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2010- 2011 Catalog

Blue Ridge Center for


Chinese Medicine

Ancestral
Mountain

Tuina School
2010
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2010
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As a family-lineage holder of the
North American Tang Shou Tao

Ancestral
Mountain

Tuina School

Associations Jin Shou Tuina, our


mission is to preserve, research and
disseminate this bodywork art in such
a way as to honor and maintain the

Mission

potent threads of knowledge that


have been passed down from those
teachers who came before us.

Our mission as an educational program for Jin Shou Tuina is to impart


the unique perspectives, understandings, techniques, skills and therapies
of our family lineage, while training
2010-2011 Catalog
Published April, 2010

Ancestral Mountain Tuina School


144 Silver Maple Lane, NE
Pilot, VA 24138
540.651.2682
email: amts@brccm.org
www.brccm.org

students to interface with the modern


world to foster health and well-being
and expand the availability of these
bodywork arts to the public at large.
1

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4-5

Introduction

22-23

Ancestral Mountain Tuina School


Governing Board, Administration and Faculty

6-7

24-27

Attendance Policy
Satisfactory Performance
Grading System
Probation
Dismissal
Withdrawal
Leave of Absence
Readmission
Rescheduling and Retaking an Exam
Graduation Requirements
Award of Certificates

School History
Historical perspective

10-11

Education Programs in Chinese


Bodywork and Internal Arts
Program for Jin Shou Tuina & Traditional Chinese Medicine
Program for Internal Arts
Facility
Standards
Program Schedule and School Calendar
Sequence of Classes
Clinical Training

12-13

28-29

600 Hour Program Overview and Full Curriculum

Course Descriptions

20-21

Admissions
Personal Qualities
Requirements
Admissions Process
Application, Registration and Orientation
English Language Competence
Transfer Credit for Previous Training
Course Challenge Policy

Student Services and Policies


Student Advising
Library
Housing
Administrative and Faculty Office Hours
Transcripts
Certification Examinations
Placement Assistance
Student Conduct
Student Dress and Personal Hygiene
Problem Solving and Grievances
Student Records
Student Right to Know Act

Curriculum

14-19

Academic Policies

Table of Contents

8-9

Tuition
Payment Schedule and Fees
Refund Policy
Financial Aid

Philosophy of Education
Non-discrimination Policy
North American Tang Shou Tao Association
Philosophies and Educational Objectives

Financial Policies

30-31

Faculty and Administration

32

Officers and Governing Board

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Ancestral Mountain Tuina School (AMTS)


is a Career and Technical school certified
to operate by the State Council of Higher
Education for Virginia (SCHEV).
Graduates of the programs are eligible
to take the National Certification Exam
(NCE) administered by the National
Certifying Board for Therapeutic
Massage and Bodywork (NCBTMB).
Successful completion of this exam allows
graduates to apply for a State massage
certificate in Virginia. States have varying
requirements for licensure, and AMTS
graduates are responsible for ascertaining
the requirements for the state in which
they seek to be licensed.
The Ancestral Mountain Tuina School
is a program of the Blue Ridge Center for
Chinese Medicine, Inc., a 501(c)(3) public non-profit corporation. Corporate and
school offices, classrooms and clinic are
located at:
144 Silver Maple Lane, NE
Pilot, VA 24138
Telephone: 540.651.2682

Blue Ridge Center


for Chinese Medicine
Governing Board

Berry Franko
Student Resources Advisor

David Wiley
Chairman and Secretary

Virginia Lepley
Librarian

Jason Redinbo
Executive Director and Board Member
Virginia Lepley
Treasurer
Mary Wiley
Board Member
Michael Waitzkin
Board Member
Pat Sharkey
Board Member

Ancestral Mountain Tuina


School Administration
Jason Redinbo
Executive Director

Ancestral Mountain Tuina School

Ancestral Mountain
Tuina School

Mary Wiley
Student Counselor

Ancestral Mountain
Tuina School Faculty
Jason Redinbo
Executive Director and Instructor
Berry Franko
Instructor
Eli Schwartz-Gralla
Instructor
Christopher Hill
Instructor
Mellisa Maynard
Instructor
Yarrow Delauney-Yard
Instructor

Jody Franko
Administrative Officer
Christopher Hill
Academic Officer
Dean of Students
David Wiley
Academic Dean and Registrar Emeritus

Ancestral
Mountain

Philosophy of Education

Tuina School
The Ancestral Mountain

Non-discrimination Policy

Tuina School has a unique

AMTS does not discriminate against individuals on the basis of race, color, sex,
sexual orientation, religion, disability, age,
veteran status, ancestry, or national or
ethnic origin in the administration of its
educational policies, admissions policies,
employment policies, student financial
assistance programs, and other AMTS
administered programs and activities.

philosophy of education and


training that integrates the
traditional Chinese approach
with modern requirements
for certification.

North American Tang


Shou Tao Association
Ancestral Mountain Tuina School faculty
and students are members of the North
American Tang Shou Tao Association, a
national organization dedicated to the
preservation, research, and dissemination
of the traditional Chinese martial and
medical arts. AMTS receives, primarily
through founder Jason Redinbo, much
of its internal arts and traditional Chinese
medicine material from the Association.
The traditional Chinese internal martial
arts of the Association include Xingyi
Quan, Bagua Zhang, Taiji Quan, and
Liuhebafa.

Traditional Chinese Medicine practiced


and researched by the Association includes
all aspects of tuina, acupuncture, herbal
medicine, Qigong, and dietary medicine.
Jin Shou Tuina is a family-style tuina
system that is the primary heirloom of
the Associations medical archives. The
Associations focus on research, preservation, and dissemination of these arts ensures their viability for future generations.
Ancestral Mountain Tuina School
encourages the instructors and practitioners of Jin Shou Tuina to actively
participate in the efforts to preserve,
research and disseminate this family
lineage bodywork in the traditional
manner in which it has been passed down
through generations. Jin Shou Tuina
is a registered trademark of the North
American Tang Shou Tao Association.
More information on Jin Shou Tuina
can be found at www.natsta.org.

