a government-to-government
and national utilitytonational utility un-

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2011
2011/09/15December
10:21 AM

POWER IN SOUTH AFRICA

The South African Power Pool has created


plans for integration, but countries
cannot be forced to comply with them.

derstanding, and this determines the connectivity. But despite South Africa having
talked about strengthening its networks to
neighboring countries for many years, the
practically, as Ntsokolo notes, is that, In
South Africa, we do not have excess power, thus we can only look at imports, and
the likely supplier would be Mozambique,
Botswana, Zambia, and DRC. The implication is cost. And at what price do we need
to buy this electricity? And the price must
not be higher than local generation. The
interconnectors have been a challenge; we
cannot commit to building until there are
commitments to taking, and you can not
commit to taking until you know the cost
of tariffs, and you cannot commit to this
until you know the cost of infrastructure.
It has to be a government-to-government
driven agenda.
There is heightened awareness of the
need to spearhead development across the
region. Right now the integration process
that is required in Africa and the various
regions is not occurring fast enough, and
as such, the continent remains dark until
such time as countries work closely and
collaborate, emphasized Galloway of
Utho Capital.
The Southern African Power Pool has
created plans for integration, but countries
cannot be forced to comply with them.
Hence, the need for strong regional leadership.
South Africas distribution industry is
also in dire need of a shake-up. The country
currently has two systems of distribution:
Eskom supplies bulk 132 kV electricity to
the municipalities, and the municipalities
are the redistributors and supply to the end
user; or Eskom supplies directly to end users. The distribution industry has a checkered history for successful implementation
of innovative systems to improve its infrastructure. It was not long ago that the
establishment of EDI holdings was made
to reconfigure the distribution network
into six regional electricity distributors
(REDS), each of whom would be responsible for raising its own funding and developing its own infrastructure.
However, a few months ago, this system

December 2011 POWER

was abolished, so the 287 municipalities


continue to handle their own distribution. The government has abandoned the
idea of REDS, and now we need to create different solutions and incentive-based
frameworks to move to improvements in
distribution and energy efficiency, remarked Tore Horvei, managing director
for the African operations of Norconsult,
a European consulting and engineering
group with experience across Africa. The
company recently decided to invest further
in South Africa to capitalize on the nations dire need for investment in generation, transmission, and distribution.
Horvei continued, At the moment there
has been a lot of focus on generation, but
we have a huge backlog of investment in

distribution and transmission, and there is


a lot of work needed in terms of expanding, upgrading, and rehabilitating existing
networks. Right now nine out of 10 times
power failures are a result of overloading
on the distribution system, and not because
of generation shortfalls.
Louis Maleka, acting divisional executive for distribution at Eskom explained,

Louis Maleka, Acting Divisional Executive, Distribution, Eskom

Norconsult - Engineering Sustainable


Energy Solutions for Africa

Norconsult is a interdisciplinary engineering and design


consultancy, providing services to clients in the public and
private sectors worldwide.
The company is the leading Norwegian consultancy, and has leveraged
its substantial international presence and experience in projects of various
sizes and at various stages of development, on all continents.
Norconsults international growth strategy has Africa as one of its focus
areas, with Norconsult Africa (Pty) Ltd in Johannesburg, South Africa
coordinating Africa business development and operations.
Energy sector services is key to our Africa business focus, including hydropower and renewable energy development, power systems engineering
but also broader energy sector management consulting services.

www.norconsult.co.za

For more information, please call +27 11 275 0259

www.powermag.com

81

POWER IN SOUTH AFRICA


We are facing some key challenges,
which unfortunately were not solved by
EDI. Firstly, municipalities depend on the
income from selling electricity. Thus, if
electricity is taken out of their control, it
means the municipalities lose the revenue
base. We also face constitutional challenges. For instance, the constitution states that
the distribution networks are the competency of municipalities; however, Eskom
has been given the responsibility of the
network should municipalities be deemed
incapable. In addition, the Municipal Fi-

nance Management Act does not allow a


municipal or government entity to transfer
assets into a PTY limited company. These
are challenges we need to continue to work
through.
South Africas distribution industry investment backlog is now estimated at R30
billion. Maleka commented on the longterm objectives in the restructuring process: EDI was supposed to give us mileage
in terms of being able to raise money and
improve infrastructure; however, now we
need to develop a new formula to tackle

these issues. We believe we need to work


in partnership with the municipalities, and
at this point we need to formulate what this
partnership will look like. The challenge for
municipalities is to raise the required funding needed to improve their infrastructure.
The backlog has been estimated at R30
million. However, the likelihood is that it
is probably much greater than this prediction. The system will collapse in the next
five years if nothing happens.
Eskom predicts that by 2017 it will be
one of the top five distribution networks

Brian Dames, Chief Executive, Eskom

The timely completion of your newbuild program will ensure mediumterm security; however, South Africas
mainstay industries, including mining, have been severely affected by
the lack of stable power supply in
the past. What is Eskom doing in the
short term?
Prior to 2008, we had electricity prices that increased at levels lower than
inflation, and the mining industry has
grown very well. A lot of this growth
has been based on Eskoms ability to
provide stable power and the fact that
Eskom was the largest buyer of coal in
South Africa, which meant a robust export industry was built as Eskom provided stable cash flow for coal supply.
Since 2008, we have had no interruptions, and no customer has been
asked not to expand. To date, we have
received no applications for a mining
project that we cannot supply power to.
The issue that we are working on is the
connection to the grid and determining the appropriate timelines for these
projects to come online. Over the next

82

two years, until the new stations are


running, the power supply-demand will
be tight.
Currently, we are working closely
with companies to create more efficient production processes. Eskom uses
the money that we receive through our
tariff to invest in our large customers, and in the last year we have invested R1 billion. We have seen great
benefits amongst our mining customers
in terms of reduction in energy usage
and increases in production. We have
very close relationships with our mining customers, and we provide quarterly
power system status updates.
We have called upon all consumers
to look at a 10% voluntary saving. We
believe this is more than possible. Our
GDP input over energy consumption
shows that we are woefully inefficient.
Some mining companies have already
achieved more than 10%. We have 134
of our large customers that have participated, and on average they have seen
about 5% energy savings.
One of the critical issues is how to
balance financial resources and sustain growth in the economy. The
country will be faced with incremental electricity price increases over the
next three consecutive years. Please
comment on how Eskom feels this will
not inhibit industrial growth.
It is very important that price reflects the cost of producing. South Africas electricity prices have historically
been very low and not reflective of the
economic cost of supply. Therefore, the
country needed to face the reality of

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making sure that electricity prices are


cost-reflective. We had an extensive period of 20 years of increases that have
been below inflation, which have led us
to make inefficient investments, or, on
the other hand, create massive profits
for industry.
For us to raise financing, investors
need to have certainty about our ability to repay; therefore, cost-reflective
tariffs are important. This also encourages energy efficiency in the country.
This year our electricity prices are still
amongst the lowest in the world, and
we will migrate to a point that is costeffective.
What differentiates Eskom from other
state-owned utilities around the world?
Eskom is one of the largest utilities in
the world. As an integrated utility, for a
long period of time we have provided a
reliable and very competitive electricity supply. Eskom has brought universal
access from less than 25% to over 70%
of the population, and we continue to
have some of the best skills to continue
to run a vertically integrated utility.
Eskom runs the only nuclear plant
on the continent, some of the largest
power plants in the world, and we have
the largest dry-cooled stations in the
world.
Given our size and ability to leverage
our balance sheet, we were able to run a
US$1.75 billion bond, the largest of any
company in South Africa.
In 2001 we were voted the best power company in the world, and we have
full confidence to restore Eskom to that
level.

POWER December 2011

POWER IN SOUTH AFRICA


globally, and by then, the bulk of Eskoms
distribution networks will be under control. While Eskom is investing heavily
in its distribution networks, at the same
time it is adding more customers, in line
with its commitment to universal access
to electricity by 2014. Maleka reported:
Since 1994, we have electrified four mil-

Medium Term Risk Mitigation Project


sets out to implement an immediate action
plan. It includes Eskoms demand-side
management program and the governments target for the rollout of one million solar water heaters, promotion of
non-Eskom cogeneration, self-generation
by industrials, and renewable generation

We are in a unique position, but in five


to 10 years, countries such as Germany
and the UK will find themselves in a
similar situation.
Thava Govender, Eskom Divisional Executive, Generation
lion households. In 2001 the government
took over the funding for these programs,
and now we have a penetration of 83% in
Eskom supply area and, on average per
annum, we electrify 120,000 homes from
Eskom.

The Short-Term Plan


The base case forecasts a supply shortfall
of 9 TWh of energy in 2012, and these
supply constraints are further complicated
and increased by the urgent need to undertake critical maintenance on generation
assets. Space needs to be created on the
system to support a comprehensive maintenance program to sustain the operational
integrity of the generation assets. Some of
this maintenance has already been significantly postponed.
Eskoms Govender observed, In essence, we have survived over the last three
years because we have been running an integrated generation control center. This is
a simple concept to ensure that everything
happening at a power station is channeled
through the center so that we can see the
risk, manage this at a senior level, and
plan accordingly. It does not detract from
the National Control Centre, which is the
central hub of the energy system and controls generation, transmission, and distribution. We have been in survival mode for
the past three years, and we will continue
to be for the next two years, until Medupi
comes online. We are in a unique position,
but in five to 10 years, countries such as
Germany and the UK will find themselves
in a similar situation.
Unlike the IRP 2010, which takes a
long-term look at the energy sector, the

December 2011 POWER

targets for the next three to five years that


need be achieved. Eskom is leading a campaign to encourage 49 million South Africans to reduce their energy consumption
and think of energy in a sustainable manner. The campaign stresses the importance
of pulling together as a nation to harness
energy savings. These measures will help
provide a safety net to deal with the immediate supply shortage.
There is also discussion around establishing a mandatory Energy Conservation
Scheme focusing on the largest electricity
users. To date, Eskom has asked for a voluntary 10% reduction from large industrial energy customers. Eskoms Govender
says, We are probably one of the only
suppliers in the world to spend billions to
encourage our customers to use less. Energy efficiency and conservation schemes
worked very well in Brazil, but the key issue in their success was that government
drove the initiative.
If we want to keep the lights on and
continue our maintenance, we need a
3,000- to 4,000-MW reduction by 2014.
. . . We are the guinea pigs, and many
utilities are waiting to see how we survive.
Although it will be difficult for the next
couple of years, we need the support of
the country, and the international community will learn from us. We got through the
World Cup, which was the coldest winter
in 20 years, and we survived. Already we
have been judged by the fact that we have
survived for three years against all odds.
The return to service of three mothballed coal-fired power stations (Camden, Komati, and Grootvlei) was one of
the initiatives taken by Eskom to increase
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supply in the short term. Camden, with a


capacity of 1,520 MW, was brought back
in 2008; two units of 125 MW have been
recommissioned at Komati; and two 200MW units have been brought back online
at Grootvlei.
The Policy-Adjusted IRP assumes that
the older Eskom coal-fired power stations
are decommissioned at the end of their
50-year lifespan. It is possible that these
power stations could have their economic
life extended with some capital investment and continue to operate for another
10 years in case the proposed new-build
options are delayed or demand projections
prove insufficient. However, this would
have to be traded off against the plants
higher emissions and low efficiencies (in
the neighborhood of 30% to 33% maximum continuous rating for the mothballed
plants that have returned to service).
To date, Alstom has successfully completed a groundbreaking integrated boiler
and turbine retrofit of Arnot power plant,
which was finalized earlier this year. The
project added 50 MW per unit, from 350
MW to 400 MW each. Retrofits as well as
life extensions provide great opportunities
for major multinationals that have experience oversees.

Conclusion
The South African electricity supplydemand balance will remain tight until
such time as both Medupi and Kusile are
brought online. Eskom, once one of the
top utilities in the world, has, because of
the energy crisis, seen itself slide in the
rankings. However, since the crisis, Eskom has posted significant net profits to
be reinvested in the business. It has successfully managed to keep the lights on
at a time of tight supply and successfully
made it through the FIFA World Cup.
With the governments guarantees, Eskom has put together a funding plan for
the next seven years. In January 2011,
Standard & Poors improved both South
Africas sovereign rating and Eskoms rating from negative to stable, and the company was able to raise a bond of $1.75
billion. There is no doubt that Eskom is
in the wake of some of its toughest times,
but with stronger governmental support, a
strengthening of legislative frameworks,
and the successful implementation of private participation, the company can remain
competitive, reduce its carbon footprint,
and ensure economic growth.

Written and researched by Sharon


Saylor, Begum Agilonu, and Sidonie
Pichard of Global Business Reports
(info@gbreports.com).
83

PLANT OPERATIONS

Siemens Releases Shaping Power


Option for Renewables Integration
The need for flexible power generation has increased drastically over the past
few years, particularly when integrating renewables. Another driver is seasonal peaks in demand that have become more severe as global drought
conditions have reduced hydropower production. One option for addressing this need is the Siemens Energy SGT6-5000F with Shaping Power. It
offers the familiar gas turbine reoptimized for increased output and higher efficiency during hot weather and for improved operating flexibility at
part-load conditions.
By Bonnie Marini, PhD, Siemens Energy

low and stable plant operation, once the


norm, no longer meets the needs of the
modern integrated and extremely dynamic grid. New generation must be fast and flexible while remaining robust and reliable even
under very demanding operating conditions.
Gas turbines have always provided very flexible
operations compared with other utility-scale
generation choices, such as coal. The Siemens
SGT6-5000F gas turbine with Shaping Power
option is well-positioned to be the technology
choice for the 21st-century electricity grid that
demands faster and more flexible response,
without an efficiency penalty (Figure 1).

1. Responding with flexibility. Siemens Shaping Power option offers improved operating flexibility with its SGT6-5000F gas turbine. The turbine was redesigned to provide fast-ramping
capability that will meet the needs of a dynamic electricity grid. Courtesy: Siemens Energy

Modern Grid Problems

In the past, gas turbines operated as baseload units, or for peaking power supply for
short periods. Baseload units ran at maximum power for extended periods. Peakers
were expected to cycle frequently in order
to supply additional power when demand
increased. A regional power grid in the U.S.
might be supplied by a combination of nuclear, coal, wind, and gas-fired generation, with
gas ramping on and off or up and down for
peaks in demand during the day. An example
of daily grid demand and the sources of electricity supply is shown in Figure 2.
The need for fluctuating power supplies,
even with this traditional fuel mix, is immediately apparent because the familiar
baseload power generation plants were not
designed for fast load change following. In
response to that need, more flexibility has
been introduced into fuel-efficient gas turbine
combined cycles over the past few years. Integrated cycles are available with control logic allowing the plant to quickly ramp up and
down, reducing startup emissions and startup
costs. For example, the Siemens Flex-Plant
combined cycle series, first introduced in the
84

mid-2000s, improved the efficiency of power


generation and increased operating flexibility
while reducing the environmental footprint
of gas-powered generation.
In recent years, the need for operations
flexibility has increased drastically. The introduction of significant amounts of renewable generation created a situation where the
fluctuations in demand are not the only driver
for the need to change the amount of power
supplied by gas-fired generation. The introduction of a significant amount of renewable
generation resulted in rapid fluctuations in
supply power that must be quickly balanced
with quick-acting, and often very expensive,
generating sources (Figure 3). While demand
www.powermag.com

is fluctuating during the day, the supply from


renewables has a strong influence on the
shape of fossil-fired plant response, particularly during off-peak hours.
Renewables, such as wind and solar, are
not typically dispatchable generation. Once
installed, the operating cost of renewable
generation is low, so there is the desire by
grid operators to dispatch renewables whenever possible. In some regions, renewables
are usually dispatched first, either by utility
policy or because renewable generation has
the lowest market bid price.
When renewable generation was a small
percentage of the electricity supply to the
grid, small simple-cycle gas turbines were

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CIRCLE 40 ON READER SERVICE CARD

PLANT OPERATIONS

What Is Shaping Power?

2. The historical grid. Typical supply and demand curves over a 24-hour day for a traditional grid with a low renewable contribution. Source: California ISO
Coal

70

Nuclear

Wind

Gas

Demand

60
50

MW

used as renewable backup. Today, the amount


of renewable energy on the grid in some regions is very large, and therefore the need for
flexible power has grown. In some regions
with large renewable portfolios, ramp rate demands as high as 400 MW/min are required
to backstop fluctuating renewable generation.
One seldom-used approach is to manage the
renewable dispatch to meet existing system
response limitations. The more common approach is to use larger gas turbines, usually
in combined cycles, that can move in concert
with renewable electricity production.

40
30

The principle behind the design of Shaping


Power was to design a combined cycle plant
that complements renewable generation rather than clashing with it. The challenge for the
designers was to improve the turbine efficiency and power output at part and full load, unlike other familiar power increase processes
(see sidebar). These goals challenged designers to conquer the common problem with all
gas turbines: Power production drops as ambient temperatures rise. Shaping Power gives
the plant owner the option to quickly ramp up
or ramp down power quickly, without impact
on the life expectancy of turbine components,

20
10
0

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

even at high ambient temperatures.


Gas turbines use ambient air as their working fluid. The amount of air a turbine ingests is
controlled by the volume of the engine and the
density of the air. On a hot day, a fixed-size turbine will ingest less air mass than on a cold day

because the air is less dense. Gas turbine compressors have a maximum flow capability and
have some adjustability. Some compressors are
adjusted by one row of airfoils that open and
close, somewhat like window blinds, changing the amount of air that gets through. Making

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86

www.powermag.com

POWER December 2011

MAGENTA (MI) - ITALY


MAGENTA
(MI)
via Robecco,
20 - ITALY
via Robecco,
20
Tel.
+39 02 972091
Tel. +39 02 972091
Fax
9794977
Fax
+39stf@stf.it
02 9794977
e-mail:
e-mail: stf@stf.it
www.stf.it
www.stf.it
CIRCLE 41 ON READER SERVICE CARD

BURMEISTER & WAIN ENERGY A/S


BURMEISTER
& WAIN ENERGY A/S
DK - 2820 Gentofte.Denmark
DK - 2820 Gentofte.Denmark
jaegersborg
Alle 164
jaegersborg
Alle20164
Tel.
+45 39 45
00
Tel.
Fax +45 39 45 20 00
05
Fax +45info@bwe.dk
39 45 20 05
e-mail:
e-mail: info@bwe.dk
www.bwe.dk
www.bwe.dk

PLANT OPERATIONS
3. The modern grid. Typical supply and demand curves over a 24-hour day for a modern
grid with significant renewable generation. Source: California ISO
Wind

45

Solar

Fossil

Demand

40
35
30

MW

25
20
15
10
5
0

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

large adjustments in flow with one row of airfoils results in a decrease in efficiency due to the
step change in volume across the row.
Historically, compressors were designed for
an operating point near ISO (standard) conditions, and the adjustability was used to ramp up
and down. Many newer engines have multiple
rows of adjustable airfoils. Using multiple rows
allows the change in volume to happen gradually and reduces the efficiency change when the
airfoils are closed or opened. Multiple rows of
adjustment are used to ramp up and down and

improve part-load efficiency. If the efficiency


is not changed significantly when the flow is
changed, this offers the opportunity to add more
range without sacrificing efficiency.
The Shaping Power design adds the advantage of a larger compressor to the flexibility
offered by multiple rows of variable compressor airfoils to extend the operating range
of the turbine. From the optimized baseload
design point, the engine can quickly ramp
down by closing the variable airfoils and
quickly ramp up by using the additional mass

flow through the oversized compressor.


This design is an improvement for two specific reasons. First, Shaping Power is a feature
that adds generation in excess of the baseload
power the engine produces, even when ambient
temperatures rise. This characteristic is advantageous whether there are renewables on the grid
or not. The second unique advantage is that significant amounts of power can be quickly and
predictably ramped in and out to support the grid
when renewables are cycling. In a combined
cycle, the plant can be operating before ramping in Shaping Power. The response is quick
because the bottoming cycle is already warm
and the steam turbine will automatically follow
the gas turbine. The result is a quick-responding
gas turbine that then produces a fast-responding
combined cycle.
The Shaping Power option available on
the SGT6-5000F has a turndown that is less
than 40% of baseload while remaining in
compliance with standard emissions regulations. This package design gives operators
the opportunity to go from the lowest turndown point to full Shaping Power at a ramp
rate of 30 MW/min per turbine, thus enabling
more than 400 MW of ramping capacity from
one SGT6-5000F 2 x 1 Flex-Plant at a rate
in excess of 60 MW/min. Siemens offers the
SGT6-5000F with Shaping Power in all of
the Flex-Plant configurations.

How Does Shaping Power Work?

The SGT6-5000F with Shaping Power option


begins with the base SGT6-5000F but with an
increase in compressor capacity, as discussed
above. The turbine runs at the same operating

More Options for Increasing Gas Turbine Power


Shaping Power uses an oversized compressor to supply the full mass
flow throughput of the gas turbine at a larger range of ambient temperatures to produce peaking power and to maintain part-load efficiency.
Standard gas turbines have adjustable inlet vanes to change mass flow
through the compressor, which are used when ramping the engine up
and down. Some gas turbines have more than one row of adjustable
inlet vanes to control the air flow into the compressor without significantly reducing engine efficiency.
Manufacturers offer a variety of equipment additions that can
produce more electricity from a particular gas turbine. All these options have advantages and, sometimes, major disadvantages. Here
are some examples.
Peak the Turbine. This approach increases the turbine inlet temperature, not the turbine mass flow. The downside of this approach is
that the increased temperature reduces the service life of gas turbine
hot parts. Because Shaping Power makes more power by increasing the
mass flow through the turbine and not by increasing operating temperature, service life is not reduced.
Chill the Inlet Air. Another option is to add a chiller and coil to
cool the inlet air, fooling the turbine into believing its a cool day.

88

Cooler air is more dense, therefore more air mass flow moves through
the turbine, increasing the power production. This option works well
and can be installed upstream of any gas turbine. The downside of this
technology is cost and the significant auxiliary load to run the chiller,
reducing plant efficiency.
Cool the Inlet Air. A similar option is to use evaporative cooling to
cool the air entering the gas turbine. The moisture addition cools the
air. This option works well in regions with low to moderate ambient humidity, but this system uses significant quantities of purified water.
Inject Steam. Steam power augmentation is also an option. This
technology injects steam into either the compressor or the combustor,
or both, again providing more mass through the turbine. The downside is
obvious: A continuous supply of very clean steam is required.
Duct Fire the Exhaust. Another popular option is duct firing the
gas turbine exhaust gas to raise its temperature before it enters the
steam generator. This option does not impact the gas turbine but does
increase steam production and therefore increases power generation
from the bottoming cycle. Duct-firing systems are fairly low in capital
cost, but the cycle efficiency decreases when used. Another downside
is increased plant fuel consumption.

www.powermag.com

POWER December 2011

PLANT OPERATIONS
SGT6-5000F with Shaping Power will produce
more power for a given ambient temperature.
Source: Siemens Energy

5. Improved efficiency. Shaping Power

produces a given amount of power at a lower heat rate in a duct-fired combined cycle.
Source: Siemens Energy
Without Shaping Power

Output without
Shaping Power

20 15 10 5

5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40

CC net heat rate (Btu/kWh)

MW

Output with
Shaping Power

r
Shaping Powe

555

580

605

630

655

680

CC net power (MW)

All Siemens 60-Hz gas turbine designs go


through full-load validation testing at Siemens
full-scale engine test facility in Berlin. The
SGT6-5000F with Shaping Power was tested
from 2007 to 2010 before market introduction
in early 2011. This configuration was tested for
more than 395 engine operating hours and 1,500
engine starts. The hot gas path is common with
the standard SGT6-5000F that entered commercial service in 2009. To date, 24 SGT6-5000F
engines with Shaping Power have been ordered,
and the first unit is scheduled to begin commercial operation in 2012. The SGT6-5000F
with Shaping Power is being manufactured at
Siemens expanded manufacturing facility in
Charlotte, N.C.

your combined cycle is a Flex-Plant with


gas turbines configured with Shaping Power,
then you have the option to run the plant at
part load and keep the remaining capacity as
spinning reserve. In the Electric Reliability
Council of Texas, this capability is called an
Bonnie Marini, PhD (bonnie.marini@
ancillary service and has a market value.
siemens.com) is director, 60-Hz product
The
option has
lineAMmarketing
abt.spinning
ms 1-3 reserve
. 7/11:Layout
1 much
8/15/11 10:08
Page 1 for Siemens Energy.

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December 2011 POWER

Ambient: 90F/59%RH/ECON
Plant config: 2X1-SCC6-5000F

30

economic value because an SGT6-5000F


with Shaping Power reaches optimum efficiency at about 10% below maximum engine load. This extra 10% can be ramped in
on demand to compensate for the unexpectedly lost renewable generation. In effect, an
SGT6-5000F with Shaping Power functions
like a high-efficiency combined cycle with a
small peaker unit built in.

Shaping Power Status

ng
firi
ct
u
D

Compressor inlet temperature (C)

temperature as the base variant, so Shaping


Power has no impact on service life. Shaping Power works much like duct firing on a
combined cycle. Duct firing supplements the
exhaust energy to produce more steam by the
heat recovery steam generator. The additional
steam produced can then be used to produce full
load from the steam turbine, even when the gas
turbine is at part load. With Shaping Power, the
same process takes place, but its the untapped
capacity of the gas turbine that is leveraged.
The advantages of Shaping Power grow
when temperatures rise. On a hot day, the
gas turbine has less flow than it is capable
of using. Shaping Power increases this mass
flow to fully exploit the unused gas turbine
capability (Figure 4). This capability enables
a variety of new applications. For example,
on a given day, the grid operator can choose
how much power to produce. The engine
can operate anywhere in the gray region of
Figure 4 without any change in operating
temperature, and therefore without change in
emission levels. The turbine can also operate
below the lower line in part-load operation.
With an SGT6-5000F, the engine can also
operate at levels of less than 40% load in
standard emissions compliance, so the range
of output available is substantial.
In combined cycle mode with duct firing
active, the capability of Shaping Power is
clear: User-specified power is produced at
a lower heat rate from the same bottoming
cycle (Figure 5). From another perspective,
Shaping Power moves the optimum design
point to a point lower than the maximum
power output of the engine. The difference
is that the unit with Shaping Power has about
10% more power capability when operating
at its highest efficiency.
In some regions of the U.S. with a large
portion of renewable generation, gas-fired
plants are tasked with filling in the voids
when renewables generation fluctuates. If

With Shaping Power

Du
ct
firi
ng

4. Less temperature sensitivity. The

CIRCLE 42 ON READER SERVICE CARD


www.powermag.com

89

PLANT OPERATIONS

GE Develops FlexEfficiency 50 for


Increased Operational Flexibility
The newest member of the 60% thermal efficiency combined cycle club is GE
Energys FlexEfficiency 50. In an era when flexible grid operation is growing in importance, this 50 Hz, single-shaft combined cycle also holds its
design point efficiency down to 87% load and features turndown to 40%
of rated load.
By Dr. Robert Peltier, PE

ave you noticed the different approaches used by U.S. and European utilities to purchase and install
gas-fired combined cycle plants? Neither
approach is intrinsically better; it is just a
difference in project philosophy.
In the U.S., the project begins by sourcing major components by competitive
bid, an engineering company decides how
to flange all the parts together, a control
equipment supplier integrates operation of
all the parts, and a contractor assembles
all the parts to produce a working plant.
Sometimes the contractor takes the lead
under an engineer-procure-construct contract, and sometimes the owner maintains
control of the project. There are variations,
but this has been the general approach in
the past.
In Europe (and many other parts of the
world, typically, 50 Hz regions), the plant
owner purchases the complete plant from a
major equipment supplier, and that supplier
handles the entire project, normally selfsupplying all of the major equipment on the
project, including the plant control system.

1. Flexible response. The GE Energy 510-MW FlexEfficiency 50 was designed to provide

grid regulation services to balance the intermittent output of renewable generation. The fastresponding, single-driveline plant is designed to fit in a space as small as 10 acres and can be
constructed in 24 months. Source: GE Energy

Class Warfare
Understanding the different procurement
practices is helpful when viewing the latest
high-efficiency combined cycle designs.
Today, several suppliers have, or will soon
have, gas-fired plant designs that are pushing the 60% effi ciency barrier. Each of
those 50 Hz plants features an integrated
design based on that suppliers equipment.
That is very good news for utilities that are
in the market for a new 50 Hz plant. That is
not such good news for utilities that are in
60 Hz countries, like those in the Western
Hemisphere.
The latest addition to the 60% thermal
efficiency class of plants is GE Energys
FlexEfficiency 50 plant design. As with
the other plant options, the base FlexEfficiency 50 operates at 50 Hz and features
90

an array of GE Energysupplied equipment optimized for efficiency and rapid


response, particularly suited for a grid
with intermittent renewable generation.
Unlike the other offerings, the FlexEfficiency 50 was designed from the ground
up with high ramp rates to meet fluctuating demand and the ability to be turned
down to low part loads while maintaining
emissions (Figure 1).

New Design Features


A few years ago, GE Energy began studying
grid behavior and economic factors when
www.powermag.com

large amounts of renewables are connected


to a grid, particularly in Western Europe,
China, India, and Brazil. The conclusions
reached by its many studies suggested that
future utility-scale combined cycle plants
must be much more flexible in dispatch,
must start and ramp up (and down) load
quickly, and must have deep turn-down
capabilityall without large efficiency
or cost-of-maintenance penalties. Another
conclusion: As the amount of renewable
energy resources added to a particular control area of the grid increases, so does the
need for regulation capacity, in installed

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CIRCLE 43 ON READER SERVICE CARD

PLANT OPERATIONS

Efficiency. The plant has an advertised


thermal efficiency of 61%, and that efficiency is maintained down to about 87%
load.
Response. The plants ramp rate is an
incredible 50 MW/minute, twice that
found in most operating combined cycle
plants today.
Turndown. The plant can turn down to
40% of its baseload output while meeting
its air emissions guarantees. Work continues to reduce that number to 20% of baseload rating.
Fast startup. The entire combined cycle
plant can start and be online and almost to
full load in less than 30 minutes, for a hot
start (Figure 2).

Optimized Designs
In the past, integrated plant designs meant
assembling a plant constrained by that
companys standard list of products, adding
supervisory controls, and taking the product to market. GE Energy did use familiar
components, although each was optimized
to meet the overall plants operation and
efficiency goals discussed above. Lets explore the equipment selected for the FlexEfficiency 50 plant design.
Combustion Turbine. The FlexEfficiency 50 is based on the venerable 9FB
(version .05) combustion turbine (CT).
This CT version includes a speed-scaled
version of the 7FA CT with field-replaceable compressor blades, an evolutionary
step from GEs aircraft engine lineage.
The engine uses the familiar dry lowNOx 2.6+ combustion system, but with a
couple of changes. This version includes
removal of the diffusion passage in each
outer nozzle and the addition of a fuel passage upstream of the swizzles, according
to GE Energy. A swizzle is the combination of a nozzle and a swirler. These combustion modifications further reduce NOx
emissions at baseload while allowing the
CT to maintain CO when the CT is at minimum load.
The power turbine is a four-stage design, evolving from the earlier H System
designs with new materials but without
steam or hybrid cooling. In sum, GE Energy expects the new design to significantly extend major inspection intervals
92

and increase rotor life by 50%. The cold


end of the CT directly connects to one side
of the generator in the FlexEfficiency 50

single-driveline configuration, and the CT


axial exhaust connects to the heat recovery
steam generator (HRSG).

2. Fast company. Full-load operation of the FlexEfficiency 50 combined cycle plant is pos-

sible in as little as 30 minutes. A variety of other starting options are available to the plant operator, depending on the needs of the grid. The start button was pushed at time zero on this chart.
Source: GE Energy
Rapid response with purge credit
Smart start/smart start lite

Smart start with purge credit


Conventional

Rapid response

100

80

Plant output (%)

megawatts and duration of operation.


GE Energy invested about $500 million
in research and development to develop
the 510-MW FlexEfficiency 50 product to
meet the challenge of renewable integration. Four distinctive operational features
of this plant were specified based on that
research:

60

20

10

20

30

40

50

60

70

Minutes

3. Advanced combustion turbine. The FlexEfficiency 50 is designed around the 9FB


combustion turbine that has many years of operating experience. Portions of the 9FB have been
redesigned to accommodate the stress of fast ramp rates while increasing component life and
maintenance intervals. A completed 9FB combustion turbine is shown undergoing final testing
on GEs Greenville, S.C., shop floor. Courtesy: GE Energy

www.powermag.com

POWER December 2011

PLANT OPERATIONS
Steam Turbine. The 180-MW steam
turbine, model 109D-14, leverages the
HEAT (High Efficiency, Advanced Technology) steam path technology introduced
in 2002. The three-casing (separate high-,
intermediate-, and low-pressure sections)
design using inlet steam conditions of 165
bar/600C/600C produces a shaft efficiency
greater than 40%. The turbine internals
use shorter bearing spans and improved
clearance control to support higher ramp
rates. Different last-stage blades can be
selected for standard and air condensing
applications. Uniquely, the steam turbine
features a single-side, two-flow exhaust,
which allows locating the condenser at
ground level, reducing construction cost.
The steam turbine connects to the opposite side of the generator through a selfsynchronizing clutch.
Generator. The 550-MW double-ended
generator uses one-piece frame construction
to simplify installation and alignment. The
generator also uses modular gas, seal oil, and
stator cooling water systems to reduce construction complexity.

construct a full-speed, full-load testing


facility in Greenville, S.C., to replicate actual operating conditions and wring out unanticipated problems before the first plant
is constructed. This facility is scheduled to
begin operation in 2014 and be ready for
full demonstration of the FlexEfficiency
50 capabilities the following year.
GE Energy reports two purchase orders
for the FlexEfficiency 50. The first buyer is
Chinas Harbin Electric Co., which signed
a letter of intent in June for four 9FB CTs,
two with FlexEfficiency technology. The

final purchase order is scheduled for the


end of 2013. The second order received
was from Turkish plant developer MetCap Energy Investments for a combination
solar/natural gasfired plant, to be built
in Karaman, Turkey. The 530-MW plant
(510 without the solar component) will be
integrated with eSolar concentrated thermal tower technology. According to Paul
Browning, who runs the GE Energy thermal products group, This will be a power
plant that combines wind, natural gas, and
integrated combined technology under one

Proven Experience - Your Choice for World-Class


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Heat Recovery Steam Generator.

HRSG manufacturers have spent the past


decade upgrading designs to handle the
internal stresses developed when units are
cycled, from using more exotic materials to increasing drum wall thickness. In
older HRSG designs, unplanned cycling
introduced unanticipated stresses in many
regions of the HRSGsuch as steam
drum penetrations, reheat steam pipes, and
downcomersreducing component life.
The FlexEfficiency design has addressed
these life-limiting HRSG issues based on
detailed transient analysis simulations and
long industry experience. For example, additional, smaller drum penetrations reduce
the magnitude of the stresses experienced
during high ramp rate evolutions. A stack
damper bottles up the thermal energy in
the HRSG, shortening the time require for
the next startup.
Advanced Controls. GE Energys Mark
VIe digital control system synchronizes
plant operations, including load change
transients and efficient part-load operation.
The plug and play Ethernet-based digital network uses fieldbus technologies that
are finding favor in the most recent plant
builds because of their ease of installation,
calibration, and online health-monitoring
capability. The sophisticated plant control
system allows true one-button startup of
the entire plant based on a user-selected
start profile.

Development Tests Pending

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GE Energy is investing $170 million to

December 2011 POWER

Follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter @NAESCorp


CIRCLE 44 ON READER SERVICE CARD

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93

PLANT OPERATIONS
roof. The plant is expected to begin service in 2015.

New Terminology Proposed


U
N I T E D STATES
STATES
UNITED

CCANADA
ANADA

SSWEDEN
WEDEN

Material Handling for


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USA: CORPORATE HEADQUARTERS


Jeffrey Rader Corporation
398 Willis Road
Woodruff, SC, USA 29388
Phone: 864.476.7523
Fax: 864.476.7510

CANADA: Montreal, Quebec


Jeffrey Rader Canada
2350 Place Trans-Canadienne
Dorval, Quebec H9P 2X5 Canada
Phone: 514.822.2660
Fax: 514.822.2699

CANADA: Vancouver, BC
Jeffrey Rader Canada
Unit 2, 62 Fawcett Road
Coquitlam, BC V3K 6V5 Canada
Phone: 604.299.0241
Fax: 604.299.1491

SWEDEN: Stockholm
Jeffrey Rader AB
Domnarvsgatan 11, 163 53 SPNGA
Stockholm, Sweden
Phone: +46 8 56 47 57 47
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CIRCLE 45 ON READER SERVICE CARD
94

www.powermag.com

Some regulating plants are added to the


grid in blocks of load such that individual turbines or engines do not operate at part load for long periods. Today,
expect regulating plants to spend the
majority of operating hours either ramping up or ramping down in load. These
new operating regimes will surely require
new methodologies for determining best
available control technology, as full-load
emissions are no longer descriptive of the
plants hourly or annual emissions.
NorthWestern Energy grappled with how
to characterize emissions from a plant that
was designed exclusively for regulating
service when building its new Dave Gates
Generating Station (see p. 54). In the end,
the regulating authorities agreed that a simulation of all expected operating scenarios
could be used to arrive at expected emissions that then became the permit limits.
The NorthWestern Energy experience may
be the exemplar for setting future emissions
limits for regulation plants.
GE Energy also recognizes that commonly used operating statistics, such as
availability and reliability, fail to properly express operations of a regulation
plant. GE suggests a new term: FlexEfficiency (FE). The suggested definition
of FE for a regulation plant is profitable
annual MWhrs divided by annual fuel
consumption.
GE suggests that a typical combined
cycle plant, with about 200 starts/year
with a mix of baseload and cycling conditions, will have an FE of about 56%;
the FlexEfficiency 50 is expected to have
about 58.5%. Your mileage may vary.
Will FlexEfficiency catch on in the
industry? I doubt it, for all the obvious
competitive reasons. Instead, how about
using the term regulating efficiency?
Then many other common performance
metrics could be modified by adding the
descriptor regulating, such as regulating availability factor, regulating reliability factor, or regulating load factor.
Useful metrics that describe the operation
of a hybrid combined cycle-concentrated
solar project are difficult to conceive. In
the meantime, metrics for a regulation
plant alone will keep the analysts who
maintain and update the North American
Electric Reliability Corp.s Generating
Availability Data System databases busy
for years.

Dr. Robert Peltier, PE is POWERs


editor-in-chief.

POWER December 2011

GEOTHERMAL POWER

Can U.S. Geothermal Power Fulfill


Its Potential?
Geothermal power and conventional fossil fuelpowered technologies have
similar power production cycles, and both generation types can be dispatched. Geothermal powers primary advantage is its renewable fuel.
Its primary disadvantage is that its fuel requires large investments over
many years to characterize uncertain sources. Enhanced recovery techniques that use fracking may be the future of this renewable resource.
By Kennedy Maize

nderachiever. Thats what comes to


mind when considering the state of
geothermal power in the United States.
By all accounts, geothermal energy is a very
attractive source of electric power. The heat of
the earth is essentially endless, providing a
sustainable source of energyand power
far into the future. The technology is fairly
well known. The U.S. has produced electricity from the stored energy in our planets crust
since 1960. Furthermore, electricity from geothermal heat, unlike that from the wind or the
sun, is dispatchable, and plants typically have
capacity factors of 80% to 90%.
Today, geothermal power installations in
the U.S. total 3,102 MW, according to the
Geothermal Energy Association (GEA). Production is concentrated in nine states: Nevada,
California, Utah, Idaho, Oregon, Alaska, Hawaii, New Mexico, and Wyoming. The largest

single project is also the oldest: The Geysers,


located in the Mayacamas Mountains north
of San Francisco, which began commercially
generating electricity for Pacific Gas & Electric Co. in 1960. Now owned by Calpine, the
15 units at The Geysers have a net generating
capacity of 725 MW, down considerably from
their 2,000-MW peak in the 1980s (Figure 1).
The U.S. has the largest fleet of geothermal power plants in the world, although they
supply only a tiny portion of the nations
electricity. The second-largest geothermal
system is in the Philippines, with total generating capacity of about 1,900 MW, which
provides 27% of that countrys electricity
(Figure 2).