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Philosophy

It is our position that Jin Shou Tuina as a


system and as a course of study unveils
these benefits and insights and makes
available a method for providing health
care at a grassroots level. Our school
strives to support our mission and philosophy by offering a unique and broad
perspective of the human condition and
by teaching the methods and skills of
Jin Shou Tuina. In doing so, we preserve
and propagate our family lineage and
promote availability to effective, affordable health care.

Jin Shou Tuina is a system of bodywork


that is rooted in both classical Chinese
medicine and Taoist internal martial arts.
It is an eclectic compilation of classical
and family Chinese medical knowledge,
internal cultivation principles and theories, physical and energetic cultivation
practices, and master and senior practitioner experience.
Traditionally, Jin Shou Tuina has been
taught through the method of apprenticeship. Students do clinical work directly
under preceptor tutelage until they grasp
the essentials of the knowledge and
skills. Although this method is preferred,
modern standards for education require
a more academic model.
The goal of Ancestral Mountain Tuina
School is to make Jin Shou Tuina state
certification available, while at the same
time maintaining the valuable approach
and intimacy of apprenticeship. This
is accomplished by integrating handson learning with academic lecture. We
have found this educational method to
be successful beyond contemporary
standards.

Educational Objectives
1. Operate educational programs to
provide opportunities and training
in traditional Chinese medical and
physical modalities, including: Jin Shou
Tuina, Chinese medical theory, and
cultivation of internal martial arts.
2. Provide clinical practicum opportunities for students in complementary
health care services using medical
and physical modalities rooted in
Traditional Chinese Medicine and
Jin Shou Tuina.
3. Promote awareness about methods,
techniques, and models that help
cultivate and maintain personal health
and well-being.
4. Preserve, research, and disseminate
Chinese healing modalities in a manner
that honors and maintains the potent
threads of knowledge that have been
passed down from those teachers and
practitioners who came before us.
5. Impart the unique perspectives,
understandings, techniques, skills and
therapies of our family lineage, while
training students to interface with
the modern world and expand the
availability of these arts to the public.

Philosophy

Ancestral Mountain Tuina School holds


that Chinese medicine and tuina have
been important traditional therapeutic
modalities over many centuries and that
the maintenance and promotion of these
modalities is beneficial to humankind not
only by providing healing benefits, but
also by offering insights into the human
condition to achieve balance, health and
well-being.

Philosophy of Education
and Training

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The Ancestral Mountain
Tuina School was formed
out of the desire to pass on
a unique and effective family-

as well as to serve the rural


communities of Southwest
Virginia.

The founder of AMTS, Jason Redinbo,


has studied these medical and internal arts
since 1990 as a member of the North
American Tang Shou Tao Association and
as a formal apprentice under his mentor
and Association founder, Vincent Black.
In keeping with tradition, the founder of
AMTS has devoted his time, energy, and
resources to establish a center for Chinese
medicine in the rural, mountain community of Floyd, Virginia. This allows the
North American Tang Shou Tao Association Jin Shou Tuina to continue to develop and flourish through a family-style
of teaching.

location, designed to accommodate the


needs of the clinic, the martial arts program and classes in Chinese medicine. In
2006, the facility had its grand opening
and the community gained an alternative
health care facility.
In 2007, a non-profit corporation named
the Blue Ridge Center for Chinese Medicine
was established to facilitate accessibility to
Traditional Chinese Medicine within rural
Appalachia. From the success of these endeavors, and in following the path set forth
by Vincent Black, it was decided that to
preserve and promote these family medical
arts in the modern era, a school must be
established in which the teaching style
continues to evolve to bring together the
value of preceptorship with that of professional licensure. The Ancestral Mountain
Tuina School was subsequently developed.

School History

style of Chinese Medicine,

Ancestral Mountain Tuina School is a


contemporary manifestation of centuries
of study and development in the healing
modalities of Chinese Medicine and in a
family-style of tuina and medical perspective that has been an heirloom tradition
for generations.

In the fall of 2004, Jason Redinbo began


treating Floyd area clients using Jin Shou
Tuina, acupuncture, Chinese herbs and
Qigong. Classes in internal martial arts
were also offered. Many people benefited
from the treatments and classes, so much
so that two apprentices were accepted. A
strong contingency of community members offered support for a permanent

Ancestral
Mountain

Tuina School
We offer programs in
Jin Shou Tuina, traditional

Education Programs

Chinese medical theory


and internal martial arts
that teach healing
methods and modalities
for practitioners and
individuals.

10

Program for Jin Shou


Tuina and Traditional
Chinese Medicine
We offer instruction in Jin Shou Tuina,
traditional Chinese medical theory and
internal martial arts that teach healing
methods and modalities for practitioners
and individuals.
The twelve-month certificate program is
offered to students interested in gaining
knowledge and training in the above
areas. Coursework is designed to educate
participants in Jin Shou Tuina, anatomy,
physiology, traditional Chinese medical
theory, and clinical application. The program consists of 600 hours of academic
and practical training, exceeding national
requirements. In addition to academic
and practicum experience, students
will take weekly classes in the internal
cultivation systems, such as Bagua
Zhang, Xingyi Quan and Qigong.
The curriculum provides a foundation
in Chinese medical theory, Western and
Eastern anatomy and physiology, tuina,
internal cultivation techniques, and
practitioner strengthening exercises. As
the curriculum progresses, students pursue
areas in greater depth, especially in Jin
Shou Tuina, including: tuina hand techniques; tuina full body protocols; tuina
adjunct modalities; and business, legal,
and ethics courses. Participants should
expect to invest significant time in study
and practice outside the classroom.

Opportunities for part-time students to


enroll in the Traditional Chinese Medical
Theory and/or Anatomy and Physiology
portions of the certificate program are
described on pages 15, 16, and 20.