Unrealized Potential
A recent Electric Power Research Institute
(EPRI) report on geothermal commented,

1. Renewable treasure. Naturally occurring high-pressure steam reservoirs in the Mayacamas Mountains north of San Francisco have been harnessed to produce electricity. This group
of plants, collectively known as The Geysers, constitute the largest geothermal complex in the
world. The Geysers produce one-fifth of Californias renewable energy. Courtesy: National Renewable Energy Laboratory

December 2011 POWER

www.powermag.com

Over the long term, the potential for geothermal power production can hardly be overstated. The earths crust serves as an insulating
blanket over an otherwise hot planet. At different depths, there is hot rock virtually everywhere, meaning that the thermal resource
is as geographically dispersed as sunshine
and is often available just a few hundred to a
few thousand feet underground.
The geothermal industry has also developed exciting new technologies. It has moved
beyond conventional steam turbines driven
by geysers of superhot water gushing from
the ground, exemplified by The Geysers.
Companies such as U.S. Geothermal and Ormat Technologies employ binary generation
technology developed by the federal government in the 1970s and 1980s. These binary
plants use lower-temperature hot geothermal
water to vaporize an organic liquid with a
boiling point lower than waters. The vapor
produced is then expanded through a turbine
generator to produce electricity, much as in
a conventional steam plant. The condensed

2. Island power. Ormats organic Rankine


cycle modules were used at the 125-MW Upper Mahiao Geothermal Plant, located on the
island of Leyte, Philippines. The plant went
into service in 1996. Courtesy: Ormat Technologies Inc.

95

GEOTHERMAL POWER
geothermal brine is then reinjected into the
geothermal reservoir. According to U.S.
Geothermal, 12 operating binary geothermal
projects in the western U.S. today generate
184 MW of electricity (Figure 3).

Disastrous Decade
Despite its promise, geothermal power production has barely budged in the U.S. over
the first decade of this century. According
to Energy Information Administration data,
geothermal power production in 2004 was
0.341 quadrillion Btu. In 2008, the figure
was 0.360 quads. By contrast, wind provided 0.142 quads in 2004 and 0.546 quads in
2008. The geothermal industry today shows
little tangible evidence of significant growth.
In 2010, for example, only one new geothermal power plant came online. That was a 15MW plant in Nevadas Jersey Valley, owned
by Ormat.
Recent headlines tell part of the tale. The
New York Times: Short on Cash and KnowHow, U.S. Geothermal Industry Stumbles.
Renewable Energy World: Geothermal
Industry Continues to Struggle for Acceptance.
The Times interviewed John McIlveen, a
Wall Street analyst who follows the five publicly traded geothermal companies. He noted
that all of the public geothermal players have
been clobbered by the market, in part because geothermal development requires large
amounts of capital for risky drilling to prove
resources before they can be turned into
revenue-producers. This is not a good time
for technologies with high upfront costs and
uncertain downstream results.
Getting a new project going, McIlveen

noted, can take five years or more and cost


$3 million to $10 million. But McIlveen also
blamed the decline in the values of the companies stock on the lack of execution on the
part of the geothermal companies. Recent
projects have sometimes come in short of the
original developers claims.
The Renewable Energy World article observed that a lack of private capital echoed
throughout our investigation. The magazine
said, Perhaps this is the price the industry
must pay for having painted overly rosy pictures in years past.
Karl Gawell, executive director of the
GEA, the industrys Washington lobbying
group, rejects the underachiever label as
not fair. He told POWER recently, Expectations were too high to begin with. Geothermal, he noted, grew steadily through the
late 1970s and 1980s, raising hopes of continued growth. But the industry collapsed in
the 1990s, he said, and for 10 years, nothing
happened.
Interest in geothermal picked up again
in 2005, noted Gawell, with passage of the
Energy Policy Act of 2005 and the inclusion
of geothermal in the production tax credit regime. But the next year, Gawell added, the
Bush administration decided to zero us out
of the Department of Energy budget. Then
the economy tanked.
Today, says Gawell, the industry is starting to see the glimmer of resurgence. A GEA
report last April noted, While the economic
downturn of 2008 adversely impacted the
rate of geothermal resource development, the
geothermal industry has maintained steady
growth in the U.S. through 2010 and 2011.
The total number of geothermal projects un-

3. One of a dozen. U.S. Geothermals Raft River geothermal project, in operation in southern Idaho since early 2008, is one of 12 operating binary plants in the western U.S. The approximately 10 MW produced by Raft River is sold to Idaho Power. The company is currently
constructing a new 8.6-MW plant outside San Emidio, Nev. Courtesy: U.S. Geothermal

96

www.powermag.com

der development, as well as geothermal prospects reported in 2011 increased 12% over
2010.
Its a slow go, said Gawell, slower than
it should be. In part, he said, thats because
the 10-year black hole of development has
meant the industry has to rebuild its infrastructure and development capacity almost
from scratch. There is a learning curve as
rebuilding takes place, he said.
An example of that learning curve is found
in a shortage of drilling crews with geothermal experience. It isnt a rig availability problem, but the experience of the crews running
the rigs. Geothermal drilling isnt the same
as drilling for oil and gas. The holes needed
to prove the resource are wider in diameter.
Also, geothermal drilling involves higher
temperatures and caustic steam. What Im
told, said Gawell, is that the experience of
the crews is important. If a crew has drilled
for a number of projects, they get better results. We have not been drilling enough holes
in recent years.
Another problem, said Gawell, is misapplied incentives in federal renewable energy tax law. While the geothermal industry
fought hard to get included in production tax
credits that have aided wind and solar development since the Energy Policy Act of 1992,
those tax credits dont kick in until the project is actually making electricity. Its great
to have the incentives, said Gawell, but the
big risk in obtaining the money is in the reservoir work. That occurs well before energy
production starts.

Industry Rebirth
A number of projects are moving forward today, and some 700 MW are in the final phases of development, according to the GEAs
2011 Annual U.S. Geothermal Power Production and Development Report. Many of
those projects are pushing to beat the 2013
deadline. New geothermal projects have to
be in service by Dec. 31, 2013, to qualify for
the production tax credits. Whether Congress
will approve further extensions is uncertain,
but some Washington observers say the prospects are doubtful given the current concern
over federal deficits.
Legislation is moving in Congress to make
it easier to finance geothermal projects at the
front end. The House Natural Resources
Committee has approved a bill that streamlines permitting for geothermal exploration
on federal lands. In the Senate, the Energy
and Natural Resources Committee has approved a bill, pushed by Alaska Republican
Senator Lisa Murkowski, that would create
a revolving loan fund for drilling exploration wells. Separately, Sen. Ron Wyden, an
Oregon Democrat, has introduced legislation

POWER December 2011

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GEOTHERMAL POWER
4. Breaking rocks. Hot, dry rock resources located 1 to 3 miles below Earths surface are
heated to 250C and higher by very deep thermal sources. Source: Western Power

Electricity to the grid

Long-Term Bet

Turbines and generator


Heat exchanger
Pumps
45 km

Cool water

Hot water

Hot water

Fractured reservoir

to increase the investment tax credit for geothermal projects.


But in todays gridlocked and spendingconstrained political environment, observers
give the geothermal legislation slim chances
for passage. The problem, says the GEAs

Gawell, is nobody really knows if any of this


is going to go anywhere. Given the uncertainty, investors tend to sit on their wallets.
Washingtons rocky experience with loan
guarantees for renewable energy projects
particularly high-profile financial failures of

If you need information on the


global power generation industry,
look to
first.

IN PRINT, IN PERSON, AND ONLINE

POWER magazine POWER news COAL POWER


Managing POWER POWER Handbook POWER mag.com
POWER connect Careers in POWER ELECTRIC POWER

www.powermag.com
To subscribe, visit www.powermag.com/subscribe
or call 847-763-9509.

98

WR fam house ad_4.5625x4.875.indd 1

some solar photovoltaic module manufacturers in 2011also militates against new


renewable energy loan programs. Orthodox
Republican doctrine challenges the ability of
the government to pick economic winners
and losers, preferring markets to bear the
fruits or pains of investment decisions.

Whatever happens in the short run in Washington, geothermal continues to offer the
prospects of a large, indigenous future source
of power. A 2007 Massachusetts Institute of
Technology study, The Future of Geothermal Energy, found that enhanced geothermal
systems, exploiting different approaches than
the conventional projects most people think
of as geothermal today, could provide 100
GW or more of cost-competitive generating
capacity in the next 50 years.
Current technology uses either natural
steam or hot water from underground reservoirs to make electricity. New technologies
would capture the energy of hot, but dry,
rocksa resource far more widely distributed
than geysers or hot springs. Hot, dry rocks are
the foundation of the enhanced systems that
technologists see as having such great potential. Research is focusing on the use of hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, technology
(which is revolutionizing natural gas production) to make these hot rocks more permeable
and better able to yield their heat (Figure 4).
Will the optimistic vision of power from
hot rocks come to pass? Travis Coleman,
who leads EPRIs geothermal energy work,
says, Enhanced geothermal systems are
a big part of the future. The technology is
conceptually very simple, but how you apply it in different rock formations is incredibly complex.
Geothermal is only one of many competing energy technologies that developers can
choose to power the future. As the MIT panel
observed, Geothermal energy provides a robust, long-lasting option with attributes that
would complement other important contributions from clean coal, nuclear, solar, wind,
hydropower, and biomass. One can now add
natural gas to that list.
But future decisions about technology developments in the U.S. will be driven largely
by the private sector, even if the federal governments awkward thumb is on the scales to
some degree. Those decisions will involve
tricky and risky choices involving cost, performance, timing, and social values. Will
geothermal be able to compete in that complex environment? That question is far from
answered.

Kennedy Maize is a POWER contributing editor and executive editor of


MANAGING POWER.

POWER December 2011

www.powermag.com
5/5/11 10:59:00 AM

BIOENERGY
WIND
SOLAR
HYDRO
GEOTHERMAL

OCEAN

WASTE TO ENERGY

OCTOBER 1719, 2012 | OMNI SHOREHAM | WASHINGTON D.C.

www.retech2012.com

690

NEW PRODUCTS

TO POWER YOUR BUSINESS

Ultrasonic Flow Meters

Sierra Instruments has introduced a new lineup of its


popular transit-time ultrasonic flow meters, which now
include improved next-generation Innova-Sonic 203,
205i, and portable 210i models. The Innova-Sonic 205i is
Sierras highest performing dedicated clamp-on instrument. It
incorporates the latest developments in digital signal processing
to offer excellent accuracy and repeatability for a wide variety
of liquids. This models accuracy has been improved to +/-0.5% of reading,
repeatability to +/-0.15% of reading, and pipe capacity up to 200 inches.
The Innova-Sonic 210i portable clamp-on ultrasonic meter has been
repackaged into a smaller more lightweight, hand-held configuration that
includes a brighter display and pushbuttons. Ideal for pipes up to 48 inches in
diameter, the 203 promises accuracy to +/-1.0% of reading, repeatability to
+/-0.3% of reading and a temperature range of 32F to 140F (0C to 60C). The 203
offers low power consumption and high reliability at an economical price. An easy-toread display and clear, user-friendly menu selections make using the instrument simple
and convenient. It can be configured via keypad without any additional programming devices.
(www.sierrainstruments.com)

Spacer Cable Systems

Eco-Friendly Absorbent Pads

Oil Eater Naturals is a new line of eco-friendly


absorbent pads made of natural plant by-products.
Featuring woven construction, the pads are designed
to provide a safer and cleaner workplace and help
users meet OSHA and EPA requirements. The line
includes Oil-Only Pads and Rolls that soak up oil
and repel water; Universal Pads and Rolls that soak
up oil, water, and other liquids; and Absorbent
Socks to control larger spills and protect drains. The
pads will absorb up to 20% more than melt-blown
polypropylene pads, yet they cost less. All are
available in a variety of weights and finishes. Product
sizes range from 16 inches x 18 inches to 28 inches
by 150 foot rolls. Weights include light, medium, and
heavy. (www.oileater.com)

December 2011 POWER

www.powermag.com

Hendrix Wire & Cable, a provider of overhead and


underground power distribution products, introduced
its Spacer Cable Systems, a green solution for
overhead distribution circuits. Because Spacer Cable
is more compact and can withstand temporary contact
with branches without causing outages, Hendrix
Spacer Cable Systems can help reduce the amount of
vegetation that must be removed when clearing rightof-way for distribution circuits. Reducing right-of-way
clearance by 20 feet can result in up to 6.5 tons of
carbon dioxide being removed from the atmosphere
every year per mile, the company claims.
Unlike bare wire, which is spread over an 8-foot
cross arm, a Spacer Cable circuit is confined to less
than 1 foot. This reduces trimming requirements
and allows multiple circuits to be placed on a single
pole, or even the same side of a single pole. The
result can often lead to new circuits being added to
existing poles without additional vegetation removal.
(www.hendrix-wc.com)

101

NEW PRODUCTS

Industrial-Strength
Pressure Sensing

Ashcroft A2, A2X, and A4 pressure transmitters


answer the call for an accurate, rugged, and reliable
heavy-duty sensor. Available in accuracies up to +/0.25% full scale, the A2 is offered with a wide variety
of electrical connections, analog output signals, and
pressure ports to meet the requirements of most any
industrial application. The A2X (explosion/flame
proof) and A4 (intrinsically safe) configurations
are specially designed for hazardous environments.
(www.ashcroft.com)

Electric Wire Rope Hoists

Harrington Hoists launched the RHN Series, a new


line of electric wire rope hoists, offered in two
configurations: the deck/base-mounted hoist in
220 metric tons and ultra-low-headroom trolley
hoist in 215 metric tons. Both versions are dual
speed. The deck/base-mounted hoist features
a compact, modular design that is perfect for
stationary applications or combined with a double
girder trolley for double-girder crane systems. The
ultra-low-headroom trolley hoist is ideal for toprunning and underhung overhead bridge cranes.
The compact body and short end approach result
in the longest hook travel possible in facilities
with limited space. The hoists, which require
minimal maintenance, offer a lubricated gear box
and an electromagnetic brake that never needs
adjustment. Key features include a heavy-duty fancooled motor, adjustable geared limit switch, load
limiter, secondary block operated limit switch and
a motor management device equipped with an hour
meter and counter. (www.harringtonhoists.com)

Interactive Virtual Training Content Software

Advanced graphical interface technology provider DiSTI Corp. unveiled


Replic8, a new software tool to effortlessly create interactive virtual
training content from Autodesks 3D Studio Max. Replic8 allows users
to easily produce compelling 3-D interactive training content through
a simplified development process. (The image is a Relic8-generated 3-D
Cummins 855 Diesel Engine.)
The software tool works directly with the commonly used 3D
Studio Max modeling package, forming a cohesive
transition of static 3-D models
into interactive learning objects
without losing essential fidelity
and functionality. Modelers can
create feature-rich 3-D objects
complete with multiple texture
layers and animations knowing
that Replic8 will retain those
details for use in the lesson
materials. Replic8 utilizes Java
to maximize deployment options,
allowing lessons to run standalone on a desktop, in a browser,
or with any operating system
that supports Javas OpenGL
bindings. (www.disti.com)

Inclusion in New Products does not imply endorsement by POWER magazine.


102

www.powermag.com

POWER December 2011

The POWER Buyers Guide consists of a


Company Directory (below), a Product Directory (p. 140), and a Service
Directory (p. 152). In the Product and
Service Directories, categories also have
subcategories. The Company Directory
lists manufacturers and service providers complete contact information.

COMPANY DIRECTORY
2G - Cenergy Power Systems Technologies Inc., 151 College Dr 15, Orange
Park, FL 32065
Phone: 904-579-3217
Fax: 904-406-8727
Email: mturwitt@2g-cenergy.com
www.2g-cenergy.com
360training.com and LKItraining.com,
13801 N. Mopac Blvd., Suite 100, Austin, TX 78731
Phone: 888-318-3552
Email: kirk.vandervort@360training.com
www.360training.com/corporate-solutions/power/

HOW TO USE THIS GUIDE


Suppose you want to contact one or
more manufacturers of circuit breaker
test equipment. Turn to the Product Directory page that lists test equipment.
There youll find subcategories listed,
including one for circuit breakers (30).
From the companies listed below the
test equipment subcategories, select
those with (30) after their names.
Then consult the Company Directory for
their contact information.

Visit www.powermag.com and click


on the Buyers Guide button to search
by company or keyword in the online
POWER Buyers Guide.

AABA-American Association of Boiler


Assessment, 795 Greenbriar Rd., Mount
Washington, KY 40047
Phone: 502-562-0022
Email: lweber@aa-ba.org
www.aa-ba.org

4-Star Hose & Supply, 10704 Composite


Dr., Dallas, TX 75220
Phone: 214-351-6085
Email: info@4starhose.com
www.4starhose.com

Aalborg CSP, Hjulmagervej 55, Aalborg,


9000, Denmark
Phone: 213-379-1611
Email: gh@aalborgcsp.com
www.aalborgcsp.com

A
A.J. Weller Corporation, P.O. Box 17566,
Shreveport, LA 71138
Phone: 318-925-1010
Fax: 318-925-8818
Email: robinr@ajweller.com
www.ajweller.com

This print directory includes companies that updated their information in our
online Buyers Guide within the past year (through early November). To ensure
current information listings at ELECTRIC POWER, visit www.powermag.com and
click on Buyers Guide to update your listing by March 2012.
The deadline for updates that will appear in next years print Buyers Guide will
be October 20, 2012. To edit or update a listing, click on the Buyers Guide
button on the powermag.com site any time before then.

SEARCH ONLINE, TOO

3Degrees, 38 Keyes Ave., Suite 300, San


Francisco, CA 94129
Phone: 415-449-0500
Fax: 415-680-1561
Email: info@3degreesinc.com
www.3degreesinc.com

IMPORTANT INFORMATION FOR VENDORS

December 2011 POWER

Listings in boldface type indicate companies that are advertisers in this issue.
Their ads appear on the pages noted.

www.powermag.com

COMPANY DIRECTORY

2012

BUYERS GUIDE

ABB Inc, 29801 Euclid Ave., Wickliffe,


OH 44092
Phone: 440-585-7076
Fax: 440-585-7054
Email: helen.m.germ@us.abb.com
www.abb.com
ABC-Diesel, Wiedauwkaai 44, Gent,
9000, Belgium
Phone: +32 9 267 00 33
Fax: +32 9267 00 67
Email: ph@abcdiesel.be
www.abcdiesel.be
Abresist, 5541 North State Rd. 13,
Urbana, IN 46990
Phone: 800-348-0717
Fax: 219-774-8188
Email: scott@abresist.com
www.abresist.com

103

COMPANY DIRECTORY

COMPANY DIRECTORY
AcousticEye, P.O. Box 205, Leusden,
3830, Netherlands
Phone: 31 (0)20 708-4784
Email: info@acousticeye.com
www.acousticeye.com
Acquip Inc., P.O. Box 191502, Miami
Beach, FL 33619
Phone: 407-401-9343
Fax: 407-210-7359
Email: storm@acquip.com
www.acquip.com
Active3D Inc., 2125 Davis Blvd., Fort
Myers, FL 33905
Phone: 313-608-8822
Fax: 435-608-8825
Email: marc@active3dinc.com
www.active3dinc.com
ADA Environmental Solutions, 8100
SouthPark Way, Unit B, Littleton, CO
80120
Phone: 303-734-1727
Fax: 303-734-0330
Email: contactus@adaes.com
www.adaes.com
Advance Products & Systems, P.O. Box
60399, Lafayette, LA 70596
Phone: 337-233-6116
Fax: 337-232-3860
Email: sales@apsonline.com
www.apsonline.com
Advanced Acoustic Technologies, LLC,
3022 Shepperd Rd., Monkton, MD 21111
Phone: 410-472-3000
Email: mail@soniccleaning.com
www.soniccleaning.com
Advanced Combustion Technology Inc,
8525 Freeland St., Houston, TX 77061
Phone: 713-910-8800
Fax: 713-910-8889
Email: act@act-texas.com
www.act-texas.com
Advanced Detection Systems, LLC, 1440
East 357th St., Eastlake, OH 44095
Phone: 440-951-6687
Fax: 440-951-6641
Email: jai@spectruminfrared.com
spectruminfrared.com
Advanced Flexible Systems Inc, P.O. Box
14156, Charleston, SC 29422
Phone: 843-795-6800

104

Fax: 843-795-6889
Email: ttaylor@afsjoints.com
www.afsjoints.com
Advanced Industrial Systems Inc., P.O.
Box 373, 1550 Confederation Line,
Sarnia, ON , Canada
Phone: 877-902-8822
Fax: 519-336-0049
Email: ko@theaisteam.com
www.theaisteam.com
Advanced Inspection Technologies,
7777 North Wickham Rd. # 12-552,
Melbourne, FL 32940
Phone: 321-610-8977
Email: paul@aitproducts.com
www.aitproducts.com
Advanced Metalcraft Inc., 9128 Belden
Ave., Franklin Park, IL 60131
Phone: 847-451-0771
Fax: 847-451-0773
Email: metalcrafter@sbcglobal.net
www.metalcrafter.net
Advanced Specialty Gases, 135 Catron
Dr., Reno, NV 89512
Phone: 775-356-5500
Fax: 775-356-5571
Email: asg@advancedspecialtygases.com
www.advancedspecialtygases.com
Advanta Energy Corp., 2500 Old Crow
Canyon Rd., Suite 526, San Ramon, CA
94583
Phone: 925-831-8001
Email: gallen@AdvantaEnergy.com
www.AdvantaEnergy.com
AE&E -Von Roll Inc., 302 Research Dr.,
Suite 300, Norcross, GA 30092
Phone: 770-613-9788
Fax: 770-613-9860
Email: info@aee-vonroll.com
www.aee-vonroll.com
Aeris Corp., P.O. Box 2026, Kalamazoo,
MI 49003
Phone: 269-207-7360
Fax: 269-375-4479
Email: jdurlach@aeriscorporation.com
www.aeriscorporation.com
Aerofin Corporation, 4621 Murray
Place10, Lynchburg, VA 24502
Phone: 434-528-6217
Fax: 434-528-6242
Email: dcorell@aerofin.com
www.aerofin.com

www.powermag.com

Aerotek Energy Services, 7301 Parkway


Dr., Hanover, MD 21076
Phone: 410-694-5483
Email: tmendoza@aerotek.com
www.aerotek.com
AGT Services Inc., 24 Sam Stratton Rd.,
Amsterdam, NY 12010
Phone: 518-843-1112
Fax: 518-843-8389
Email: brian@AGTservices.com
www.agtservices.com
AIMS LLC, 1616 S 31st Ave., Phoenix,
AZ 85009
Phone: 602-237-0292
Fax: 602-237-0294
Email: chris@azindustrialcleaning.com
www.azindustrialcleaning.com
Air Cure Inc., 8501 Evergreen Blvd.,
Minneapolis, MN 55433
Phone: 763-717-0707
Fax: 763-717-0394
Email: alyssa.pierro@aircure.com
www.aircure.com
Air Engineering Inc., 2075 S 170th St.,
New Berlin, WI 53151
Phone: 800-558-4318
Email: parts@airengineering.com
www.airengineering.com
Air Instruments & Measurements LLC,
15404 E Valley Blvd., City of Industry,
CA 91746
Phone: 626-330-4700
Fax: 626-330-4776
Email: aimanalysis@earthlink.net
www.aimanalysis.com
Air Systems Ltd., 139 Velachery Rd.,
Chennai, 600015, Tamil Nadu, India
Phone: 919884050000
Fax: 914424988499
Email: nitin@asplparts.com
www.asplparts.com
Airfloat, LLC, 2230 Brush College Rd.,
Decatur, IL 62526
Phone: 217-423-6001
Fax: 217-422-1049
Email: tabbott@airfloat.com
www.airfloat.com
Airflow Sciences Corporation, 12190
Hubbard St., Livonia, MI 48150
Phone: 734-525-0300
Fax: 734-525-0303
Email: power@airflowsciences.com
www.airflowsciences.com

POWER December 2011

Airtrol, Inc., 920 S. Highway Dr., Fenton, MO 63026


Phone: 636-326-4600
Fax: 636-326-4610
Email: cthompson@airtrol.com
www.airtrol.com
Aitech Defense Systems, 19756 Prairie
St., Chatsworth, CA 91311
Phone: 888-248-3248
Fax: 818-718-9787
Email: dpatterson@rugged.com
www.rugged.com
Alaron Corp., 2138 State Route 18,
Wampum, PA 16157
Phone: 513-759-4303
Fax: 513-759-4302
Email: eckler@alaron-nuclear.com
www.alaron-nuclear.com
Albemarle Sorbent Technologies, 1664
E. Highland Rd., Twinsburg, OH 44087
Phone: 330-425-2354
Fax: 330-425-3983
Email: mercury@albemarle.com
www.albemarle.com/mercury
See our ad on p. 37

Alden, 30 Shrewsbury St., Holden, MA


01520
Phone: 508-829-6000
Email: info@aldenlab.com
www.aldenlab.com
Aleasoft, Viladomat 1, 1 1, Barcelona,
8015, Spain
Phone: +34 93 289 20 29
Email: info@aleasoft.COM
www.aleasoft.com
Alfa Laval, Maskinvej 5, Sborg, 0,
Denmark
Phone: +45 39 53 60 00
Fax: +45 39 53 65 56
Email: susanne.rosentoft@alfalaval.com
www.alfalaval.com
Alfred Conhagen Inc., 203 Texas Ave.,
La Marge, TX 77568
Phone: 409-938-4226
Fax: 409-935-0631
Email: srutter@conhagen.com
www.conhagen.com
Algae-X International (AXI), 5400-1
Division Dr., Fort Myers, FL 33905
Phone: 239-690-9589
Email: pgeorge@algae-x.net
www.algae-x.net

Albert Products, P.O. Box 1245, Springfield, IL 62705


Phone: 217-529-9600
Fax: 217-529-8919
Email: buckets@carhoe.com
www.carhoe.com

Alimak Hek, Inc., 1100 Boston Ave.,


Bridgeport, CT 06610
Phone: 203-367-7400
Fax: 203-367-9251
Email: info@alimakhek.com
www.alimakhek.com

Alcatel-Lucent, 3, Avenue Octave


Greard, Paris, 75007, France
Phone: +33 (0)1 40 76 10 10
Fax: +33 (0)1 40 76 10 10
Email: kamal.y.Ballout@alcatel-lucent.com
www.alcatel-lucent.com/smart-grid

All Erection & Crane Rental Corp., 7809


Old Rockside Rd., Cleveland, OH 44131
Phone: 216-524-6550
Fax: 216-901-8983
Email: dang@allcleveland.com
www.allcrane.com

Alchemy Consultants, Inc., 9144 Highland Ridge Way, Tampa, FL 33647


Phone: 813-994-1654
Fax: 813-994-6095
Email: aci1@tampabay.rr.com

Allegheny Industrial Sales Inc., 105


N Jamestown Rd., Moon Township, PA
15108
Phone: 412-262-9050
Fax: 412-262-9055
Email: dlb2@allegheny-ind.com
www.allegheny-ind.com

Alcon Solenoid Valves, 369 Franklin St.,


Buffalo, NY 14202
Phone: 716-855-2500
Fax: 716-855-1400
Email: marketing@alconsolenoids.com
www.alconsolenoids.com

December 2011 POWER

Allegro, 1445 Ross Ave., Suite 2200,


Dallas, TX 75202
Phone: 214-237-8000
Fax: 214-526-7076
Email: info@allegrodev.com
www.allegrodev.com

www.powermag.com

Allen Gears Ltd, Atlas Works, Station


Rd., Pershore, Worcestershire, United
Kingdom
Phone: +44 1386 552211
Email: sales@allengears.com
www.allengears.com
Allen-Sherman-Hoff, 185 Great Valley
Parkway, Malvern, PA 19355
Phone: 610-647-9900
Fax: 610-648-8679
Email: dpi_marketing@diamondpower.com
www.a-s-h.com

COMPANY DIRECTORY

COMPANY DIRECTORY

Allied Environmental Solutions Inc,


9730 Patuxent Woods Dr., Suite 100,
Columbia, MD 21046
Phone: 410-910-5100
Fax: 410-910-5101
Email: rfabian@allied-env.com
www.allied-env.com
Allied Industrial Marketing, Inc., W62
N248 Washington Ave., # 208, Cedarburg, WI 53012
Phone: 262-618-2403
Fax: 262-618-2303
Email: info@alliedindustrialmarketing.
com
www.alliedindustrialmarketing.com
Allied Power Group, 10131 Mills Rd.,
Houston, TX 77070
Phone: 281-444-3535
Fax: 281-444-3529
Email: info@alliedpg.com
www.alliedpg.com
Allied Union Inc., 4704 Yorkshire St.,
Sugar Land, TX 77479
Phone: 281-980-1700
Email: Alliedui@gmail.com
www.alliedunion.com
Allmineral LLC, 1360 Union Hill Rd. #
1-F, Alpharetta, GA 30004
Phone: 770-410-0220
Fax: 770-410-0807
Email: allmineral@aol.com
www.allmineral.com
Alloy Bellows & Precision Welding, 653
Miner Rd., Highland Heights, OH 44143
Phone: 440-541-7347
Fax: 440-684-3001
Email: f.loucka@alloybellows.com
www.alloybellows.com
105

COMPANY DIRECTORY

COMPANY DIRECTORY
Alltec Corporation, 64 Catalyst Dr.,
Canton, NC 28716
Phone: 828-646-9290
Email: bchittum@allteccorp.com
www.allteccorp.com
Alstom Projects India Limited, First
Floor,Brahmputra Building, Makarpura
Gidc, Maneja, Vadodara, 390013, India
Phone: 0265-6613367
Fax: 0265-6613080
Email: himanshu.joshi@power.alstom.com
www.alstom.co.in
Alstom Thermal Services, 2800 Waterford Lake Dr., Midlothian, VA 23112
Phone: 804-763-2329
Email: tgservices@power.alstom.com
www.power.alstom.com
Altec Capital Services, LLC, 33 Inverness Center Parkway, Suite 200,
Birmingham, AL 35242
Phone: 205-408-8077
Fax: 205-408-8113
Email: abby.wiggins@altec.com
www.alteccapital.com
Alturdyne, 660 Steele St., El Cajon, CA
92020
Phone: 619-440-5531
Fax: 619-442-0481
Email: info@alturdyne.com
www.alturdyne.com
Amarillo Gear Company, P.O. Box 1789,
Amarillo, TX 79105
Phone: 806-622-1273
Fax: 806-622-3258
Email: info@amarillogear.com
www.amarillogear.com
Ambassador Heat Transfer Co., 10080
Alliance Rd., Cincinnati, OH 45242
Phone: 513-792-9800
Fax: 513-792-9933
Email: sales@ambassadorco.com
www.ambassadorco.com
Ambitech Engineering Corporation,
1411 Opus PLace, Downers Grove, IL
60515
Phone: 630-769-7230
Fax: 630-963-8099
Email: gturkot@ambitech.com
www.ambitech.com
See our ad on p. 10

106

AMECO USA, 910 Cahoon Rd., Cleveland,


OH 44135
Phone: 440-899-9400
Fax: 440-899-9401
Email: george.donnelly@ameco-usa.com
www.ameco-usa.com
American Aerospace Controls, Inc, 570
Smith St., Farmingdale, NY 11735
Phone: 631-694-5100
Email: greg@a-a-c.com
www.a-a-c.com
American Babbitt Bearing, 80 Industrial
Lane, Huntington, WV 25072
Phone: 304-523-5700
Fax: 304-523-1222
Email: fablair@americanbabbitt.com
American Chemical Technologies, Inc.,
485 E. Van Riper Rd., Fowlerville, MI
48836
Phone: 517-223-0300
Fax: 517-223-1703
Email: rkovanda@americanchemtech.com
www.americanchemtech.com
American DG Energy Inc., 45 First Ave.,
Waltham, MA 02451
Phone: 781-522-6000
Fax: 781-522-6050
Email: info@americandg.com
www.americandg.com
American Efficiency Services, LLC,
15925 North Ave., Woodbine, MD 21797
Phone: 410-489-0613
Fax: 410-489-6937
Email: wscherer@americanefficiency.com
www.americanefficiency.com
American Electrical Testing Co., Inc.,
480 Neponset St., P.O. Box 267, Canton, MA 02021
Phone: 800-992-3826
Fax: 781-821-0771
Email: hbramson@99aetco.com
www.99aetco.com
American Exchanger Services, 1950 Innovation Way, Hartford, WI 53027
Phone: 414-529-0067
Fax: 414-433-4839
Email: joe@amexservices.com
www.amexservices.com
American Fire Technologies Inc., 2120
Capital Dr., Wilmington, NC 28405
Phone: 910-799-9191
Fax: 910-799-3382
Email: gregr@americanfiretech.com
www.americanfiretech.com
www.powermag.com

American Galvanizers Association, 6881


S. Holly Cir., Suite. 108, Centennial, CO
80112
Phone: 720-554-0900
Fax: 720-554-0909
Email: marketing@galvanizeit.org
www.galvanizeit.org
American Nuclear Society-Nuclear News,
555 N. Kensington Ave., La Grange
Park, IL 60526
Phone: 708-579-8217
Fax: 708-579-8295
Email: gnaurocki@ans.org
www.ans.org
American Polywater Corp., P.O. Box 53,
Stillwater, MN 55082
Phone: 651-430-2270
Fax: 651-430-3634
Email: freddy@polywater.com
www.polywater.com
American Pulverizer Company, 1319
Macklind Ave., St. Louis, MO 63110
Phone: 314-781-6100
Fax: 314-880-2293
Email: jholder@ampulverizer.com
www.ampulverizer.com
American Wind Energy Association,
1501 M St. NW, Suite 1000, Washington, DC 20005
Phone: 202-383-2500
Fax: 202-383-2505
Email: windmail@awea.org
www.awea.org
Ametek Land Instruments, 37 N. Valley
Rd., Paoli, PA 19301
Phone: 610-889-5257
Fax: 215-323-9366
Email: folahan.tubi@ametek.com
www.ametek.com
Ametek Land, Inc., 150 Freeport Rd.,
Blawnox, PA 15238
Phone: 412-826-4444
Fax: 412-826-4460
Email: irsales@ametek.com
www.ametek-land.com
Ametek Power Instruments, 255 N
Union St, Rochester, NY 14605
Phone: 585-263-7700
Fax: 585-262-4777
Email: power.sales@ametek.com
www.ametekpower.com

POWER December 2011

Ametek, Solidstate Controls, 875 Dearborn Dr., Columbus, OH 43085


Phone: 614-846-7500
Fax: 614-885-3990
Email: nick.yarnell@ameteksci.com
www.solidstatecontrolsinc.com
Amiad Filtration Systems, 2220 Celsius
Ave., Oxnard, CA 93103
Phone: 805-988-3323
Fax: 805-988-3313
Email: renee@amiadusa.com
www.amiad.com
Amonix, Inc., 1709 Apollo Ct., Seal
Beach, CA 90740
Phone: 562-446-8713
Fax: 562-430-4774
Email: krice@amonix.com
www.amonix.com
Amphenol Industrial Operations, 40-60
Delaware Ave., Sidney, NY 13838
Phone: 800-678-0141
Fax: 607-563-5157
Email: cvansoest@amphenol-aio.com
www.amphenol-industrial.com
AMREL/AMERICAN RELIANCE, 3445
Fletcher Ave., El Monte, CA 91731
Phone: 626-443-6818
Fax: 626-443-8600
Email: ariinfo@amrel.com
www.amrel.com
AMWEI Thermistor Co., Ltd., 1205,
Jidian Zonghe Builiding, No. 32, Meilin
Rd., Futian, 518000, Shenzhen, China
Phone: 86-755-26570111
Fax: 86-755-26571122
Email: sales@amwei.com
www.amwei.com
Analysts, Inc., P.O. Box 2955, Torrance,
CA 90509
Phone: 310-320-0070
Fax: 310-320-0970
Email: analystsinc@analystsinc.com
www.analystsinc.com
Analytec Corp., 8828 S Kingston Ave.,
Tulsa, OK 74137
Email: analytec@worldnet.att.net
www.analytec.com

December 2011 POWER

Andritz AG, Stattegger Strasse 18, Graz,


0, Austria
Phone: 43.316.6902-2133
Fax: 43.316.6902-406
Email: guenter.haiden@andritz.com
www.andritz.com/pumps
Anixter, 4464 Willow Rd. #101, Pleasanton, CA 94588
Phone: 925-469-8751
Fax: 925-469-8750
Email: matt.scheid@anixter.com
www.anixter.com
Ansaldo Caldaie SPA, Largo Buffoni 3,
Gallarate, 21013, VA, Italy
Phone: 390331738111
Fax: 390331738794
Email: sales@ansaldoboiler.it
www.ansaldoboiler.it
Anvil Engineered Pipe Supports, 160
Frenchtown Rd., North Kingstown, RI
02852
Phone: 401-886-3005
Email: bstrouss@anvilintl.com
www.anvilintl.com
Anvil International, 500 W. Eldorado
St., Decatur, IL 62522
Phone: 217-425-7354
Fax: 217-425-7537
Email: dmcdavitt@muellercompany.com
ap+m, 3030 SW 13th Place, Boynton
Beach, FL 33426
Phone: 561-732-6000
Fax: 561-732-6562
Email: sales@apm4parts.com
www.apm4parts.com
APC by Schneider Electric, 132 Fairgrounds Rd., West Kingston, RI 02892
Phone: 888-994-8867
Fax: 401-788-2698
Email: gutor.usa@apc.com
www.gutor.com
APdel Engineering and Consulting, 2235
Sundown Dr., Atlanta, Ga 30345
Phone: 678-665-6908
Fax: 404-321-5805
Email: afponced@ieee.org
www.ieee.org
Apollo Valves, 701 Matthews Mint Hill
Rd., Matthews, NC 28105
Phone: 704-841-6032
Fax: 704-841-6021
Email: nora.meszaros@conbraco.com
www.apollovalves.com
www.powermag.com

APOYOTEC (Plantas de Energa), P.O.


Box 272, 720 Snyder Creek Rd., Jefferson, CO 80456
Phone: 970-231-6032
Fax: 970-506-9229
Email: admin@apoyotec.com
www.apoyotec.com
Applied Bolting, 1413 Rockingham
Rd., Bellows Falls, VT 05101
Phone: 802-460-3100
Fax: 802-460-3104
E-mail: info@appliedbolting.com
www.appliedbolting.com
See our ad on p. 89

COMPANY DIRECTORY

COMPANY DIRECTORY

Applied Gas Turbines, 2500 State Hwy


160, Warrior, AL 35180
Phone: 205-647-4312
Email: sales@appliedgasturbines.com
www.appliedgasturbines.com
Applus RTD USA, 11801 S. Sam Houston
Parkway W, Houston, TX 77031
Phone: 832-295-5000
Fax: 832-295-5001
Email: jason.gray@applusrtd.com
www.applusrtd.com
Aptech Engineering Services Inc., P.O.
Box 3440, Sunnyvale, CA 94088
Phone: 408-745-7000
Fax: 408-734-0445
Email: aptech@aptecheng.com
www.aptecheng.com
Aquatech International Corporation,
One Four Coins Dr., Canonsburg, PA
15317
Phone: 724-746-5300
Fax: 724-746-5359
Email: aic@aquatech.com
www.aquatech.com
Aquatic Sciences L.P., 40 Centre Dr.,
Orchard Park, NY 14127
Phone: 716-667-3507
Fax: 716-667-3509
Email: blaurens@aquaticsciences.com
www.aquaticsciences.com
Aqua-Vu, 34076 County Rd. 3, P.O. Box
368, Crosslake, MN 56442
Phone: 218-297-0744
Fax: 218-692-4881
Email: ben@aquavu.com
www.aquavu.com

107

COMPANY DIRECTORY

COMPANY DIRECTORY
Arc Machines, Inc., 10500 Orbital Way,
Pacoima, CA 91331
Phone: 818-896-9556
Email: sales@arcmachines.com
www.arcmachines.com
Ares Technology, LLC, 126 Corporate Dr.
Suite E, Simpsonville, SC 29681
Phone: 864-399-9805
Fax: 864-399-9809
Email: jpalmer@arestechllc.com
AREVA Inc., 4800 Hampden Lane,
Suite 1100,Bethesda, MD 24501
Phone: 434-832-3702
Fax: 434-832-3840
E-mail: donna.gaddybowen@areva.com
www.us.areva.com
See our ad on p. 23
Aries Electronics, 2609 Bartram Rd.,
Bristol, PA 19007
Phone: 215-781-9956
Fax: 215-781-9845
Email: frankf@arieselec.com
www.arieselec.com
Arizona Instrument LLC, 3375 N. Delaware St., Chandler, AZ 85225
Phone: 602-470-1414
Fax: 480-804-0656
Email: sales@azic.com
www.azic.com
Armstrong-Hunt, Inc., 648 Moeller St.,
Granby, QC J2G , Quebec, Canada
Phone: 450-378-2655
Fax: 450-375-3787
Email: jrsmith@armstronginternational.
com
www.armstronginternational.com
ASB Industries, Inc., 1031 Lambert St.,
Barberton, OH 44203
Phone: 330-753-8458
Fax: 330-753-7550
Email: cmkay@asbindustries.com
www.asbindustries.com
Asco Valve Inc., 50 Hanover Rd., Florham Park, NJ 07932
Phone: 973-966-2000
Fax: 973-966-2448
Email: info-valve@asco.com
www.ascovalve.com

108

ASGCO Manufacturing, Inc., 301 Gordon


St., Allentown, PA 18102
Phone: 800-344-4000
Fax: 610-778-8991
Email: info@asgco.com
www.asgco.com

Atlas Copco Compressors LLC, 1800


Overview Dr., Rock Hill, SC 29730
Phone: 866-546-3588
E-mail: paul.humphreys@us.atlascopco.
com
www.atlascopco.us

Ashland Water Technologies, Drew


Industrial, One Drew Plaza, Boonton,
NJ 07005
Phone: 973-263-7600
Fax: 973-263-4483
www.drewindustrial.com

ATM Freight Services, 1924 Rankin Road


Suite. 300, Houston, TX 77073
Phone: 281-821-2002
Fax: 281-443-0938
Email: jeremy@atmfreight.com
www.atmfreight.com

ASI Group Ltd., 250 Martindale Rd., St.


Catharines, ON L2R 7R8, Canada
Phone: 905-641-0941
Fax: 905-641-1825
Email: blaurens@asi-group.com
www.asi-group.com

AUMUND Frdertechnik GmbH, Saalhoffer Strasse 17, Rheinberg, 47495,


Germany
Phone: 492843720
Fax: 49284360270
Email: aumund@aumund.de
www.aumund.com

ASME International, 3 Park Ave. M/S


22W3, New York, NY 10016
Phone: 212-591-7055
Fax: 212-591-7671
Email: missouria@asme.org
www.asme.org
Aspen Technology Inc., 200 Wheeler
Rd., Burlington, MA 01803
Phone: 281-584-1000
Fax: 281-584-4329
Email: karsten.harstad@aspentech.com
www.aspentech.com
Associated Electric Products, Inc., P.O.
Box 6713, Longmont, CO 80501
Phone: 800-361-6314
Email: info@assoc-elec-prod.com
www.assoc-elec-prod.com
Aston Evaporative Services, 743 Horizon Ct., Suite 250, Grand Junction, CO
81506
Phone: 970-242-7003
Fax: 970-256-7006
Email: kevink@astoncompanies.com
www.astoncompanies.com
Atlantic Plant Services, 10440 Little
Patuxent Pkwy. Suite 600, Columbia,
MD 21044
Phone: 800-433-0438
Fax: 815-730-3350
Email: kelly.simonsen@atlanticii.com
www.atlanticplantservices.com
Atlas Business Solutions, Inc. (ABS),
3330 Fiechtner Dr. SW, Fargo, ND 58104
Phone: 701-235-5226 (ext.117)
Email: jwyganowska@abs-usa.com
www.abs-usa.com
www.powermag.com

Automated Appointment Reminders,


30150 Telegraph Rd., Bingham Farms,
MI 48025
Phone: 800-962-0126
Email: sales@voiceshot.com
www.voiceshot.com/public/appointment-reminder.asp
Automatic Systems Inc., 9230 East 47th
St., Kansas City, MO 64133
Phone: 816-356-0660
Fax: 816-356-5730
Email: brian.petrie@asi.com
www.asi.com
Automation Products, Inc. - DYNATROL
Division, 3030 Maxroy St., Houston, TX
77008
Phone: 713-869-0361
Fax: 713-869-7332
Email: sales@dynatrolusa.com
www.DynatrolUSA.com
Automation Technology, Inc., 2001
Gateway Place, Suite 100, San Jose, CA
95110
Phone: 408-350-7020
Fax: 408-350-7021
Email: sales@atinet.com
www.atinet.com
Automation Training Inc., 1067 East
Woolley, Carlisle, IN 47838
Phone: 866-573-9849
Email: Terri@atifortraining.com
www.atifortraining.com

POWER December 2011

Avalon Consulting, Inc., 427 Prairie


Knoll Dr., Naperville, IL 60565
Phone: 630-357-3960
Fax: 630-357-1004
Email: exedir@turbineinletcooling.org
www.turbineintetcooling.org
AVO Training Institute, Inc., 4271
Bronze Way, Dallas, TX 75237
Phone: 877-594-3156
Fax: 214-331-7363
Email: avotraining@avotraining.com
www.avotraining.com
Axiomtek, 18138 Rowland St., City of
Industry, CA 91748
Phone: 626-581-3232
Fax: 626-581-3552
Email: jessicav@axiomtek.com
www.axiomtek.com

B
B&W Mechanical Handling Ltd., Gemini
House, Cambridgeshire Business Park,
1 Bartholomews Walk, Ely, 0, Cambridgeshire, United Kingdom
Phone: 441353665001
Fax: 441353666734
Email: sales@bwmech.co.uk
www.bwmech.co.uk
b3o enviroTek, 695 Nashville Pike, No.
310, Gallatin, TN 37066
Phone: 615-989-1576
Fax: 615-451-5044
Email: budr@locateunderground.com
www.locateunderground.com

Babcock & Wilcox Company, 20 S Van


Buren Ave., Barberton, OH 44203
Phone: 330-753-4511
Fax: 330-860-1886
Email: info@babcock.com
www.babcock.com
Babcock Power Environmental Inc, 5
Neponset St., Worcester, MA 01606
Phone: 508-854-3853
Fax: 508-854-3800
Email: tlicata@babcockpower.com
www.babcockpower.com

December 2011 POWER

Babcock Power Services Inc, 5 Neponset St., Worcester, MA 01606


Phone: 508-852-7100
Fax: 508-852-7548
Email: info@babcockpower.com
www.babcockpower.com
See our ad on p. 29

Bauer Compressors Inc., 1328 Azalea


Garden Rd., Norfolk, VA 23502
Phone: 757-855-6006
Fax: 757-857-1041
Email: sls@bauercomp.com
www.bauercomp.com

Badger Daylighting, 1300 US HWY 136,


Pittsboro, IN 46167
Phone: 317-892-2666
Fax: 317-892-2661
Email: dhutchison@badger-corp.com
www.badgerinc.com

BE&K Construction Company, LLC, 2000


International Park Dr., Birmingham, AL
35243
Phone: 205-972-6618
Fax: 205-972-6807
Email: bonsackr@bek.com
www.bek.com

Balfour Beatty Rail Inc., 12276 San Jose


Blvd. Suite 410, Jacksonville, FL 32223
Phone: 404-253-6302
Fax: 404-607-1784
Email: lcaceres@bbri.com
www.bbri.com

Beamex, Inc., 2152 Northwest Parkway,


Suite A, Marietta, GA 30067
Phone: 800-888-9892
Fax: 770-951-1928
Email: beamex.inc@beamex.com
www.beamex.com

Band-It-Idex, Inc., 4799 Dahlia St.,


Denver, CO 80216
Phone: 303-320-4555
Fax: 303-329-9901
Email: scaldwell@idexcorp.com
www.band-it-idex.com

Bechtel, 5275 Westview Dr., Frederick,


MD 21703
Phone: 301-228-8609
Email: powernews@bechtel.com
www.Bechtel.com

COMPANY DIRECTORY

COMPANY DIRECTORY

Bannerstone Energy, 7 Buerger Rd.,


Mobile, AL 36608
Phone: 251-344-2534
Email: pstabler@bannerstoneenergy.com
www.bannerstoneenergy.com
Barkman Concrete, 152 Brandt St.,
Steinbach, MB R5G OR2, Canada
Phone: 204-326-3445
Fax: 204-326-5915
Email: mvogt@barkmanconcrete.com
www.barkmanconcrete.com
Barnhart, 26374 Pollard Rd. Suite B,
Daphne, AL 36526
Phone: 800-587-3249
Fax: 251-654-0547
Email: thughes@barnhartcrane.com
www.barnhartcrane.com
Basic Concepts, 1310 Harris Bridge Rd.,
Anderson, SC 29621
Phone: 800-285-4203
Fax: 864-224-7063
Email: bci@basicconcepts.com
www.basicconcepts.com
Basler Electric Co., Rte 143, P.O. Box
269, Highland, IL 62249
Phone: 618-654-2341
Fax: 618-654-2351
Email: info@basler.com
www.basler.com
www.powermag.com

E L E C T R I C A C T U AT O R S

Beck, Harold Beck & Sons Inc., 11 Terry


Dr., Newtown, PA 18940
Phone: 215-968-4600
Fax: 215-860-6383
Email: sales@haroldbeck.com
www.haroldbeck.com
Beckwith Electric Co., Inc., 6190-118th
Ave. North, Largo, FL 33773
Phone: 727-544-2326
Fax: 727 546-0121
Email: marketing@beckwithelectric.com
www.beckwithelectric.com
Bedeschi America Inc., 3275 W. Hillsboro Blvd. Suite 312, Deerfield Beach,
FL 33442
Phone: 954-602-2175
Email: info@bedeschiamerica.com
www.bedeschiamerica.com
Beetle Plastics, LLC, Ardmore Industrial
Airpark, P.O. Box 1569, Ardmore, OK
73402
Phone: 580-389-5421
Fax: 580-389-5424
Email: sales@beeltleplastics.com
www.beetleplastics.com

109

COMPANY DIRECTORY

COMPANY DIRECTORY
Belgrave Management Ltd, Suite 3,
Poseidon Ct, Cyclops Wharf, Docklands,
London, E14 3UG, United Kingdom
Phone: +44 020 7193 8707
Fax: +44 020 8593 7690
Email: belgrave@belgraveltd.com
www.belgraveltd.com
Belt Conveyor Guarding, 5 Winstar Rd.
RR#1, Shanty Bay, Ontario L0L 2L0,
Canada
Phone: 866-300-6668
Fax: 705-487-8795
Email: sharon.richardson@conveyorguarding.com
www.conveyorguarding.com
Beltran Technologies, Inc., 1133 East
35th St., Brooklyn, NY 11210
Phone: 718-338-3311
Fax: 718-253-9028
Email: beltran@earthlink.net
www.Beltrantechnologies.com
Beltservice de Mexico, Gustavo Baz 305,
Colonia La Loma, Tlalnepantla, Edo. de
MX, 54060, Mexico
Phone: 5-5362-0434
Fax: 5-5362-0261
Email: ventasmexico@beltservice.com
www.beltservicedemexico.com

Benjamin Company, 3575 East Oak Lake


Rd., Port Clinton, OH 43452
Phone: 419-366-0950
Fax: 419-285-2585
Email: ksb@kenben.com
www.kenben.com
Bently Pressurized Bearing Co., 1711
Orbit Way, Minden, NV 89423
Phone: 775-783-4600
Fax: 775-783-4650
Email: sales@bpb-co.com
www.bentlypressurizedbearing.com
Berthold Technologies USA, LLC, 99
Midway Ln., Oak Ridge, TN 37830
Phone: 865-483-1488
Fax: 865-425-4309
Email: Berthold-US@BertholdTech.com
www.berthold-us.com
Beta Engineering, 4725 Hwy. 28 E,
Pineville, LA 71360
Phone: 318-767-5564
Email: Kevin.Smith@BetaEngineering.
com
www.BetaEngineering.com

Belyea Company Inc., 2200 Northwood


Ave., Easton, PA 18045
Phone: 610-515-8775
Fax: 610-258-1230
Email: jkinney@belyeapower.com
www.belyeapower.com

Beta Max Hoist, Inc., P.O. Box 2750,


Melbourne, FL 32902
Phone: 321-727-3737
Fax: 321-768-9517
Email: rfant@betamaxhoist.com
www.betamaxhoist.com

Belzona Western Ltd., 10732 Maple


Bend Dr. S.E., Calgary, AB T2J 1X5 ,
Canada
Phone: 403-225-0474
Fax: 403-278-8898
Email: belzona1@telus.net
www.belzona.ca

Beu - Math Engineering Inc., 3201 W.


Harrison St., Phoenix, AZ 85009
Phone: 602-323-0436
Fax: 602-265-5431
Email: lbeugelink@beu-math.com
www.beu-math.com

Benchmark Oilflushing Services, 6635


Boykin Rd., Theodore, AL 36582
Phone: 251-653-7235
Fax: 251-653-5847
Email: info@oilflush.com
www.oilflush.com

110

Benetech, 1851 Albright Rd., Montgomery, IL 60538


Phone: 630-844-1300
Fax: 630-844-0064
Email: smitha@benetechusa.com
www.benetechusa.com

BEUMER Maschinenfabrik GmbH & Co.


KG, Oelder Str. 40, Beckum, 59269,
Germany
Phone: +49 2521 24 0
Fax: +49 2521 24 280
Email: beumer@beumer.com
www.beumer.com

www.powermag.com

BHI Energy, 60 Industrial Park Rd.,


Plymouth, MA 02360
Phone: 508-591-1149
Fax: 508-591-1397
Email: lauren.buckman@bhienergy.com
www.bhienergy.com
See our ad on p. 15
Bianchi Industrial Services, LLC, 208
Long Branch Rd. Suite 300, Syracuse,
NY 13209
Phone: 315-453-0001
Fax: 315-453-0033
Email: dbianchi@bianchidemo.com
www.bianchidemo.com
Bibb & Associates, 8455 Lenexa Dr.,
Lenexa, KS 66214
Phone: 913-928-7234
Fax: 913-928-7734
Email: cmfeeley@bibb.com
BIC Alliance, P.O. Box 1086, Kemah, TX
77565
Phone: 281-751-9996
Fax: 281-538-9991
Email: brooke@bicalliance.com
www.bicalliance.com
BICE Engineering and Consulting, 5729
Lebanon Rd., Suite 144 PMB 353,
Frisco, TX 75034
Phone: 214-883-3675
Fax: 972-668-0563
Email: bemay@bice-eeconsulting.com
www.bice-eeconsulting.com
Bierlein Companies, 2000 Bay City Rd.,
Midland, MI 48642
Phone: 800-336-6626
Fax: 989-496-0144
Email: bboyle@bierlein.com
www.bierlein.com
Big Top Manufacturing, 3255 N. US 19,
Perry, FL 32347
Phone: 850-584-7786
Fax: 850-584-7713
Email: sales@bigtopshelters.com
www.bigtopshelters.com
Bigge Crane And Rigging Co., 10700
Bigge Ave., San Leandro, CA 94577
Phone: 510-639-4093
Fax: 510-639-4053
Email: dvalluzzi@gmail.com
www.bigge.com

POWER December 2011

Bilfinger Berger Power Services GmbH,


Duisburger Str. 375, Oberhausen,
46049, Germany
Phone: +49 208 4575 7740
Fax: +49 208 4575 2170
Email: andreas.goebel@bbps.bilfinger.com
www.bbps.bilfinger.com
Binder Group Pty Ltd, 26 Miles Rd.,
Kewdale, 6105, Perth, Australia
Phone: + 61 8 9353 2208
Fax: + 61 8 9353 2806
Email: leo.crohan@bindergrp.com
www.bindergrp.com
BinMaster Level Controls, 7201 N 98th
St., P.O. Box 29709 (68529), Lincoln,
NE 68507
Phone: 402-434-9102
Fax: 402-434-9133
Email: info@binmaster.com
www.binmaster.com
BIOFerm Energy Systems, 617 N. Segoe
Rd., Suite 202, P.O. Box 5408, Madison,
WI 53705
Phone: 608-467-5523
Fax: 608-233-7085
Email: info@biofermenergy.com
www.biofermenergy.com
Bird Machine Co., 1600 Providence
Hwy., Suite 45, Walpole, MA 02081
Blac Inc., 195 Spamler Ave., Elmhurst,
IL 60126
Phone: 630-279-6400
Fax: 630-279-1005
Email: melisa.miller@blacinc.com
www.blacinc.com
Black & Veatch, 11401 Lamar Ave.,
Overland Park, KS 66211
Phone: 913-458-7504
Fax: 913-458-2012
Email: jennessad@bv.com
www.bv.com
Blasch Precision Ceramics, 580 Broadway, Albany, NY 12204
Phone: 518-436-1263
Fax: 518-436-0098
Email: mlavicska@blaschceramics.com
www.blaschceramics.com

December 2011 POWER

Blome International, 1450 Hoff Industrial Dr., OFallon, MO 63366


Phone: 636-379-9119
Fax: 636-379-0388
Email: andy@blome.com
www.blome.com
BMC P. Ltd., B-184 Okhla Industrial Area,
Phase-1, New Delhi, 110020, India
Phone: +91 11 26812554
Fax: +91 11 26371343
Email: jbihani@bihanigroup.com
www.bihanigroup.com
Boiler Tube Co of America, 506 Charlotte Hwy, Lyman, SC 29365
Phone: 864-439-4489
Fax: 864-439-8292
Email: sales@boilertubes.com
www.boilertubes.com
Boldrocchi Srl, Viale Trento e Trieste,
93, Biassono, 20046, Italy
Phone: 39-039-22021
www.boldrocchi.it
Boldt Construction, 2525 North Roemer
Rd., Appleton, WI 54915
Phone: 920-347-1719
Fax: 920-347-3019
Email: hveeser@exhibit-resource.com
www.theboldtcompany.com
Bonetti Valves and Gauges, 8311 Brier
Creek Pkwy., Suite 105 - No. 257, Raleigh, NC 27617
Phone: 919-806-3880
Fax: 919-806-8774
Email: nelson@bonetti-valves.com
www.bonetti-valves.com
BORSIG GmbH, Egellsstr. 2, Berlin, WV
13507, Germany
Phone: +49 (0)30 4301 2622
Fax: +49 (0)30 4301 2236
Email: info@borsig.de
www.borsig.de

Braden Mfg LLC, 5199 N Mingo Rd,PO


Box 1229, Tulsa, OK 74117 USA
Phone: 918-272-5371
Fax: 918-272-7414
E-mail: jtrost@braden.com
www.braden.com

www.powermag.com

Brand Energy & Infrastructure Services,


2505 South Main St., Kennesaw, GA
30144
Phone: 905-660-8176
Fax: 905-738-1391
Email: faran.latafat@beis.com
www.beis.com
Brandenburg Industrial Service Co.,
2625 South Loomis St., Chicago, IL
60608
Phone: 312-326-5800
Fax: 312-326-5055
Email: email@Brandenburg.com
www.brandenburg.com

COMPANY DIRECTORY

COMPANY DIRECTORY

BRAY Controls, Division of Bray International, Inc., 13333 Westland East Blvd.,
Houston, TX 77041
Phone: 281-894-5454
Fax: 281-894-0077
Email: bob.bloem@bray.com
www.bray.com
Brayman Construction, Inc., 1000 John
Roebling Way, Sanxonburg, PA 16056
Phone: 724-814-6203
Fax: 724-443-8733
Email: p_phister@brayman.com
www.brayman.com
Brelko Conveyor Products Inc., 5589
arapahoe Ave. #105, Boulder, CO 80303
Phone: 303-544-0817
Fax: 303-544-0818
Email: ken@brelko.us
www.brelko.com
Brown Wood Preserving Co., Inc., P.O.
Box 30536, Pensacola, FL 32503
Phone: 850-484-7653
Fax: 850-476-9999
Email: eddiepoles@brownwoodpensacola.com
www.brownwoodpensacola.com
BRUKS Rockwood, Inc., 5975 Shiloh Road Suite 109, Alpharetta, GA
30005
Phone: 770-849-0100
Fax: 770-495-7195
Email: kuh@bruks.com
www.rockwood.net
See our ad on p. 28
BRUSH Turbogenerators, Falcon Works,
Nottingham Rd., Loughborough, Leicestershire, LE11 1EX, United Kingdom
Phone: +44 1509611511
Fax: +44 1509612009
Email: salesuk@brush.eu
www.brush.eu
111

COMPANY DIRECTORY

COMPANY DIRECTORY
BS&B Safety Systems, LLC, 7455 E. 46th
St., Tulsa, OK 74145
Phone: 918-622-5950
Fax: 918-665-3904
Email: sales@bsbsystems.com
www.bsbsystems.com
Buckman Laboratories Inc, Water
Technologies, 1256 N McLean Blvd.,
Memphis, TN 38108
Phone: 901-272-8386
Fax: 901-276-6890
Email: agtucker@buckman.com
www.buckman.com
Buffalo Pumps, 874 Oliver St., North
Tonawanda, NY 14120
Phone: 716-693-1850
Fax: 716-693-6303
Email: tforrest@buffalopumps.com
www.buffalopumps.com
Bulwark Protective Apparel, 545 Marriott Drive #200, Nashville, TN 37214
Phone: 615-565-5317
Fax: 615-885-2248
Email: kathryn_hutcherson@vfc.com
www.bulwark.com
Burkhalter Rigging Inc., 304-B Uptown
Square, Murfreesboro, TN 37129
Phone: 615-217-5016
Fax: 615-217-3002
Email: brollins@burkhalter.net
www.burkhalter.net
Burns & McDonnell, 9400 Ward Parkway,
Kansas City, MO 64114
Phone: 816-333-9400
Fax: 816-333-3690
Email: jreid@burnsmcd.com
www.burnsmcd.com
Burns & Roe Enterprises, 800
Kinderkamack Rd., Oradell, NJ 07649
Phone: 201-986-4179
Fax: 201-986-4103
Email: aferrer@roe.com
www.roe.com

C
C.C. Jensen, Inc., Oil Maintenance, 1555
Senoia Rd., Suite A, Tyrone, GA 30290
Phone: 770-692-6001
Fax: 770-692-6006
Email: ccjensen@ccjensen.com
www.ccjensen.com
112

C.H.Robinson Worldwide, 5550 North


Riverside Dr., Fort Worth, TX 76137
Phone: 866-797-9370
Email: panirud@chrobinson.com
www.chrobinson.com
C.I.Agent Solutions, 11760 Commonwealth Dr., Louisville, KY 40299
Phone: 502-267-0101
Fax: 502-267-0181
Email: terry@ciagent.com
www.ciagent.com
C.M.G. & Associates Inc., 1757 Madison
Ave., North Port, FL 34286
Phone: 941-429-0890
Fax: 614-386-5591
Email: cmgai@earthlink.net
C.S. Osborne & Co., 125 Jersey St., Harrison, NJ 07029
Phone: 973-483-3232
Fax: 973-484-3621
Email: cso@csosborne.com
www.csosborne.com
Cabelas Inc., One Cabela Dr., Sidney,
NE 69160
Phone: 308-255-2373
Fax: 888-249-4596
Email: eugene.catrambone@cabelas.com
www.cabelas.com
Cain Industries, Inc., W194 N11826 McCormick Dr., Germantown, WI 53022
Phone: 262-251-0051
Fax: 262-251-0118
Email: sales@cainind.com
www.cainind.com
Caldwell, 4000 Tower Rd., Louisville, KY
40219
Phone: 502-964-3361
Fax: 502-966-8732
Email: jkraft@caldwellenergy.com
www.caldwelltanks.com
Calgon Carbon Corporation, 500 Calgon
Carbon Dr., Pittsburgh, PA 15205
Phone: 412-787-5675
Fax: 412-787-4523
Email: sheidenreich@calgoncarbon-us.com
www.calgoncarbon.com
Calpine Corp., 50 W San Fernando, San
Jose, CA 95113
www.calpine.com

www.powermag.com

Calvert Wire & Cable Corporation, 5091


West 164th St., Brook Park, OH 44142
Phone: 216-433-7618
Fax: 216-433-7618
Email: jvaughan@calvert-wire.com
www.calvert-wire.com
Camarines sur Polytechnic College,
peafrancia Avenue Naga City, San
Vicente, libmanan, 4407, Camarines
sur, Philippines
Phone: 9197871757
Email: xylhug89@yahoo.com
Cambria Contracting, Inc., 5105 Lockport Rd., Lockport, NY 14094
Phone: 716 625-6690
Fax: 716-625-6693
Email: weichhorn@cambriacontracting.com
www.cambriacontracting.com
CAMCORP, Inc., 9732 Pflumm Rd.,
Lenexa, KS 66215
Phone: 913-831-0740
Fax: 913-831-9271
Email: tracyj@camcorpinc.com
www.camcorpinc.com
Camfil Farr Power Systems, 2785 av. Francis Hughes, Laval, QC H7L 3J6, Canada
Phone: 800-976-9382
Fax: 450-629-5847
Email: gt.americas@camfilfarr.com
www.camfilfarr.com/ps/
Canadian Buffalo, 465 Laird Rd.,
Guelph, ON N1G 4W1, Canada
Phone: 519-837-1921
Fax: 519-837-2380
Email: marcel@canadianbuffalo.com
www.canadianbuffalo.com
Canasia Power Corp., Suite 306, 73 Simcoe St., Toronto, ON M5J 1W9, Canada
Phone: 416-363-1815
Email: canasia@istar.ca
www.canasiapower.com
Cannon Technologies, Inc, 8301 Golden
Valley Rd., #300, Minneapolis, MN
55427
Phone: 763-595-7777
Fax: 763-595-7776
Email: info@cannontech.com
www.cannontech.com
Carhartt Workwear at Rugged Outfitters,
89 Broadway, Park Ridge, NJ 07656
Phone: 201-379-3102
Fax: 888-643-3159
Email: csmith@ruggedoutfitters.net
www.ruggedoutfitters.net

POWER December 2011

Carling Technologies, 60 Johnson Ave.,


Plainville, CT 06062
Phone: 860-793-9281
Email: info@carlingtech.com
www.carlingtech.com
Cat Pumps, 1681 94th Lane NE, Minneapolis, MN 55449
Phone: 763-780-5440
Fax: 763-780-2958
Email: techsupport@catpumps.com
www.catpumps.com
Caterpillar Inc., P.O. Box 610, N4
AC6109, Mossville, IL 61552
Phone: 800-321-7332
Fax: 309-578-2559
Email: cat_power@cat.com
www.cat-electricpower.com
CB&I, 2103 Research Forest Dr., The
Woodlands, TX 77380
Phone: 832-513-1000
Fax: 832-513-1005
Email: info@cbi.com
www.CBI.com
CBP Engineering Corp., 185 Plumpton
Ave., Washington, PA 15301
Phone: 724-229-1180
Fax: 724-229-1185
Email: Halulko@cpbengineering.com
www.cpbengineering.com
CBS ArcSafe, 314 E. Mullberry St., Denton, TX 76201
Phone: 940-382-4411
Fax: 940-382-9435
Email: kristin@cbsarcsafe.com
www.cbsarcsafe.com
CCC Group Inc., Air Control Science
Division, 5660 Greenwood Plaza Blvd.,
Suite 445, Greenwood Village, CO 80111
Phone: 303-581-1070
Fax: 303-530-3208
Email: jbrowning@cccgroupinc.com
www.cccgroupinc.com
CCC Group, Inc. Engineering & Design
Div., 5660 Greenwood Plaza Blvd., Ste.
445, Greenwood Village, CO 80111
Phone: 303-516-4910
Fax: 303-530-3208
Email: jbrowning@cccgroupinc.com
www.cccgroupinc.com

December 2011 POWER

CCI (Control Component Inc), 22591


Avenida Empresa, Rancho Santa Margarita, CA 92688
Phone: 949-888-1877
Fax: 949-635-5151
Email: etodd@ccivalve.com
www.ccivalve.com
CD-adapco, 60 Broadhollow Rd., Melville, NY 11747
Phone: 631-549-2300
Fax: 631-549-2654
Email: info@us.cd-adapco.com
www.cd-adapco.com
CDR Systems Group, 146 South Atlantic
Ave., Ormond Beach, FL 32176
Phone: 386-615-9510
Fax: 386-615-9606
Email: sales@cdrsystems.com
www.westernpowerproducts.com
CE Power Solutions, P.O. Box 147, Lake
Hamilton, FL 33851
Phone: 863-439-2992
Fax: 863-439-2991
Email: ncampbell@cepowersol.com
www.cepowersol.com
CECO Compressor Engineering Corp,
5440 Alder Dr., Houston, TX 77081
Phone: 713-664-7333
Fax: 713-664-6444
Email: sales@ceconet.com
www.tryceco.com
Ceilcote Products / International Paint
LLC, 640 N. Rocky River Dr., Berea, OH
44017
Phone: 440-234-2900
Fax: 440-234-7466
Email: larry.hess@akzonobel.com
www.ceilcotecc.com
CEMTEK Environmental, 3041 S Orange
Ave., Santa Ana, CA 92707
Phone: 714-437-7100
Fax: 714-437-7177
Email: info@cemteks.com
www.cemteks.com
Ceresist, Inc., P.O. Box 213, Hawthorne,
NJ 07507
Phone: 973-345-3231
Fax: 973-345-3066
Email: seanm@ceresist.com
www.ceresist.com

www.powermag.com

CERREY SA de CV, Republica Mexicana


#300 San Nicolas de los Garza NL, San
Nicolas de los Garza NL, 63450, Nuevo
Leon, Mexico
Phone: 11528183694011
Fax: 11528183694058
Email: eangulo@cerrey.com.mx
www.cerrey.com.mx
Cesare Bonetti Inc., 17, Via Cesare Bonetti, Garbagnate Milanese,
I-20024, Italy
Phone: +3902 99072444
Fax: +3902 99072400
Email: expoert@bont.it
www.cesare-bonetti.it

COMPANY DIRECTORY

COMPANY DIRECTORY

CFM/VR-TESCO, LLC-Continental Field


Machining, 1875 Fox Lane, Elgin, IL
60123
Phone: 800-323-1393
Fax: 847-895-7006
Email: wfinedore@globalfield.net
www.globalfield.net
CGV Engineering Services Ltd, 13 France
St., Westhoughton, Bolton, BL5 2HG,
United Kingdom
Phone: 07823 322681
Fax: 01942 817285
Email: david@cgvengineeringservices.
co.uk
www.cgvengineeringservices.co.uk
CH2M HILL, 303 Perimeter Center N,
Suite 800, Atlanta, GA 30346
Phone: 770-829-6514
Fax: 770-829-6600
Email: Alan.Champagne@ch2m.com
www.ch2m.com/power
Champion Valves, Inc., P.O. Box 12901,
Wilmington, NC 28405
Phone: 910-794-5547
Fax: 910-794-5581
Email: jphillips@wafercheck.com
www.wafercheck.com

Chanute Manufacturing, 5727 S. Lewis,


Suite 600, Tulsa, OK 74105
Phone: 918-491-9191
Email: kbrown@optimus-tulsa.net
www.chanutemfg.com

113

COMPANY DIRECTORY

COMPANY DIRECTORY
Chatham Steel Corporation, 501 W.
Boundary, P.O. Box 2567, Savannah,
GA 31498
Phone: 800-869-2762
Fax: 919-682-0322
Email: nuclear@chathamsteel.com
www.chathamsteel.com
See our ad on p. 9
CHEC S.A. E.S.P., kmt estacion uribe,
manizales, 51, Caldas, Colombia
Phone: 368507120
Email: juesgohi1983@hotmail.com
www.chec.com.co
Chemco Systems, 1500 Industrial Dr.,
Monongahela, PA 15063
Phone: 724-258-7333
Fax: 724-258-7350
Email: tennant@chemcosystems.net
www.chemcosystems.net
CHEMetrics, Inc., 4295 Catlett Rd.,
Calverton, VA 20138
Phone: 800-356-3072
Fax: 540-788-4856
Email: bhruska@chemetrics.com
www.chemetrics.com
Chemetron Fire Systems, 4801 Southwich Dr. 3rd Floor, Matteson, IL 60442
Phone: 708-748-1503
Fax: 708-283-6500
Email: pat.brown@chemetron.com
www.chemetron.com
Chesapeake Soda Clean, Inc., 212 Najoles Rd., Bldg. D, Millersville, MD 21108
Phone: 410-271-2652
Email: chessieclean@comcast.net
www.chesapeakesodaclean.com
Chi Li Tomas Trading CO., LTD, 6F, NO.
182-2, Sec. 1, Ho-Ping E. RD., Taipei,
106, Taiwan
Phone: 886-2-83692009
Fax: 886-2-83691743
Email: chilipeggy@gmail.com
www.chilitomas.com
CHLOR*RID International Inc., 3356 N.
San Marcos Place Unit 104, Chandler,
AZ 85225
Phone: 480-821-0039
Fax: 480-821-0364
Email: paulap@chlor-rid.com
www.chlor-rid.com

114

Chromalloy, 330 Blaisdell Rd., Orangeburg, NY 10962


Phone: 845-359-4700
www.chromalloy.com
Chromium Corporation, 14911 Quorum
Dr., Suite 600, Dallas, TX 75254
Phone: 972-851-0487
Fax: 972-851-0461
Email: mike.taylor@chromcorp.com
www.chromcorp.com
Cianbro Corporation, 605 Pittman Rd.,
Baltimore, MD 21226
Phone: 410-636-3000
Fax: 410-636-3111
Email: bfrania@cianbro.com
www.cianbro.com
Citel Surge Protection, 1515 NW 167th
St., Suite No 6-303, Miami, FL 33169
Phone: 305-621-0022
Fax: 305-621-0766
Email: citel@citelprotection.com
www.citelprotection.com
Citel, Inc., 11381 Interchange Circle
South, Miramar, FL 33025
Phone: 954-430-6310
Fax: 954-430-7785
Email: marketing@citel.us
www.citel.us
Clark-Reliance Corporation, 16633 Foltz
Industrial Parkway, Strongsville, OH
44136
Phone: 440-846-7655
Fax: 440-238-8828
Email: jkolbus@clark-reliance.com
www.clark-reliance.com
CLC Lodging, 8111 E. 32nd St. North
Ste. 300, Wichita, KS 67226
Phone: 316-771-7097
Fax: 316-771-7897
Email: hwright@corplodging.com
www.corplodging.com
Clear Lake Filtration, 400 Hobbs Rd.
#102, League City, TX 77573
Phone: 281-534-9112
Fax: 281-534-9269
Email: dlewis@clearlakefiltration.com
www.clearlakefiltration.com
ClearSpan Fabric Structures, 1395 John
Fitch Blvd., South Windsor, CT 06074
Phone: 866-643-1010
Fax: 860-760-0210
Email: TrussInquiry@ClearSpan.com
www.ClearSpan.com
www.powermag.com

ClearView Monitoring Solutions, 19


Hartum St., Har Hotzvim Science Park,
Jerusalem, 91450, Israel
Phone: +972 2 5400920
Fax: +972 2 5400044
Email: sales@clearviewmonitoring.com
www.clearviewmonitoring.com
Cleaver-Brooks, 11950 W Lake Park
Dr., Milwaukee, WI 53224
Phone: 414-359-0600
Fax: 414-359-3159
Email: info@cleaver-brooks.com
www.cleaver-brooks.com
See our ad on p. 35

Clyde Bergemann Inc, 4015 Presidential


Pkwy., Atlanta, GA 30340
Phone: 770-557-3600
Fax: 770-557-3641
E-mail: info@us.cbpg.com
www.cbpg.com
CMP Coatings, Inc.,1610 Engineers
Rd.,Belle Chasse, LA 70037
Phone: 504-392-4817
E-mail: sales@cmpusa.com
http://cmp.co.jp
See our ad on p. 24
Coal People Magazine, 629 Virginia St.
West, Charleston, WV 25362
Phone: 304-342-4129
Fax: 304-343-3124
Email: cpmcirc@ntelos.net
www.coalpeople.com
Coal Recovery Investments Ltd, 8 Willowbrook, Llandogo Rd., St Mellons,
CF3 0EF, Wales, United Kingdom
Phone: 442920190222
Fax: 442920797761
Email: smerald@aol.com
www.gwarexpolska.pl
CoaLogix, 11701 Mt. Holly Rd., Charlotte, NC 28214
Phone: 704-827-8933
Fax: 704-827-8935
Email: rs@coalogix.com
www.CoaLogix.com

POWER December 2011

Coastal Drilling East, LLC, 70 Gum


Springs Rd., Morgantown, WV 26508
Phone: 304-413-0623
Fax: 304-291-0671
Email: rwolfe@shaftdrillers.com
www.shaftdrillers.com

Coen Company, Inc., 951 Mariners


Island Blvd., Suite 410, San Mateo, CA
94404
Phone: 650-522-2100
Fax: 650-522-2147
Email: marketing@coen.com
www.coen.com
Coffman Electrical Equipment Company,
3300 Jefferson Ave. SE, Grand Rapids,
MI 49548
Phone: 616-452-8708
Fax: 616-452-1337
Email: rcoffman@steadypower.com
www.steadypower.com
Cogen Power Inc., 36929 Meadowdale
Dr., Solon, OH 44139
Phone: 440-498-1676
Fax: 440-498-1676
Email: jainsk@cogenpowerinc.com
Colmac Coil Manufacturing, Inc., P.O.
Box 571, Colville, WA 99114
Phone: 509-684-2595
Fax: 509-684-8331
Email: mail@colmaccoil.com
www.colmaccoil.com

Columbia Steel Casting Co, Inc, 10425


N. Bloss Ave., Portland, OR 97203
Phone: 503-286-0685
Fax: 503-286-1743
Email: service@columbiasteel.com
www.columbiasteel.com
Columbian TecTank Inc, 9701 Renner
Blvd., Suite 150, Lenexa, KS 66219
Phone: 316-421-0200
Fax: 316-421-9122
Email: sales@columbiantectank.com
www.columbiantectank.com

December 2011 POWER

Columbus McKinnon, 140 John James


Audubon, Amherst, NY 14228
Phone: 716-689-5678
Email: sales@cmworks.com
www.cmindustrial.com
Commerce Lanes, Inc, 806 Rosa St.,
Celebration, FL 34747
Phone: 321-939-2961
Fax: 321-939-1151
Email: business@commercelanes.com
Commodities Consulting & Asset Management COMCAM, Eigenhaardstraat 10, Middelburg, 4331HS, Zeeland, Netherlands
Phone: 49937531495000
Fax: 49937531495009
Email: backoffice@com-cam.com
www.com-cam.com
Commonwealth Dynamics Inc, 95 Court
St., Portsmouth, NH 03801
Phone: 603-433-6060
Fax: 603-436-0944
Email: marketing@comdynam.com
www.comdynam.com
Compact Automation Products LLC, 105
Commerce Way, Westminser, SC 29687
Phone: 864-647-9521
Fax: 864-647-9574
Email: marketing@compactautomation.com
www.compactautomation.com
Computer Power Supply, 7313 SW Tech
Center Dr., Tigard, OR 97223
Phone: 503-684-8026
Email: caleb@cpshv.com
www.cpshv.com
ComRent International, 7640 Investment Ct., Unit A, Owings, MD 20736
Phone: 410-257-3000
Fax: 410-257-2240
Email: rentals@comrent.com
www.loadbanks.com
Conco Systems Inc., 530 Jones St.,
Verona, PA 15147
Phone: 412-828-1166
Fax: 412-828-3336
Email: eric@concosystems.net
www.concosystems.com
Condenser & Chiller Services, Inc.,
13488 Fifth St., Chino, CA 91710
Phone: 800-356-1932
Fax: 909-590-3446
Email: chiller@cyberg8t.com
www.ccs-tubes.com

www.powermag.com

Conforma Clad Inc, 501 Park E Blvd.,


New Albany, IN 47150
Phone: 812-948-2118
Fax: 812-944-3254
Email: info@conformaclad.com
www.conformaclad.com
ConocoPhillips, 600 N. Dairy Ashford,
Houston, TX 77079
Phone: 281-293-2929
Fax: 281-293-1915
Email: donna.m.wood@conocophillips.com
www.conocophillips.com/tech
See our ad on cover 2

COMPANY DIRECTORY

COMPANY DIRECTORY

Conomos Industrial Services, Coulter &


Station Streets, Bridgeville, PA 15017
Phone: 412-221-1800
Fax: 412-221-4641
Email: ckucherawy@conomos.com
www.conomos.com
Conspec Controls, 6 Guttman Blvd.,
Charleroi, PA 15022
Phone: 724-489-8450
Fax: 724-489-9772
Email: rob.albinger@conspec-controls.com
www.conspec-controls.com
Construction Business Associates, LLC,
2310 Seven Lakes South, West End, NC
27376
Phone: 910-400-3113
Email: PGHessler@ConstrBiz.com
www.constrbiz.com
Construction Techniques, Inc, 15887
Snow Rd. Suite 100, Cleveland, OH
44142
Phone: 216-267-7310
Fax: 216-267-9310
Email: bjakers@fabriform1.com
www.fabriform1.com
Control Plus Inc. c/o Micronics Ultrasonic Flow, 257 N. West Ave., Elmhurst,
IL 60126
Phone: 888-274-8803
Fax: 630-279-9026
Email: bob@controlplusinc.com
www.micronicsflowmeters.com
ControlSoft Inc., 5387 Avion Park Dr.,
Highland Heights, OH 44143
Phone: 440-443-3900
Email: power@controlsoftinc.com
www.controlsoftinc.com

115

COMPANY DIRECTORY

COMPANY DIRECTORY
Conval, Inc, 265 Field Rd., Somers, CT
06071
Phone: 860-763-3551
Fax: 860-763-3557
Email: sales@conval.com
www.Conval.com
CONVAULT INC., 4109 E. Zeering Rd.,
Denair, CA 95316
Phone: 209-632-7571
Fax: 209-632-4711
Email: info@convault.com
www.convault.com
Conveyor Services/Classic Conveyor
Components, 120 Airport Rd., Blairsville, PA 15717
Phone: 724-459-5261
Fax: 724-459-5605
Email: r_vachal@classicconveyor.com
www.classicconveyor.com