Program for Internal Arts


Internal cultivation practices are
historically an integral part of traditional
Chinese medicine. The concept of
Qi as a bioelectrical substance in the
body pervades all of traditional Chinese
medical thought and much of the
Asian culture as well.
The arts of Xingyi Quan, Bagua Zhang,
Taiji Quan and Qigong are all recognized
to be health-promoting systems of movement and martial expression. The purpose
of training in these systems is to promote
the health and strength of the practitioner
and to develop a necessary sensitivity to
qi in order to utilize its functional integration in the body.
The Ancestral Mountain Tuina School
approach to internal arts is to provide
teaching that allows each individual to
learn and progress with the group yet at
an individual pace. These classes are for
personal development and do not have a
rank or promotion structure. This allows
students to progress naturally and without
competition. These classes will be ongoing
throughout the program.

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Facility

Built to the highest standards of craftsmanship with an Asian architectural


influence, its environmentally appropriate
design and materials create a healthy and
earth friendly facility. Gardens surrounding the structure incorporate native species,
ornamentals, and gardens for the production of medicinal Chinese herbs.
Though accessible to major highways,
the school is located off the beaten path in
an area of spectacular beauty. Meditation
areas, walking trails, quiet vistas, and outdoor practice areas inspire practitioners,
clients, students, and visitors to stay,
learn, and enjoy.

Standards
AMTS provides a training program in
Jin Shou Tuina and Traditional Chinese
Medicine based on the strengths and
knowledge of the apprenticeship model

Certification by the State Council of


Higher Education for Virginia indicates
that all eligibility qualifications have
been met to operate as a Career and
Technical school.
AMTS is dedicated to exceeding standards
and offering students the information and
guidance necessary to become professional
tuina therapists. The effectiveness and success of the program is regularly evaluated
using educational and quality standards
applied to such aspects as instructional
planning, curriculum, teaching facilities,
administration, and safety.

Program Schedule
The Jin Shou Tuina certification program
operates on a twelve month calendar,
with scheduled breaks for holidays and
balance. Classes generally meet from
9:00AM to 5:00PM Tuesdays and Thursdays. Some classes will be scheduled at
other times, including nights and weekends as needed, and with due notice to
students and faculty.

If observance of a religious holiday


necessitates that classes be missed,
students must contact their instructors
to make up class work.

Education Programs

The activities of the Ancestral Mountain


Tuina School program take place in the
Blue Ridge Center for Chinese Medicine
(BRCCM) facility. The 4,200 square foot
custom designed building includes
multiple treatment rooms, an herbal
apothecary, a fully equipped kitchen and
an internal martial arts timber framed
training room with a clear span of thirty
feet by forty-eight feet.

while incorporating industry standards


to allow for certification and licensure.
The curriculum has been customized
to integrate guidelines required by the
National Certification Board for Massage
Therapy and Bodywork (NCBTMB),
Commission on Massage Therapy
Accreditation (COMTA), and North
American Tang Shou Tao Association.

2010-2011 Calendar
Orientation
Classes Begin
Thanksgiving Break
Winter Break
Spring Break
Summer Break
NATSTA Conference
Program Finishes

Sept. 20, 2010


Sept. 21, 2010
Nov. 20-28, 2010
Dec. 24 -Jan. 16, 2011
April 16 -24, 2011
June 11-19, 2011
July 30 -Aug.14, 2011
Sept. 13, 2011

Sequence of Classes
Courses are taken in the sequence offered.
Since subject areas are taught in parallel,
an effort is made toward coordinating
instruction in the different courses as
they apply to specific aspects of the body
and Jin Shou Tuina. Part-time students
take their classes with the certificate
program students.

Clinical Training
All clinical training is done on school
premises with certified Jin Shou Tuina
practitioners. Students are required to
attend all scheduled clinical training hours.

11

Ancestral
Mountain

Tuina School
Jin Shou Tuina 600
Hour Program Overview
Traditional Chinese Medicine
Anatomy, physiology
and kinesiology*

125 hours

Chinese medical theory**

135 hours

Curriculum

Jin Shou Tuina


Discipline, technique
and practice
Supervised clinical
application

First aid and CPR

70 hours

30 hours
10 hours

Craniosacral therapy
and Chinese medicine

24 hours

Introduction to Anatomy
and Physiology
10 hours
A. Western Terminology
B. Intro to Biochemistry,
Cells and Tissues

I.

II.

Osteology
Structure and function
of the skeletal system

26 hours

III. Myology
Structure and function
of the tendinomuscular
system

26 hours

Foundations of Chinese
Medical Theory
6 hours
A. History and
Development of
Jin Shou Tuina
B. Overview of Traditional
Chinese Medicine
C. Comparison of Eastern
and Western approaches
to disease and medicine
D. Yin/Yang Theory

II.

Five Elements;
4 hours
Five Phases; Five
Transformations
A. Concepts of Five Elements
B. Five Elements in Nature
C. Five Element Correspondences
D. Five Elements in the
Human Condition

IV.

600 hours

* This curriculum is available to part-time


students by taking the 100 hour Human
Anatomy and Physiology class (which does
not include Kinesiology) and, optionally,
by taking the separate Physical Practices for
Health class which includes Kinesiology.
** This curriculum is available to part-time
students by taking the 107 hour Chinese
Medical Theory class and the Meridian
Qigong class, which is offered separately.

12

I.

6 hours

Business, legal and ethics

TOTAL

Traditional Chinese
Medical Theory

200 hours

Practice Integration
Internal arts training

Anatomy, Physiology
and Kinesiology

V.