Cosa Instrument Corp, Process Control Div,


84G Horseblock Rd., Yaphank, NY 11980
Phone: 631-345-3434
Email: cosa@cosaic.com
www.cosa-instrument.com

CORIMPEX USA, Inc., 501 Main St.,


Suite 208, Klamath Falls, OR 97601
Phone: 541-273-3030
Email: corimpex@qwest.net

COSS, Certified Occupational Safety


Specialist, 8180 Siegen Lane, Baton
Rouge, LA 70810
Phone: 225-766-0955
Fax: 225-766-1099
Email: bgordon@safetylca.org
www.coss.net

Coritech Services, 4716 Delemere, Royal


Oak, MI 48073
Phone: 248-563-7280
Email: rhance@coritech.com
www.coritech.com
Cormetech, Inc., 5000 International Dr.,
Durham, NC 27712
Phone: 919-595-8721
Fax: 919-595-8701
Email: wensellg@cormetech.com
www.cormetech.com

Cooling Technology Institute, 2611 FM


1960 West Rd. #A-101, Houston, TX
77068
Phone: 281-583-4087
Fax: 281-537-1721
Email: vmanser@cti.org
www.cti.org

Cornerstone Material Handling Inc., 258


Prospect St., St. George, ON N0E 1N0,
Canada
Phone: 519-448-3344
Fax: 519-448-4514
Email: brian@cornerstonematerialhandling.com
www.cornerstonematerialhandling.com

Cooling Tower Depot, Inc., 651 Corporate Cir., Suite 206, Golden, CO 80401
Phone: 720-746-1234
Fax: 720-746-1110
Email: dsheldon@ctdepotinc.com
www.coolingtowerdepot.com

Corrosion Control Inc., 494 Fairplay St.,


Rutledge, GA 30663
Phone: 706-557-9624
Fax: 706-557-7923
Email: debbie@corrosioncontrolinc.com
www.corrosioncontrolinc.com

Cooling Tower Technologies Inc, 52410


Clark Road, White Castle, LA 70788
Phone: 225-545-4144
Fax: 225-545-4151
Email: kcampesi@cemail.cc
www.crownenterprises.com

Corrosion Engineering, P.O. Box 5670,


Mesa, AZ 85211
Phone: 480-890-0203
Fax: 480-890-0589
Email: sales@corroeng.com
www.corroeng.com

Cooper Power Systems, 505 Highway


169 North, Suite 1200, Minneapolis, MN
55441
Phone: 763-595-7777
Fax: 763-543-7777
Email: jlayer@cannontech.com
www.cannontech.com

Corrosion Monitoring Services, 902


Equity Dr., West Chicago, IL 60174
Phone: 630-762-9300
Fax: 630-762-9301
Email: info@cmsinc.us
www.cmsinc.us

Copes-Vulcan, An SPX Brand, 5602 West


Rd., McKean, PA 16426
Phone: 814-476-5800
Fax: 814-476-5834
Email: cv@spx.com
www.copesvulcan.com
116

CORA Technology, 13003 Finch Brook


Dr., Cypress, TX 77429
Phone: 281-376-6619
Fax: 281-376-6827
Email: rcorvelli@comcast.net

Corrpro Companies, Inc., 1055 West


Smith Rd., Medina, OH 44256
Phone: 330-723-5082
Fax: 330-722-7606
Email: jlary@corrpro.com
www.corrpro.com

www.powermag.com

Cotter Turbine Service, LLC, 16804


170th St. SE, Big Lake, MN 55309
Phone: 763-263-5611
Fax: 763-263-5601
Email: nichole.cotter@cotterturbineservice.com
www.stcotterturbine.com
CPFD-Software, 10899 Montgomery NE,
Albuquerque, NM 87111
Phone: 505-275-3894
Fax: 505-275-3894
Email: tim@cpfd-software.com
www.cpfd-software.com
CPV Manufacturing, 851 Preston St.,
Philadelphia, PA 19104
Phone: 215-386-6508
Fax: 215-387-9043
Email: sales@cpvmfg.com
www.cpvmfg.com
CRC Engineering, P.C., 1261 Broadway,
Suite 608, New York, NY 10001
Phone: 212-889-1233
Fax: 212-889-1211
Email: cnystrom@crc-eng.com
www.crc-eng.com
Croll-Reynolds Engineering Company Inc,
2400 Reservoir Ave., Trumbull, CT 06611
Phone: 203-371-1983
Fax: 203-371-0615
Email: creco@att.net
www.croll-reynoldsengineering.com
Crossfire Safety Eyeware, 320 Northpoint
Parkway, Suite J, Acworth, GA 30102
Phone: 770-975-4711
Fax: 770-975-4712
Email: liz@crossfiresafety.com
www.crossfiresafety.com

POWER December 2011

Crowcon Detection Instruments, 21


Kenton Lands Rd., Erlanger, KY 41018
Phone: 800-527-6926
Fax: 859-957-1044
Email: robin.bidwell@crowcon.com
www.crowcon.com
Cryogenic Institute of New England,
Inc., 78 Chilmark St., Worcester, MA
01604
Phone: 800-739-7949
Fax: 508-459-7426
Email: rtaylor@nitrofreeze.com
www.nitrofreeze.com
Crystal Communication Ltd., Suit1/B,House-7,Road-14/C,Sector4,Uttara,Dhaka-1230,Bangladesh,
Suit-D/3,House-1098,Road-9/C,Sector5,Uttara,Dhaka-1230,Bangladesh,
Dhaka, 1230, Bangladesh
Phone: 8801711535040
Fax: 88028953674
Email: solutionNsources@gmail.com
www.crystalbgd.com
CTI Industries, Inc., 283 Indian River
Rd., Orange, CT 06477
Phone: 203-795-0070
Fax: 203-795-7061
Email: kshugrue@cti-ind.com
www.cti-ind.com
CTI Power/Chicago Tube & Iron Company, 421 Browns Hill Rd., P.O. Box
670, Oakboro, NC 28129
Phone: 704-781-2060
Fax: 704-781-2099
Email: pnance@chicagotube.com
www.cti-power.com
Custom Expansion Joints, Inc., 313 N.
Stewart Rd., Liberty, MO 64068
Phone: 816-781-3507
Fax: 816-781-3520
Email: sales@cej.com
www.cej.com
Cutsforth Products Inc., 37837 Rock
Haven Rd., Cohasset, MN 55721
Phone: 218-326-8263
Fax: 218-327-1006
Email: kcarlstrom@cutsforth.com
www.cutsforth.com

December 2011 POWER

CYME International T&D, 67 S Bedford


St., Suite 201 East, Burlington, MA
01803-5177
Phone: 781-229-0269
Fax: 781-229-2336
Email: info@cyme.com
www.cyme.com

D
Daeyoung C & E C0., Ltd., GA-1-5,
Gangneung Science & Industrial Complex, Gangenung, Gangwon, 210-340,
South Korea
Phone: 82-33-650-9000
Fax: 82-33-644-4744
Email: daeyoungcne@gmail.com
www.cnedrc.com

Diesel & Gas Turbine Worldwide, 20855


Watertown Rd., Waukesha, WI 53186
Phone: 262-754-4100
Fax: 262-754-4175
Email: kkane@dieselpub.com
www.dieselpub.com
DIS-TRAN Packaged Substations, LLC,
4725 Hwy 28 E, Pineville, LA 71360
Phone: 318-448-0274
Fax: 318-445-7240
Email: lisa.deville@distran.com
www.distran.com
DMC Power, 2846 Saddlebrook Way,
Marietta, GA 30064
Phone: 404-617-8794
Email: dschrampfer@dmcpower.com
www.dmcpower.com

Day & Zimmermann ECM, 1827 Freedom


Rd. Suite 101, Lancaster, PA 17601
Phone: 717-391-3140
Fax: 215-656-2624
Email: david.bronczyk@dayzim.com
www.dayzim.com

Doble Engineering Company, 85 Walnut


St., Watertown, MA 02472
Phone: 617-926-4900
Fax: 617-926-0528
Email: dobleINFO@doble.com
www.doble.com

Degremont Technologies, 8007 Discovery Dr., Richmond, VA 23229


Phone: 804-756-8423
Fax: 804-756-7643
Email: sylvie.roy@degremont.com
www.degremont.com

DOE Wind Technologies Program, P.O.


Box 281213, Lakewood, CO 80228
Phone: 720-962-7423
Fax: 720-962-7427
Email: manion@wapa.gov
www.wapa.gov

Design Analysis Services, 857 bonnie


Brae Lane, Bolingbrook, IL 60440
Phone: 630-783-0384
Email: john@design-analysis.com
www.design-analysis.com

Dollinger Filtration, an SPX Brand, 4647


SW 40th Ave., Ocala, FL 34474
Phone: 800-344-2611
Fax: 352-873-5773
Email: dollinger.sales@dehydration.spx.
com
www.dollinger-spx.com

Detroit Stoker Company

Our Opportunities Are Always Growing

Detroit Stoker Company, 1510 East


First St., Monroe, MI 48161
Phone: 734-241-9500
Fax: 734-241-7126
Email: sales@detroitstoker.com
www.detroitstoker.com
See our ad on p. 62
Diamond Power International Inc,
2600 E Main St., Lancaster, OH
43130-0415
Phone: 740-687-4101
Fax: 740-687-4229
Email: mlgossel@diamondpower.com
www.diamondpower.com
See our ad on p. 31

www.powermag.com

COMPANY DIRECTORY

COMPANY DIRECTORY

Donaldson Company Inc, 9250 West


Bloomington Freeway, Bloomington, MN
55431
Phone: 952-887-3232
Fax: 952-703-4712
Email: barry.link@donaldson.com
www.donaldson.com
Doner Advertising, 25900 Northwestern
Highway, Southfield, MI 48075
Phone: 248-827-0869
Fax: 248-827-8399
Email: llamar@doner.com
www.doner.com

117

COMPANY DIRECTORY

COMPANY DIRECTORY
Doosan Engineering & Services, LLC (A
Burns & Roe - Doosan Projects Alliance),
5 Paragon Dr., Montvale, NJ 07645
Phone: 201-986-4252
Fax: 201-986-4869
Email: meyna.park@doosan.com
www.doosanheavy.com

Dustex Corporation, 100 Chastain Ctr


Blvd., Suite 195, Kennesaw, GA 30144
Phone: 770-429-5575
Fax: 770-429-5556
Email: rtdavies@dustex.com
www.dustex.com

Dow Electrical & Telecommunications,


Houston Dow Center, 1254 Enclave
Parkway, Houston, TX 77077
Phone: 1-800-441-4DOW
www.dowinside.com
See our ad on p. 39

DustMASTER Enviro Systems, 190 Simmons Ave., Pewaukee, WI 53072


Phone: 262-691-3100
Fax: 262-691-3184
Email: bjs@mixersystems.com
www.mixersystems.com

DragonWear, P.O. Box 28789, Seattle,


WA 98118
Phone: 800-873-5725
Fax: 206-723-1890
Email: info@truenorthgear.com
www.truenorthgear.com

Dynamic Systems, Inc., 15331 NE 90Th


St., Redmond, WA 98052
Phone: 425-284-1662
Fax: 425-861-3978
Email: robf@dsisales.com
www.a-barcode.com

Drayton Group Inc, 2295 North Opdyke,


Suite D, Auburn Hills, MI 48326
Phone: 586-840-5130
Fax: 248-377-2418
Email: lacord@draytongroupinc.com
www.draytongroupinc.com
Dresser-Rand, 299 Lincoln St., Worcester, MA 01605
Phone: 508-595-1700
Fax: 508-595-1780
Email: tlevis@dresser-rand.com
www.dresser-rand.com
Dresser-Rand Company Ltd, 85 Papyrus
Road, Peterborough, PE4 5HG, Cambridgeshire, United Kingdom
Phone: +44 1733 292213
Fax: +44 1733 292300
Email: scanham@dresser-rand.com
www.dresser-rand.com
Durocher Marine Division of Kokosing
Construction Co. Inc., 958 N. Huron St.,
Cheboygan, MI 49721
Phone: 231-627-5633
Fax: 231-627-2646
Email: mhenrikson@durocher.biz
www.durocher.biz
Duromar Inc, 706 Washington St., Pembroke, MA 02359
Phone: 781-826-2525
Fax: 781-826-2150
Email: daniel.toft@duromar.com
www.duromar.com
118

ECT Inc, 401 E Fourth St., Bldg 20,


Bridgeport, PA 19405
Phone: 610-239-5120
Fax: 610-239-7863
Email: sales@ectinc.net
www.ectinc.net
EITI - Electrical Industry Training Institute USA Inc., 1465 Slater Rd., P.O. BOX
5007, Ferndale, WA 98248-5007
Phone: 877-859-8228
Fax: 877-284-7916
Email: info@eiti.us
www.eiti.us
EK Ekcessories, 575 West 3200 South,
Logan, UT 84321
Phone: 435-753-8448
Fax: 435-753-2411
Email: ek@ekusa.com
www.ekusa.com

E
E / SYSTEMS, Mack Pl., - 566, St. Clair
Sh., MI 48080
Phone: 313-882-1133
Email: intellife@hotmail.com
www.ENXEX.com

Eliminator Slurry Pumps, 4432 Venture


Ave., Duluth, MN 55811
Phone: 218-722-9904
Fax: 218-722-2826
Email: info@gpmco.com
www.eliminatorpumps.com

E.H. Wachs, 600 Knightsbridge Parkway,


Lincolnshire, IL 60069
Phone: 847-537-8800
Fax: 847-520-1147
Email: sales@ehwachs.com
www.ehwachs.com

Elma Electronic, 760 Veterans Circle,


Warminster, PA 18974
Phone: 800-445-6194
Email: valerie.andrew@elma.com
www.elma.com

East Jordan Iron Works, Inc., 301


Spring Street, East Jordan, MI 49727
Phone: 231-536-4465
Fax: 231536-4458
Email: rnowka@ejiw.com
www.ejiw.com
Eaton Corporation, 1000 Cherrington
Parkway, Moon Township, PA 15108
Phone: 412-813-3630
Email: alanecolorito@eaton.com
www.eaton.com
EcoSys, 800 Westchester Ave., Suite
710, Rye Brook, NY 10573
Phone: 914-304-5000
Fax: 914-464-7320
Email: into@ecossys.net
www.ecosys.net

www.powermag.com

Elsys Instruments, 234 Cromwell Hill


Rd., Monroe, NY 10950
Phone: 845-238-3933
Fax: 845-782-6045
Email: Klaas.Vogel@elsys-instruments.com
www.elsys-instruments.com
Emerson Process Management, Fisher,
301 S 1st Ave., Marshalltown, IA
50158
Phone: 641-754-3011
Email: fc-valve@emerson.com
www.fisher.com
Emerson Process Management, Power &
Water Solutions, 200 Beta Dr., Pittsburgh, PA 15238
Phone: 412-963-4000
Fax: 412-963-3644
Email: powerwater@emersonprocess.com
www.emersonprocess-powerwater.com

POWER December 2011

Endress + Hauser, 3936 Addison Woods


Rd., Frederick, MD 21704
Phone: 317-535-2147
Fax: 317-535-2243
Email: ravi.jethra@us.endress.com
www.us.endress.com
Enduride Canada USA, Inc., 1880 Provinciale St., Quebec City, Quebec G1N
4A2, Canada
Phone: 418-571-5494
Fax: 418-266-0121
Email: jet11@enduridecanadausa.com
www.enduridecanadausa.com
Enecon Corp., 38 Water Crest Dr.,
Doylestown, PA 18901
Phone: 215-489-1050
Fax: 215-489-1055
Email: lauren@enecon.com
www.enecon.com
Enerfin, Inc, 5125 J.A. Bombardier, St
Hubert, Quebec J3Z 1G4, Canada
Phone: 514-290-7566
Fax: 450-443-0711
Email: bmajeau@enerfin-inc.com
www.enerfin-inc.com
Energy Associates, P.C., Montville Office
Park, 150 River Rd., Suite J4, Montville,
NJ 07045
Phone: 973-331-8100
Email: HR@Energy-PC.com
www.Energy-PC.com
Energy Equipments & Products Company, No.9/203, RUBIN, Premjyot Complex, Ghatkopar - Mankhurd Link Road,
Near Indian Oil Nagar, MUMBAI, MA 400
043, Maharashtra, India
Phone: 919820063635
Fax: 912225563635
Email: energy.epco@yahoo.com
www.energy.epco.com
Energy Storage and Power, 520 US Hwy
22 E, Suite 205, Bridgewater, NJ 08807
Phone: 908-393-0526
Email: info@caespower.com
www.caespower.com
Energy Systems Products, 6830 N
Eldridge Pkwy, Suite 102, Houston, TX
70741
Phone: 713-937-6336
Email: bobw@espenergysystems.com
www.espforenergy.com

December 2011 POWER

Energy-Tech, 801 Bluff St., Dubuque, IA


52004
Phone: 563-588-3851
Fax: 563-588-3848
Email: jhopp@woodwardbizmedia.com
www.energy-tech.com

EtherWAN Systems, 4570 E. Eisenhower


Circle, Anaheim, CA 92807
Phone: 714-779-3800
Fax: 714-779-3806
Email: info@etherwan.com
www.etherwan.com

Engart Inc, One White Oak Trace, Beckley, WV 25801


Phone: 304-253-0777
Fax: 304-253-0719
Email: pparsons@engartinc.com
www.engartamerica.com

Eutectic Corporation, N94 W14355 Garwin


Mace Dr., Menomonee Falls, WI 53051
Phone: 262-532-4677
Fax: 262-255-5542
Email: marketing@eutecticusa.com
www.eutecticusa.com

Environment One Corp, 2773 Balltown


Rd., Niskayuna, NY 12309
Phone: 518-579-3033
Fax: 518-346-6188
Email: rseiler@eone.com
www.eone.com

Everlasting Valve Co, 108 Somogyi


Court, South Plainfield, NJ 07080
Phone: 908-769-0700
Fax: 908-769-8697
Email: djenkins@everlastingvalveusa.com
www.everlastingvalveusa.com

Environmental Energy Services, 5 Turnberry Lane, Sandy Hook, CT 06482


Phone: 203-270-0337
Fax: 203-426-0150
Email: lcookfair@eescorp.com
www.eescorp.com

Expro Services Inc., 501 Scott St.,


Worthington, KY 41183
Phone: 606-834-9402
Email: craigsherman@charter.net
www.explosiveprofessionals.com

EPG Enginuit Portable Grid, 3511


Silverside Rd. Suite 105,, Wilmington,
DE 19180
Phone: 205-647-4279
Email: info@EPGinc.us
www.EPGinfo.us
Epic, Inc., 919 Trakk lane, Woodstock,
IL 60098
Phone: 815-337-2880
Fax: 815-337-2881
Email: stan@epicparts.com
www.epicparts.com
Ergonomic Office Chairs by United
Group, Inc., 13700 Polo Trail Dr., Lake
Forest, IL 60045
Phone: 847-816-7100
Fax: 847-816-7102
Email: tkramer@unitedgp.com
www.eocUSA.com
ESP/Energy Systems Products, Inc, 6830
N Eldridge Pkwy. #506, Houston, TX
77041
Phone: 713-937-6336
Fax: 713-937-6378
Email: bobw@espforenergy.com
www.espforenergy.com

www.powermag.com

COMPANY DIRECTORY

COMPANY DIRECTORY

ExxonMobil Lubricants & Petroleum


Specialties (Mobil Industrial Lubricants) 3225 Gallows Rd., Room
6C0631, Fairfax, VA 22031
Phone: 703-846-1998
Fax: 703-846-3041
E-mail: mike.j.zinngrabe@exxonmobil.com
www.mobilindustrial.com
See our ads on pages 2 & 3
E-ZLIFT Portable Conveyors, 2000 S.
Cherokee St., Denver, CO 80223
Phone: 303-733-5533
Fax: 303-733-5642
Email: ezlift@earthlink.net
www.ezliftconveyors.com

F
Fabreeka International, Inc., 1023
Turnpike St., P.O. Box 210, Stoughton,
MA 02072
Phone: 781-341-3655
Fax: 781-341-3983
Email: info@fabreeka.com
www.fabreeka.com
Fairbanks Morse Engine, 701 White
Ave., Beloit, WI 53511
Phone: 608-364-8054
Fax: 608-364-8444
Email: luke.fredrickson@fairbanksmorse.com
www.fairbanksmorse.com
119

COMPANY DIRECTORY
120

COMPANY DIRECTORY
Fauske & Associates, 16W070 83rd St.,
Burr Ridge, IL 60527
Phone: 630-887-5213
Fax: 630-986-5481
Email: afauske@fauske.com
www.Fauske.com
FE Moran, Inc., 2265 Carlson Dr., Northbrook, IL 60062
Phone: 847-291-6336
Fax: 847-498-9210
Email: m.bromberg@femoran.com
www.femoranshs.com

Flowrox Oy (former Larox Flowsys Oy), P.O.


Box 338, Lappeenranta, FI-53101, Finland
Phone: +358 201 113 311
Fax: +358 201 113 300
Email: sales@larox.fi
www.larox.fi

Flowserve, 1900 S. Saunders St., Raleigh, NC 27603


Phone: 919-831-3200
Fax: 919-831-3369
Email: fbensinger@flowserve.com
www.Flowserve.com

FP Turbomachinery, Wiesenstrasse 57,


Emmendingen, 79312, Germany
Email: contact@fpturbo.com
www.fpturbo.com
Frederick Cowan & Company, Inc, 48
Kroemer Ave., Riverhead, NY 11901
Phone: 631-369-0360
Fax: 631-369-0637
Email: tlc@fcowan.com
www.fcowan.com
Frenzelit North America, 4165 Old Salisbury Rd., Lexington, NC 27295
Phone: 336-956-3956
Fax: 336-956-3913
Email: fna@frenzelit.net
www.frenzelit.net

Fenner Dunlop Americas, 21 Laredo


Drive, Scottdale, GA 30079
Phone: 404-297-3115
Fax: 404-296-5165
Email: jill.schultz@fennerdunlop.com
www.fennerdunlopamericas.com
See our ad on p. 61

FLSmidth Inc., 2040 Ave. C, Bethlehem,


PA 18017
Phone: 610-264-6800
Fax: 610-264-6307
Email: info-us@flsmidth.com
www.fls-pt.com

Fibrwrap Construction, Inc., 8380 Miralani Dr., San Diego, CA 92126


Phone: 858-642-0694
Fax: 858-444-2982
Email: markg@fclp.com
www.fyfeco.com

Fluke Corporation, P.O. Box 9090, Everett, WA 98206-9090


Phone: 800-443-5853
Fax: 425-446-5116
Email: fluke-info@fluke.com
www.fluke.com

Filtration & Membrane Technology, Inc.,


8342 Silvan Wind, Houston, TX 77040
Phone: 713-870-1120
Fax: 713-422-2533
Email: fmt-houston@att.net
www.fmt-houston.com

Fluke Thermography, P.O. Box 9090,


Everett, WA 98206
Phone: 503-679-8834
Fax: 530-918-9020
Email: flukethermography@msn.com
www.fluke.com/thermography

Flexco, 2525 Wisconsin Ave., Downers


Grove, IL 60543
Phone: 800-541-8028
Fax: 800-225-4833
Email: info@flexco.com
www.flexco.com

Fluor Enterprises Inc., 47 Discovery,


Irvine, CA 92618
Phone: 864-281-4400
Fax: 949-349-2653
Email: christine.devlaming@fluor.com
www.fluor.com

Fuel Tech Inc., 27601 Bella Vista


Parkway, Warrenville, IL 60555
Phone: 800-666-9688
Fax: 630-845-4502
Email: info@ftek.com
www.ftek.com
See our ad on p. 13

FLEXIM AMERICAS Corporation, 250-V


Executive Dr., Edgewood, NY 11717
Phone: 631-492-2300
Fax: 631-492-2117
Email: usinfo@flexim.com
www.flexim.com

FMC Corporation, 1735 Market St.,


Philadelphia, PA 19103
Phone: 215-299-6208
Fax: 215-299-6387
Email: russ.leets@fmcti.com
www.fmc.com

Fujikin of America Inc, 4 Alsan Way,


Little Ferry, NJ 07643
Phone: 201-641-1119
Fax: 201-641-1137
Email: bbeirne@fujikin.com
www.fujikin.com

Flowrox Inc., 808 Barkwood Court Suite


N, Linthicum, MD 21090
Phone: 410-636-2250
Email: todd.loudin@flowrox.com
www.flowrox.com

Forney Corporation, 3405 Wiley Post


Rd., Carrollton, TX 75006
Phone: 972-458-6100
Fax: 972-458-6195
Email: sales@forneycorp.com
www.forneycorp.com

Furnace Mineral Products Inc., 37 Sandiford Dr. Unit 209, Stouffville, Ontario
L4A 7X5, Canada
Phone: 905-640-1669
Email: aliberatore@fmpcoatings.com
www.fmpcoatings.com

www.powermag.com

Freudenberg Filtration Technologies KG,


Hoehnerweg 2-4, Weinheim, 69465,
Germany
Phone: +49 6201 80-6264
Fax: +49 6201 88-6299
Email: viledon@freudenberg-filter.com
www.freudenberg-filter.com
Frontier Industrial Corp, 26 Mississippi
St., Suite 400, Buffalo, NY 14203
Phone: 716-447-7587
Fax: 716-447-7593
Email: rzuchlewski@fic-services.com
www.fic-services.com

POWER December 2011

Fusion Babbitting Co. Inc, 4540 W.


Burnham St., Milwaukee, WI 53219
Phone: 800-613-5118
Fax: 414-645-6606
Email: mmckindley@sbcglobal.net
www.fusionbabbitting.com

G
GAI Consultants, Inc., 385 East Waterfront Dr., Homestead, PA 15120-5005
Phone: 412-476-2000
Email: r.houston@gaiconsultants.com
www.gaiconsultants.com
Gallagher Security Management Systems,
4305 St Johns Pkwy, Sanford, FL 32771
Phone: 407-302-4055
Fax: 407-302-4955
Email: toml@gallaghersms.com
www.gallaghersms.com
GARD Specialists Co., Inc., P.O. Box
157, Eagle River, WI 54521
Phone: 715-479-9365
Fax: 715-479-9269
Email: suem@gardspecialists.com
www.gardspecialists.com

GE Energy, 1 River Rd., Bldg 2-609,


Schenectady, NY 12345
Phone: 518-385-2231
Email: Joy.zimberlin@ge.com
www.gepower.com/energyconsulting
GEA Power Cooling, Inc. - Headquarters,
143 Union Blvd. Suite 400, Lakewood,
CO 80228
Phone: 303-987-4014
Fax: 303-987-0101
Email: mary.mcculley@geapowercooling.com
www.geapowercooling.com
GEDA USA, LLC, P.O. Box 752086, Houston, Texas 77275
Phone: 713-621-7272
Fax: 713-621-7279
Email: herb.calles@gedausa.com
www.gedausa.com.
General Monitors, 26776 Simpatica
Circle, Lake Forest, CA 92630
Email: info@generalmonitors.com
www.generalmonitors.com

Gardner Denver, 1800 Gardner Expwy,


Quincy, IL 62305
Phone: 217-222-5400
Fax: 217-228-8243
Email: maggie@gardnerdenver.com
www.gardnerdenver.com

General Physics Corporation, 6095


Marshalee Dr., Suite 300, Elkridge,
MD 21075
Phone: 410-379-3600
Fax: 410-540-5304
Email: energyservices@gpworldwide.com
www.energy.gpworldwide.com
See our ad on p. 7

Gas Equipment Company Inc, 11616


Harry Hines Blvd., Dallas, TX 75229
Phone: 888-467-4919
Fax: 972-620-4142
Email: rnichols@gasequipment.com
www.gasequipment.com

Georg Fischer Piping Systems Ltd,


Ebnatstrasse 111, Schaffhausen, 8201,
Schaffhausen, Switzerland
Phone: 0041 52 631 3909
Email: sanjay.patel@georgfischer.com
www.piping.georgfischer.com

Gas Turbine World, 654 Hillside Rd.,


Fairfield, CT 06824
Phone: 203-226-0003
Fax: 203-226-0061
Email: publications.grp@snet.net
www.gtwbooks.com

Geospatial Corporation, 229 Howes Run


Rd., Sarver, PA 16055
Phone: 724-353-3400
Email: info@geospatialcorporation.com
www.geospatialcorporation.com

GC3 Specialty Chemicals, Inc., 733


Heights Blvd., Houston, TX 77007
Phone: 713-802-1761
Fax: 713-869-0680
Email: spress@gc3.com
www.gc3.com

December 2011 POWER

GERB Vibration Control Systems, 1950


Ohio St., Lisle, IL 60532
Phone: 630-724-1660
Fax: 630-724-1664
Email: gerbusa@gerb.com
www.gerb.com

www.powermag.com

Global Training Solutions Inc, P.O. Box


26067, 3163 Winston Churchill Blvd.,
Mississauga, ON L5L 5W7, Canada
Phone: 416-806-5777
Email: info@globaltrainingsolutions.ca
www.globaltrainingsolutions.ca
Golden Specialty Inc., 931 Seaco Ct.
P.O. Box 1898, Deer Park, TX 77536
Phone: 281-476-9898
Fax: 281-476-9876
Email: kwayne1@goldenspecialty.com
www.goldenspecialty.com

COMPANY DIRECTORY

COMPANY DIRECTORY

Goodway Technologies Corp, 420 West


Ave., Stamford, CT 06902
Phone: 800-243-7932
Fax: 203-359-9601
Email: kmarko@goodway.com
www.goodway.com
GOTAR Technologies inc., 1101, boulevard
des Chutes, Quebec, QC G1E 6B4, Canada
Phone: 418-661-6691
Fax: 418-661-0086
Email: egosselin@gotar.com
www.gotar.com
Grace Industries, Inc., 305 Bend Hill
Rd., Fredonia, PA 16124
Phone: 410-286-2401
Fax: 410-286-2410
Email: tlenzi@graceindustries.com
www.graceindustries.com
Graycor, One Graycor Dr., Homewood, IL
60430
Phone: 708-206-0500
Fax: 708-206-0505
Email: melissa_garcia@graycor.com
www.graycor.com
Great Lakes Solutions, A Chemtura Business, 1801 U.S. Highway 52 W, West
Lafayette, IN 47906
Phone: 765-497-6332
Fax: 765-497-6060
Email: amy.lamott@chemtura.com
www.greatlakes.com
Greenbank/CBP, 185 Plumpton Ave.,
Washington, PA 15301
Phone: 724-229-1180
Fax: 724-229-1185
Email: halulko@cbpengineering.com
www.cbpengineering.com

121

COMPANY DIRECTORY

COMPANY DIRECTORY
Grindex Pumps, 18524 81st Ave., Tinley
Park, IL 60487
Phone: 708-532-9988
Fax: 708-532-8767
Email: deb.delbovo@grindex.com
www.grindex.com/us
GSE Systems, Inc, 1332 Londontown
Blvd., Suite 200, Sykesville, MD 21784
Phone: 410-970-7800
Fax: 410-970-7995
Email: info@gses.com
www.gses.com
GSI - Generator Services Intl, Inc, 1865
Scott Futrell Dr., Charlotte, NC 28208
Phone: 704-399-5422
Fax: 704-399-5983
Email: ljohnson@gsionsite.com
www.gsionsite.com
GulfRim Navigation, P.O. Box 1214, Abbeville, LA 70511
Phone: 877-893-0789
Fax: 337-893-6256
Email: larry@gulfrim.com
www.gulfrim.com

H
H2O Innovation USA, Inc, 6840 Shingle
Creek Parkway Suite 20, Brooklyn Center, MN 55430
Phone: 763-566-8961
Fax: 763-566-8972
Email: dale.iverson@h2oinnovation.com
www.h2oinnovation.com
Haberberger, Incorporated, 9744 Pauline Place, Saint Louis, MO 63116
Phone: 314-631-3324
Fax: 314-631-2751
Email: stevejh@haberbergerinc.com
www.haberbergerinc.com
Hach, P.O. Box 389, Loveland, CO 80539
Phone: 866-450-4248
Fax: 970-669-2932
Email: orders@hach.com
www.hach.com

122

Hadek Protective Systems, Foster Plaza


5, 651 Holiday Dr., Pittsburgh, PA
15220
Phone: 412-204-0028
Fax: 412-204-0039
Email: sales@hadek.com
www.hadek.com
Haefely Test AG, Birsstrasse 300, Basel,
04052, Switzerland
Phone: +41 61 373 4111
Fax: +41 61 373 49 12
Email: sales@haefely.com
www.haefely.com
Hafco Vac, 301 Greenwood Ave., Midland Park, NJ 07432
Phone: 201-447-0433
Fax: 201-447-1065
Email: basil@hafcovac.com
www.hafcovac.com
Hamon Custodis, Inc., 58 East Main St.,
Somerville, NJ 08876
Phone: 908-333-2000
Fax: 908-333-2151
Email: info.hcusus@hamonusa.com
www.hamoncustodis.com
Hanson Pressure Pipe, 1003 N. MacArrthur Blvd., Grand Prairie, TX 75050
Phone: 614-440-5441
Fax: 614-766-3856
Email: jeff.killin@hanson.com
www.hansonpressurepipe.com
Hanson Professional Services Inc., 1525
South Sixth St., Springfield, IL 62703
Phone: 217-747-9367
Fax: 217-788-2503
Email: belliott@hanson-inc.com
www.hanson-inc.com
Harper Industries, 151 E. Hwy 160,
Harper, KS 67058
Phone: 620-896-7381
Fax: 620-896-7129
Email: angie@harperindustries.com
www.harperindustries.com
Harrington Hoists, Inc., 401 West End
Ave., Manheim, PA 17545
Phone: 800-233-3010
Fax: 717-665-2861
E-mail: customerservice@harringtonhoists.com
www.harringtonhoists.com
www.powermag.com

Heyl & Patterson,Inc., P.O. Box 36,


Pittsburgh, PA 15230
Phone: 412-788-9810
Fax: 412-788-9822
Email: info@heylpatterson.com
www.heylpatterson.com

Hitachi Power Systems America Ltd.,


645 Martinsville Rd., Basking Ridge,
NJ 07920
Phone: 908-605-2800
Fax: 908-604-6211
Email: power.info@hal.hitachi.com
www.hitachipowersystems.us
See our ad on cover 3
HOERBIGER Compression Technology,
1358 West Newport Center Dr., Deerfield
Beach, FL 33442
Phone: 954-246-1351
Fax: 954-422-9872
Email: info-americas@hoerbiger.com
www.hoerbiger.com
Hoffmann, Inc, 6001 49th St.S, Muscatine, IA 52761
Phone: 563-263-4733
Fax: 563-263-0919
Email: hoffmann@hoffmanninc.com
www.hoffmanninc.com
Hoist-Co, Inc., P.O. Box 27, Baldwin
City, KS 66006
Phone: 423-332-6222
Fax: 423-332-6222
Email: tokeefe@hoistco.com
www.hoistco.com
Holleman Hydroseeding Service, 1041 S
Water Ave., Gallatin, TN 37066
Phone: 615-451-7440
Fax: 615-451-7441
Email: scott@hollemanhydroseeding.com
www.hollemanhydroseeding.com
Holtec International, 555 Lincoln Dr.
West, Marlton, NJ 08053
Phone: 856-797-0900
Fax: 856-797-1931
Email: d.bell@holtec.com
www.holtecinternational.com

POWER December 2011

Homrich Wrecking, 200 Matlin Rd.,


Carelton, MI 48117
Phone: 734-654-9800
Fax: 734-654-9116
Email: jeffr@homrichinc.com
www.homrichinc.com
HOPPY Industrial Co., Ltd., 74, Lane
255, Ren-Ai St., San-Chung District,
New Taipei City, 00241, Taiwan
Phone: 886-2-2985-3001
Fax: 886-2-2985-5490
Email: csw@hoppy.com.tw
www.hoppy.com.tw
Horiba Instruments, Inc., 17671 Armstrong Ave., Irvine, CA 92614
Phone: 949-250-4811
Fax: 949-250-0924
Email: cleanair@horiba.com
www.environ.hii.horiba.com
Horn Industrial Services, P.O. Box 1905,
Owensboro, KY 42302
Phone: 270-683-6564
Fax: 270-684-4056
Email: clay.ellis@titancontracting.com
www.titancontracting.com
Hose Master Inc, 1233 East 222nd St.,
Cleveland, OH 44117
Phone: 216-481-2020
Fax: 216-481-7557
Email: musgraveca@hosemaster.com
www.hosemaster.com
Houston Dynamic Service, Inc., 8150
Lawndale, Houston, TX 77012
Phone: 713-928-6200
Fax: 713-928-2903
Email: Tom@houstondynamic.com
www.houstondynamic.com
Hoyt Electrical Instrument Works Inc.,
23 Meter St., Penacook, NH 03303
Phone: 603-753-6321
Fax: 603-753-9592
Email: sales@hoytmeter.com
www.hoytmeter.com
HPC Technical Services, 500 Tallevast
Rd. Suite 101, Sarasota, FL 34243
Phone: 941-747-7733
Fax: 941-746-5374
Email: stparker@hpcnet.com
www.hpcnet.com

December 2011 POWER

Hurst Technologies Corp., 4005 Technology Dr., Suite 1000, Angleton, TX 77515
Phone: 979-849-5068
Fax: 979-849-6663
Email: bobb@hursttech.com
www.hursttech.com

Hydro Dyne Inc., P.O. Box 318, 225


Wetmore Ave. S.E., Massillon, OH
44648-0318
Phone: 330-832-5076
Fax: 330-832-8163
Email: howard@hydrodyneinc.com
www.hydrodyneinc.com
Hydro, Inc., 834 W. Madison, Chicago,
IL 60607
Phone: 312-738-3000
Fax: 312-738-4182
Email: lkoziol@hydroinc.com
www.hydroinc.com
Hytest Safety Footwear, 9341 Courtland
Dr., Rockford, MI 49351
Phone: 616-866-6259
Fax: 616-866-7617
Email: maatmajo@www.inc.com
www.hytest.com
Hyundai Heavy Industries Co., 140-2
Kye-Dong, Chongro-Ku, Seoul, 110793, South Korea
Phone: 822-746-7576
Fax: 922-746-7548
Email: mark@hhi.co.kr
www.hyundai-elec.com/eng/

I
IAEA Careers: Argonne National Labs,
Intl Program Office 9700 S Cass Ave.,
Argonne, IL 60439
Phone: 630-252-9378
Fax: 630-252-3193
Email: zordan@dep.anl.gov
www.dep.anl.gov
IDE Technologies, Hamatechet St., Hasharon Industrial Park, P.O. Box 5016,
Kadima, - 60920, Israel
Phone: +972-9-8929-777
Fax: +972-9-8929-715
Email: shlomir@ide-tech.com
www.ide-tech.com

www.powermag.com

IFS North America, Inc., 200 South


Executive Dr., Brookfield, WI 53005
Phone: 262-317-7480
Fax: 262-317-7401
Email: melissa.visel@ifsworld.com
www.ifsworld.com
See our ad on p. 85
igus Inc., P.O. Box 14349, East Providence, RI 02914
Phone: 401-438-2200
Fax: 401-438-7270
Email: sales@igus.com
www.igus.com

COMPANY DIRECTORY

COMPANY DIRECTORY

Illinois Water Technologies, 5443


Swanso Court, Roscoe, IL 61073
Phone: 815-636-8884
Fax: 815-636-8883
Email: mattk@illinoiswatertech.com
www.illinoiswatertech.com
ILT-RES, LLC, M.Pokrovskaya st. 18,
of. 312, Kostina st. 2, of 132, Nizhniy
Novgorod, 603000, Nizhniy Novgorod,
Russian Federation
Phone: +7 906 366 12 78
Fax: +7 831 433 77 14
Email: alexander.elin@ilt-res.com
www.ilt-res.com
Imbibitive Technologies, 8 Hiscott St.
#1, St. Catherine, ON L2R 1C6, Canada
Phone: 888-843-2323
Fax: 877-439-2323
Email: jcp@imbiberbeads.com
www.imbiberbeads.com
Imeco Limited, Imeco House, Budge
Budge Trunk Road, Maheshtalla, Dakghar,
Kolkata, 700141, West Bengal, India
Phone: 913366146614
Fax: 913366146666
Email: lda@imecolimited.com
www.imecolimited.com
Imerys, 100 Mansell Court East, Roswell, GA 30076
Phone: 770-645-3490
Fax: 770-645-3460
Email: mrollins@imerys.com
www.imerys.com
Indeck Power Equipment Co., 1111 Willis Ave., Wheeling, IL 60090
Phone: 847-541-8300
Fax: 847-541-9984
Email: mwillets@indeck-power.com
www.indeck.com

123

COMPANY DIRECTORY

COMPANY DIRECTORY
Independent Turbine Consulting, LLC,
215 Gilead Rd, Ste 200A, Huntersville,
NC 28078
Phone: 804-397-9411
Email: Independent@TurbineFieldService.com
www.TurbineFieldService.com
InduMar Products, inc., 3355 West Alabama, Suite 110, Houston, TX 77098
Phone: 713-977-4100
Fax: 713-977-4164
Email: stopit@indumar.com
www.indumar.com
Industrial Information Resources , 2277
Plaza Dr., Sugarland, TX 77479
Phone: 800-762-3361
Fax: 713-266-9306
Email: asolis@industrialinfo.com
www.industrialinfo.com
Industrial Insite, LLC, P.O. Box 286,
Osseo, MN 55369
Phone: 763-753-7595
Email: kpitman@industrialinsite.com
www.Industrialinsite.com
Industrial Marketing Systems, P.O. Box
890, Twin Peaks, CA 92391-0890
Phone: 909-337-2238
Fax: 909-336-5293
Email: info@imswe.com
www.imswe.com
Industrial Testing Laboratory Services,
LLC, 635 Alpha Dr., Pittsburgh, PA
15238
Phone: 412-963-1900
Fax: 412-963-1926
Email: marketing@itls.com
www.itls.com
Innoplast Inc., 10120 Gottschalk Parkway, Chagrin Falls, OH 44023
Phone: 440-543-8660
Fax: 440-543-8661
Email: blong@innoplast.com
www.innoplast.com
Innovative Energy Inc., 556 Leffingwell
Ave., Kirkwood, MO 63122
Phone: 636-600-1230
Fax: 636-600-1231
www.innovativeenergyinc.com

124

Innovative Steam Technologies, 549


Conestoga Blvd., Carbridge, ON N1R
7P4, Canada
Phone: 519-740-0757
Fax: 519-740-2051
Email: yservellon@otsg.com
www.otsg.com
Instrument Transformer Equipment Corp
(ITEC), P.O. Box 23088, Charlotte, NC
28227
Phone: 704-282-4331
Fax: 704-283-3017
Email: sales@itec-ctvt.com
www.itec-ctvt.com
International Chimney Corp, 55 S Long
St., Williamsville, NY 14221
Phone: 716-634-3967
Fax: 716-634-3983
Email: gms@internationalchimney.com
www.internationalchimney.com
International Cooling Tower, 3310-93
St., Edmonton, AB T6N 1C7, Canada
Phone: 780-469-4900
Fax: 780-489-5858
Email: jolson@ictower.com
www.ictower.com
International Tank Service, Inc., 1085
S. Metcalf St., Lima, OH 45804
Phone: 419-223-8251
Fax: 419-227-4590
Email: butch@itstank.com
www.itstank.com

J
J Custom Supply, Inc, 10013 Mammoth,
Baton Rouge, LA 70814
Phone: 225-272-2210
Fax: 225-272-2223
Email: robert@jcustom.com
www.jcustom.com
Jamko Technical Solutions, Inc., 932
Sohn Alloway Rd., Lyons, NY 14489
Phone: 315-871-4420
Fax: 315-871-4430
Email: dean.bailey@jamkocorp.com
www.jamkocorp.com
Janus Fire Systems, 1102 Rupcich Dr.,
Crown Point, IN 46307
Phone: 219-663-1600
Fax: 219-663-4562
Email: fhildebrandt@janusfiresystems.
com
www.janusfiresystems.com
www.powermag.com

Jeffrey Rader Corporation, 398 Willis


Rd., Woodruff, SC 29388
Phone: 864-476-7523
E-mail: buster@penncrusher.com
www.jeffreyrader.com
See our ad on p. 94
Jiangsu High Hope International Group
Co. Ltd, High Hope Mansion, 91 Baixia
Rd., Nanjing, 210008, China
Phone: 86-25-84691037
Fax: 86-025-84691038
Email: hhyp@high-hope.com
www.high-hope.com
Johnson Industries, 101 Pike Fork Rd.,
Pikeville, KY 41501
Phone: 606-639-2029
Fax: 606-639-0259
Email: rogerm@johnsonindustries.com
www.johnsonindustries.com
Johnson Matthey Catalysts LLC, 1121
Alderman Drive, Suite 204, Alpharetta,
GA 30005
Phone: 678-341-7521
Fax: 678-341-7509
Email: bruce.gobbel@jmusa.com
ect.jmcatalysts.com
Jonas, Inc, 4313 Nebraska Court,
Pomfret, MD 20675
Phone: 301-934-5605
Fax: 301-934-5606
Email: jonasinc@steamcycle.com
www.steamcycle.com

K
Kafko Intl. Ltd., 3555 W. Howard,
Skokie, IL 60175
Phone: 800-528-0334
Fax: 847-763-0334
Email: rmorgando@kafkointl.com
www.oileater.com
Kanawha Scales & Systems, 1910 Dixie
Ave., Fairmont, WV 26554
Phone: 304-755-8321
Fax: 304-755-3327
Email: mcook@kanawhascales.com
www.kanawhascales.com
Karl Storz Endoscopy, Mittelstrasse 8,
Tuttlingen, 78532, Germany
Phone: 33628750510
Email: kdaouadi@karlstorz.fr
www.karlstorz.com

POWER December 2011

Kawasaki Gas Turbines-Americas, 8829


North Sam Houston Pkwy W, Houston,
TX 77064
Phone: 281-970-3255
Fax: 281-970-6465
www.kawasakigasturbines.com
KE-Burgmann, 10035 Prospect Ave.
Suite 202, Santee, CA 92071
Phone: 619-562-6083
Fax: 619-562-0636
Email: kat@keb-ejs.com
www.keb-ejs.com
Kiewit/TIC, 9401 Renner Blvd.,
Lenexa, KS 66219
Phone: 913-928-7234
Fax: 913-928-7734
Email: andrea.albers@kiewit.com
www.kiewit.com
See our ad on p. 25
KINDER MORGAN, 500 Dallas, Houston,
TX 77002
Phone: 713-369-8811
Fax: 713-369-9375
Email: derek_tatum@kindermorgan.com
www.kindermorgan.com
Kingsbury Repair & Service Div., 3615
Davisville Rd., Hatboro, PA 19040
Phone: 215-956-0565
Fax: 215-956-9027
Email: lmf@kingsbury.com
www.kingsbury.com
Kipper Tool Company, 2375 Murphy
Boulevard, Gainesville, GA 30504
Phone: 678-989-1395
Fax: 770-532-4916
Email: joe@kippertool.com
www.kippertool.com

Knight Pisold Ltd., 1400-750 West Pender St., Vancouver, BC V6C 2T8, Canada
Phone: 604-685-0543
Fax: 604-685-0147
Email: vancouver@knightpiesold.com
www.knightpiesold.com

Laboratory Testing Inc., 2331 Topaz Dr.,


Hatfield, PA 19440
Phone: 800-219-9095
Fax: 800-219-9096
Email: sales@labtesting.com
www.labtesting.com

KnightHawk Engineering, 17625 El


Camino Real #412, Houston, TX 77058
Phone: 281-282-9200
Fax: 281-282-9333
Email: dlewis@knighthawk.com
www.knighthawk.com

Laidig Systems, Inc., 14535 Draggon


Train, Mishawaka, IN 46544
Phone: 574-256-0204
Fax: 574-256-5575
Email: johnschini@laidig.com
www.laidig.com

Kobelco Compressors America, Inc.,


1415 Louisiana, Suite 4111, Houston,
TX 77002
Phone: 713-655-0015
Fax: 713-982-8450
Email: raquel.vasquez@kobelco-kca.com
www.kobelcocompressors.com

LAP Power Engineering, 800 Village


Walk, #237, Guilford, CT 06437
Phone: 203-464-9123
Fax: 203-488-3439
Email: lap.power.engineering@comcast.
net

Komline-Sanderson, 12 Holland Ave.,


P.O. Box 257, Peapack, NJ 07977
Phone: 908-234-1000
Fax: 908-234-9487
Email: info@komline.com
www.komline.com
KSB, Inc, 4415 Sarellen Rd., Richmond,
VA 23231
Phone: 804-565-8353
Fax: 804-226-6961
Email: sheinly@ksbusa.com
www.ksbusa.com
K-Tek International, 9755 SW Commerce
Circle Suite B2, Wilsonville, OR 97070
Phone: 503-624-0315
Fax: 503-624-0735
Email: kevin@ktekintl.com
www.ktekintl.com

Kirk Key Interlock Company, 211 Wetmore Ave. S.E., Massillon, OH 44646
Phone: 330-833-8223
Fax: 330-833-1528
Email: sean@kirkkey.com
www.kirkkey.com

L&S Electric Inc, 5101 Mesker St.,


Schofield, WI 54476
Phone: 715-241-3262
Fax: 715-241-3263
Email: dmanney@lselectric.com
www.lselectric.com

Kleentek, 4440 Creek Rd., Cincinnati,


OH 45242
Phone: 800-252-4647
Fax: 513-891-4171
Email: info@kleentek.com
www.kleentek.com

L.R. Kimball, 615 W. Highland Ave.,


Ebensburg, PA 15931
Phone: 814-472-7700
Fax: 814-472-7712
Email: morgan.sava@lrkimball.com
www.lrkimball.com

December 2011 POWER

www.powermag.com

COMPANY DIRECTORY

COMPANY DIRECTORY

Larox Flowsys, Inc., 808 Barkwood Ct.


Suite N, Linthicum, MD 21090
Phone: 401-636-2250
Fax: 410-381-4490
Email: todd.loudin@larox.us
www.larox.us
Layne Christensen, W229 N5005 Du
Plainville Rd., Pewaukee, WI 53072
Phone: 262-246-4646
Fax: 262-246-4784
Email: dosgood@laynechristensen.com
www.laynechristensen.com
LCR Electronics, 9 South Forest Ave.,
Norristown, PA 19401
Phone: 610-278-0840
Fax: 610-278-0935
Email: sales@lcr-inc.com
www.lcr-inc.com
Lectrodryer, 135 Quality Dr., Richmond,
KY 40475
Phone: 859-624-2091
Fax: 859-623-2436
Email: abell@lectrodryer.com
www.lectrodryer.com
LEDtronics, Inc., 23105 Kashiwa CT,
Torrance, CA 90505
Phone: 310-534-1505
Fax: 310-534-1424
Email: jpapanier@ledtronics.com
www.LEDtronics.com
Lenox Instrument Company, Inc., 265
Andrews Rd., Trevose, PA 19053
Phone: 215-322-9990
Fax: 215-322-6126
Email: sales@lenoxinst.com
www.lenoxinst.com
125

COMPANY DIRECTORY

COMPANY DIRECTORY
Life Cycle Engineering, 4360 Corporate
Rd., Charleston, SC 29405
Phone: 843-744-7110
Fax: 843-725-1603
Email: mshomo@lce.com
www.lce.com
Lift-It Manufacturing Company, Inc,
4780 Corona Ave., Los Angeles, CA 90058
Phone: 323-582-6076
Fax: 323-587-1630
Email: mgelskey@aol.com
www.lift-it.com
Lincoln Electric, 22801 Saint Clair Ave.,
Cleveland, OH 44117
Phone: 216-383-2576
Fax: 216-383-8381
Email: scott_skrjanc@lincolnelectric.com
www.lincolnelectric.com

LumaSense Technologies, 3301 Leonard


Ct., Santa Clara, CA 95054
Phone: 906-370-0232
Fax: 408-727-1600
Email: j.coponen@lumasenseinc.com
www.lumasenseinc.com
LYNN Engineered Systems LLC, 28835 N.
Herky Dr. Suite 103, Lake Bluff, IL 60044
Phone: 847-549-8900
Fax: 847-549-8901
Email: ned@lynnengineeredsystems.com
www.lynnengineeredsystems.com

Lineal Recruiting Services, 46 Copper


Kettle Rd., Trumbull, CT 06611
Phone: 203 386-1091
Fax: 203 386-9788
Email: lisalineal@lineal.com
www.lineal.com

M.E.A. Inc, 2600 American Lane, Elk


Grove Village, IL 60007
Phone: 847-766-9040
Fax: 847-350-1951
Email: cnush@meaincorporated.com
www.meaincorporated.com

LINE-X Protective Coastings, 2981 East


White Star Ave., Anaheim, CA 92806
Phone: 714-380-5045
Fax: 714-632-5757
Email: twigington@linexmail.com
www.linex.com

M+P Labs, Inc., 2210 Technology Dr.,


Schenectady, NY 12301
Phone: 518-382-0082
Fax: 518-382-1182
Email: info@the-mandp-lab.com
www.the-mandp-lab.com

LobePro Rotary Lobe Pumps, 2610 Sidney Lanier Dr., Brunswick, GA 31525
Phone: 912-466-0304
Fax: 912-466-0086
Email: eddieo@lobepro.com
www.lobepro.com

Magellan Professional Solutions Inc,


109-G Gainsborough Sq. #744, Chesapeake, VA 23320
Phone: 757-549-1880
Fax: 866-861-9647
Email: dlong@magellan-ps.com
www.magellan-ps.com

Logistics Planning Services, 1140


Centre Point Dr. Suite 100, Mendota
Heights, MN 55120
Phone: 651-789-4920
Fax: 651-552-4910
Email: bkutka@shiplps.com
www.shiplps.com

Mainsaver, 15150 Ave. of Science, San


Diego, CA 92128
Phone: 858-674-8700
Email: Mainsaver.info@mainsaver.com
www.mainsaver.com

LUDECA, INC., 1425 NW 88th Ave.,


Doral, FL 33172
Phone: 305-591-8935
Fax: 305-591-1537
Email: info@luceca.com
www.ludeca.com

126

Lufft USA, 123 Gray Ave., Santa Barbara, CA 93101


Phone: 805-453-9668
Email: apattison@abbeon.com
www.lufftusa.com

Mammoet USA North, Inc., 2130 Frontage Rd., Rockdale, IL 60436


Phone: 815-725-5603
Fax: 815-725-5604
Email: dan.wrocinski@mammoet.com
www.mammoet.com

www.powermag.com

MAN Turbo Inc USA, 2901 Wilcrest Dr.,


Suite 345, Houston, TX 77042
Phone: 713-780-4200
Fax: 713-780-2848
Email: powergeneration@manturbo-us.com
www.manturbo.com
Management Resources Group, Inc., 555
Heritage Rd. Suite 2, Southbury, CT 06488
Phone: 203-264-0500
Fax: 203-264-0768
Email: carolanj@mrgsolutions.com
www.mrgsolutions.com
Margan Inc., 330 Rayford Rd. Suite 412,
Spring, TX 77386
Phone: 936-273-1144
Fax: 936-273-1148
Email: rw@margan.com
www.margan.com
Marietta Silos LLC, 2417 Waterford Rd.,
Marrietta, OH 45750
Phone: 740-373-2822
Fax: 740-376-2635
Email: dennis@mariettasilos.com
www.mariettasilos.com
Martin Engineering, 1 Martin Place,
Neponset, IL 61345
Phone: 309-594-2384
Fax: 309-594-2432
Email: chelseac@martin-eng.com
www.martin-eng.com
Masaba Mining Equipment Inc., 1617
317th St., Vermillion, SD 57069
Phone: 605-624-9555
Fax: 605-624-8997
Email: jim.peterson@masabainc.com
www.masabainc.com
Massaging Insoles By WaveWalkers, 363
Robincrest Lane, Lindenhurst, IL 60046
Phone: 847-712-2127
Fax: 847-265-0405
Email: dlundgren@massaginginsoles.com
www.massaginginsoles.com
MasseReaction, Inc., P.O. Box 1063,
Hobe Sound, FL 33475
Phone: 772-240-8745
Fax: 772-325-5771
Email: art@massereaction.com
www.massereaction.com
Master Bond, Inc., 134 Hobart St.,
Hackensack, NJ 07601
Phone: 201-343-8983
Fax: 201-343-2132
Email: main@masterbond.com
www.masterbond.com

POWER December 2011

mda_logo_Tran Background_BlackLine.pdf

8/30/2010

11:20:32 AM

CM

MY

CY

Matrix Service, 5100 East Skelly Dr. #


700, Tulsa, OK 74135
Phone: 918-838-8822
Fax: 918-838-0782
Email: dstarcher@matrixservice.com
www.matrixservice.com
See our ad on p. 45
MAVEN POWER, LLC, 134 Vintage Park
Blvd., Suite A-101, Houston, TX 77070
Phone: 832-552-9225
Fax: 832-460-3760
Email: info@mavenpower.com
www.mavenpower.com
McDermott Brothers Products, 2435 W.
Union St., Allentown, PA 18104
Phone: 610-432-6188
Fax: 610-432-5690
Email: tnunn@iso-con.com
www.iso-con.com
McGill AirClean LLC, 1777 Refugee Rd.,
Columbus, OH 43207-2119
Phone: 614-829-1200
Fax: 614-445-8759
Email: sales@mcgillairclean.com
www.mcgillairclean.com
MDF Cable Bus Systems, 4465 Limaburg
Rd., Hebron, KY 41048
Phone: 888-808-1655
Fax: 859-586-6572
Email: mmiller@mdfbus.com
www.mdfbus.com
Measurement Specialties Inc, 1000
Lucas Way, Hampton, VA 23666
Phone: 800-678-7226
Fax: 757-766-4297
Email: Denise.Topping@meas-spec.com
www.meas-spec.com
Mechanical & Ceramic Solutions, Inc.,
730 Superior St., Building 16, Carnegie,
PA 15106
Phone: 412-429-8991
Fax: 412-429-8766
Email: kevinb@mcs-pa.com
www.mcs-pa.com

December 2011 POWER

CMY

Mechanical Dynamics & Analysis, Ltd.,


19 British American Blvd., Latham, NY
12110
Phone: 518-399-3616
Fax: 518-399-3929
Email: smclenithan@MDAturbines.com
www.MDAturbines.com
Membrana, 13800 S Lakes Dr.,Charlotte,
NC 28273
Phone: 704-587-8888
Fax: 704-587-8610
E-mail: info@liqui-cel.com
www.liqui-cel.com
MEN Micro Inc, 24 North Main St.,
Ambler, PA 19002
Phone: 215-542-9575
Fax: 215-542-9577
Email: Stephen.Cunha@menmicro.com
www.menmicro.com
Mercer International Oil Water Separators, P.O. Box 540, Mendham, NJ 07945
Phone: 973-543-9000
Email: aellman@mercerows.com
www.oil-water-separators.com
Mesa, 6030 East Lake Rd., Auburn, NY
13021
Phone: 315-704-0004
Fax: 315-704-0005
Email: jmoore@mesainc.com
www.mesainc.com
Metabo Corporation, 1231 Wilson Dr.,
West Chester, PA 19380
Phone: 800-638-2264
Fax: 800-638-2261
Email: abrogan@metabousa.com
www.metabousa.com
Metso Minerals Industries Inc., 2715
Pleasant Valley Rd., York, PA 17402
Phone: 412-239-5298
Fax: 412-269-5212
Email: bonnie.gall@metso.com
www.metso.com
Mettler-Toledo Thornton, Inc., 36
Middlesex Turnpike, Bedford, MA 01730
Phone: 781-301-8600
Fax: 781-301-8701
Email: craig.lazinsky@mt.com
www.mt.com/thornton

www.powermag.com

Middough Inc., 1901 East 13th St.,


Cleveland, OH 44114
Phone: 216-367-6307
Fax: 216-367-6020
Email: bakapj@middough.com
www.middough.com
Mid-Mountain Materials, Inc., 2385 82nd Ave. SE Suite 100, Mercer Island,
WA 98040
Phone: 800-382-2208
Fax: 206-762-7694
Email: info@mid-mountain.com
www.mid-mountain.com

COMPANY DIRECTORY

COMPANY DIRECTORY

MidWest Generation- EMG, One Financial


Place Suite 3500, Chicago, IL 60436
Phone: 815-207-5908
Fax: 847-599-2265
Email: mnagel@mwgen.com
Midwest Industrial Supply Inc, 1101 3rd
St. SE, Canton, OH 44707
Phone: 330-456-3121
Fax: 330-456-3247
Email: julie.mamula@midwestind.com
www.midwestind.com
Midwest Towers Inc, 6434 Hodges Dr.,
Prairie Village, KS 66208
Phone: 405-224-4622
Fax: 405-224-4625
Email: paul.middleton@midwesttowers.
com
www.midwesttowers.com
Milton Roy, 201 Ivyland Rd., Ivyland,
PA 18974
Phone: 215-441-7848
Fax: 215-441-8620
Email: rdougherty@miltonroy.com
www.miltonroy.com
Mining Media Intl/Coal Handling &
Storage Conference, 8751 East Hampden Ave. Suite B1, Denver, CO 80231
Phone: 713-343-1872
Fax: 303-283-0641
Email: djohnson@mining-media.com
www.mining-media.com
MinTech, P.O. Box 19903, Atlanta, GA
30325
Phone: 404-355-4580
Fax: 404-355-8284
Email: alecia.cofield@momar.com
www.momar.com

127

COMPANY DIRECTORY

COMPANY DIRECTORY
Mitsubishi Power Systems Inc, 100
Colonial Center Pkwy., Lake Mary, FL
32746
Phone: 407-688-6100
www.mpshq.com
See our ad on p. 41

MobileCal, P.O. Box 20195, Wichita, KS


67208
Phone: 866-384-3010
Email: brad@mobilecal.net
www.mobilecal.net

N. B. Harty General Contractors, Inc.,


P.O. Box 188, Dexter, MO 63841
Phone: 573-624-4588
Fax: 573-624-4589
Email: christy@nbharty.com
www.nbharty.com

Moran Iron Works Inc., 11739 M-68


Hwy, P.O. Box 732, Onaway, MI 49765
Phone: 989-733-2011
Fax: 989-733-2371
Email: sales@moraniron.com
www.moraniron.com

NAB, 902-904 Whitehorse Road, Boxhill, 3128, VIC, Australia


Phone: 03-88430397
Fax: 03-88430397
Email: diana.lin@nab.com.au
www.nab.com.au

MOST Mobilization Optimization Stabilization Train, 753 State Ave. Suite 800,
Kansas City, KS 66101
Phone: 800-395-1089
Fax: 913-281-0037
Email: bconnors@mostprograms.com
www.mostprograms.com

NAES Corporation, 1180 NW Maple


St., Suite 200, Issaquah, WA 98027
Phone: 425-961-4700
Fax: 425-961-4646
Email: jeanette.carroll@naes.com
www.naes.com
See our ad on p.93

MPW Industrial Services Inc., 9711


Lancaster Rd. SE, Hebron, OH 43025
Phone: 800-827-8790
Fax: 740-928-8033
Email: swilliams@mpwservices.com
www.mpwservices.com

Nalco Mobotec, 1601 West Diehl Rd.,


Narperville, IL 60563-1198
Phone: 630-305-1714
Fax: 630-305-2505
Email: jcrilley@nalcomobotec.com
www.nalco.com

MTI Power Services, 1020 Broadway St.,


Marseilles, IL 61341
Phone: 815-795-6818
Fax: 815-795-6535
Email: msimundza@jointfield.com
www.mtipowerservices.com

Nash, A Gardner Denver Product, 9


Trefoil Dr., Trumbull, CT 06611
Phone: 203-459-3900
Email: nash@gardnerdenver.com
www.GDNash.com

Multifab Inc. Fabricators, 1200 Elmwood Ave., Sharon Hill, PA 19079


Phone: 610-534-2000
Fax: 610-534-7308
Email: multifabinc@rcn.com
www.multifabinc.com
MWM GmbH, Carl-Benz-Strae 1,
Mannheim, 68167, Baden-Wrttemberg,
Germany
Phone: +49 (0) 621 384 0
Fax: +49 (0) 621 384 8386
Email: info@mwm.net
www.mwm.net

128

Myrex Industries, 9119 Weedy Lane,


Houston, TX 77093
Phone: 713-691-5200
Email: ppatel@myrex.com
www.myrex.com

National Electric Coil, 800 King Ave.,


Columbus, OH 43212
Phone: 360-753-9126
Fax: 614-488-8892
Email: jhutt@national-electric-coil.com
www.national-electric-coil.com
National Heat Exchange Cleaning Corp.,
156 Nulf Dr., Columbiana, OH 44408
Phone: 330-482-0893
Fax: 330-482-0895
Email: jim@nationalheatexchange.com
www.nationalheatexchange.com

www.powermag.com

National Steel City, LLC, 14650 Jib St.,


Plymouth, MI 48170
Phone: 734-459-9515
Fax: 734-459-9543
Email: ryan.rhodes@nsc-us.com
www.nationalsteelcity.com
National Steel Erection, 1115 Industrial
Dr., Owensboro, KY 43202
Phone: 270-926-2534
Fax: 270-683-1960
Email: terry.byrnes@hornhis.com
www.nationalsteelerection.com
NEC Avio Infrared Technologies Co.,
Ltd./SOLTEC Corporation, 12977 Arroyo
St., San Fernando, CA 91340
Phone: 818-365-0800
Fax: 818-365-7839
www.solteccorp.com

Nesco Sales & Rentals, 3112 East State


Rd. 124, Bluffton, IN 46714
Phone: 800-252-0043
Fax: 260-824-6350
Email: sales@nescosales.com
www.nescosales.com
NeuCo, Inc., 33 Union St., 4th Floor,
Boston, MA 02108
Phone: 617-587-3188
Fax: 617-262-4186
Email: levy@neuco.net
www.neuco.net
Nickel Systems, Inc., 138 West 5th St.,
Lansdale, PA 19446
Phone: 215-855-5633
Fax: 215-855-6499
Email: tom@nickel-systems.com
www.nickel-systems.com
NIPSCO, 801 E. 86th St., Merrillville, IN
46410
Phone: 800-464-7726
Fax: 219-873-7203
Email: dwoloch@nisource.com
www.nisource.com

www.nol-tec.com

Nol-Tec Systems, Inc., 425 Apollo Dr.,


Lino Lakes, MN 55014
Phone: 651-780-8600
Fax: 651-780-4400
Email: sales@nol-tec.com
www.nol-tec.com

POWER December 2011

NORD Drivesystems - Getriebebau NORD


GmbH & Co. KG, Rudolf-Diesel-Str. 1,
Bargteheide, 22941, Germany
Phone: +49 4532 401-0
Fax: +49 4532 401-253
Email: info@nord.com
www.nord.com
NORD-LOCK, 1051 Cambridge Dr., Elk
Grove Village, IL 60007
Phone: 877-799-1097
Fax: 224-875-3256
Email: julie.pereyra@nord-lock-inc.com
www.nord-lock.com
North America Industrial Services, Inc.,
1240 Saratoga Rd., Ballston Spa, NY
12020
Phone: 518-885-1820
Fax: 518-885-7638
Email: cspain@naisinc.com
www.naisinc.com
North American Dismantling Services, 380
Lake Nepessing Rd., LaPeer, MI 48446
Phone: 810-664-2888
Fax: 810-664-6053
Email: tseagraves@nadc1.com
www.nadc1.com

Nova Analytical Systems Inc., 1925 Pine


Ave., Niagara Falls, NY 14301
Phone: 800-295-3771
Fax: 716-282-2937
Email: sales@nova-gas.com
www.nova-gas.com
Novinium Cable LIfe Extension, 34110
9th Ave. South, Federal Way, WA 98003
Phone: 206-529-4828
Fax: 206-774-9754
Email: rich.brinton@novinium.com
www.novinium.com
Nuclear News, 555 N. Kensington Ave.,
LaGrange Park, IL 60526
Phone: 708-579-8225
Fax: 708-579-8204
Email: jmosses@ans.org
www.ans.org/pubs/magazines/nn

December 2011 POWER

NWL Transformers, 312 Rising Sun Rd.,


Bordentown, NJ 08505
Phone: 609-298-7300
Fax: 609-298-8235
Email: hherder@nwl.com
www.nwl.com

O
Oak Park Chimney Corporation, 1800
Des Plaines Ave., Forest Park, IL 60130
Phone: 708-383-6589
Fax: 708-386-0848
Email: cwessels@oakparkchimney.com
www.oakparkchimney.com
OILKLEEN, Inc., 1510 River Dr. S.W.,
Suite A, Ruskin, FL 33570
Phone: 813333-6356
Fax: 813-944-2893
Email: paul@oilkleen.com
www.oilkleen.com
OLYMPUS, 48 Woerd Ave. Suite. 105,
Waltham, MA 02453
Phone: 781-419-3625
Fax: 781-419-3980
Email: paula.scordino@olympusndt.com
www.olympus-ims.com
Omaha Standard PALFINGER, 3501 S.
11th St., Council Bluffs, IA 51501-0876
Phone: 800-279-2201
Fax: 712-328-8383
Email: os@omahastd.com
www.omahastd.com
Onset Computer Corporation, 470 MacArthur Blvd., Bourne, MA 02532
Phone: 1-800-LOGGERS
Email: Evan_Lubofsky@onsetcomp.com
www.onsetcomp.com
Orbital Tool Technologies, 6550 Revlon
Dr., Belvidere, IL 61008
Phone: 815-978-2156
Fax: 815-547-3609
Email: mcassidy@orbitaltool.com
www.orbitaltool.com
Orion Instruments LLC, 6646 Complex
Dr., Baton Rouge, LA 70809
Phone: 225-906-2343
Fax: 225-906-2344
Email: jpereira@orioninstruents.com
www.orioninstruments.com

www.powermag.com

Orival Water Filters, 213 S Van Brunt


St., Englewood, NJ 07631
Phone: 201-568-3311
Fax: 201-568-1916
Email: filters@orival.com
www.orival.com

COMPANY DIRECTORY

COMPANY DIRECTORY

Ovivo USA, LLC, 4255 Lake Park Blvd


Suite 100, Salt Lake City, UT 84120
Phone: 801-931-3000
Fax: 801-931-3080
Email: guy.beauchesne@glv.com
www.ewtpower.com

P
PAC, 1855 Olympic Bldv. Suite 165,
Walnut Creek, CA 94596
Phone: 706-691-6662
Fax: 888-852-4412
Email: brad.gerrard@pacpeople.com
www.pacpeople.com
Pacific West Marketing, 31211 Via de
Verde, San Juan Capistrano, CA 92675
Phone: 949-489-2110
Fax: 949-489-2210
Email: ed@pacificwestmarketing.com
www.pacificwestmarketing.com
Paharpur Cooling Towers Ltd, Paharpur
House, 8/1/B, Diamond Harbour Rd.,
Kolkata, 700 027, Kolkata, India
Phone: 91-33-4013 3000
Fax: 91-33-4013 3499
Email: pctccu@paharpur.com
www.paharpur.com
See our ad on p. 55
PALA Interstate, LLC., P.O. Box 15949,
Baton Rouge, LA 70816
Phone: 225-226-7444
Fax: 225-272-5239
Email: joshcoots@palagroup.com
www.palagroup.com
Palfinger North America, P.O. Box 846,
7942 Dorchester Rd., Niagara Falls, ON
L2E 6V6, Canada
Phone: 800-567-1554
Fax: 905-374-1203
Email: info@palfingerna.com
www.palfinger-northamerica.com

129

COMPANY DIRECTORY

COMPANY DIRECTORY
Palmetto Depot Services LLC, 3 Conservation Ct., Savannah, GA 31419
Phone: 912-660-8118
Email: palmettodepot@aol.com

Panglobal Training Systems Ltd.(Publishers of Power Engineering Training


Systems Courseware), 1301 16 Ave. NW,
Calgary, AB T2M 0L4, Canada
Phone: 866-256-8193
Fax: 403-284-8863
Email: info@powerengineering.org
www.powerengineering.org
Paragon Airheater Technologies, 23143
Temescal Canyon Rd., Suite B, Corona,
CA 92883
Phone: 951-277-8035
Fax: 951-277-8031
Email: cturner@paragonairheater.com
www.paragonairheater.com
Parkline Inc., P.O. Box 65, Winfield,
WV 25213
Phone: 800-786-4855
Fax: 304-586-3842
Email: sjarrell@parkline.com
www.parkline.com
See our ad on p. 56
Patriot Solar Group, 1007 Industrial
Ave., Albion, MI 49224
Phone: 517-629-9292
Fax: 517-629-9296
Email: ken.sexton@patriotsolargroup.com
www.patriotsolargroup.com
Pennsylvania Crusher, 600 Abbott Dr.,
Broomall, PA 19008
Phone: 610-544-7200
E-mail: buster@penncrusher.com
www.penncrusher.com
PENTA Industrial Corp., 10276 Bach
Blvd., St. Louis, MO 63132
Phone: 314-878-0143
Fax: 314-878-0166
Email: mmohan@penta.net
www.pentaindustrial.com
Per Se Group, Inc., 310 S Hale St.,
Wheaton, IL 60187
Phone: 630-588-3000
Fax: 630-588-0333
www.PerSeEnergy.com

130

Petro-Valve, 11248 East Hardy


St.,Houston, TX 77093
Phone: 713-676-1212
Fax: 713-467-3876
E-mail: shawnw@petrovalve.com
www.petrovalve.com

Phenix Technologies Inc, 75 Speicher


Dr., Accident, MD 21520
Phone: 301-746-8118
Fax: 301-895-5570
Email: info@phenixtech.com
www.phenixtech.com
Philadelphia Gear Corp, 901 East 8th
Ave. Suite 100, King of Prussia, PA
19406
Phone: 610-337-5425
Fax: 610-337-5637
Email: rfisher@philagear.com
www.philagear.com
PIC Group, Inc, 1165 Northchase
Pkwy, 4th Floor, Marietta, GA 30067
Phone: 770-850-0100
Fax: 770-850-2200
Email: marketing@picworld.com
www.picworld.com
See our ad on p. 27

Pick Heaters, Inc., 730 S. Indiana Ave.,


West Bend, WI 53095
Phone: 262-338-1191
Fax: 262-338-8489
Email: info1@pickheaters.com
www.pickheaters.com
PIP-Process Industry Practices, 3925 West
Braker Lane (R4500), Austin, TX 78759
Phone: 512-232-3040
Fax: 512-473-2968
Email: marketing@pip.org
www.pip.org
Pittsburg Tank & Tower Maintenance Co,
P.O. Box 913, Henderson, KY 42419
Phone: 270-826-9000
Fax: 270-831-7025
Email: kwilkerson@watertank.com
www.watertank.com

www.powermag.com

Plant Professionals, 1851 Albright Rd.,


Montgomery, IL 60538
Phone: 630-844-1300 X220
Fax: 630-844-0064
Email: huntera@benetechusa.com
www.plant-professionals.com
Plastocor Inc, 100 Research Rd., Hingham, MA 02043
Phone: 724-942-0582
Fax: 724-942-0583
Email: jemplastocor@aol.com
www.plastocor.com
Platts, 333 Clay St. Suite. 3800, Houston, TX 77002
Phone: 713-658-3247
Fax: 713-658-3251
Email: naomi_card@platts.com
www.platts.com
Plymouth Tube Co, 29W150 Warrenville
Rd., Warrenville, IL 60555
Phone: 630-393-3550
Fax: 630-393-3551
www.plymouth.com
Polaris Industries, 2100 Highway 555,
Medina, MN 55340
Phone: 763-542-0544
Fax: 763-542-2317
Email: wanda.campbell@polarisind.com
www.polarisind.com
POLARIS Laboratories, 7898 Zionsville
Rd., Indianapolis, IN 46268
Phone: 877-808-3750
Fax: 317-808-3751
Email: sales@polarislabs.com
www.polarislabs.com
Political Robo Calls. GOTV Robocalls,
30150 Telegraph Rd., Bingham Farms,
MI 48025
Phone: 800-962-0126
Email: shaaren@capitolcommunication.com
www.voiceshot.com/public/political.asp
Power & Industrial Services, 95 Washington St., Donora, PA 15033
Phone: 724-379-4477
Fax: 724-379-4408
Email: nshekell@piburners.com
www.piburners.com

POWER December 2011

Power Engineers, 3940 Glenbrook Drive,


Hailey, ID 83333
Phone: 678-966-4426
Fax: 678-966-4499
Email: bridget.dalin@powereng.com
www.powereng.com
Power Source International, 18680 Augusta Dr. #100, Monument, CO 80132
Phone: 719-487-8877
Email: PowerSourceI@comcast.net
Power Systems Mfg LLC, 1440 W Indiantown Rd., Jupiter, FL 33458
Phone: 561-354-1100
Fax: 561-354-1199
Email: power@powermfg.com
www.powermfg.com
Power Techniques, Inc., 707 Railroad
St., Alma, IL 62807
Phone: 800-425-2356
Fax: 618-547-9110
Email: cindyk@powertechniques.net
www.powertechniques.net
PowerSafe, 8180 Siegen Lane, Baton
Rouge, LA 70810
Phone: 225-766-0955
Fax: 225-766-1099
Email: tventress@powersafetraining.org
www.powersafetraining.org
Praxair Surface Technologies, Inc., 1500
Polco St., Indianapolis, IN 46222
Phone: 317-240-2329
Email: Michael_Brennan@praxair.com
www.praxairsurfacetechnologies.com
Praxair, Inc., 700 High Grove Blvd.,
Burr Ridge, IL 60527
Phone: 630-320-4133
Fax: 630-320-4508
Email: ann_pennino@praxair.com
www.praxair.com
Premier Power Maintenance, 6525 Guion
Rd., Indianapolis, IN 46268
Phone: 317-879-0660
Fax: 317-875-0312
Email: rick.herold@premierpower.us
www.premierpower.us

December 2011 POWER

Pressure Systems, Inc, 34 Research Dr.,


Hampton, VA 23666
Phone: 757-865-1243
Fax: 757-865-8744
Email: denise.topping@pressuresystems.
com
www.pressuresystems.com
Primesouth LLC. - Wamar International
LLC., 800 Dutch Square Blvd., Columbia,
SC 29209
Phone: 803-354-4206
Fax: 803-354-4207
Email: susanwilkes@primesouthinc.com
www.primesouthwamar.com
PRO Solutions, Inc, 30 Bethel Rd., Glen
Mills, PA 19342
Phone: 865-414-7644
Email: jdischner@p-rosolutions.com
www.p-rosolutions.com
Process Equipment/Barron Industries,
2770 Welborn St., Pelham, AL 35124
Phone: 205-663-5330
Fax: 205-663-6037
Email: wunderwood@processbarron.com
www.processbarron.com
ProEnergy Services, 2031 Adams Rd.,
Sedalia, MO 65301
Phone: 660-829-5100
Fax: 660-829-1160
Email: ccallis@ccallis.com
www.proenergyservices.com
See our ad on cover 4
ProSonix, P.O. Box 26676, Milwaukee,
WI 53226-0676
Phone: 800-849-1130
Fax: 800-849-1130
Email: info@pro-sonix.com
www.pro-sonix.com
PROTO Manufacturing Inc, 12350 Universal Dr., Taylor, MI 48180
Phone: 734-946-0974
Fax: 734-946-0975
Email: proto@protoxrd.com
www.protoxrd.com
Proton Energy Systems, 10 Technology
Dr., Wallingford, CT 06492
Phone: 203-678-2000
Fax: 203-949-8016
Email: jsperanza@protonenergy.com
www.protonenergy.com

www.powermag.com

PS Doors, 1150 South 48th St., Grand


Forks, ND 58201
Phone: 701-746-4519
Fax: 701-746-8340
Email: nellingson@psdoors.com
www.psdoors.com
PSB Industries, 1202 West 12th St.,
Erie, PA 16501
Phone: 814-453-3651
Fax: 814-454-3492
Email: al.wassel@psbindustries.com
www.psbindustries.com

COMPANY DIRECTORY

COMPANY DIRECTORY

PTMW, INC, 5040 NW US Highway 24,


Topeka, KS 66618
Phone: 785-232-7792
Fax: 785-232-7793
Email: pgoff@ptmw.com
www.ptmw.com
Pumping Solutions, Inc., 2850 139th
St., Blue Island, IL 60406
Phone: 708-272-1800
Fax: 708-272-1825
Email: SM@pump96.com
www.pump96.com
Pure Technologies Ltd., 300, 705 - 11
Ave. SW, Calgary, AB T2R 0E3, Canada
Phone: 855-280-7873
Fax: 403-266-6570
Email: info@puretechltd.com
www.puretechltd.com

R
R - V Industries, Inc., 584 Poplar Rd.,
Honey Brook, PA 19344
Phone: 610-273-2457
Fax: 610-273-3361
Email: robh@rvii.com
www.rvii.com
R & R Lotion, Inc., 15547 North 77th
St., Scottsdale, AZ 85260
Phone: 480-443-9255
Fax: 480-443-9256
Email: kyle@rrlotion.com
www.rrlotion.com
Randall Industries, 741 S. Rt 83, Elmhurst, IL 60126-4268
Phone: 800-966-7412
Fax: 630-833-9108
Email: b.skoda@randallind.com
www.fiberglassscaffolds.com

131

COMPANY DIRECTORY

COMPANY DIRECTORY
Reliability Management Group (RMG),
151 W. Burnsville Parkway, Minneapolis,
MN 55337
Phone: 952-882-8122
Fax: 952-882-8133
Email: pwensmann@rmgmpls.com
www.reliabilitymanagement.com

Rentech Boiler Systems, Inc, 5025-A E.