Major Physiological
38 hours
Systems of the Body
A. Integumentary
B. Digestive
C. Neurological
D. Respiratory
E. Cardiovascular
F. Lymphatic/Immune system
G. Urinary and Reproductive
H. Endocrine
Kinesiology
Study of biomechanics
using internal martial
arts movements

25 hours

III. Fundamental
Substances of the Body
A. Qi
B. Blood
C. Body Fluids
D. Essence (Jing)
E. Shen (Spirit)
IV.

7 hours

Organ Theory
30 hours
A. Zang Organs
B. Fu Organs
C. Relationships between
Zang and Fu

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D. Eastern/Western
Comparison of Zangfu
E. Correlations of the Zangfu
and Other Parts of the Body
F. Curious Organs (Uterus,
Gall Bladder, Brain)
G. Manifestations of Organ
Disharmonies
Channels and
43 hours
Effective Points
Theory (15 hours):
A. Twelve Primary Meridians
B. Eight Extraordinary Vessels
C. Tendinomuscular Channels
D. Effective Points
Meridian Qigong (28 hours)

VI. General Evaluation


Techniques
A. Observation
B. Listening/Smell
C. Asking
D. Palpating

5 hours

VII. Western/Eastern
40 hours
Etiology and Pathology
A. Etiology
B. Patterns of Imbalance
C. Survey of Common
Western Pathologies

I.

TechniqueLecture
60 hours
and Demonstration
A. Jin Shou Tuina
Principles of Application
B. Cautions and
Contraindications
C. Sanitation and
Personal Hygiene
D. Hand Techniques
E. Full Body Tuina Protocols

II.

Supervised Classroom
Practice of Techniques

70 hours

Clinical Application
Supervised
70 hours
Clinical Practice
Students are given the opportunity
to apply Chinese medical theoretical
principles and Jin Shou Tuina
techniques in a supervised clinical
setting. A professional environment
will be maintained and a Certified
Practitioner of Jin Shou Tuina will
be present at all times.

Practice Integration
I.

Internal Arts Training


30 hours
Xingyi Quan, Bagua Zhang,
Taiji Quan, and Meridian
Qigong are essential and
foundational parts of Jin Shou
Tuina. Students are expected
to participate in one or more
weekly internal arts classes concurrently with the Jin Shou Tuina
program, and to practice on
a daily basis outside of classes.

II.

First Aid, CPR

III. Clinically Oriented


30 hours
Applications
A. Clinical Presentation
B. Commonly Seen Issues
C. Planning a Therapeutic Session
D. Application of Techniques
IV.

Practitioner
40 hours
Self-Awareness
Theory (10 hours):
A. Personal Health
Practices and Bodywork
B. Cultural Influences/
Body Language
C. Professionalism/
Communication
D. Effects of Physical, Mental,
and Emotional Stressors
E. Stress Reduction Techniques
Practitioner Strengthening
and Physical Fitness (30 hours)

Curriculum

V.

Jin Shou Tuina Discipline,


Technique and Practice

6 hours

III. Ethics

6 hours

IV.

Business and Legal


Considerations

4 hours

V.

Craniosacral Therapy
and Chinese Medicine

24 hours

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Anatomy, Physiology
and Kinesiology

Students will demonstrate the ability to


properly name and pronounce Western
anatomy and physiology terms as they
apply to the body. Students will use these
terms throughout the program and in
professional clinical settings.
Osteology
This course covers various aspects of the
bones, bony structures and functional
groups of bones of the body with a focus
on relationship to bodywork.
Students will demonstrate the ability to
identify, locate and palpate the bones,
bony structures and functional groups
of bones of the body.

Students will demonstrate the ability


to identify, locate and palpate the
major muscles, tendons and ligaments
of the body.
Major Physiological
Systems of the Body
This course will investigate the major
physiological systems of the body,
including: Integumentary, Digestive,
Neurological, Respiratory, Cardiovascular,
Lymphatic/Immune system, Urinary,
Reproductive and Endocrine.

Part-time Study in
Anatomy, Physiology
and Kinesiology
This curriculum is available to parttime students by taking the 100 hour
Human Anatomy and Physiology class
(which does not include Kinesiology)
and, optionally, by taking the separate
Physical Practices for Health class which
includes Kinesiology.

Course Descriptions

Introduction to Anatomy
and Physiology
This course teaches common Western
anatomy and physiology terminology
that applies to bodywork.

Myology
This course covers the functional groups
and individual muscles, tendons and
ligaments of the human body with a focus
on relationship to bodywork.

Students will demonstrate knowledge of


the major systems of the body, including
individual components and collective
physiological functions and effects.
Kinesiology: Understanding
Movement through Internal Arts
This course will actively demonstrate
and expose students to the internal arts
exercises and concepts of proper movement of the body in parts and as a whole.
Students will experience proper body
mechanics through the movements of
the internal arts.

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Ancestral
Mountain

Tuina School
Traditional Chinese
Medical Theory

Course Descriptions

Foundations of Chinese
Medical Theory
This course provides an overview
of the history of Chinese medical theory
and Jin Shou Tuina and the concepts
of Yin/Yang theory.
Students will learn the history of Jin Shou
Tuina and Chinese medical theory and
demonstrate a knowledge of Yin/Yang
theory and how it applies to the human
condition.
Five Elements
(Five Phases; Five Transformations)
This course explores the aspects of the
Five Element theory as it pertains to
Chinese medicine.
Students will be able to perceive and
understand the functions and aspects of
the human condition through the use
of the theory of the Five Elements.
Fundamental Substances of the Body
This course differentiates and explains the
fundamental substances of Qi, blood, body
fluids, essence and spirit as seen through
traditional Chinese medical theory.
Students will be able to describe the
nature, quality and importance of each
fundamental substance.

16

Organ Theory
This course covers organ theory as seen
through the Chinese medical perspective.

Part-time Study in
Traditional Chinese
Medical Theory

Students will be able to describe in detail


the physiological aspects of the body as
they relate to each organ category. This
course is in complement to Western
organ theory as taught in Anatomy/
Physiology/Kinesiology.