Business 20, Abilene, TX 79601-6411
Phone: 325-672-3400
Fax: 325-672-9996
Email: sales@rentechboilers.com
www.rentechboilers.com

RetubeCo, Inc., 6024 Ooltewah-Georgetown Rd., Ooltewah, TN 37363


Phone: 423-238-4814
Fax: 423-238-9028
Email: sales@retubeco.com
www.retubeco.com
REW Solar USA, 215-415 Northern Boulevard, Bayside, NY 11361
Phone: 718-225-6600 x2
Fax: 718-225-6605
Email: nbrand.rewsolar@gmail.com
www.rewsolarusa.com
RF System Lab, 123 W. Main St., #202,
Gaylord, MI 49735
Phone: 989-731-5083
Fax: 989-688-5966
Email: mrau@rfsystemlab.us
www.rfsystemlab.us
Richmond Engineering Works, 1204
Parkway View Dr., Pittsburgh, PA 15205
Phone: 412-787-9640
Fax: 412-787-9645
Email: dfetcko@richmondengineering.com
www.richmondengineering.com
Richwood, 707 7th St. West, Huntington, WV 25704
Phone: 304-525-5436
Fax: 304-525-8018
Email: scady@richwood.com
www.richwood.com
132

Rig-A-Lite, 8500 Hansen Rd., Houston,


TX 77075
Phone: 713-943-0340
Fax: 713-943-8354
Email: rossblanford@azz.com
www.rigalite.com

Rogers Equipment Sales, 690 Sawmill


Rd., Durango, CO 81301
Phone: 800-990-7374
Fax: 970-259-7177
Email: joeymotors@frontier.net
www.rogersequip.com

Riley Power Inc, 5 Neponset St.,


Worcester, MA 01606
Phone: 508-852-7100
Fax: 508-856-7025
Email: info@babcockpower.com
www.babcockpower.com

Rolls-Royce plc, 105 Sandusky, Mount


Vernon, OH 43050
Phone: 740-393-8015
E-mail: jonathan.li@rolls-royce.com
www.rolls-royce.com
See our ad on p. 5

River Consulting, LLC, 445 Hutchinson


Ave., Suite 740, Columbus, OH 43235
Phone: 614-890-3456
Fax: 614-890-1883
Email: janderson@riverconsulting.com
www.riverconsulting.com

Rotork Controls Inc, 675 Mile Crossing


Blvd., Rochester, NY 14624
Phone: 585-247-2304
Fax: 585-247-2308
www.rotork.com

Riverhawk Company, 215 Clinton Rd.,


New Hartford, NY 13413
Phone: 315-768-4855
Fax: 315-768-4941
Email: tim.cain@riverhawk.com
www.riverhawk.com
Rkneal Engineering, 1150 Collier Rd.
NW L-11, Atlanta, GA 30318
Phone: 314-754-8814
Fax: 312-264-5445
Email: asbrewer@rkneal.com
www.rkneal.com
RMF Nooter Inc, 915 Matzinger Ave.,
Toledo, OH 43612
Phone: 419-727-4153
Fax: 419-727-1989
Email: groberts@rmfnooter.com
www.rmfnooter.com
Roberts & Schaefer Company,
222 S Riverside Plaza, Suite 1800,
Chicago, IL 60606
Phone: 312-236-7292
Fax: 312-726-2872
Email: bobw@eni.com
www.r-s.com
See our ad on p. 43
Rochem Technical Services, 4711 SW
Huber St., Suite 7E, Portland, OR 97219
Phone: 503-246-8618
Fax: 503-246-8697
Email: bob.auguston@rochemltd.com
www.rochemltd.com

www.powermag.com

RTDS Technologies Inc., 100-150 Innovation Dr., Winnipeg, MB R3T2E1,


Canada
Phone: 204-989-9700
Fax: 204-452-4303
Email: rtds@rtds.com
www.rtds.com

S
S & B Engineers and Constructors, Ltd.,
7809 Park Place Boulevard, P.O. Box
266245, Houston, TX 77087
Phone: 713-845-3176
Fax: 713-640-0045
Email: SBPower@sbec.com
www.sbec.com
S.T. Cotter Turbine Service, Inc./TexBlast, 2167 196th St. E, Clearwater, MN
55320
Phone: 612-424-5614
Fax: 320-558-2365
Email: nichole.cotter@stcotterturbine.com
www.stcotterturbine.com
Sabre Tubular Structures, 8653 E Hwy
67, Alvarado, TX 76009
Phone: 817-852-1700
Fax: 817-850-1703
Email: utilityinfo@sabreindustries.com
www.SabreTubularStructures.com
Safway Services LLC, N19 W 24200 Riverwood Dr., Waukesha, WI 53188
Phone: 262-523-6587
Fax: 262-523-9803
Email: darrell.domokos@safway.com
www.safway.com

POWER December 2011

Sanford Rose Opportunity Center, 265


S. Main St., Akron, OH 44308
Phone: 330-762-6211
Fax: 330-762-6161
Email: deilertson@sraoc.com
www.sraoc.com

SCR-Tech, a CoaLogix Company, 11701


Mt. Holly Rd., Charlotte, NC 28214
Phone: 704-812-4206
Fax: 704-827-8935
Email: rs@coalogix.com
www.coalogix.com

Shermco Industries, 2425 East Pioneer


Dr., Dallas, TX 75061
Phone: 972-793-5523
Fax: 972-793-5542
Email: sowen@shermco.com
www.shermco.com

Sealeze A Unit of Jason Incorporated,


8000 Whitepine Rd., Richmond, VA 23237
Phone: 804-275-1675
Fax: 804-743-0051
Email: mharvey@sealeze.com
www.sealeze.com

SICK MAIHAK, Inc., 4140 World Houston Parkway, Suite 180, Houston, TX
77032
Phone: 281-436-5100
Fax: 281-436-5200
E-mail: information@sick.com
www.sicknorthamerica.com
See our ad on p. 57

Sargent & Lundy LLC, 55 East Monroe


St., Chicago, IL 60603
Phone: 312-269-2000
Fax: 312-269-3680
Email: thinkingpower@sargentlundy.com
www.sargentlundy.com

Selkirk Corporation, 5030 Corporate Exchange Blvd. SE, Grand Rapids, MI 49512
Phone: 800-992-VENT
Fax: 877-393-4145
Email: sales@selkirkinc.com
www.selkirkcorp.com/commercial-andindustrial/

SAS Global Corporation, 21601 Mullin


Ave., Warren, MI 48089
Phone: 248-414-4470
Fax: 248-414-4480
Email: justinb@sasglobalcorp.com
www.sasglobalcorp.com

Sensear, 555 Post St., Larkspur, CA 94102


Phone: 415-345-7764
Fax: 866-269-0129
Email: pam.allan@sensear.com
www.sensear.com

Scaffold Industry Association, 400


Admiral, Kansas City, MO 64106
Phone: 816-595-4860
Fax: 816-472-7765
Email: elouise@scaffold.org
www.scaffolding.org
SCHADE Lagertechnik GmbH, Dorstener
Strasse 360, Herne, 44653, Germany
Phone: 49232558740
Fax: 492325587474
Email: info@schade-lagertechnik.de
www.schade-lagertechnik.com

Schmidt Industries, 3290 Patterson Rd.,


Bay City, MI 48706
Phone: 989-684-3216
Fax: 989-684-3228
Email: schmidtind@aol.com
www.schmidtindustries.com
Scientech- a Curtiss Wright Company,
1060 Keene Rd., Dunedin, FL 34698
Phone: 727-644-8361
Fax: 727-669-3100
Email: bgibson@scientech.com
www.rapidpartsmart.com

December 2011 POWER

Sentry Equipment Corp, 966 Blue Ribbon


Circle, North, Oconomowoc, WI 53066
Phone: 262-567-7256
Fax: 262-567-4523
Email: sales@sentry-equip.com
www.sentry-equip.com
Separator Spares & Equipment, LLC,
1441 Intracoastal Dr., Houma, LA 70363
Phone: 985-346-0122
Fax: 985-346-0244
Email: paul@separatorequipment.com
www.separatorequipment.com
sera ComPress GmbH, sera-Strasse 1,
Immenhausen, 34376, Germany
Phone: 49 (0) 5673 999-04
Fax: 49 (0) 5673 999-05
Email: info@sera-web.com
www.sera-web.com
Shell Lubricants, 700 Milam St., Houston, TX 77002
Phone: 713-546-8038
Fax: 713-423-8203
Email: melissa.cantuell@shell.com
www.shell-lubricants.com
www.powermag.com

COMPANY DIRECTORY

COMPANY DIRECTORY

Siemens AG, I IA AS PA CIS, KarlLegien-Str. 190, Bonn, 53117, NRW,


Germany
Phone: +49 228 64805210
Fax: +49 228 64805125
Email: info.comos@siemens.com
www.siemens.com/comos

Siemens Energy, 4400 Alafaya Trail,


Orlando, FL 32826
Phone: 407-736-2000
Fax: 407-736-5008
www.siemens.com/energy
Signal-X-Press Concept, 12, Industrial
Crescent, Ilupeju Recreation Hall, Ilupeju, 23401, Lagos, Nigeria
Phone: 2348097764030
Email: signal@signalxpressconcept.com
Skire Inc, 111 Independence Dr., Menlo
Park, CA 94025
Phone: 650-289-2631
Fax: 650-289-2650
Email: smarrujo@skire.com
www.skire.com
SkyFuel, Inc., 18300 West Highway 72,
Arvada, CO 80007
Phone: 303-330-0276
Fax: 866-422-1292
Email: alison.mason@skyfuel.com
www.skyfuel.com
Slingmax Inc, 2626 Market St., Aston,
PA 19014
Phone: 610-485-8500
Fax: 610-494-5835
Email: jeff@slingmax.com
www.slingmax.com

133

COMPANY DIRECTORY

COMPANY DIRECTORY
SMA America, 6020 West Oaks Blvd.,
Suite 300, Rocklin, CA 95765
Phone: 916-625-0870
Fax: 916-625-0871
E-mail: info@SMA-America.com
www.sma-america.com
Smith & Loveless Inc., 14040 Santa Fe
Trail Dr., Lenexa, KS 66215
Phone: 913-888-5201
Email: answers@smithandloveless.com
www.smithandloveless.com
Sodimate, Inc. - Bulk Handling System
Specialists, 639 W. Diversey Pkwy.,
Suite 219, Chicago, IL 60614
Phone: 773-665-8800
Fax: 773-665-8805
Email: sodimate.inc@sodimate.com
www.sodimate-inc.com/en/index.html
SoftPLC Corporation, 25603 Red Brangus, Spicewood, TX 78669
Phone: 512-264-8390
Fax: 512-264-8399
Email: info@softplc.com
www.softplc.com
Sohre Turbomachinery Inc, 128 Main
St., Monson, MA 01057
Phone: 413-267-0590
Fax: 413-267-0592
Email: tsohre@sohreturbo.com
www.sohreturbo.com
Solar Power & Light, 2411 Cross Pointe
Dr., Miamisburg, OH 45342
Phone: 937-353-6221
Fax: 937-247-9468
Email: cehrstine@buycastings.com
www.buycastings.com
SolarDock, P.O. Box 711, Wilmington,
DE 19801
Phone: 302-504-0124
Fax: 302-225-8716
Email: info@solardock.com
www.solardock.com
Solberg Filtration & Separation, 1151
Ardmore Ave., Itasca, IL 60143
Phone: 630-616-4411
Fax: 630-773-0727
Email: info@oilmistsolutions.com
www.solbergmfg.com

134

SOLVAir Solutions/Solvay Chemicals,


Inc., 3333 Richmond Ave., Houston, TX
77098
Phone: 713-525-6500
Fax: 713-525-6759
Email: solvay@solvaychemicals.com
www.solvair.us
Sound Technologies, 310 Commerce
Square, Michigan City, IN 46360
Phone: 219-879-2600 x3409
Email: s_schreeg@soundtech.us
www.soundtech.us

Southern Environmental, 6690 W Nine


Mile Rd., Pensacola, FL 32526
Phone: 850-944-4475
Fax: 850-944-8270
Email: apcsales@sei-group.com
www.southernenvironmental.com
Southern Research Institute, 2000
Ninth Ave. South, Birmingham, AL
35205
Phone: 205-581-2381
Fax: 205-581-2333
Email: cushing@sri.org
www.southernresearch.org
Southwest Microwave, Inc., 9055 S.
McKemy St., Tempe, AZ 85284
Phone: 480-783-0201
Fax: 480-783-0401
Email: infossd@southwestmicrowave.com
www.southwestmicrowave.com/ssd
SpecWorks, Inc., 810 S. Bond St., Baltimore, MD 21231
Phone: 410-558-1191
Fax: 410-558-1410
Email: corina@specworks.com
www.specworks.com
Spirax Sarco, Inc., 1150 Northpoint
Blvd., Blythewood, SC 29016
Phone: 803-714-2000
Fax: 803-714-2222
Email: ssisales@spirax.com
www.spiraxsarco.com/us
SPX Cooling Technoogies, 7401 W 129
St., Overland Park, KS 66213
Phone: 913-664-7587
Fax: 913-664-7872
Email: don.lillig@spx.com
www.spxcooling.com

www.powermag.com

SPX Flow Technology (Copes-Vulcan),


5620 West Rd., McKean, PA 16426
Phone: 814-476-5800
Fax: 814-476-5848
Email: courtney.johnson@spx.com
www.copesvulcan.com
SPX Heat Transfer, 2121 North 161st St.
East, Tulsa, OK 74101
Phone: 918-234-6000
Fax: 918-234-3345
Email: susan.hanson@spxht.com
www.spxheattransfer.com
SRP, P.O. Box 52025, KYS102, Phoenix,
AZ 85079-2025
Phone: 602-236-8754
Fax: 602-685-3271
Email: kelly.may@srpnet.com
www.investmentrecovery.srpnet.com
SSS Clutch Company Inc, 610 W Basin
Rd., New Castle, DE 19720
Phone: 302-322-8080
Fax: 302-322-8548
Email: engineering@sssclutch.com
www.sssclutch.com
St. Lawrence Steel, 2500 Crane Centre
Dr., Streetsboro, OH 44241
Phone: 800-837-3789
Fax: 330-562-1100
Email: dharvanek@stlawrencesteel.com
www.stlawrencesteel.com

Stanley Consultants, Inc., 225 Iowa


Ave., Muscatine, IA 52761
Phone: 800.553.9694
Fax: 563-264-6658
Email: power@stanleygroup.com
www.stanleyconsultants.com
STAR (Steam Turbine Alternative Resources), 116 Latourette St., Marion,
OH 43302
Phone: 740-387-5535
Fax: 740-383-2089
Email: Vince@Starturbine.com
www.starturbine.com
Sterling Lumber Company, 3415 W.
127th St., Blue Island, IL 60406
Phone: 708-388-2223
Email: carson@sterlinglumber.com
www.sterlinglumber.com

POWER December 2011

Stone Mountain Access Systems, Inc.,


4029 May St., Hillside, IL 60162
Phone: 708-544-9010
Fax: 708-544-9013
Email: jamin@stonemountainaccess.com
www.stonemountainaccess.com
Structural Integrity Associates, Inc.,
5215 Hellyer Ave., Suite 210, San
Jose, CA 95138
Phone: 877-474-7693
Fax: 704-597-0335
Email: info@structint.com
www.structint.com
See our ad on p. 1
Struthers Wells, P.O. Box 8, 36 Clark St.
West, Warren, PA 16365
Phone: 814-726-1000
Fax: 814-726-1025
Email: srooks@strutherswells.com
www.strutherswells.com
SUBNET Solutions Inc., #100, 4639
Manhattan Rd. SE, Calgary, AB T2G 4B3,
Canada
Phone: 403-270-8885
Fax: 403-270-9631
Email: info@SUBNET.com
www.SUBNET.com
Sulzer Hickham Inc, 11518 Old La Porte
Rd., La Porte, TX 77571-9516
Phone: 713-567-2700
Fax: 713-567-2830
Email: stephanie.king@sulzer.com
www.hickham.com
Sulzer Turbo Services, 11518 Old Laporte Rd., La Porte, TX 77571
Phone: 713-567-2700
Fax: 713-567-2830
E-mail: sulzertshouston@sulzer.com
www.sulzerts.com
Sumitomo Electric Lightwave-Future
FLEX Air-Blown Network Solutions,
P.O. Box 13445, 78 T.W. Alexander Dr.,
Research Triangle Park, NC 27709
Phone: 919-541-8383
Fax: 919-541-8265
Email: amanning@sumitomoelectric.com
www.sumitomoelectric.com

December 2011 POWER

Superheat FGH Services, 680 Industrial


Park Dr., Evans, GA 30809
Phone: 706-790-5353
Fax: 706-790-3383
Email: maryborror@superheatfgh.com
www.superheatfgh.com

Taprogge America Corp, 150-J Executive


Dr., Edgewood, NY 11717
Phone: 631-964-1400
Fax: 631-964-1414
Email: ldonovan@taprogge.com
www.taprogge.com

Superior Interlock Corporation, 7339


Central Ave., Glendale, NY 11385-8202
Phone: 718-821-8949
Fax: 718-417-6162
Email: info@superiorinterlock.com
www.superiorinterlock.com

Tatman Associates Inc, P.O. Box 39400,


29015 Solon Rd., Solon, OH 44139-0400
Phone: 440-248-0644
Fax: 440-248-0649
Email: tatmansubs@sbcglobal.net
www.tatmansubstations.com

Superior Water Screen Company, Inc,


28230 Orchard Lake Rd., Suite 204,
Farmington Hills, MI 48334
Phone: 248-419-5322
Email: kbridge@superiorwaterscreens.com
www.superiorwaterscreens.com

TAW Miami Service Center, 9930 NW


89th Ave., Medley, FL 33178
Phone: 305-525-2419
Fax: 305-884-8136
Email: tawlew@aol.com
www.tawinc.com

SWAN Analytical USA, Inc., 225 Larkin


Dr. Unit 4, Wheeling, IL 60090
Phone: 847-229-1290
Fax: 847-229-1320
Email: chris.dreher@swan-analyticalusa.com
www.swan-analytical-usa.com

Taylor Technologies Inc, 31 Loveton


Circle, Sparks, MD 21152
Phone: 800-TEST-KIT
Fax: 410-771-4291
Email: customerservice@taylortechnologies.com
www.taylortechnologies.com

Sword CTSpace, 49 Stevenson St., Suite


950, San Francisco, CA 94105
Phone: 415-882-1888
Fax: 415-882-1888
Email: sword.ctspace@live.com
www.sword-ctspace.com

Team Industrial Services, 200 Hermann


Dr., Alvin, TX 77511
Phone: 281-388-5551
Fax: 281-331-4107
Email: dave.cammisa@teaminc.com
www.teamindustrialservices.com

Syscom Instruments S.A., Rue de l


Industrie 21, Sainte-Croix, CH-1450,
Switzerland
Phone: 314-361-5084
Email: ayden@syscominstruments.net
www.syscom.ch

Tech Center, 265 S Main St., Akron, OH


44308
Phone: 330-762-6212
Fax: 330-762-2035
Email: douge@techcenterinc.com
www.techcenterinc.com

T
Taggart Global Llc, 4000 Town Center
Blvd. Suite 200, Canonsburg, PA
15317
Phone: 412-429-9800
Fax: 412-429-9801
Email: amcguire@taggl.com
www.taggl.com
See our ad on p. 19
Tank Connection, P.O. Box 579, Parsons,
KS 67357
Phone: 620-423-3010
Fax: 620-423-3999
Email: lheady@tankconnection.com
www.tankconnection.com
www.powermag.com

COMPANY DIRECTORY

COMPANY DIRECTORY

Terrington Data Management, IT Centre,


York Science Park, Heslington, York,
YO10 5NP, United Kingdom
Phone: +44 (0)1904 567674
Fax: +44 (0)1904 567719
Email: tm@terringtondm.com
www.terringtondm.com
Teseq, 52 Mayfield Ave., Edison, NJ
08837
Phone: 732-225-9533
Fax: 732-225-4789
Email: MJSalvador@teseq.com
www.teseq.com

135

COMPANY DIRECTORY

COMPANY DIRECTORY
Tesla Energy Solutions, 36068 Hidden
Springs Rd., Suite C - 119, Wildomar,
CA 92595
Phone: 888-583-7525
Fax: 888-837-6086
Email: damberson@teslaenergyllc.com
www.teslaenergyllc.com
TesTex Inc, 535 Old Frankstown Rd.,
Pittsburgh, PA 15239
Phone: 412-798-8990
Fax: 412-798-8995
Email: r.joswick@testex-ndt.com
www.testex-ndt.com
Testo Inc., 40 White Lake Rd., Sparta,
NJ 07871
Phone: 800-227-0729
Fax: 862-354-5020
Email: info@testo.com
www.testo.com
Thaker Simulation Technologies, 57 W
Farms Rd., Canaan, NH 03741
Phone: 603-632-3767
Fax: 603-632-4546
Email: info@thakerllc.com
www.thakerllc.com
The Avogadro Group, LLC, 2825 Verne
Roberts Circle, Antioch, CA 94509
Phone: 877-602-1023
Fax: 925-680-4416
Email: craig.thiry@avogadrogroup.com
www.avogadrogroup.com
The Protectowire Company Inc.,
Phone: 781-826-3878
Fax: 781-826-2045
Email: dmcpeck@protectowire.com
www.protectowire.com
The Shaw Group, 128 South Tryon St.,
Charlotte, NC 28202
Phone: 704-343-7500
Email: morepower@shawgrp.com
www.shawgrp.com
The Silchem Group, P.O. Box 231487,
Encinitas, CA 92923
Phone: 760-798-4390
Fax: 901-328-1427
Email: custsvc@silchem.com
www.silchem.com

136

Thermal Engineering Associates, 1424


Farrington Dr., Knoxville, TN 37923
Phone: 865-357-2002
Fax: 865-357-2002
Email: lthomas@thermalea.com
www.thermalea.com

Tiger-Vac, Inc. (USA), 73 S. W. 12 Ave.


Bldg. 1 Unit 7, Dania, FL 33004
Phone: 954-925-3625
Fax: 954-925-3626
Email: massimo@tiger-vac.com
www.tiger-vac.com

Thermal Engineering International


(USA) Inc, 10375 Slusher Dr., Santa Fe
Springs, CA 90670
Phone: 323-726-0641
Fax: 323-726-9592
Email: sales@thermalengint.com
www.thermalengint.com

Tioga Air Heaters, 9201 International


Parkway, Minneapolis, MN 55428
Phone: 763-525-4000
Fax: 763-525-9796
Email: bwallace@tioga-inc.com
www.tioga-inc.com

ThermaSteel Corp, 847 S. Randall Rd.,


Suite 191, Chicago, IL 60123
Phone: 224-400-8134
Email: ghisky@hotmail.com
www.thermasteelcorp.com

Tioga Pipe Supply Company Inc, 2450


Wheatsheaf Lane, Philadelphia, PA 19137
Phone: 215-831-0700
Fax: 215-533-1645
Email: jshaw@tiogapipe.com
www.tiogapipe.com

Thermo Scientific, 166 Cummings Center, Beverly, MA 01915


Phone: 978-232-6228
Email: sara.whyte@thermofisher.com
www.thermoscientific.com/water

Titan Fabrication, P.O. Box 1905, Owensboro, KY 42302


Phone: 270-683-6564
Fax: 270-684-4056
www.hornhis.com

Thielsch Engineering, 8761 Mayfield Rd.


Suite. 308, Chesterland, OH 44026
Phone: 440-729-8866
Fax: 440-729-8060
Email: psmoske@thielsch.com
www.thielsch.com

Toshiba International Corp, Power Systems Div, 6 Dickinson Dr., Building 300,
Suite 2, Chadds Ford, PA 19317
Phone: 610-361-9300
Fax: 610-459-7846
Email: info@toshibatic-pa.com
www.toshiba.com

Thomas & Betts, Utility Products Group,


8155 T&B Blvd., Memphis, TN 38125
Phone: 901-752-5000
Fax: 800-888-0690
Email: barry_minatra@tnb.com
www.tnb.com
ThyssenKrupp Robins, Inc., 6400 S. Fiddlers Green Circle, Suite 700, Greenwood Village, CO 80111
Phone: 303-770-0808
Fax: 303-770-8233
Email: tom.armesy@thyssenkrupp.com
www.thyssenkrupprobins.com
Ti Anode Fabricators Pvt Ltd, 48, Noothanchary,, Madambakkam, Selaiyur,,
Chennai, 600073, Tamilnadu, India
Phone: 0091 44 22781148
Fax: 0091 44 22781362
Email: info@tianode.com
www.tianode.com

Tower Elevator Systems, Inc., 900 RR


620 South, C206, Lakeway, TX 78734
Phone: 512-266-6200
Fax: 512-266-6210
Email: info@towerelevators.com
www.towerelevators.com
Trachte Prefabricated Buildings, 422 N.
Burr Oak Ave., Oregon, WI 53575
Phone: 608-835-5707
Fax: 608-835-3920
Email: sales@trachteusa.com
www.trachteusa.com
Transcube USA, 290 Quarry Rd., Milford,
CT 06460
Phone: 203-847-4300
Fax: 203-847-4310
Email: info@transcube.us.com
www.transcube.net/us
Transformer Protector Corp. (TPC), 1880
Treble Dr., Humble, TX 77338
Phone: 281-358-9900
Fax: 281-358-1911
Email: marketing@transproco.com
www.transproco.com

www.powermag.com

POWER December 2011

Travelliance, 10225 Yellow Circle Dr.,


Minnetonka, MN 55343
Phone: 952-826-2823
Email: ggrobel@ljkco.com
www.ljkco.com
TRI TOOL Inc, 3041 Sunrise Blvd., Rancho Cordova, CA 95742
Phone: 916-288-6100
Fax: 916-288-6160
Email: s.stanton@tritool.com
www.tritool.com
TRI Transmission & Bearing Corp, P.O.
Box 454, Lionville, PA 19353
Phone: 610-363-8570
Fax: 610-524-6326
Email: mel@turboresearch.com
www.turboresearch.com
Triangle Enterprises, Inc., 3630 Cairo
Rd., Paducah, KY 42001
Phone: 270-443-2424
Email: bsayner@triangle-co.com
www.triangle-co.com
Tricor Metals, 3225 West Old Lincoln
Way, Wooster, OH 44691
Phone: 330-264-3299
Fax: 330-262-6678
Email: chuck@tricormetals.com
www.tricormetals.com
Triple-S Steel Supply, P.O. Box 21119,
6000 Jensen Dr., Houston, TX 77226
Phone: 713-697-7105
Fax: 713-697-5945
Email: davids@sss-steel.com
www.sss-steel.com
Turbine Energy Solutions, LLC, 4627
N. Sam Houston Pkwy. E., Houston, TX
77032
Phone: 281-227-0090
Fax: 281-227-0098
Email: Sales@TurbineEnergySolutions.com
www.turbineenergysolutions.com
Turbo Parts, LLC, 767 Pierce Rd. Suite
2, Clifton Park, NY 12065
Phone: 518-885-3199
Fax: 518-885-3072
Email: info@turbopartsllc.com
www.turbopartsllc.com

December 2011 POWER

TurboCare Inc, 2140 Westover Rd.,


Chicopee, MA 01022
Phone: 413-593-0500
Fax: 413-593-3424
Email: mletendre@turbocare.com
www.turbocare.com
See our ad on p. 30
Turner Business Services LLC, 1300
Gladolas Dr., Winter Park, FL 32792
Phone: 407-927-6517
Email: turnerbizservices@gmail.com
TUV Rheinland Industrial Solutions, 8181
Boradmoor S.E, Caledonia, MI 49316
Phone: 616-891-3570
Email: sbills@ndtg.net
www.nondestructivetesting.com
TWR Lighting, Inc./Orga Aviation, 4300
Windfern Rd. Suite #100, Houston, TX
77041
Phone: 713-973-6905
Fax: 713-973-9352
Email: info@twrlighting.com
www.twrlighting.com
Tyco Flow Control, 10707 Clay Rd.,
Houston, TX 77041
Phone: 713-986-6362
Fax: 201-475-9490
Email: cyang@tycovalves.com
www.tycovalves.com
See our ad on p. 33
Type K Damper Drives, 10410 Vista Park
Rd., Dallas, TX 75238
Phone: 469-385-9408
Fax: 214-343-2658
Email: lisa.underwood@cii-holdings.com
www.typek.com

U
U. S. Metals, 19102 Gundle, Houston,
TX 77073
Phone: 281-443-7473
Fax: 281-443-6748
Email: steve_tralie@usmetals.com
www.usmetals.com
U.S. Lighting Tech, 14370 Myford Rd.
Suite 100, Irvine, CA 92606
Phone: 954-632-5893
Fax: 714-617-8820
Email: lnevils@uslightingtech.com
www.uslightingtech.com

www.powermag.com

U.S. Water Services, 12270 43rd St. NE,


St. Michael, MN 55376
Phone: 763-553-0379
Fax: 763-553-0613
Email: kdanielson@uswaterservices.com
www.uswaterservices.com
Ukraine Partnership Bureau, 84, Balzaka
str. app.116, Kiyv, 02232, Ukraine
Phone: 677397425
Fax: 677397425
Email: andrey.s@uapb.eu
www.uapb.eu

COMPANY DIRECTORY

COMPANY DIRECTORY

Unimar Inc., 4944 Verplank Road,P.O.


Box 220, Clay, NY 13041
Phone: 315-699-4400
Fax: 315-699-3700
Email: maurita@unimar.com
www.unimar.com
United Conveyor Corporation, 2100 Norman Dr. West, Waukegan, IL 60085
Phone: 847-473-5900
Fax: 847-473-5959
Email: contactucc@unitedconveyor.com
www.unitedconveyor.com
United Scrap, 1545 S Cicero Ave.,
Cicero, IL 60804
Phone: 708-780-5324
Fax: 708-780-0510
Email: rgruenspan@unitedscrap.com
www.unitedscrap.com
Universal Acoustic & Emission Technologies, P.O. Box 411, Stoughton, WI
53589
Phone: 608-575-5667
Fax: 608-223-1944
Email: laurie@theexhibitexperts.com
www.universalaet.com
Universal Analyzers Inc., 5200 Convair
Dr., Carson City, NV 89706
Phone: 775-883-2500
Fax: 775-883-6388
Email: marketing@universalanalyzers.com
www.universalanalyzers.com
University of Maryland, 1134 Glenn L.
Martin Hall, College Park, MD 20742
Phone: 301-405-3017
Fax: 301-405-3305
Email: peaster@umd.edu
www.advancedengineering.umd.edu

137

COMPANY DIRECTORY

COMPANY DIRECTORY
University of Nevada, Reno Fire Science Academy, P.O. Box 877, Carlin, NV
89822
Phone: 775-754-6003
Fax: 775-754-6575
Email: tvalline@unr.edu
www.unrfsa.org

URS, Power Business Unit, 510 Carnegie


Ctr., Princeton, NJ 08543
Phone: 609-720-2000
Fax: 609-720-2050
www.urscorp.com

V
Vac-U-Max, 69 William St., Belleville,
NJ 07109
Phone: 800-289-8228
Fax: 973-959-6449
Email: davidkennedy@vac-u-max.net
www.vac-u-max.com
Valdes Engineering Company, 100 West
22nd St., Lombard, IL 60148
Phone: 630-792-1886
Fax: 630-792-1986
Email: mprestemon@valdeseng.com
www.valdeseng.com
Valley Construction Co., 3610 78th Ave.
West, Rock Island, IL 61201
Phone: 309-787-0292
Fax: 309-787-7048
Email: billhass@valleyconstruction.com
www.valleyconstruction.com

VALTIMET, 5501 Air Park Blvd., Morristown, TN 37813


Phone: 423-587-1888
Fax: 423-585-4215
Email: us.contact@valtimet.com
www.valtimet.com
Vandal Shields, 8560 Roland St. #E, P.O.
Box 434, Buena Park, CA 90621
Phone: 714-523-0572
Fax: 714-523-3328
Email: sales@vandalshields.com
www.vandalshields.com
138

Varo Engineers Inc, 2751 Tuller Parkway, Suite. 100, Dublin, OH 43017
Phone: 614-459-0424 x149
Fax: 614-442-2750
Email: dsnyder@varoeng.com
www.varoengineers.com
Vector Construction, Inc., P.O. Box
1220, Decatur, IL 62525
Phone: 204-223-4642
Fax: 204-409-6033
Email: keiths@vectorgroup.com
www.vectorgroup.com
VEGA Americas, Inc, 4170 Rosslyn Dr.,
Cincinnati, OH 45209
Phone: 513-272-0524
Fax: 513-272-0133
Email: j.weaver@vega.com
www.ohmartvega.com
Veolia ES Special Services, Inc., 785
County Rd. CB, Suite 100, Neenah, WI
54956
Phone: 202-512-8014
Fax: 202-236-8140
Email: natalie.splawski@veoliaes.com
www.VeoliaES.com
Victaulic, 4901 Kesslersville Rd.,
Easton, PA 18040
Phone: 610-559-3300
Email: blowar@victaulic.com
www.victaulic.com
See our ad on p. 11
Victory Energy Operations, LLC,
10701 E 126th St. N., Collinsville, OK
74021
Phone: 918-382-4840
E-mail: cswallow@victoryenergy.com
www.victoryenergy.com
See our ad on p. 10
viZaar Industrial Imaging, 3392 Saxonburg Blvd., Glenshaw, PA 15116
Phone: 412-767-5840
Fax: 412-767-5876
Email: hutz@itconceptsworld.com
www.vizaar.com
Vogt Power International Inc, 4000
Dupont Circle, Louisville, KY 40207
Phone: 502-899-4500
Fax: 502-899-4690
Email: sales@vogtpower.com
www.vogtpower.com

www.powermag.com

Voith Turbo GmbH & Co. KG, Voithstr. 1,


Crailsheim, 74564, Germany
Phone: +49 7951 32-0
Fax: +49 7951 32-500
Email: industry@voith.com
www.voithturbo.com/industry

Wabash Power Equipment Company, 444


Carpenter Ave., Wheeling, IL 60090
Phone: 847-541-5600
Fax: 847-541-1279
Email: info@wabashpower.com
www.wabashpower.com
Walbridge, 777 Woodward, Detroit, MI
48226
Phone: 313-442-1440
Fax: 313-234-0576
Email: ceising@waguest.com
www.walbridge.com
Warren & Baerg Manufacturing, Inc.,
39950 Rd. 108, Dinuba, CA 93618
Phone: 559-591-6790
Fax: 559-591-5728
Email: info@warrenbaerg.com
www.warrenbaerg.com
Wrtsil North America, Inc., 16330
Air Center Blvd., Houston, TX 77032
Phone: 281-233-6209
Fax: 281-233-6233
Email: michelle.romero@wartsila.com
www.wartsila.com/usa
See our ad on p. 74
Waste Management, 1001 Fannin, Houston, TX 77002
Phone: 303-886-9696
Fax: 866-332-3829
Email: creilly@wm.com
www.wm.com
We Energies, 231 W. Michigan St, Milwaukee, WI 53203
Phone: 414-221-3630
Fax: 414-221-3799
Email: kim.evans@we-energies.com
www.we-energies.com

POWER December 2011

Weschler Instruments, 16900 Foltz


Pkwy., Cleveland, OH 44149
Phone: 440-238-2550
Fax: 440-238-0660
Email: sales@weschler.com
www.weschler.com
Westcon Inc, P.O. Box 1735, Bismarck,
ND 58502
Phone: 701-222-0076
Fax: 701-224-8178
Email: sueg@westconindustries.com
www.westconindustries.com
Whiting Corporation, 26000 South
Whiting Way, Monee, IL 60449
Phone: 708-587-2030
Fax: 708-587-2171
Email: bshapiro@whitingcorp.com
www.whitingcorp.com
William W. Rutherford & Associates,
3102 Maple Ave. Suite 230, Dallas, TX
75201
Phone: 214-624-3205
Fax: 214-624-2390
Email: jason.marino@wwrutherford.com
www.wwrutherford.com
Wilmore Electronics Co, Inc, 607 US
70-A East, P.O. Box 1329, Hillsborough,
NC 27278
Phone: 919-732-9351
Fax: 919-732-9359
Email: info@wilmoreelectronics.com
www.wilmoreelectronics.com
Wilson Industrial Sales Co. Inc., 201
South Wilson St., Brook, IN 47922
Phone: 219-275-7333
Fax: 219-275-9622
Email: bwarne@wilsonindustrial.com
www.wilsonindustrial.com
WINSAFE Corp, One Valley Wood Dr. Unit
1, Markham, ON L3R 5L9, Canada
Phone: 905-474-9340
Fax: 905-474-9341
Email: rik@winsafe.com
www.winsafe.com
Winsted Corporation, 10901 Hampshire
Ave. South, Minneapolis, MN 55438
Phone: 800-237-5606
Fax: 770-840-9685
Email: custom@winsted.com
www.winstedcustom.com

December 2011 POWER

Winters Instruments, 600 Ensminger


Rd., Buffalo, NY 14150
Phone: 716-874-8700
Fax: 716-874-8800
Email: usasales@winters.com
www.winters.com
Wiznucleus, Inc., 244 Fifth Ave., Suite
K227, New York, NY 10001
Phone: 646-367-1947 x 501
Email: kshetty@wiznucleus.com
www.wiznucleus.com
Wolverine Fire Protection, P.O. Box 219,
Mt. Morris, MI 48458
Phone: 810-691-2905
Fax: 810-686-0440
Email: yolanda@wolverinefp.com
www.wolverinefp.com
Wood Group GTS, 15600 John F Kennedy
Blvd., Suite 500, Houston, TX 77032
Phone: 281-227-5600
Fax: 281-227-5655
Email: gts@woodgroup.com
www.woodgroup.com
Woodward GmbH, Handwerkstr. 29,
Stuttgart, 70656, Germany
Phone: +49 (0) 711 789 54-0
Fax: +49 (0) 711 789 54-1
Email: stgt-info@woodward.com
www.woodward.com
Workrite Uniform Co, 1701 North Lombard St. Suite. 200, Oxnard, CA 93030
Phone: 805-483-0175
Fax: 805-483-0678
Email: jcosta@workrite.com
www.workrite.com

Y
Yantai Longyuan Power Technology
Co,Ltd, #9 Hengshan Road, EconomicTechnological Development Zone,
Yantai, Shandong 264006, P.R. China
Phone: 86 10 57658531
Fax: 86 10 57658500
Email: tiansheng@lypower.com.cn
www.lypower.com.cn
Yokogawa Corporation of America, 2
Dart Rd., Newnan, GA 30265
Phone: 770-254-0400
Fax: 770-251-2088
Email: meters-instr@us.yokogawa.com
www.yokogawa-usa.com/
See our ad on p. 72

COMPANY DIRECTORY

COMPANY DIRECTORY

Z
Zachry Engineering Corporation, 1515
Arapahoe St., Tower 1, Suite 800, Denver, CO 80202
Phone: 303-928-4400
Fax: 303-928-4368
Email: uesales@ue-corp.com
www.zhi.com
ZOLLERN GmbH & Co. KG, Hitzkofer
Strasse 1, Sigmaringendorf, 72517,
Baden-Wrttemberg, Germany
Phone: +49 7571 70-0
Fax: +49 7571 70-602
Email: raik.flaemig@zollern.de
www.zollern.com

X
Xenics, Ambachtenlaan 44, Leuven,
3001, Vlaams-Brabant, Belgium
Phone: +3216 389900
Email: kve@xenics.com
www.xenics.com
Xtralis, 700 Longwater Drive, Norwell,
MA 02061
Phone: 800-229-4434
Email: marketing@xtralisamericas.com
www.xtralis.com

www.powermag.com

139

PRODUCT DIRECTORY
ACI SYSTEMS FOR MERCURY
CONTROL
ADA Environmental Solutions
Clyde Bergemann Inc
Dustex Corporation

ACTUATORS
Beck, Harold Beck & Sons Inc
Blac Inc.

PRODUCT DIRECTORY

Compact Automation Products LLC


Flowserve

Air Instruments & Measurements LLC (20)


CEMTEK Environmental
(1,20,70,80,90,100,110)
Cosa Instrument Corp, Process Control
Div (1,10)
Horiba Instruments, Inc. (1,20)
Nova Analytical Systems Inc. (1)

Columbian TecTank Inc (170,180)


Detroit Stoker Company (40,150)
See our ad on p. 62

Nova Analytical Systems Inc. (1)

ADDITIVES, COAL

10 H2-cooled Power Generators

10 Coal-pile binders
20 Dust-suppression agents
30 Freeze-conditioning agents
40 Slag modifiers

Nova Analytical Systems Inc. (10)

ADDITIVES, FUEL-OIL

AERATORS
Nol-Tec Systems, Inc.

ANALYZERS, WATER-PURITY
1 Analyzers, water-purity - General
10 Alkalinity
20 Boron
30 Calcium hardness
40 Chloride
50 Hydrazine
60 Hydrogen
70 Oxygen
80 Silica
90 Sodium
100 Sulfide

AERIAL LIFTS

Camarines sur Polytechnic college (60)

1 Aerial lifts - General


10 Basket testers

CHEMetrics, Inc.
(1,10,30,40,50,70,80,100)

Nesco Sales & Rentals (1)

Clyde Bergemann Inc

1 Analyzers, air-quality General

ANALYZERS, HYDROGEN
PURITY

Benetech (10,20,30,40)

50 Combining tubes
60 Conveyors
80 Dewatering bins
90 Exhausters
100 Feeders
110 Fluidizers
120 Jet ash pumps
140 Receiver/separators (air/ash)
150 Rotary unloaders
160 Sluice pumps
170 Storage bins
180 Storage tanks

ANALYZERS, AIR-QUALITY

Voith Turbo GmbH & Co. KG

Jiangsu High Hope International Group


Co. Ltd

Eliminator Slurry Pumps (120,160)


FLSmidth Inc. (1,20,60,100,120,150)
Nol-Tec Systems, Inc.
United Conveyor Corporation (1,10,20,
30,40,50,60,80,90,100,110,120,140,
150,160,170,180)

AUGERS (EARTH)
Nesco Sales & Rentals

BAGHOUSES
Babcock & Wilcox Company
Clyde Bergemann Inc
Dustex Corporation
Hitachi Power Systems America Ltd.
See our ad on cover 3
Southern Environmental

BAGS

Hach (1,10,30,40,50,60,70,80,90,100)

1 Bags - General

Mettler-Toledo Thornton, Inc.

Dustex Corporation (1)

AIR PREHEATER BASKETS


SUPPLY

Sentry Equipment Corp


(1,40,50,60,70,80,90)

BARGE POSITIONERS

Imeco Limited

Taylor Technologies Inc


(1,10,20,30,40,80,90)

Phenix Technologies Inc (10)

Tesla Energy Solutions

Thermo Scientific

AIRFLOW MEASUREMENT,
COMBUSTION

ARRESTERS

Testo Inc.

60 Transmission, line
70 Transmission, station

ALIGNMENT SYSTEM SHAFT

CITEL SURGE PROTECTION (60,70)

20 Laser

Siemens Energy

Ludeca, Inc. (20)

ANALYZERS, AIR-POLLUTION
1 Analyzers, air-pollution - General
20 Continuous emissions monitors
70 NH3
80 NO, NOx
140

90 Particulates
100 SO2 and/or SO3
110 Stack-gas

ASH-HANDLING SYSTEMS
1 Ash-handling systems - General
10 Air washers
20 Blowers
30 Ceramic lined pipe
40 Clinker grinders (crushers)
www.powermag.com

Heyl & Patterson,Inc.

BEARINGS
1 Bearings - General
30 Sleeve babbitt
40 Sleeve, bronze
50 Thrust, special
Bently Pressurized Bearing Co (1,40,50)
Fusion Babbitting Co. Inc (30)
igus Inc. (1)
Mechanical Dynamics & Analysis, Ltd.
(1,30,40,50)
Schmidt Industries
TurboCare Inc (1,30,50)
See our ad on p. 30

POWER December 2011

PRODUCT DIRECTORY
ZOLLERN GmbH & Co. KG (1,40,50)

BLADE MANUFACTURING
Schmidt Industries

BLOWERS
10 ExhaustBoiler Optimization
Clyde Bergemann Inc
Dustex Corporation (10)

BOILER OPTIMIZATION

BOILER PARTS
10 Air Preheater Baskets-Enameled and
Non-Enameled Types
20 Pressure and non-pressure parts
30 ID, FD, PA Fan Parts
40 Soot Blower parts
50 Electrostatic precipitator parts
Air Systems Limited (10,20,30,40,50)
CTI Power/Chicago Tube & Iron Company (20)
Hitachi Power Systems America Ltd.
See our ad on cover 3

1 Burners - General
10 Coal, pulverized
20 Gas, natural
30 Management Systems
40 NOx, low
50 Oil
80 Valves
90 Waste fuels

CABLE,
TELECOMMUNICATIONS
Calvert Wire & Cable Corporation

CALIBRATION EQUIPMENT
Beamex, Inc.

CAPACITORS/CONTROLS

Coen Company, Inc.


(1,20,30,40,50,80,90)

LCR Electronics

Detroit Stoker Company (40)


See our ad on p. 62

CASTINGS

Fuel Tech Inc. (1,10,20,40,50)


See our ad on p. 13
Hitachi Power Systems America Ltd.
(1,10,40)
See our ad on cover 3

1 Castings - General
10 FerrousCatalyst
Columbia Steel Casting Co, Inc (1,10)

CATALYST
CoaLogix

BURNERS, SUPPORT
EQUIPMENT

Cormetech, Inc.

Coen Company, Inc.

Fuel Tech Inc.


See our ad on p. 13

Forney Corporation

DAEYOUNG C & E CO., LTD.

Johnson Matthey Catalysts LLC

BUS
1 Bus - General
10 Aluminum/copper

CATHODIC PROTECTION

MDF Cable Bus Systems (1,10)

Corrpro Companies, Inc.

Advance Products & Systems

BUS DUCT

Indeck Power Equipment Company

CENTRIFUGES

1 Bus duct - General

Rentech Boiler Systems, Inc

Bird Machine Co

MDF Cable Bus Systems (1)

BOILERS

BUSHINGS/BUSHING WELLS

CHEMICALS, FLUE-GAS
DESULFURIZATION

Victory Energy Operations, LLC


See our ad on p. 10

Schmidt Industries

10 Reagents

CABLE LAYERS

SOLVAir Solutions/Solvay Chemicals,


Inc. (10)

BOILERS, FLUIDIZED-BED
10 Bubbling-bed
20 Circulating
30 OtherBolts
Babcock & Wilcox Company (10,20)

Dow Electrical & Telecommunications


See our ad on p. 39

CABLE PULLING

CHEMICALS,
TURBOMACHINERY
1 Chemicals, turbomachinery - General
20 Centrifugal compressors
30 Gas turbines
40 Steam turbines

Metso Power

1 Cable pulling - General


10 Pullers, pulling accessories

Wabash Power Equipment Company (30)

Nesco Sales & Rentals (1,10)

BOLTS

CABLE TERMINATIONS/
SPLICES

FP Turbomachinery (30)

20 Potheads
30 Splice kits, distribution
40 Splice kits, transmission
50 Stress cone kits

CHEMICALS, WATERTREATMENT

Schmidt Industries

BRUSHES
Cutsforth Products Inc.

BUCKETS
Columbia Steel Casting Co, Inc

Thomas & Betts, Utility Products Group


(20,30,40,50)

Schmidt Industries

December 2011 POWER

www.powermag.com

PRODUCT DIRECTORY

Fuel Tech Inc.


See our ad on p. 13

BURNERS

ECT Inc (20,30,40)


Rochem Technical Services (1,30)

1 Chemicals, water-treatment - General


10 Antifoulants
20 Coagulants (and aids)
30 Corrosion inhibitors
40 Disinfectants
50 Flocculants
60 Neutralizers
141

PRODUCT DIRECTORY

BHI Energy (1,30,40)


See our ad on p. 15
Blome International (1,10,30,40,60)

70 Oxidizers
80 Reducing agents
90 Scale inhibitors

CMP Coatings (1,30,60)


See our ad on p. 24

Ashland Water Technologies, Drew


Industrial (30)

Hadek Protective Systems (1,10,30,40)

Buckman Laboratories Inc, Water Technologies (10,20,30,40,50,60,70,80,90)


GC3 Specialty Chemicals, Inc.
(1,10,20,30,40,50,60,70,80,90)

CHIMNEYS

PRODUCT DIRECTORY

Commonwealth Dynamics Inc


Hadek Protective Systems
Hamon Custodis, Inc.
Hoffmann, Inc

CHLORINATORS
Ti Anode Fabricators Pvt Ltd

Air Engineering Inc.


(1,10,50,60,70,80,90)

Master Bond, Inc. (1)

Atlas Copco Compressors LLC


(1,5,10,40,50,60,70,80,90)

Praxair Surface Technologies, Inc.


(1,30)

Bauer Compressors Inc. (1,5,50,80)

The Silchem Group

COGENERATION SYSTEMS,
PACKAGED
2G - CENERGY Power Systems Technologies Inc.
Alturdyne
American DG Energy Inc.

COMBUSTERS
20 Rotary-kiln

CIRCUIT BREAKERS, HIGH


VOLTAGE

AE&E - Von Roll Inc (20)

1 Circuit breakers, high voltage General

COMBUSTION AIRFLOW
MEASUREMENT

Belyea Company Inc (1)

AMETEK Land, Inc.

Carling Technologies

sera ComPress GmbH


Siemens Energy

COMPRESSORS STEAM AND


GAS
Nash, A Gardner Denver Product

COMPUTER SOFTWARE
1 Computer software - General
10 Automation & control
30 Environmental compliance
50 Geographic information systems (GIS)
60 Maintenance management
75 Monitoring
80 Neural Network
90 Operations & maintenance
100 Performance monitoring
110 Piping systems
130 Power system simulation

Siemens Energy

COMBUSTION-CONTROL
SYSTEMS

Automation Technology, Inc


(1,30,50,60,90,100,110)

CLOTHING, PROTECTIVE

Beck, Harold Beck & Sons Inc

CD-adapco (1)

1 Clothing, protective General


30 Glove testing, electric

Coen Company, Inc.

CYME International T&D (1)

DragonWear (1)

COMBUSTION-WASTE
MANAGEMENT

General Physics Corporation


(1,100,130)
See our ad on p. 7

Phenix Technologies Inc (30)

Riley Power Inc

Mainsaver (60)

COAL FEEDERS

COMMUNICATIONS
SYSTEMS/EQUIPMENT

1 Coal feeders - General

NeuCo, Inc.
(1,10,20,30,60,75,80,90,100)
Siemens AG

COAL GASIFIERS

1 Communications systems/equipment
- General
10 Broadband/LAN
30 Fiber-optics
80 Networking products

Siemens Energy

Aitech Defense Systems

COAL-CLEANING EQUIPMENT

Alcatel-Lucent

Coal Recovery Investments Ltd

Elma Systems Division

5 Control Room Furniture


70 Printers

EtherWAN Systems (1,10,30,80)

Dynamic Systems Inc. (70)

MEN Micro Inc

Ergonomic Office Chairs by United


Group, Inc. (5)

Bedeschi America, Inc. (1)


Riley Power Inc (1)

COATINGS
1 Coatings - General
10 Insulating
30 Protective
40 Sealing
60 Silicone
Belzona Western Ltd. (30)
142

Duromar Inc (30)

40 Portable
50 Reciprocating
60 Reciprocating nonlubricated
70 Reciprocating tank-mounted
80 Rotary-screw
90 Rotary-vane (sliding-vane)

COMPRESSORS
1 Compressors - General
5 Air booster high pressure
10 Centrifugal
www.powermag.com

Terrington Data Management


(30,60,90,100)
Wiznucleus, Inc. (1)

COMPUTER TERMINALS/
KEYBOARDS/PRINTERS

CONDENSERS
1 Condensers - General
10 Air-cooled

POWER December 2011

PRODUCT DIRECTORY
40 Surface

ASGCO Manufacturing, Inc. (1,10)

CRUSHERS/BREAKERS

Benetech

10 Bradford Breakers
20 Double-roll
30 Hammermills
40 Reversible mills
50 Single-roll

Flexco (1)

Ambassador Heat Transfer Co (40)

CONVEYORS

GEA Power Cooling, Inc. - Headquarters


(10)

1 Conveyors - General
10 Belt
20 Drag
40 High-angle
60 Screw

LYNN Engineered Systems LLC (1)

CONNECTORS
20 Compression
60 Power
Amphenol Industrial Operations

Beltservice de Mexico (1,20,40)


BEUMER Maschinenfabrik GmbH & Co.
KG (10)

Pensylvania Crusher (10,20,30,40,50)

CYCLONE COLLECTORS
Dustex Corporation

DAMPER ACTUATORS
Beck, Harold Beck & Sons Inc

Aries Electronics

Conveyor Services/Classic Conveyor


Components (1,10,60)

DMC Power (20,60)

E-ZLIFT Portable Conveyors (1,20)

J Custon Supply, Inc (60)

Fenner Dunlop Americas (1,10)


See our ad on p. 61

1 Dampers - General
10 Guillotine
20 Louvers
30 Special-design

Nol-Tec Systems, Inc.

Braden Mfg LLC

1 Control systems - General


10 Compressor
30 Gas-turbine
40 Main plant
ABB Inc (1,30)
Clyde Bergemann Inc
Emerson Process Management, Power &
Water Solutions (1)

COOLING TOWERS
1 Cooling towers - General
10 Dry
20 Wet, mechanical draft
30 Wet, natural draft (hyperbolic)
40 Wet/dry

Clyde Bergemann Inc


McDermott Brothers Products
(1,10,20,30)

DATA ACQUISITION/
MANAGEMENT

Cooling Tower Depot, Inc. (1,20,30)

Elsys Instruments

GE Energy (1,10,30)

Midwest Towers (1,20)

Lufft USA

Mechanical Dynamics & Analysis, Ltd.


(1,30,40)

Paharpur Cooling Towers Ltd


(1,10,20,30,40)
See our ad on p. 55

DEGASIFIERS

Voith Turbo GmbH & Co. KG (1,10,30)

Membrana

CORROSION CONTROL

CONTROLLERS (ENERGY
MANAGEMENT)

DESUPERHEATERS

30 Protection
40 Silicone

Pick Heaters, Inc.

10 Demand
20 Load
30 Power-factor

CMP Coatings (30,40)


See our ad on p. 24

DIGESTORS

E / SYSTEMS (10,20,30)

CONTROLLERS (KEY
MEASUREMENTS)
BinMaster Level Controls

CONTROLLERS,
PROGRAMMABLE
SoftPLC Corporation

CONVERTERS
40 DC/DC
Wilmore Electronics Co, Inc.(40)

CONVEYOR ACCESSORIES

Hadek Protective Systems (30)


PENTA Industrial Corp. (30)

COUPLINGS
Victaulic
See our ad on p. 11

December 2011 POWER

20 AnaerobicDrills
BIOFerm Energy Systems (20)

DRILLS
Metabo Corporation

DRY SCRUBBERS

Voith Turbo GmbH & Co. KG

Clyde Bergemann Inc

CRANES/DERRICKS

Dustex Corporation

1 Cranes/derricks - General
5 120,000 lb overhead crane
30 Controls, remote radio
90 Telescopic
110 Truck

DRYERS

Nesco Sales & Rentals (1,30,90,110)

DRYERS AIR

Schmidt Industries (5)

Heyl & Patterson,Inc.

1 Conveyor accessories - General


10 Belt cleaner
www.powermag.com

PRODUCT DIRECTORY

CONTROL SYSTEMS

DAMPERS

1 Dryers - General
Heyl & Patterson,Inc. (1)

143

PRODUCT DIRECTORY

PRODUCT DIRECTORY

Nova Analytical Systems Inc.

EVAPORATORS

Sentry Equipment Corp (10)

1 Evaporators - General
10 Distillation
50 Vertical-tube

DUCT BURNERS

Sick Maihak, Inc. (10,20)


See our ad on p. 57

Coen Company, Inc.

Universal Analyzers Inc. (10)

DUCT JOINTS, EXPANSION

ENCLOSURES

1 Duct joints, expansion - General


Energy Systems Products (1)

30 Fiberglass reinforced plastic (FRP)


60 Metal
80 Switchgear

DUCT SEALANT

CDR Systems Group (30,80)

American Polywater Corp

Elma Electronic (60)

DUCT WORK

Trachte Prefabricated Buildings (60,80)

1 Duct work - General

Custom Expansion Joints, Inc.

Chanute Manufacturing (1)

ENERGY MANAGEMENT
SYSTEMS/CONTROLS

Dustex Corporation (1)

Siemens Energy

Frenzelit North America

Woodward GmbH

Hose Master LLC

ENERGY STORAGE

Multifab Inc. Fabricators

Energy Storage and Power

FABRIC FILTERS (DESIGN)

ENVIRONMENTAL
COMPLIANCE

1 Fabric filters (design) - General


10 Pulse-jet
20 Reverse-air
30 Shaker

DUST-COLLECTION
10 Bags
20 Systems
Airtrol, Inc. (20)
Benetech (20)
CAMCORP, Inc.
Dustex Corporation (10,20)

ECONOMIZERS
1 Economizers - General
10 Nonsteaming
20 Steaming
Boiler Tube Co of America (10,20)
Cain Industries, Inc. (1)
Chanute Manufacturing (1)

1 Environmental compliance - General


20 Noise abatement, transformers
30 NOx control
40 SOx control

Hydro Dyne Inc. (1,10)

EXPANSION JOINTS
4-STAR Hose & Supply
Advanced Flexible Systems Inc
Allegheny Industrial Sales Inc
alloy bellows & precision welding
Braden Mfg LLC
ESP/Energy Systems Products, Inc

Allied Environmental Solutions, Inc (10)


Clyde Bergemann Inc

Basic Concepts (1,20)

Dustex Corporation (1,10,20,30)

Coen Company, Inc. (30)

Hitachi Power Systems America Ltd.


(10)
See our ad on cover 3

Lenox Instrument Company, Inc. (1,30)


Plant Professionals
Riley Power Inc (30)

FABRIC FILTERS (MATERIALS)

Southern Environmental (1,40)

Clyde Bergemann Inc

ELECTROSTATIC
PRECIPITATORS

ENVIRONMENTAL PRODUCTS

Clyde Bergemann Inc

Chesapeake Soda Clean, Inc.

FABRICATION

Hitachi Power Systems America Ltd.


See our ad on cover 3

EQUIPMENT (SURPLUS)

10 Metal
20 Steel

Commerce Lanes, Inc

CERREY SA de CV

EQUIPMENT PARTS (REPAIR/


REPLACE)

Chanute Manufacturing (20)

1 Equipment parts (repair/replace) General


10 Ash-handling equipment
20 Coal-handling equipment
25 Pulverizer

Moran Iron Works Inc. (20)

Nol-Tec Systems, Inc.


Southern Environmental

ELEVATORS
1 Elevators- General
10 Bucket
Alimak Hek, Inc (1,10)
Tower Elevator Systems, Inc. (1)

EMISSIONS-SAMPLING
SYSTEMS

Columbia Steel Casting Co, Inc


(1,10,20,25)
Conforma Clad Inc (20)

10 Extractive
20 In-situ
144

Aston Evaporative Services (1)

www.powermag.com

Dustex Corporation

CTI Industries, Inc.


Myrex Industries (20)
Process Equipment/Barron Industries
Tricor Metals (10)

FANS
1 Fans - General
30 Forced-draft
35 Servicing

POWER December 2011

PRODUCT DIRECTORY
40 Gas-recirculation
50 Induced-draft
60 Overfire-air
70 Primary-air
80 Scrubber-exhaust
90 Transformer
Boldrocchi Srl (1,30,40,50,60,70,80)
Canadian Buffalo
(1,30,35,40,50,60,70,80,90)
Industrial Marketing Systems
(1,30,35,40,50,60,70,80)

Applied Bolting
See our ad on p. 89
NORD-LOCK

FEEDERS
1 Feeders - General
50 Screw
Sodimate, Inc. - Bulk Handling System
Specialists (1)
St. Lawrence Steel (50)

FEEDWATER HEATERS
(CLOSED)
1 Feedwater heaters (closed) - General
10 High-pressure (downstream of
feedpump)
20 Low-pressure (upstream of feedpump)
American Exchanger Services (1,10,20)
Hydro Dyne Inc. (1,10,20)
Pick Heaters, Inc.

FILTER
Dollinger Filtration, an SPX Brand

FILTERS (TURBINES,
DIESELS)

1 Filters, dry - General


10 Cartridge-type
Dustex Corporation (1,10)

FILTERS, LIQUID
1 Filters, liquid - General
10 Activated-carbon
50 Polishing
100 Water intake

Babcock Power Environmental Inc


(20,30,40)
See our ad on p. 29
Hitachi Power Systems America Ltd.
(30,40)
See our ad on cover 3
Nol-Tec Systems, Inc.
Pick Heaters, Inc.

FUEL ECONOMIZERS

Clear Lake Filtration (1)

ALGAE-X International (AXI)

Croll-Reynolds Engineering Company


Inc (50)

FUEL MANAGMENT

Filtration & Membrane Technology, Inc.


(1,10,50,100)

Plant Professionals

FILTERS, WATER
Orival Water Filters

1 Fuel-handling equipment - General


20 Stacker/reclaimers
30 Stackers

FIRE-PROTECTION SYSTEMS

Benetech (1,20)

1 Fire-protection systems - General


10 CO2 systems

Roberts & Schaefer Company (1,20,30)


See our ad on p. 43

American Fire Technologies Inc (1,10)

Transcube USA (1)

Chemetron Fire Systems

FLASH TANKS
Thermal Engineering International
(USA) Inc

FLOWMETERS
1 Flowmeters - General
10 DP (differential pressure: orifice,
venturi)
20 Nonintrusive (magnetic, resonance,
ultrasonic)
30 PD (positive displacement :
Dighragm rortary vane)
40 Swirl, vortex-shedding
50 Totalizers
60 Turbine
70 Variable-area (plug, rotameter)
Control Plus Inc.
(1,10,20,30,40,50,60,70)
FLEXIM AMERICAS Corporation (1,20)

FUEL-HANDLING EQUIPMENT

FUEL-OIL HANDLING
EQUIPMENT
60 Storage tanks
Columbian TecTank Inc (60)

GAS TURBINE AIR-INTAKE


SYSTEMS
Braden Mfg LLC

GAS TURBINE AUXILIARY


SYSTEMS
Braden Mfg LLC

GAS TURBINE AUXILIARY


SYSTEM REPLACEMENT
PARTS
Braden Mfg LLC

GAS TURBINE EXHAUST


SYSTEMS

1 Filters (turbines, diesels) - General


10 Fuel-oil
20 Intake-air
30 Lube-oil

Spirax Sarco, Inc. (20,60,70)

Braden Mfg LLC (20)

GAS-HANDLING EQUIPMENT

Camfil Farr Power Systems (1,20)

1 Flue-gas desulfurization units - General


20 Spray dryer
30 Wet lime
40 Wet limestone

Freudenberg Filtration Technologies KG


(20)

Allied Environmental Solutions, Inc


(1,20,40)

GASKETS (TYPE)

Solberg Filtration & Separation


(1,20,30)

Babcock & Wilcox Company (20,30,40)

C.C. Jensen, Inc. Oil Maintenance


(1,10,30)

December 2011 POWER

FLUE-GAS
DESULFURIZATION UNITS

www.powermag.com

PRODUCT DIRECTORY

FASTENERS (ADHESIVES,
WASHERS, ETC)

FILTERS, DRY

Braden Mfg LLC


SELKIRK CORPORATION

Advanced Specialty Gases


Clyde Bergemann Inc

1 Gaskets (type) - General


Mid-Mountain Materials, Inc. (1)
145

PRODUCT DIRECTORY
GAUGES PRESSURE
10 Deflection ( bellows Bourdon-tube
diaphragm)

40 Watertube

Pick Heaters, Inc.

Rentech Boiler Systems, Inc (40)

Sentry Equipment Corp (1,30,60,80)

GENERATORS, STEAM

HEATERS COAL THAWING


(INFRARED)

Automation Products, Inc. - DYNATROL


Division (1)
Orion Instruments LLC

ANSALDO CALDAIE SPA (1,20,50,100)

Pressure Systems, Inc

Hitachi Power Systems America Ltd.


(1,20,50,60)
See our ad on cover 3

GAUGES, LIQUID-LEVEL
1 Gauges, liquid-level - General

PRODUCT DIRECTORY

Hydro Dyne Inc. (1,20,30,35,80,90,100)

1 Generators, steam - General


20 Boilers
40 Firetube
50 Heat-recovery
60 Nuclear
80 Watertube, industrial
90 Watertube, special - design
100 Watertube, utility

Winters Instruments (10)

GEARS
1 Gears - General
10 Engineered gear drives
Allen Gears Ltd (1,10)
Amarillo Gear Company (1,10)
Schmidt Industries

Rentech Boiler Systems, Inc


(1,20,50,80,90)
Siemens Energy
Wabash Power Equipment Company
(20,40,80,100)

Voith Turbo GmbH & Co. KG (1,10)

GENERATORS/ENGINES,
DIESEL

GENERATOR/ENGINE SETS,
IC

ABC - Diesel

Coffman Electrical Equipment Company


MWM GmbH

GENERATOR/TURBINE SETS,
GAS (GT)
Belyea Company Inc
Hitachi Power Systems America Ltd.
See our ad on cover 3
Kawasaki Gas Turbines-Americas
Rolls-Royce plc
See our ad on p. 5

Advanced Detection Systems, LLC

HEATERS, AIR
1 Heaters, air - General
Armstrong-Hunt, Inc. (1)
Coen Company, Inc. (1)
Tioga Air Heaters (1)

HEATERS, THERMAL-LIQUID
Pick Heaters, Inc.
ProSonix

HOISTS
1 Hoists - General
10 Blocks
30 Lever
40 Powered
Columbus McKinnon (1)

Belyea Company Inc

Cornerstone Material Handling Inc.


(1,10,30,40)

EPG Enginuit Portable Grid

Harrington Hoists, Inc (1)

Wabash Power Equipment Company

GRADUATED
STRAIGHTENING GRID
Fuel Tech Inc.
See our ad on p. 13

GT COMPRESSOR CLEANING
SYSTEMS
Rochem Technical Services

INSPECTION EQUIPMENT
20 Confined spaces
AcousticEye
Aqua-Vu (20)
Karl Storz Endoscopy

INSULATION ( ENERGY
MANAGMENT)
Advanced Industrial Systems Inc.

Siemens Energy

HEAT EXCHANGERS

GENERATORS

INSULATION (GENERAL)

GENERATORS, ELECTRIC

1 Heat exchangers - General


20 Bare-tube
30 Finned-tube
35 Tube failure analysis
45 Tube cleaners
60 Heat-recovery
80 Shell-and-tube
90 Straight-tube
100 U-tube

1 Generators, electric - General


10 Continuous-duty
20 Standby

Alfa Laval

LANDFILLS

Chanute Manufacturing
(20,30,60,90,100)

Nova Analytical Systems Inc.

Dustex Corporation
(1,20,45,60,80,90,100)

LIGHTS

BRUSH Turbogenerators
Caterpillar Inc.
Mechanical Dynamics & Analysis, Ltd.
Wabash Power Equipment Company

APOYOTEC (Plantas de Energia) (10)


Power Source International (1,10,20)

146

GENERATORS, HOT-WATER

Hitachi Power Systems America Ltd.


See our ad on cover 3
www.powermag.com

Triangle Enterprises, Inc.

INVERTERS
10 DC/AC
SMA America (10)

GulfRim Navigation
LEDtronics, Inc.

POWER December 2011

PRODUCT DIRECTORY
Rig-A-Lite
TWR Lighting, Inc./Orga Aviation

LIME STONE SUPPLIERS


Palmetto Depot Services LLC

LININGS

Airfloat, LLC (1)


AUMUND Fordertechnik GmbH (1)
B&W Mechanical Handling Ltd. (1)
Benetech (1,10)
Clyde Bergemann Inc
Jeffrey Rader Corporation
See our ad on p. 94

280 Moisture
290 pH monitors
350 smoke
380 Transformer
Arizona Instrument LLC
(150,180,200,280)
Coen Company, Inc. (1,130)

Nol-Tec Systems, Inc.

ENERGY EQUIPMENTS & PRODUCTS


COMPANY (280)

Palfinger North America (1)

General Monitors (130,150,170,180)

10 Duct
40 Oil-containment pits
50 Scrubbers
60 Stack
70 Tank

SCHADE Lagertechnik GmbH

Phenix Technologies Inc (100)

Ceilcote Products / International Paint


LLC (10,40,50,60,70)

Chatham Steel Corporation (1)


See our ad on p. 9

Columbian TecTank Inc (40,70)

Columbia Steel Casting Co, Inc

LOAD MANAGEMENT
EQUIPMENT/SYSTEMS
ALEASOFT
Cannon Technologies, Inc
Cooper Power Systems

LOCATORS/TRACERS
b3o enviroTek

LOCKS
Superior Interlock Corporation

LUBE-OIL COOLERS
Hydro Dyne Inc.

1 Metals General

METERS/INSTRUMENTS
20 Ammeters
60 Calibration
80 Clamp-on
120 Frequency
130 Galvanometers
190 Manometers
200 Multimeter
210 Ohmmeters
230 Panel
260 Power
270 Power-factor
320 Revenue-meters
370 Tachometers
400 Totalizer
410 VAr
430 Voltmeter
450 Voltmeter high-voltage
460 Voltmeter low voltage
480 Wattmeter

Weschler Instruments (380)


Xtralis (150,170,180,350)

MOTORS, INDUCTION
(FRAMES)
1 Motors, induction (frames) General
10 Enclosed
20 Fan-cooled
Hyundai Heavy Industries Co. (1,10,20)

NITROGEN-OXIDES
CONTROL
1 Nitrogen-oxides control - General
5 Combustion modeling & NOx control
10 Low-NOx combustion systems
30 SCR catalysts
40 SCR systems
50 SNCR systems (urea, NH3)
Allied Environmental Solutions, Inc (40)
Braden Mfg LLC (40)
Coen Company, Inc. (1,5,10)
Fuel Tech Inc. (1,5,10,30,40,50)
See our ad on p. 13

LUBRICANTS

Ametek Power Instruments (320)

40 Synthetic

Hoyt Electrical Instrument Works Inc.


(260)

Hitachi Power Systems America Ltd.


(1,5,10,30,40)
See our ad on cover 3

Weschler Instruments (230)

Nol-Tec Systems, Inc.

Yokogawa Corporation of America


(20,60,80,120,130,190,200,210,
230,260,270,370,400,410,430,450,
460,480)
See our ad on p. 72

Riley Power Inc (5,10,40,50)

MONITORS/DETECTORS/
INDICATORS

Sentry Equipment Corp (1)

American Chemical Technologies, Inc.


(40)
ExxonMobil Lubricants
& Petroleum Specialties
(Mobil Industrial Lubricants)
See our ads on pages 2 & 3
Shell Lubricants

MANHOLES
1 Manholes - General
Babcock Power Services Inc (1)
See our ad on p. 29

MATERIALS-HANDLING
EQUIPMENT
1 Materials-handling equipment - General
10 Railcar hopper unloaders

December 2011 POWER

1 Monitors/detectors/indicators General
20 Conductivity
100 Fault locators
130 Flame
150 Gas
170 Gases, combustible
180 Gases poisonous
200 Humidity
www.powermag.com

PRODUCT DIRECTORY

Hadek Protective Systems (10,60)

Sentry Equipment Corp (1,20,290)

METALS

NUCLEAR METERS/
INSTRUMENTS
1 Nuclear meters/instruments General

NUCLEAR MONITORS/
DETECTORS/INDICATORS
1 Nuclear monitors/detectors/indicators
- General
30 Contamination
Sentry Equipment Corp (1,30)

147

PRODUCT DIRECTORY
NUCLEAR PRESSURE
VESSELS

40 High-alloy steel
70 Miscellaneous-metal
Boiler Tube Co of America (40,70)

Hitachi Power Systems America Ltd.


See our ad on cover 3

PIPE FITTINGS (TYPE)

Thermal Engineering International


(USA) Inc

Anvil International (30)

NUCLEAR RADWASTE
TREATMENT EQUIPMENT
Hitachi Power Systems America Ltd.
See our ad on cover 3

PRODUCT DIRECTORY

PIPE FITTINGS (MATERIALS)

NUCLEAR REACTORS
AREVA Inc.
See our ad on p. 23

30 Groove-end

PIPE SUPPORTS
1 Pipe supports - General
10 Constant-support
20 Rigid
30 Snubbers
Anvil Engineered Pipe Supports
(1,10,20,30)
Binder Group Pty Ltd (1,10,20,30)

1 Pressure vessels (code/non-code) General


Benjamin Company (1)

PROTECTORS,
INTERFERENCE,
COMMUNICATION AND
RELAY
Alstom Projects India Limited
Beckwith Electric Co., Inc.

PULVERIZERS
20 Ball mill
30 Ball-and-race
35 Parts, replacement wear
40 Roller-and-race
50 Rotating vane conversions

OIL SPILL/LEAK CONTROL


EQUIPMENT

PIPE TOOLS
20 Portable

Babcock & Wilcox Company


(20,30,35,40,50)

1 Oil spill/leak control equipment


General

E.H. Wachs (20)

Columbia Steel Casting Co, Inc (35)

Metabo

Hitachi Power Systems America Ltd.


(40)
See our ad on cover 3

InduMar Products, Inc. (1)

OIL-HANDLING EQUIPMENT
1 Oil-handling equipment - General
5 Filtration systems
20 Purifiers
30 Reclamation

PLUGS
10 Heat exchanger
20 Tube
Thermal Engineering International
(USA) Inc (10,20)

Kleentek (5)

POLE ACCESSORIES

OILKLEEN, Inc. (1,5,20,30)

Vandal Shields

PACKING

POLES, DISTRIBUTION

Mechanical Dynamics & Analysis, Ltd.

1 Poles, distribution - General


50 Wood

Schmidt Industries
STAR (Steam Turbine Alternative Resources)
TurboCare Inc
See our ad on p. 30

PIPE
1 Pipe - General
80 Iron/steel
120 Plastic
130 Thermoplastic
Georg Fischer Piping Systems Ltd
(120,130)

Brown Wood Preserving Co., Inc. (1,50)

POLES, TRANSMISSION
60 Steel
Sabre Tubular Structures (60)

POWER SUPPLIES
1 Power supplies - General
10 High voltage
20 Uninterruptible
Ametek, Solidstate Controls (20)

Triple-S Steel Supply (80)

APC by Schneider Electric (1,20)

U. S. Metals (1)

Computer Power Supply (1,10,20)

PIPE BENDS/FABRICATION

Phenix Technologies Inc (10)

Chanute Manufacturing

PRESSURE SEAL HEADS

Haberberger, Incorporated

Schmidt Industries

Mechanical & Ceramic Solutions, Inc.


148

PRESSURE VESSELS (CODE/


NON-CODE)

www.powermag.com

Wabash Power Equipment Company

PUMPS (GENERAL)
1 Pumps (general) - General
10 Ash-service
20 Boiler-feed
30 Condensate
40 Condenser-circulating
50 Dewatering
60 Diaphragm
65 End suction
70 Fire
80 General-service, base-mounted
90 General-service, close-coupled
100 General-service, frame-mounted
105 Horizontal split-case
110 Liquid-ring
120 Metering
130 Mixed-flow
140 Oil
150 Propeller
160 Reciprocating
170 Rotary
180 Screw
190 Sewage/sludge
200 Slurry
205 Submersible
210 Sump
220 Turbine, deep-well
230 Turbine regenerative
240 Vacuum
250 Vacuum, liquid-ring
260 Vacuum, mechanical
270 Water
Andritz AG

POWER December 2011

PRODUCT DIRECTORY

30 Trace elements
40 Wastewater
Sentry Equipment Corp (1,10,20,30,40)

CAT PUMPS (1,10,20,30,40,50,65,


70,80,90,100,140,150,160,210)
Eliminator Slurry Pumps (1,10,50,65,
190,200,205,210,270)
Flowrox Inc. (1,120,170,190,200,240)
Hydro, Inc.
Pumping Solutions, Inc. (1,10,20,30,
40,50,60,65,80,90,105,110,120,130,
140,150,160,170,180,190,200,205,
210,220,230,240,250,260,270)

Siemens Energy

SCAFFOLDING
Atlantic Plant Services
BHI Energy
See our ad on p. 15

TurboCare Inc (1,20)


See our ad on p. 30

SECURITY EQUIPMENT/
SYSTEMS
EK Ekcessories
Southwest Microwave, Inc.
Winsted Corporation

SEISMIC EQUIPMENT

Brand Energy & Infrastructure Services

10 Instrumentation

Randall Industries

Syscom Instruments S.A. (10)

Safway Services LLC

SCALES, WEIGHING

SENSORS, CURRENT AND


VOLTAGE

Berthold Technologies USA, LLC

Onset Computer Corporation

SCR BYPASS SYSTEMS

SENSORS, TEMPERATURE

Albert Products (35)

Clyde Bergemann Inc

40 Thermistors

Heyl & Patterson,Inc. (1,30,35,40)

SCREENS, LIQUID

RECLOSERS

10 Bar
30 Traveling

SHIELDS

RECTIFIERS

Superior Water Screen Company, Inc


(10,30)

Boiler Tube Co of America (20)

Corrosion Control Inc.

SCRUBBERS & AUXILIARIES

REELS, STEEL FOR CABLE

1 Scrubbers & auxiliaries - General


10 Dry
30 In-duct sorbent injection
50 Packed-tower
60 Spray-tower
70 Tray-column
90 Venturi

1 Railroad/railcar equipment - general


30 Railcar dumpers (rotary)
35 Railcar hopper unloaders
40 Railcar positioners

Siemens Energy

Nesco Sales & Rentals

RELAYS
Basler Electric Co
Siemens Energy

AMWEI Thermistor Co., Ltd. (40)

20 Thermal

Allied Environmental Solutions, Inc


(10)

SILENCERS (GENERAL)
1 Silencers (general) - General
10 Duct
20 Exhaust
30 Piping
Braden Mfg LLC (20)
Sound Technologies (1,10,20,30)

SILOS

Babcock & Wilcox Company (10,60,70)

10 Concrete
20 Steel

Clyde Bergemann Inc

Columbian TecTank Inc (20)

Hitachi Power Systems America Ltd.


(1,30,60,90)
See our ad on cover 3

Hoffmann, Inc (10)

Komline-Sanderson (10)
McGill AirClean LLC (1,10,30,50,60)

1 Simulators - General
10 System

Pick Heaters, Inc.

Siemens Energy

GSE Systems, Inc (1,10)

RIGGING EQUIPMENT

SEALS (TYPE)

Aeris Corp

1 Seals (type) - General


10 Mechanical
20 Steam turbine

SLAG REMOVAL SYSTEMS

Hitachi Power Systems America Ltd.


(1,10,20)
See our ad on cover 3

SOLAR BOILERS

RESINS, ION EXCHANGE


1 Resins, ion exchange - General
10 Beaded
Pick Heaters, Inc.
Sentry Equipment Corp (1,10)

REVERSE-OSMOSIS
EQUIPMENT

Sterling Lumber Company

SAMPLERS
1 Samplers - General
10 Coal
20 Liquid

December 2011 POWER

PRODUCT DIRECTORY

RAILROAD/RAILCAR
EQUIPMENT

SCADA

Paragon Airheater Technologies (1,10)

SIMULATORS

RTDS Technologies Inc. (10)

Clyde Bergemann Inc

Aalborg CSP A/S

Mechanical Dynamics & Analysis, Ltd.


(1,10,20)
www.powermag.com

149

PRODUCT DIRECTORY
SOLAR COLLECTOR SYSTEMS

10 Chaingrate
20 Water-cooled vibrating grate

1 Switches - General
10 Air, group-operated
50 Grounding

Detroit Stoker Company (10,20)


See our ad on p. 62

SkyFuel, Inc. (20)

STOKERS, SPREADER

Siemens Energy

SolarDock

50 Traveling grate
60 Vibrating grate

SWITCHGEAR

SOLAR HEAT EXCHANGERS

Detroit Stoker Company (50,60)


See our ad on p. 62

1 Switchgear General

STOKERS, UNDERFEED
10 Multiple retort
20 Single Retort

Hitachi Power Systems America Ltd.


(1)
See our ad on cover 3

Detroit Stoker Company (10,20)


See our ad on p. 62

Siemens Energy

SOLAR PV
REW Solar USA

PRODUCT DIRECTORY

SWITCHES

20 Heat generation

Struthers Wells

SOLID-WASTE-HANDLING
EQUIPMENT (INDUSTRIAL/
MUNICIPAL)

CORIMPEX USA, Inc. (1,10,50)

Belyea Company Inc (1)

SWITCHGEAR CUBICLES

STORAGE

TANKS

Corrosion Engineering (70)

1 Storage - General
10 Bins
20 Hazardous materials
30 Units

1 Tanks - General
10 Reaction
20 Settling
30 Storage

Warren & Baerg Manufacturing, Inc. (1)

Big Top Manufacturing (1,10,20,30)

Allegheny Industrial Sales Inc (30)

ClearSpan Fabric Structures (1)

Columbian TecTank Inc (10,20,30)

STRINGING EQUIPMENT

CONVAULT INC (1,30)

1 Solid-waste-handling equipment
(industrial/municipal - General)
70 Trommel screens

SOOTBLOWERS
1 Sootblowers General
10 Acoustic
20 Air
25 Detonation
30 Steam
40 Water
Advanced Acoustic Technologies, LLC
(10)
Analytec Corp (10)
Clyde Bergemann Inc (1,10,20,30,40)
Diamond Power International Inc.
(1,20,25,30,40)

SORBENT INJECTION
Clyde Bergemann Inc
Fuel Tech Inc.
See our ad on p. 13
Nol-Tec Systems, Inc.
United Conveyor Corporation

SPRAY NOZZLES
1 Spray nozzles General
Rochem Technical Services (1)

STACKS
1 Stacks - General
Hadek Protective Systems (1)
Hoffmann, Inc (1)

150

STOKERS, MASS BURNING

Nesco Sales & Rentals

Pittsburg Tank & Tower Maintenance


Co. (1)

SUBSTATIONS (GENERAL)

TENSIONERS

1 Substations (general) - General


30 Metal-enclosed
50 Outdoor
60 Packaged

1 Tensioners General
Nesco Sales & Rentals (1)

Belyea Company Inc (1)

TERMINAL BLOCKS

Beta Engineering

HOPPY Industrial Co., Ltd.