This curriculum is available to parttime students by taking the 107 hour


Chinese Medical Theory class and
the Meridian Qigong class, which is
offered separately.

Channels and Effective Points,


including Meridian Qigong
This course covers the twelve primary
meridians, the eight extra meridians, the
tendinomuscular meridians and effective
points on those meridians that are useful
to tuina therapy.
Students will be able to trace the course
of each meridian in the practice of
Meridian Qigong and describe the
application and effectiveness of the
commonly used points on each meridian.
General Evaluation Techniques
This course covers the Traditional Chinese
Medicine methodology for information
gathering relevant to therapy. The techniques of observation, auscultation, inquiry and palpation will be covered for
both general health and specific issues.
This course also investigates in depth the
evaluative information that comes from
gait and movement evaluation.

Students will show a working knowledge


of traditional Chinese medical evaluative
techniques. They will be able to gather
pertinent information enough to develop a
logical and practical approach to therapy.
Western/Eastern Etiology and Pathology
This course covers the external and
internal pathological factors as viewed
by Traditional Chinese Medicine. This
course will also include a survey of
common Western pathologies that are
encountered in bodywork.
Students will be able to differentiate the
external and internal factors that cause
disharmony in the human condition. This
will include identification of pathogens
based on symptomology, understanding
etiology of pathogenic symptoms and
approaches for resolving pathological
disharmonies.

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Jin Shou Tuina Discipline,
Technique and Practice

Students will show the ability to identify


and apply the knowledge and skills that
promote safety and sanitation appropriate
to manual therapy and bodywork.
Hand Techniques
This course teaches the primary hand
techniques of Jin Shou Tuina. Hand
technique limitations, cautions and
contraindications will also be learned
and identified.
The student will be able to demonstrate
the proper application of each hand
technique and discern which techniques
will be most appropriate for any given
scenario.

Students will be able to demonstrate the


proper application of each full-body protocol and be able to describe the difference
between a protocol and applying tuina
based on client evaluation.
Supervised Classroom
Practice of Techniques
This course involves the direct supervision
of students in the hands-on application of
hand techniques and full body protocols.
Students will demonstrate competency
in Jin Shou Tuina techniques and skills.
Clinically Oriented Applications
This course discusses the aspects of
a clinical setting. Scope of practice,
client intake/outtake, room preparation,
professionalism, conduct and emergency
situations are all discussed. Planning
a therapeutic session from start to
finish, record keeping and follow up
are also taught.

dealing with emergencies. Students will


also be able to demonstrate ability to
plan a therapeutic approach and follow
it through to completion with proper
record keeping, including HIPPA
compliance and follow up.

Course Descriptions

Jin Shou Tuina Principles of Application


This course discusses the general principles of bodywork including principles of
application, cautions and contraindications, sanitation and personal hygiene,
and use of appropriate equipment.

Full-Body Tuina Protocols


This course teaches the full-body tuina
protocols of Jin Shou Tuina.

Practitioner Self-Awareness
Self-awareness is an important aspect of
clinical bodywork. How a practitioner
presents him/herself directly affects the
client. This course raises awareness to
physical, verbal, non-verbal and cultural
factors that often affect practitioner-client
relationships. Practitioner physical fitness
is also an important aspect of bodywork
in order to maintain a practice and avoid
injury. Internal martial arts exercises
will be used to promote practitioner
physical fitness.
Students will demonstrate an understanding of the levels of communication involved in bodywork and physical exercises
that promote health for practitioner
and client.

The student will learn to professionally


conduct him/herself in a clinical setting
including preparing the room before and
after a session, client interactions, and

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Clinical Application

Students will gain experience and


perspective applying their knowledge in
a clinic setting. Students will also be
required to log at least 50 tuina sessions
over the course of the program.

Practice Integration
Internal Arts Training
Xingyi Quan, Bagua Zhang, Taiji Quan,
and Meridian Qigong are essential and
foundational parts of Jin Shou Tuina and
the NATSTA family-lineage Chinese
medicine system. Students are expected
to participate in one of more weekly
internal arts classes concurrently with
the Jin Shou Tuina program, and to
practice on a daily basis outside of
classes. Determining which arts are
most appropriate for each student will
be determined in consultation with
AMTS faculty.

First Aid, CPR


This course will cover all the requirements
of certification in CPR and AED for
adult, child and infant following the
American Red Cross and The American
Heart Association guidelines.
Students will learn the fundamentals of
Basic Life Support and the cognitive skills
needed to administer CPR and First Aid
in case of an emergency. Upon completion, students will be certified in CPR
and the use of an AED.
Ethics
This course covers professional and social
ethics as they apply to bodywork and
practitioner-client relationships. Students
will be able to define terms and conduct
themselves in ways that reflect ethical
professional behavior.
Students will be able to demonstrate the
appropriate responses and actions to various possible practitioner-client situations.

Business & Legal Considerations


This course will provide descriptions,
models and insights for starting, developing and managing an individual or group
tuina practice. It will also address the current licensing and legal considerations for
the professional standard and continuing
education hours.

Course Descriptions

Supervised Clinical Practice


Students are given the opportunity to
apply Chinese medical principles and Jin
Shou Tuina techniques in a supervised
clinical setting. A professional environment will be maintained and a certified
practitioner of Jin Shou Tuina will be
present at all times.

These exercises will help the student


develop whole body strength, fitness,
balance and stress reduction that is
appropriate to Jin Shou Tuina.

Students will be able to develop proposed


models for tuina practices that meet the
current professional standards.
Craniosacral Therapy
and Chinese Medicine
This course explores the techniques
of Craniosacral Therapy as an adjunct
therapy to Jin Shou Tuina and explains
the correlations with Chinese medicine
and Qigong.
Students will be able to perform basic
Craniosacral techniques as adjunctive
therapy for Jin Shou Tuina. Students will
also be able to demonstrate a knowledge
of the shared characteristics involved
in Craniosacral Therapy, Chinese
medicine, and Qigong.