DIS-TRAN Packaged Substations, LLC


(1,50,60)

TEST EQUIPMENT

Parkline, Inc. (30)


See our ad on p. 56
SUBNET Solutions Inc. (1)
Tatman Associates Inc (1,50,60)

SUBSTATIONS (MATERIALS)
20 Steel
30 Packaged
DIS-TRAN Packaged Substations, LLC
(20,30)

SULFUR HEXAFLUORIDE
Nova Analytical Systems Inc.

1 Test equipment - General


10 Cable faults
30 Circuit breaker
60 Ground resistance
70 HV impulse
80 HV test sets
90 High current
100 Insulation
110 Load banks
120 Oil
180 Power-factor
200 Reclosers
210 Relay
215 SF6
240 Testing standards
250 Tools electric
260 Transducers

SUPPORT EQUIPMENT
(GENERAL)

American Aerospace Controls, Inc (260)

Chromium Corporation

ComRent International (1,10)

www.powermag.com

AMREL/AMERICAN RELIANCE (1,10)

POWER December 2011

PRODUCT DIRECTORY
Doble Engineering Company
(10,30,100,120,180,210,215)
Fluke Corporation (1,240,250)
Haefely Test AG (1,10,70,80,90)
Nol-Tec Systems, Inc.

(10,20,30,40,45,50,60,70,80)

TURBINE

Panglobal Training Systems Ltd.


(Publishers of Power Engineering Training Systems Courseware)
(10,20,30,40,45,50,60,70,80)

Alstom Thermal Services

TRANSDUCERS
Measurement Specialties Inc

ConocoPhillips
See our ad on cover 2
Schmidt Industries
Wabash Power Equipment Company

TURBINE BLADES

Phenix Technologies Inc


(1,30,70,80,90,100,120,200)

TRANSFORMERS

Teseq (60)

Siemens Energy

TEST EQUIPMENT,
NONDESTRUCTIVE

Wabash Power Equipment Company (1)

Hitachi Power Systems America Ltd.


See our ad on cover 3

TRANSFORMERS,
DISTRIBUTION

Mechanical Dynamics & Analysis, Ltd.


(1,20)

Belyea Company Inc

TurboCare Inc (1,10,20)


See our ad on p. 30

TRANSMISSION
MECHANICAL

TURBINE COMPONENTS

Phenix Technologies Inc (1)

TOOLS
30 Hand
50 Hydraulic
60 Portable
Associated Electric Products,Inc
(50,60)
C.S. Osborne & Co (30)

30 Gears gear boxes


NORD Drivesystems - Getriebebau NORD
GmbH & Co. KG (30)

TUBE CLEANERS

1 Turbine blades - General


10 Gas turbine
20 Steam turbine

20 Gears & Bearings


30 Turbine Sub-Components, Mechanical
50 Bearings
70 Hubs, Rings, Forged Components
90 Other Turbine ComponentsTurbine/
rotor/shell repair

TORQUE CONVERTERS

Conco Systems Inc. (1)

Hitachi Power Systems America Ltd.


(50)
See our ad on cover 3

Voith Turbo GmbH & Co. KG

TUBES

Turbo Parts, LLC (20,30,50,70,90)

TRAILERS

VALTIMET

10 Cable splicer
70 Pole
80 Reel

TUBES, MATERIALS

TURBINE/ROTOR/SHELL
REPAIR

Nesco Sales & Rentals (10,70,80)

TRAILERS/PRE-FAB
BUILDINGS/SHELTERS
1 Trailers/pre-fab buildings/shelters
General

1 Tube cleaners - General

1 Tubes, materials - General


10 Admiralty metal
30 Carbon steel
50 Stainless steel
60 Titanium
Boiler Tube Co of America (10,30,50)
VALTIMET (1,50,60)

ThermaSteel Corp (1)

TUBES, REPLACEMENT

TRAINING MATERIALS
TEXTBOOKS, WORKBOOKS,
MEDIA, ONLINE LEARNING
PORTAL

1 Tubes, replacement - General


10 Boilers
20 Condensers
30 Heat exchangers

10 Environmental
20 Equipment
30 Fossil
40 Management and Supervisory
45 Online LMSEducator supported
and Self Directed
50 Operation and Maintenance
60 Safety
70 Thermal Management
80 Training General
Global Training Solutions Inc

December 2011 POWER

Chanute Manufacturing (1,10)

Schmidt Industries

TURBINES GEOTHERMAL
TurboCare Inc
See our ad on p. 30

TURBINES, GAS
1 Turbines, gas - General
13 Engineering
20 Overhauling
30 Rebuilding
40 Servicing
50 Spare
Applied Gas Turbines (1)

Plymouth Tube Co (10,20,30)

Ares Technology, LLC


(1,13,20,30,40,50)

Riley Power Inc (10)

Chromalloy (1)

VALTIMET (1,20,30)

Hitachi Power Systems America Ltd.


(1)
See our ad on cover 3

TUBING
1 Tubing - General
50 Stainless-steel

Siemens Energy

VALTIMET (1,50)

Wabash Power Equipment Company (1)

www.powermag.com

PRODUCT DIRECTORY

1 Test equipment, nondestructive


General

1 Transformers - General

Turbine Energy Solutions, LLC (1,50)

151

PRODUCT DIRECTORY

PRODUCT DIRECTORY

Arc Machines, Inc.


Eutectic Corporation

Champion Valves, Inc. (1,60)

1 Turbines, steam - General


10 Coupling bolts
15 Induction bolt heating
20 Generator-drive
30 Mechanical-drive, multistage
40 Mechanical-drive, single-stage
50 Spare

Clyde Bergemann Inc

WINDINGS

Conval, Inc (1,20,60,80,100,120,


130,160,170,250)

10 Generator/motor

Hitachi Power Systems America Ltd.


(1)
See our ad on cover 3

SERVICE DIRECTORY

WELDING EQUIPMENT

TURBINES, STEAM

Dresser-Rand (1,20,30,40,50)

Mechanical Dynamics & Analysis, Ltd.


(1,10,40,50,60,70)
Siemens Energy
Wabash Power Equipment Company (1)

TURBINES, WIND
Siemens Energy

VALVE ACTUATORS/
POSITIONERS
1 Valve actuators/positioners - General
10 Electric, motor
20 Electric, solenoid
Alcon Solenoid Valves (20)
Beck, Harold Beck & Sons Inc (1,10)
Flowserve (1,10)

VALVES
1 Valves - General
10 Abrasion-resistant
20 Angle
30 Ball
40 Butterfly
60 Check
70 Control
80 Corrosion-resistant
90 Diaphragm
100 Drain
110 Four-way
120 Gate
130 Globe
140 Instrument
150 Metering
160 Needle
170 Nuclear
180 Pinch
190 Plug
210 Safety/relief
220 Solenoid
230 Special-purpose
240 Test equipment
250 Three-way
Asco Valve Inc (220)

152

CCI (Control Component Inc) (1,10,20,


30,40,60,70,80,90,100,110,120,130,
140,150,170,190,210)

Copes-Vulcan, An SPX Brand


(1,70,130,170)
Emerson Process Management, Fisher
(1,20,30,40,70,80,130,170,250)
Flowrox Oy (former Larox Flowsys Oy)
(1,30,70,120,180,240)
Flowserve
(1,20,30,40,60,70,120,130,170)

Mechanical Dynamics & Analysis, Ltd.


(10)

WIRE
Anixter

WIRING PRODUCTS
BMC P. Ltd.

Petro-Valve

SERVICE DIRECTORY

PSB Industries (1,30,60,70,100,170)


Schmidt Industries

VEHICLES/TRUCKS/TRUCK
BODIES
80 Specalized
Omaha Standard PALFINGER (80)

VIBRATION ISOLATORS

ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY
GAS TURBINE REBUILDING
Sulzer Turbo Services

AIR-PREHEATER CLEANING
Corrosion Monitoring Services

Fabreeka International, Inc.

ALIGNMENT

VOLTAGE REGULATORS

1 Alignment - General
10 Shaft
20 Turbine component

Phenix Technologies Inc


Siemens Energy

WASTE-TO-ENERGY SYSTEMS
Riley Power Inc

WASTEWATER TREATMENT
SYSTEMS

Mechanical Dynamics & Analysis, Ltd.


(1,10,20)

ASSET RECOVERY
SRP

Amiad Filtration Systems

ASSOCIATION,
PROFESSIONAL AND/OR
TRADE

Aquatech International Corporation

American Wind Energy Association

Mercer International Oil Water Separators

Signal-X-Press Concept

Pick Heaters, Inc.

Ukraine Partnership Bureau

Smith & Loveless Inc.

BALANCING

WATER TREATMENT
SYSTEMS

Mechanical Dynamics & Analysis, Ltd.

1 Water treatment systems - General


5 Electrodeionization
H2O Innovation USA, Inc (1,5)
NAB (1)

WEB-BASED PRODUCTS
Atlas Business Solutions, Inc. (ABS)
www.powermag.com

TurboCare Inc
See our ad on p. 30

BOILER OPTIMIZATION
Clyde Bergemann Inc
Fuel Tech Inc.
See our ad on p. 13
Hitachi Power Systems America Ltd.
See our ad on cover 3

POWER December 2011

SERVICE DIRECTORY
BOILERS
1 Boilers - General
10 Cleaning, chemical
20 Deslagging explosive
BORSIG GmbH (1)
Cleaver-Brooks (1)
See our ad on p. 35
Expro Services Inc. (1,20)
Hitachi Power Systems America Ltd.
See our ad on cover 3
Rentech Boiler Systems, Inc
Siemens Energy
Vogt Power International Inc 10

CABLE RESTORATION AND


CONDITION ASSESSMENT
Novinium Cable LIfe Extension

CERTIFICATION & TESTING


Laboratory Testing Inc.

CLEANING (EQUIPMENT)

1 Computing services/software - General


5 Computer modeling
10 Database services
20 Electronic documentation services
35 Information management
40 Software design
EcoSys (1,10,20,35,40)
Sword CTSpace (1,5,10,20,35)

CONDENSERS
10 Cleaning
20 Inspection
40 Plugging
50 Testing
60 Retubing

Belgrave Management Ltd (30,40,60)


Cogen Power Inc (1,40,60)
Commodities Consulting
& Asset Management COMCAM
(1,20,30,40,45,55,90)

Hydro Dyne Inc. (10,20,40,50,60)

General Physics Corporation (1,10,20)


See our ad on p. 7

RetubeCo, Inc. (20,40,50,60)

LAP Power Engineering (60)

CONSTRUCTION SERVICES

M+P Labs, Inc. (1,50)

1 Construction services - General


40 Stacks
50 Substations
60 Transmission line
Babcock Power Services Inc (1)
See our ad on p. 29
BE&K Construction Company, LLC (1)
Cambria Contracting, Inc.

Cryogenic Institute of New England,


Inc.

CB&I (1)

COMMUNICATIONS
SERVICES

Allegro (10,30)

Construction Business Associates, LLC


(1,33,40,60)

AIMS LLC (1,20)

MinTech Enterprises

45 Market structures
50 Materials
55 Organization/Industrial Development
60 Power generation systems
70 Soil mechanics
75 Substation automation
80 System engineering
90 T&D economics
100 Telecommunications

Conomos Industrial Services (1)


Construction Business Associates, LLC
(1,50,60)
Kiewit/TIC (1)
See our ad on p. 25

Plant Professionals
Sargent & Lundy LLC (1,10,20,30,33,35,
37,40,45,50,60,70,75,80,90,100)
Stanley Consultants, Inc. (1)
URS, Power Business Unit (1)

CONSULTING/SERVICES,
ENVIRONMENTAL
1 Consulting/services, environmental General
5 Acoustics, transformer
10 Continuous emissions monitoring
15 Emissions control
20 Emissions testing
30 Noise control

Matrix Service

Airflow Sciences Corporation


(1,10,15,20)

Political Robo Calls. GOTV Robocalls (1)

S & B Engineers and Constructors, Ltd.


(1,40)

Albemarle Sorbent Technologies (1)


See our ad on p. 37

COMPRESSORS

The Shaw Group

Alchemy Consultants, Inc. (1)

URS, Power Business Unit (1)

Plant Professionals

CONSULTANT

Sargent & Lundy LLC (1,10,15,30)

1 Communications services General


Crystal Communication Ltd.

1 Compressors - General
10 Overhauling
20 Rebuilding
30 Servicing
CECO Compressor Engineering Corp
Gardner Denver (1)
MAN Turbo Inc USA
TurboCare Inc (1,10,20,30)
See our ad on p. 30

December 2011 POWER

GSI - Generator Services Intl, Inc


Hurst Technologies Corp.

CONSULTING
1 Consulting - General
10 Computer/software
20 Consulting services information
systems
30 Energy management
33 Field Service
35 Independent system operators
37 Inspection
40 Management
www.powermag.com

SERVICE DIRECTORY

1 Cleaning (equipment) - General


20 Vacuuming

COMPUTING SERVICES/
SOFTWARE

Stanley Consultants, Inc. (1)


URS, Power Business Unit (1)

COOLING TOWERS
1 Cooling towers - General
10 Repairing
20 Servicing
30 Upgrading
Cooling Tower Technologies, Inc.
(1,10,20)
SPX Cooling Technoogies (1,10,20,30)
153

SERVICE DIRECTORY
CRANES/DERRICKS
Barnhart

DESIGN SERVICES
1 Design services - General
Sargent & Lundy LLC (1)
URS, Power Business Unit (1)

EFFICIENCY IMPROVEMENT
UPGRADES
Rochem Technical Services

ELECTROSTATIC
PRECIPITATORS

SERVICE DIRECTORY

20 Rebuilding
60 Repairing
70 Upgrading

KnightHawk Engineering

1 Energy system management - General


52 Performance monitoring
57 Performance optimization
70 Risk management
80 System/plant maintenance
85 System/plant modifications and/or
improvements
90 System/plant operation

Plant Professionals

Babcock Power Services Inc


(52,57,80,85,90)
See our ad on p. 29
Calpine Corp (1,70,90)

ENGINEERING SERVICES
Bechtel
BHI Energy
See our ad on p. 15
Bilfinger Berger Power Services GmbH
Knight Pisold Ltd.

Allied Environmental Solutions, Inc

Mechanical Dynamics & Analysis, Ltd.

Beltran Technologies, Inc. (20,60,70)


Nol-Tec Systems, Inc.

Structural Integrity Associates, Inc.


See our ad on p. 1

Southern Environmental

Tech Center

ENERGY EFFICIENCY
SERVICES

ENGINEERING STUDIES

1 Energy efficiency services - General


30 Energy audits
40 Equipment design
50 Equipment installation and/or
maintenance
Babcock Power Services Inc
(30,40,50)
See our ad on p. 29
TurboCare Inc (1,50)
See our ad on p. 30

ENERGY SERVICES
1 Energy services - General
10 Consulting
20 Plant or system operations
30 Plant or system maintenance &
other
40 Products & Installation
3Degrees (1)
Aptech Engineering Services Inc
(10,20,30)
General Physics Corporation
(1,10,20,40)
See our ad on p. 7
Jonas, Inc (10)

154

ENERGY SYSTEM
MANAGEMENT

Alden

ENGINEERING, DESIGN
SERVICES
1 Engineering, design services - General
10 Distribution systems
20 Environmental
22 Field Service
23 Noise abatement
26 Protective systems
30 Stacks
40 Substations
50 Transmission line
Aquatic Sciences L.P. (1)
Benetech (1,20,22)
Beu-Math Engineering, Inc. (1)
BICE Engineering and Consulting
(1,10,26)
CCC Group Inc., Air Control Science
Division (1)

MAVEN POWER, LLC (1)


River Consulting, LLC
(1,10,20,22,30,40,50)
Sargent & Lundy LLC
(1,10,20,22,23,26,30,40,50)
Stanley Consultants, Inc.
(1,10,20,40,50)
TurboCare Inc (1,22)
See our ad on p. 30
URS, Power Business Unit (1)
Valdes Engineering Company (1,10,40)
Zachry Engineering Corporation
(1,20,40)

ENVIRONMENTAL
CONSULTING
Sargent & Lundy LLC

EXECUTIVE SEARCH
CONSULTANTS
Sanford Rose Opportunity Center

FANS
1 Fans - General
30 Forced-draft
40 Gas-recirculation
50 Induced-draft
60 Overfire-air
70 Primary-air
80 Scrubber-exhaust
Boldrocchi Srl (1,30,40,50,60,70,80)

FEEDWATER HEATERS
(CLOSED)
1 Feedwater heaters (closed) - General
10 Rebuilding
20 Removal/Installation
30 Repair
40 Retubing/Rebundle
50 Tube plugging
60 Tube sleeving
70 Welding
Hydro Dyne Inc.
(1,10,20,30,40,50,60,70)
RetubeCo, Inc. (1,10,30,40,50)

CE Power Solutions (1,10,22,26,40)

FILTERS, FABRIC

CH2M HILL (1,10,20,22,23,26,30,40,50)

Southern Environmental

CRC Engineering, P.C. (1,10,22)


Design Analysis Services (1)

PIC Group, Inc. (1,10,20,30,40)


See our ad on p. 27

Doosan Engineering & Services, LLC ( A


Burns & Roe - Doosan Projects Alliance)
(1)

Stanley Consultants, Inc. (1)

GAI Consultants, Inc. (50)


www.powermag.com

FINANCIAL SERVICES
Altec Capital Services, LLC

POWER December 2011

SERVICE DIRECTORY

HEAT EXCHANGERS

MAINTENANCE SERVICES/
PRODUCTS

Sentry Equipment Corp (1)

10 Rebuilding
15 Repair
20 Bare-tube
30 Finned-tube
35 Tube failure analysis
40 Tube plugging
50 Upgrading coils
60 Welding

FLOW MODELING

Colmac Coil Manufacturing, Inc.


(20,30,60)

CGV Engineering Services Ltd

Braden Mfg LLC

Condenser & Chiller Services, Inc.


(20,30)

Construction Techniques, Inc

FLUE-GAS CONDITIONING
SYSTEM SERVICES

Hydro Dyne Inc. (10,15,20,35,40,60)

Kafko Intl. Ltd.

Fuel Tech Inc.


See our ad on p. 13

RetubeCo, Inc. (10,15,20,35,40)

Mechanical Dynamics & Analysis, Ltd.

Struthers Wells

TurboCare Inc
See our ad on p. 30

FLOW MEASUREMENT/
CALIBRATION SERVICES
1 Flow measurement/calibration
services General

FUEL SUPPLY SERVICES


Bannerstone Energy

Vogt Power International Inc


(10,20,30,35,40,50,60)

A.J. Weller Corporation


ASB Industries, Inc.
Benetech
BHI Energy
See our ad on p. 15
ClearView Monitoring Solutions

MAPS/MAPPING SERVICES
Geospatial Corporation

1 Inspection services - General


20 Leak detection

MARKETERS

Jamko Technical Solutions, Inc. (1)

1 Marketers General

Laboratory Testing Inc. (1)

Allied Union Inc. (1)

Pure Technologies Ltd. (1,20)

ILT-RES, LLC (1)

FULL-INSTALLATION
SERVICES

URS, Power Business Unit (1)

TURNER BUSINESS SERVICES LLC (1)

URS, Power Business Unit

INSTRUMENTATION/
CONTROL SYSTEM SERVICES

MATERIALS HANDLING
MANAGEMENT

1 Instrumentation/control system
services - Gene
10 Calibration
20 Component replacement
30 Diagnostics
40 Installation
50 Maintenance
60 Repairing

20 Materials flow modeling


30 Materials quality tracking

FUEL-HANDLING SERVICES
Benetech
Energy Associates, P.C.
Plant Professionals

GALVANIZING
American Galvanizers Association

GENERATORS, STEAM
1 Generators, steam - General
30 Inspections
40 Rebuilding
50 Retubing
60 Upgrading

Coritech Services (1,10,20,30,40)

Benetech (20,30)
Plant Professionals

MERCURY CONTROL
Fuel Tech Inc
See our ad on p. 13

BHI Energy
See our ad on p. 15

Mechanical Dynamics & Analysis, Ltd.


(1,10,20,30,40,50,60)

Rentech Boiler Systems, Inc (1,40,60)

Phenix Technologies Inc (10)

Fuel Tech Inc.


See our ad on p. 13

Struthers Wells

INVENTORY SERVICES

Thaker Simulation Technologies

Dynamic Systems, Inc.

MULTI-POLLUTANT
CONTROL

Vogt Power International Inc


(30,40,50,60)

GENERATORS/MOTORS
10 Maintenance
20 Rebuilding
30 Repairing
AGT Services Inc (10,20,30)
TurboCare Inc (10,20,30)
See our ad on p. 30

LONG TERM SERVICE


AGREEMENTS
Clyde Bergemann Inc

LUBE OIL
1 Lube oil General
Analysts, Inc. (1)

SERVICE DIRECTORY

INSPECTION SERVICES

MODELING

Fuel Tech Inc.


See our ad on p. 13
Nol-Tec Systems, Inc.

NUCLEAR POWER PLANT


1 Nuclear powerplant - General
20 Component repairing
30 Component replacement
BHI Energy (1,20,30)
See our ad on p. 15

December 2011 POWER

www.powermag.com

155

SERVICE DIRECTORY
General Physics Corporation (1)
See our ad on p. 7

Benetech
Canasia Power Corp.

STAFFING & RECRUITING


BHI Energy
See our ad on p. 15

ILT-RES, LLC

STEAM TURBINE AND


COMPRESSOR OVERHAUL

URS, Power Business Unit (1,30)

Sargent & Lundy LLC

Dresser-Rand Company Ltd

OPERATIONS AND
MAINTENANCE SERVICES

PUMPS

Mechanical Dynamics & Analysis, Ltd.

Mechanical Dynamics & Analysis, Ltd.

Eliminator Slurry Pumps (1)

STOKERS

NAES Corporation
See our ad on p. 93

SAFTEY PROGRAMS

Plant Professionals

COSS

Detroit Stoker Company


See our ad on p. 62

PRO Solutions, Inc

SCRUBBERS

TELECOMMUNICATIONS
SERVICES

Sargent & Lundy LLC

10 Rebuilding
20 Repairing

1 Telecommunications services General

URS, Power Business Unit

Babcock Power Environmental Inc


(10,20)

Automated Appointment Reminders (1)

PERSONNEL SUPPORT
SERVICES

SERVICES, MISCELLANEOUS

Sargent & Lundy LLC (1)

Siemens Energy

1 Personnel support services - General


10 Consultants
20 Craft labor
25 Recruitment/employment
30 Technical/professional

SERVICE DIRECTORY

PROJECT DEVELOPMENT
SERVICES

1 Pumps General

1 Services, miscellaneous - General


60 Plant startup/operation
70 Technical assistance
American Efficiency Services, LLC (1)

Aerotek Energy Services (1,25,30)

Babcock Power Services Inc (60,70)


See our ad on p. 29

BHI Energy (1,10,20,25,30)


See our ad on p. 15

Bianchi Industrial Services, LLC (1)

Lineal Recruiting Services (1,25,30)

PIPE
10 Abrasion-resistant
60 Fiberglass-reinforced plastic (FRP)
120 Plastic
130 Thermoplastic
Beetle Plastics, LLC (60,120,130)

Bibb & Associates (1)


Bierlein Companies (1)
Brandenburg Industrial Service Co.
(1,10)
ProEnergy Services
See our ad on cover 4
URS, Power Business Unit

CBP Engineering Corp (10)

SIMULATORS TRAINING

POWER QUALITY SERVICES

General Physics Corporation


See our ad on p. 7

1 Power quality services - General


10 Assessment and/or monitoring
20 Management
30 Upgrades and/or improvements
Allied Industrial Marketing, Inc. (1)

1 Testing - General
10 Motors (electric)
20 Oil
25 Sulfur hexafluoride (SF6)
27 Switchgear
30 Vibration analysis
American Electrical Testing Co., Inc.
(1,10,20,25,27,30)
Laboratory Testing Inc. (1)
Mechanical Dynamics & Analysis, Ltd.
(1,30)
Phenix Technologies Inc (10,20,27)
POLARIS Laboratories (20)
The Avogadro Group, LLC (1)

THERMOGRAPHIC
EQUIPMENT/SERVICES
Xenics

TRAINING

STACKS
1 Stacks General

360training.com and LKItraining.com

Hoffmann, Inc (1)

Automation Training Inc.


(1,20,37,38,50)

20 Environmental studies
Sargent & Lundy LLC (20)

SPARE PARTS

Stanley Consultants, Inc. (1)

Mechanical Dynamics & Analysis, Ltd.

POWER/BROKERS/
MARKETERS/SUPPLIERS

TESTING

1 Training - General
10 Environmental
20 Equipment
30 Fossil
35 Interactive CD-ROM
37 Maintenance
38 Management and Supervisory
40 Nuclear
50 Safety
55 Team Development

SITING SERVICES

Sargent & Lundy LLC (1,10,20,30)


URS, Power Business Unit (1,30)

Schmidt Industries

Advanta Energy Corp.

AVO Training Institute, Inc. (1,50)


156

www.powermag.com

POWER December 2011

Power Systems Mfg LLC (1)

SERVICE DIRECTORY
EITI - Electrical Industry Training Institute USA Inc. (1)
General Physics Corporation
(1,20,30,37,40,50,55)
See our ad on p. 7
Hitachi Power Systems America Ltd.
(1,20)
See our ad on cover 3
Industrial Insite, LLC
(1,10,20,35,37,38,40,50)

TurboCare Inc (1,10,12,13,20,30,40)


See our ad on p. 30
Wood Group GTS (40)

TURBINES, STEAM
1 Turbines, steam - General
10 Blade repairing
15 Induction bolt heating
30 Oil flush
40 Overhauling
50 Rebuilding
60 Rotor aligning
70 Servicing

WATER AND/OR
WASTEWATER SERVICES
1 Water and/or wastewater services General
10 Sales, retail
20 Sales, wholesale
ASI Group Ltd. (1)
C.M.G. AND ASSOCIATES INC (10,20)
Sentry Equipment Corp (1)

WEB-BASED SERVICES
20 Plant solutions
General Physics Corporation (20)
See our ad on p. 7

Mechanical Dynamics & Analysis, Ltd.


(30,37)

Allied Power Group

Sargent & Lundy LLC

Belyea Company Inc (1)

Thermal Engineering Associates


(1,30,37,40,50)

BHI Energy (1,15,30,40,50,60,70)


See our ad on p. 15

TRANSFORMERS

Hitachi Power Systems America Ltd. (1)


See our ad on cover 3

WIND FARM OPERATION &


MAINTENANCE

Mechanical Dynamics & Analysis, Ltd.


(1,10,40,50,60,70)

BHI Energy
See our ad on p. 15

Toshiba International Corp, Power


Systems Div

Mechanical Dynamics & Analysis, Ltd.

20 Rebuilt, sales/lease
60 Testing
Belyea Company Inc (20)
Hitachi Power Systems America Ltd.
See our ad on cover 3

Phenix Technologies Inc (60)

TRANSPORTATION
1 Transportation General
ATM Air Freight (1)
C.H.ROBINSON WORLDWIDE (1)

TURBINES, GAS
1 Turbines, gas - General
10 Blade repairing
12 Brush seals
13 Engineering
20 Overhauling
30 Rebuilding
40 Servicing
Active3D Inc.
Advanced Combustion Technology Inc
(10,20,30,40)
Allied Power Group (1)
ap+m

WIND FARM DESIGN &


MAPPING
Sargent & Lundy LLC

TurboCare Inc (1,10,40,50,60,70)


See our ad on p. 30

VALVES
1 Valves - General
10 Installation
20 Angle
20 Modifying
30 Reconditioning
40 Butterfly
40 Repairing
60 Check
210 Safety/relief
Bonetti Valves and Gauges (1,30)
BRAY Controls, Division of Bray International, Inc. 40
Cesare Bonetti Inc. (1)
CFM/VR-TESCO, LLC-Continental Field
Machining (1,10,20,30,40)
CPV Manufacturing (1,20,60,210)
Flowserve (1,20,30,40)

WANT TO
BE INCLUDED
IN THE 2013

BUYERS
GUIDE?

SERVICE DIRECTORY

Instrument Transformer Equipment Corp


(ITEC)

ap+m

PLEASE VISIT
WWW.POWERMAG.
COM/POWERCONNECT
TO ADD YOUR
INFORMATION

Mechanical Dynamics & Analysis, Ltd.


(1,10,20,30,40)

Independent Turbine Consulting, LLC


(1,40)
Mechanical Dynamics & Analysis, Ltd.
(1,13,20,30,40)
Mitsubishi Power Systems Inc (1)
See our ad on p. 41

December 2011 POWER

www.powermag.com

157

POWER PLANT
BUYERS MART
FOR SALE/RENT

24 / 7 EMERGENCY SERVICE
BOILERS

POWER PROFESSIONALS

Need help? Need a job?

Opportunities in Operations and Maintenance,


Project Engineering and Project Management,
Business and Project Development,
First-line Supervision to Executive Level Positions.
Employer pays fee. Send resumes to:

Contact Lisa Lineal in confidence

LINEAL

RECRUITING
SERVICES

www.Lineal.com LisaLineal@Lineal.com

P.O. Box 87875


Vancouver, WA 98687-7875
email: dwood@powerindustrycareers.com

Toll free 877-386-1091


Electric Power Systems & Service Specialists
Se habla Espaol

(360) 260-0979 l (360) 253-5292


www.powerindustrycareers.com

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FAX: 847-541-1279
WEB SITE: www.wabashpower.com

The Evolution of High


Purity Water Production

wabash

POWER

EQUIPMENT CO.

444 Carpenter Avenue, Wheeling, IL 60090

READER SERVICE NUMBER 201

CONDENSER OR GENERATOR AIR COOLER TUBE PLUGS


THE CONKLIN SHERMAN COMPANY, INC.

Easy to install, saves time and money.

FEDI

ADJUSTABLE PLUGS - all rubber with brass insert. Expand it,


install it, reverse action for tight fit.
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OVER ONE MILLION PLUGS SOLD

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A patented, two-stage
dual voltage process
thats newer, smarter,
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READER SERVICE NUMBER 202

Need a Thorough Mix?


Ash, coal, sludges, what do You need to mix?

Get a thorough mix with:

Pugmill Systems, Inc.

P.O. Box 60
Columbia, TN 38402 USA
ph: 931/388-0626 fax: 931/380-0319
www.pugmillsystems.com

Q-SEP

READER SERVICE NUMBER 203

Ultrafiltration
Membrane Modules
offer flexible solutions
for all filtration
applications.

For more information:


E-mail: sales@quagroup.com
Toll Free: 877-782-7558

www.quagroup.com
READER SERVICE NUMBER 204

READER SERVICE NUMBER 200


158

www.powermag.com

POWER December 2011

POWER PLANT BUYERS MART

fabric structures

Solutions
Sustainable Design-Build

Buildings
available up to
300' wide.
Low in cost per
square foot.
Natural daytime
lighting.
Easy to relocate.
Expandable.

Call one of our ClearSpan specialists at 1.866.643.1010


or visit us at www.ClearSpan.com/ADPM.
READER SERVICE NUMBER 206

READER SERVICE NUMBER 205

NEED CABLE? FROM STOCK


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and Non-shielded, Interlock Armor to 35KV, Thermocouple

BASIC WIRE & CABLE

Fax (773) 539-3500 Ph. (800) 227-4292


E-Mail: basicwire@basicwire.com
WEB SITE: www.basicwire.com
READER SERVICE NUMBER 207

CONDENSER BRUSHES-PLUGS-SCRAPERS
IN STOCK SHIP TODAY M ADE IN USA
Magazine
1 1907
JOHNPower
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INC.2 Since
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POWER December 2011

Advertisers Index
Enter reader service numbers on the FREE Product Information Source card in this issue.

Page

Reader
Service
Number

ABMA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 . . . . . . . . . . 31

www.victaulic.com

Victory Energy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 . . . . . . . . . . . 7

www.ftek.com

www.victoryenergy.com

Westinghouse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 . . . . . . . . . . 15

www.etaproefficiency.com

Hitachi Power Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cover 3 . . . . . . . . . . 46

www.tycoflowcontrol.com

Victaulic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 . . . . . . . . . . . 9

www.fennerdunlopamericas.com

General Physics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 . . . . . . . . . . . 5

www.turbocare.com

Tyco Flow Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 . . . . . . . . . . 24

www.mobilindustrial.com

Fuel Tech . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 . . . . . . . . . . 10

www.taggartglobal.com

Turbocare . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 . . . . . . . . . . 22

www.dowinside.com

Fenner Dunlop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 . . . . . . . . . . 37

www.sulzerts.com

Taggart Global . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 . . . . . . . . . . 13

www.diamondpower.com

Exxon Mobil . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,3 . . . . . . . . . . 3

www.structint.com

Sulzer Turbo Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 . . . . . . . . . . . .


DOW Electrical & Telecommunications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 . . . . . . . . . . 27


www.detroitstoker.com

Diamond Power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 . . . . . . . . . . 23

www.stf.it

Structural Integrity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 . . . . . . . . . . . 2

www.conocophillipslubricants.com/PowerMag

Detroit Stoker . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 . . . . . . . . . . 38

www.therminol.com

STF S.p.A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87 . . . . . . . . . . 41

www.cmp.co.jp/en

ConocoPhillips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cover 2 . . . . . . . . . . . 1

www.sicknorthamerica.com

Solutia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 . . . . . . . . . . 12

www.cleaverbrooks.com/engineered

CMP Coatings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 . . . . . . . . . . 17

www.rolls-royce.com

SICK Sensor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 . . . . . . . . . . 35

www.chathamsteel.com

CleaverBrooks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 . . . . . . . . . . 25

www.r-s.com

Rolls-Royce . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 . . . . . . . . . . . 4

www.catelectricpowerinfo.com/pwr

Chatham Steel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 . . . . . . . . . . . 6

www.proenergyservices.com/vision

Roberts & Schaefer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 . . . . . . . . . . 29

www.bruks.com

Caterpillar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 . . . . . . . . . . . .

www.picworld.com

ProEnergy Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cover 4 . . . . . . . . . . 47

www.bhienergy.com

BRUKS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 . . . . . . . . . . 20

www.parkline.com

PIC Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 . . . . . . . . . . 19

www.babcockpower.com

BHI Energy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 . . . . . . . . . . 11

www.paharpur.com

Parkline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 . . . . . . . . . . 34

www.areva.com

Babcock Power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 . . . . . . . . . . 21

www.marquisjet.com

Paharpur . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 . . . . . . . . . . 33

www.appliedbolting.com

AREVA. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 . . . . . . . . . . 16

www.naes.com

NetJets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91 . . . . . . . . . . 43

www.ambitech.com

Applied Bolting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89 . . . . . . . . . . 42

www.mpshq.com

NAES Corp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 . . . . . . . . . . 44

www.albemarle.com

Ambitech . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 . . . . . . . . . . . 8

Mitsubishi Power Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 . . . . . . . . . . 28

www.abma.com

Albemarle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 . . . . . . . . . . 26

Page

Reader
Service
Number

www.westinghousenuclear.com

Williams Patent Crusher . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 . . . . . . . . . . 32

www.hitachipowersystems.us

www.williamscrusher.com

IFS North America . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85 . . . . . . . . . . 40


www.ifsworld.com/en-NA

Classified Advertising

Jeffrey Rader . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94 . . . . . . . . . . 45

www.jeffreyrader.com/power

Kiewit / TIC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 . . . . . . . . . . 18

www.kiewit.com

Pages 158-162. To place a classified ad, contact

Matrix Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 . . . . . . . . . . 30

www.matrixservice.com

Midwesco Filter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 . . . . . . . . . . 14

Dianne Hammes,
713-343-1885, dianeh@powermag.com

www.midwescofilter.com

December 2011 POWER

www.powermag.com

163

COMMENTARY

Wind Energy: Dealing with


Intermittency Challenges
By Becky H. Diffen

he wind power industry has exploded over the past


decade. In the U.S. alone, almost 40,000 MW of wind
power have come online since 2000. As more wind generation has been added, grid operators have been challenged
to integrate a large amount of intermittent generation. As
the state with by far the most installed wind power capacity,
Texas has had to face this problem head on.
Critical advances in technology have led to new ways of
balancing wind power. For example, new advances in turbine
technology have allowed wind developers to build projects
in more diverse areas, which in turn has diversified generation patterns. In addition, the rapid advancement of storage
technologies has led to pilot projects being installed in conjunction with wind farms to demonstrate the benefits storage
can bring to the electrical grid.

Diverse Resources
In Texas, most of the installed wind power is in West Texas
and the Panhandle. Wind speeds in those areas are consistently higher at night, which is when demand for electricity
is lowest. In the past few years, several new onshore wind
farms have been built along the Texas Gulf Coast. The wind
resource in this area is quite different: The wind blows the
most in the afternoon, resulting in the highest amounts of
generation when peak load occurs.
We have seen a significant increase in coastal wind projects for several reasons. First, transmission congestion issues
in West Texas led developers to look for areas with more
transmission capacity. More importantly, turbine manufacturers began building turbines suitable for areas with lower
wind resources, such as the Texas coast. These new turbines
provide higher capacity factors than were originally available, and they have made coastal projects more economic.
The wind industry has long argued that geographic diversity of wind energy helps to even out variability. This is true
within one wind project, where the turbines are spread out
over many miles, but even more so when projects are spread
over several counties. Spreading out turbines also helps in
another way. As a weather event rolls in, it may affect some
turbines long before it moves across all of the turbines; this
arrangement allows grid operators time to ramp up or ramp
down other generation, as necessary. The best case scenario,
now being seen in Texas, occurs when projects are spread out
into areas where the wind tends to blow at different times
of the day.
Utilities can also help balance their portfolios by mixing
renewable technologies. Like coastal wind, solar projects
generate during the day. Thus, combining solar and wind resources can help balance generation.
164

Storage Facilities
Advances in storage technologies also provide new tools for
grid operators. For example, Duke Energy recently announced
a pilot project with Xtreme Power to install a 36-MW battery
at one of Dukes existing Texas wind farms. Chamisa Energy
has announced plans for a 135-MW compressed air energy
storage project to be located in the Texas Panhandle. Chamisa plans to buy electricity generated by wind to charge the
project and have the ability to interconnect with either the
Electric Reliabilty Council of Texas or the Southwest Power
Pool. Other technologies, such as flywheels and a variety of
battery-type technologies, are also being developed.
Pumped storage hydro, which has been used since the
1970s and 80s to work in conjunction with nuclear plants, is
another possibility. Traditional hydro can also be useful, as
demonstrated by the New York Independent System Operator, which has partnered with Hydro Quebec to use the latters hydro storage capacity to help balance wind farms being
built in New York.
To be clear, I am not advocating that every wind farm
should have a storage system. The U.S. has successfully added tens of thousands of megawatts of wind power without
using storage. Similarly, many European countries generate
20% to 30% of their power from wind. What large-scale storage projects do is add flexibility. They also help to even out
variability from all generators, not just renewables. A storage
project can be called on when a gas plant goes down unexpectedly just as easily as when the wind stops blowing.
What I find most interesting about energy storage projects being developed in conjunction with wind projects is
their multiple uses. I assumed the main purpose of a storage
facility would be to store electricity when the wind farm
is generating and then have that electricity available to be
dispatched whenever needed, but storage projects being developed and constructed now will be used for much more.
They can provide ancillary services that are critical for grid
operators to maintain grid reliability and can earn valuable
revenue for the storage owner.
As energy demand in the U.S. continues to increase, the
need for new generation is great. The shortage cannot be
solved by any one technology; instead, the U.S. needs both
traditional and renewable power generation. Strategies such
as geographic diversity and storage can help make wind power an even more valuable resource, as they lessen potential
intermittency and other grid reliability issues while bringing
valuable new capabilities to the grid that benefit all types
of generation.
Becky H. Diffen (bdiffen@velaw.com) is an attorney at Vinson
& Elkins LLP in Austin, Texas.

www.powermag.com

POWER December 2011

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