19

Ancestral
Mountain

Admissions

Tuina School
Personal Qualities

Requirements

The school seeks students who have:


1. A strong desire to study and practice
Traditional Chinese Medicine and
tuina as a means of service to others
and as a method of self-awareness and
development.
2. The passion and commitment to
persevere through demanding study
of the family-lineage system of tuina
and Chinese medicine.
3. Recognized the developmental
demands that are an integral part of
the program and possess the willingness
to participate in the process of physical
and personal evolution.
4. A willingness to acquire knowledge,
manual techniques, and develop
personal qualities that are necessary
for professional services in bodywork
and health care.

1. Applicants must have completed a


high school education or the equivalent.
2. Be 18 years of age at the time of
enrollment.
3. Possess the physical, mental, and
personal characteristics required to
learn and perform Jin Shou Tuina.

Prospective students are asked to consider


that Chinese medicine and tuina are
continuous branches of information that
take their root several thousand years in
the past. They have been the life work
of countless generations of practitioners.
Our school honors these traditions and
methods, acknowledging that our forefathers, teachers, students and graduates are
a branch of this living tree of medicine.

20

Admissions Process
To complete the admissions process and
be considered for a place in the next
class, certificate program students should:
1. Make an appointment for a personal
or telephone interview with members
of the Admissions committee by calling
the AMTS Office.
2. Submit a completed application form
(download at www.brccm.org or
contact the office at 540.651.2682)
by Thursday, July 1, 2010, along with
a $50 non-refundable application fee.
Application must include the following:
a. Recommendations from two persons
(professionals, instructors, employers)
who can evaluate your qualifications.
b. Copies of any applicable professional
licenses or certificates, as well as
transcripts from previous education.
c. A typed resume, outlining educational and professional experience.
d. A typed narrative of one to three
pages expressing your interest in
pursuing this course of study,

outlining your intentions and


demonstrating your understanding
of the commitment of time and
resources needed to succeed as a
student of Jin Shou Tuina.
Upon review of a completed application,
AMTS will notify applicants in writing
of acceptance into the program by
Saturday, July 31, 2010.

Curriculum and
Admissions Process for
Part-time Students
Those seeking to take the 9 month,
107 hour Chinese Medical Theory class
(see p. 16) and/or the 12 month, 100
hour Human Anatomy and Physiology
class (see p. 15) may apply as part-time
students. The admissions process for
part-time students is the same as for
certificate students above, except a personal interview, recommendations, and
transcripts from previous study are not
required. Admission is approved on a
case by case basis. Contact the AMTS
office for information on class schedule .

Application, Registration
and Orientation
Applications, including all supporting
documents, are accepted through the
first day of orientation, space permitting.
Applications can be downloaded at
brccm.org or are available by contacting
the administration office at 540.651.2682.

2010
201 1
Catalog
Registration must be completed by the orientation session, Monday, September 20,
2010. Registration includes the signing of
a student agreement delineating student
and AMTS obligations.

English Language
Competence
English language competence is required
of all students seeking admission to
AMTS programs.

Transfer Credit for


Previous Training
Transfer credit will be considered on a
case-by-case basis using the following
guidelines:
1. Persons seeking transfer credit for tuina
courses are asked to send transcripts
from North American Tang Shou Tao
Association Jin Shou Tuina training programs. No credit will be given for bodywork training outside these programs.
2. Transfer credit for traditional Chinese
medicine courses and Western anatomy
and physiology courses require a
transcript or documentation from

Course Challenge Policy


Students admitted to AMTS who believe
they possess competency in coursework
required for graduation, for instance a
licensed acupuncturist or other health

care professional, may get credit for course


work on a case by case basis using the
following Course Challenge guidelines:
1. To undertake a Course Challenge,
a student must:
a. Meet with the Academic Officer
to determine the advisability of
challenging the course;
b. If approved, pay a $100
administrative fee; and
c. Be examined on the content of the
course, which may include completion of projects, oral and written
exams, clinic observation and other
tests and measurements at the
discretion of AMTS.
2. If these examinations are completed to
the satisfaction of the instructor, meet
with the Academic Officer to validate
the challenge, thereby receiving credit
for the course.
3. A student who receives Course Challenge credit will be required to take the
course in AMTS, unless waived by the
Academic Dean, in order to broaden
his/her base of knowledge. The course
will not be graded unless the student
requests otherwise by the first day of
class in the course.
4. The quarterly tuition for the period in
which the course begins will be reduced
at the Tuition Reduction rate for the
number of credit hours the course provides. See Tuition and Fees on page 22.

Admissions

Orientation includes staff introductions,


review of school policies and procedures,
facility tour, finalizing documentation
and financial matters, and distribution
of program materials. All students, fulltime and part-time, are required to attend.

the school and review by the AMTS


Academic Officer in order to be accepted.
3. Transfer credit for other coursework
will be evaluated on a case by case basis.
4. To receive transfer credit, a student
must have the equivalent of B or better
performance in the course at the previous institution.
5. At the discretion of AMTS, a student
may be examined in the coursework by
an AMTS instructor in order to receive
credit for the course.
6. A student who receives transfer credit
for a course will be required to take the
course in AMTS, unless waived by the
Academic Dean, in order to broaden
his/her base of knowledge. The course
will not be graded unless the student requests otherwise by the first day of class
in the course.
7. An administrative fee of $30 will be
charged for each course for which
transfer credit is requested.
8. The quarterly tuition for the period in
which the course begins will be reduced
at the Tuition Reduction rate for the
number of Hours credit the course provides. See Tuition and Fees on page 22.

21

Ancestral
Mountain

Tuina School
This section describes

The Board of Directors sets tuition and


fees annually. Tuition and fees will not
change during the academic year, and are
as follows for 2010-11:

the third week of a Quarter may be


cause for administrative action. Alternate
payment schedules can be arranged on
a case by case basis.

Schooltuition, fees, refund

Jin Shou Tuina


Certificate Program*

$7,900

Fees

policy, and financial aid.

Part-time: Chinese
Medical Theory class

$1,680

The following Fees are payable


when incurred:

$1,280

Application for Admission


to Certificate Program

$50

Application for Admission


to Part-time Program

$25

Late tuition payment per week

$25

Returned check

$25

the financial policies of the

Financial Policies

Ancestral Mountain Tuina

Part-time: Human Anatomy


and Physiology class

Tuition Reduction per


Course Hour for approved
Transfer Credit and Course
Challenge Credit
$6
per course hour
* Tuition also includes the monthly
fees for required internal arts classes in
the Spirit Honesty Martial Arts School.

Payment Schedule
One-quarter of the Tuition is due prior
to the first day of each Quarter of the
academic yearspecifically tuition is
due September 20, 2010, December 21,
2010, March 22, 2011, and June 21,
2011. Each Quarter is 13 weeks in length,
and the first Quarter begins on the first
day of classes. The year is divided into
Quarters for the purpose of tuition payments and refunds; the Quarters have no
bearing on the academic course schedule.

22

A $25 late fee per week is charged for


late payments. Non-payment beyond

Request for a Course Challenge

$100

Request for Transfer Credit


in a Course

$30

Transcript

$10

Duplicate Certificate
of Completion

$100

Late or make-up exam (when prior


arrangements were not made)
$25
Tutorial fee per hour for
make-up work

$25

Other Expenses
Books and supplies
(approximate)
North American Tang
Shou Tao Association
membership dues

$200-$250

$100

2010
201 1
Catalog
Certification Examination

Current exam fee


Official Score Report Request

$225
$15

Refund Policy
1. Written notice of withdrawal must be
submitted to AMTS either in person or
by certified mail. Withdrawal Date for
refund computation purposes is the
arrival date of the written Withdrawal
notice or the date a student is Dismissed
from the progam. See Dismissal and
Withdrawal policies on page 27.
2. Any tuition amount paid to AMTS
will be refunded in full if the applicant:
is not accepted for enrollment, chooses
not to enroll, cancels enrollment within
three business days after signing the
enrollment agreement, or withdraws
before the first day of classes.
3. Withdrawal after a Quarter has begun
will result in refund of payment for the
Quarter according to the following rules:

Financial Aid
AMTS awards a limited number of needbased scholarships to full-time Jin Shou
Tuina Certificate Program students. Need
is determined by analysis of information
provided on the scholarship application.
Download the scholarship application at
www.brccm.org or contact the administration office at 540.651.2682. Deadline
for applications is Thursday, July 1, 2010,
and thereafter until AMTS scholarship resources are exhausted. An application for
admission has no bearing on an application for aid, and vice versa.

Financial Policies

The National Certification Board


for Therapeutic Massage and Bodywork
(NCBTMB) National Certification
Exam (NCE) is held simultaneously in
regional centers several times throughout
the year.

a. The student is responsible for paying


a percentage of the Quarter's tuition,
determined by the number of days
from the first day of the Quarter
through the Withdrawal Date,
divided by 91 (13 weeks). Exception:
if the Withdrawal Date is within the
first 18 days of the First Quarter, that
percentage is 20%.
b. There will be no reduction in tuition
for Transfer Credit and Course
Challenge Credit, nor will any
Scholarship awards be applied, in
the Quarter in which the Withdrawal
Date occurs.
c. If the total tuition for which the
student is responsible is less than the
amount that has already been paid,
the student is entitled to a full refund
of the excess amount paid; otherwise,
the balance is due and payable.
4. Only tuition will be refunded. Fees and
other expenses paid are not refundable.
5. Amounts paid by the student will
be applied first to fees and other
expenses, and then to tuition.
6. AMTS is required to refund any
amount owed the student within 45
days after the student's Withdrawal
Date.

Students are strongly urged to explore


all areas of financial assistance, including
Federal, state, local, and private scholarship and loan programs.

7. Program services beyond the


Withdrawal Date are automatically
cancelled.

23

2010
201 1
Catalog
Attendance Policy

policies and procedures

Excused absences will be granted only


for religious observance and extenuating
circumstances.
1. A student can miss one class in a course,
unexcused, with no consequences.
2. Missing two classes, unexcused, will
require a conference with the instructor
to determine if make-up work is
required, such as a tutorial ($25 per
hour) or homework assignments.
3. Missing three or more classes, unexcused, will result in the student being
dropped from the course without
credit, and given consideration for
dismissal from the program.
4. Missing seven (7) consecutive days of
classes, unexcused, will result in the
students AMTS enrollment being
terminated.

pertaining to attendance,
academic progress,
grading, examinations,
graduation and certification.

Missing any portion of a class hour,


unexcused, will be considered as a full
hour of absence. Three hours of absence
is equivalent to one-half instructional day.
The school reserves the right to terminate
an individuals status as a student after
the unexcused absence from four instructional days.

Assignments and information missed as


a consequence of not attending classes,
laboratories, or clinical experiences for any
reason, excused or not, are the responsibility of the student. Students must obtain
makeup assignments from the instructor
upon return to school. Missed work is
to be completed within a week of the
reassignment date and will be graded.

Academic Policies

This section outlines

Satisfactory Performance
To be in good standing in the school,
a student must demonstrate a mature,
responsible attitude toward studies, staff,
faculty and other students; maintain at
least a C grade point average; fulfill
financial agreements in a timely manner;
adhere to the attendance policy; and
demonstrate respect for school property
and reputation.
If a student has unsatisfactory standing
in a course, he/she will be put on academic probation and may be assigned
additional work to satisfy course requirements. If course standing continues to be
unsatisfactory, the student will meet with
the Dean of Students to discuss options.

25

Ancestral
Mountain

Tuina School
Grading System

Academic Policies

Students academic progress will be


recorded using quizzes, tests, and evaluations of laboratory and clinical work. All
written work will be graded. Practicum
and clinical grades will be determined in
a manner appropriate for the experience.
Students may request to discuss
their progress and evaluations with their
instructors.
AMTS grades are not awarded according
to predetermined percentage distributions. Rather, as the following grade descriptions show, a student's grade in a
subject is related more directly to the student's mastery of the material than to the
relative performance of his or her peers.

26

Passing Grades:
Students who satisfactorily complete
the work in a subject receive one of the
following grades:
A Exceptionally good performance
demonstrating a superior understanding of the subject matter, a foundation
of extensive knowledge, and a skillful
use of concepts and/or materials. (Has
value of 4.0 in the Cumulative Grade
Point Average.)
B Good performance demonstrating capacity to use the appropriate concepts,
a good understanding of the subject
matter, and an ability to handle the
problems and materials encountered in
the subject. (Has value of 3.0 in the
Cumulative Grade Point Average.)
C Adequate performance demonstrating
an adequate understanding of the subject matter, an ability to handle relatively straightforward problems, and
adequate preparation for moving on to
more advanced work in the field. (Has
value of 2.0 in the Cumulative Grade
Point Average.)

Non-Passing Grade:
U Less than adequate performance or not
completed. This grade also signifies
that the student must do further work
in the subject to receive credit. (Has
value of 0.0 in the Cumulative Grade
Point Average.)
Subjects that are not included in the
Cumulative Grade Point Average.
When authorized for use in certain
non-academic/practicum subjects, the
following notations are used:
HP High pass, equivalent to grade of A
P

Pass, equivalent to grade of B or C

NC No Credit, equivalent to grade of U


Notation used when a student receives
full credit for a course, either by transfer
credit or course challenge, by demonstrating adequate performance or higher:
CR Credit, equivalent to grade of
A, B, or C.

2010
201 1
Catalog
Withdrawal

Retaking an Exam

If satisfactory performance is not maintained in academic or practical areas of


study and there is concern about a student
successfully completing the program, the
Dean of Students, in consultation with the
Academic Dean and instructors, can place
the student on probation for a period
not to exceed six months.

Written notice of withdrawal must be


submitted to AMTS either in person or
by registered or certified mail. If written
notice is submitted, the effective date of
termination on the student's academic
record will be the date the student last
attended classes. See also Refund Policy
on page 25.

If a student receives lower than a grade of


'C' on a final exam, at the discretion of
the instructor, tutorial(s) may be scheduled
and a different version of the exam may
be taken. The student will be billed for the
tutorial time and time to construct a new
test. The exam must be retaken within
two weeks of the date the student was
informed of his/her original exam result.

This may result in extra expense if the student requires tutorials and/or retaking part
of a course in order to achieve a passing
grade. If satisfactory improvement is not
shown during the probationary period, as
determined by the Academic Dean, the
Dean of Students, and instructors, and in
regular consultation with the student, the
student may be asked to withdraw. If satisfactory improvement is made during the
probationary period, the probation will
be removed.

Dismissal
Behavior as outlined below, though not
limited to these criteria, will be cause for
dismissal:
1. Failure to maintain satisfactory
academic performance
2. Unsatisfactory attendance
3. Behavior that is unprofessional, disruptive or harmful to fellow students, faculty, staff, school property or reputation
4. Failure to fulfill financial agreements

Leave of Absence
Requests for a Leave of Absence should be
submitted in writing to the AMTS Aministrative Officer and will be evaluated and
granted on a case by case basis.

Readmission
A student can apply for readmission after a
leave of absence or dismissal. To be considered, the student must interview with the
AMTS Administrative Officer to evaluate
his/her eligibility. Upon approval, the student may reapply and complete the AMTS
standard admissions process.

Rescheduling an Exam
If a student fails to attend class on the
day an examination is scheduled, he/she
will need to reschedule the exam with
the instructor. With prior arrangement,
staff can proctor the examination in the
office. Missed exams must be taken within
two weeks or receive a failing grade.

Academic Policies

Probation

Graduation Requirements
In order to graduate from the certificate
program, a student must have passed all
courses and the comprehensive examinations with a grade of C or better, met all
clinical requirements, paid the tuition
and fees according to the enrollment
agreement, returned all library materials
and complied with all the rules and
regulations of the school.

Award of Certificate
After all requirements for graduation in
the Jin Shou Tuina program have been
completed, the Ancestral Mountain Tuina
School awards the student a Certificate as
a Practitioner of Jin Shou Tuina.
It is the students responsibility to
determine whether the credits or
certificate awarded from AMTS will
transfer to other institutions or meet
employer requirements.

27

Ancestral
Mountain

Tuina School
AMTS is fully committed

Student Advising

to providing students with

The AMTS Administrative Officer advises


on financial, administrative and admissions-related matters. The Academic Dean,
Dean of Students, and instructors advise
on academic matters. The Student Counselor advises on non-academic matters.
The Student Resources Advisor assists students in navigating through the program.

a fulfilling educational,

Student Services

community, and personal


growth experience. In
doing so, we hope to inspire
a dedication to life-long
learning in the traditional
Chinese medical arts.

Library
A reference library is maintained at the
facility and holds a general collection of
books and journals on traditional Chinese
medicine, philosophy and human sciences. Libraries are available at Virginia
Tech, Radford University, and Roanoke
College. The Floyd/Montgomery
Regional Library is also available to
AMTS students and can provide access
to materials statewide.

Housing
The school does not offer student
housing at this time. The Administrative
Officer can provide information about
area housing.

28

The administration office will be open


during school hours. Additional communication is available via telephone or email.

Transcripts
Transcripts for licensing, national board
examinations or other purposes are
issued provided that a student is in good
standing according to their enrollment
agreement. Transcripts of the student's
permanent academic record are confidential and released only upon the students
written request. The fee for all but the
first transcript is $10 per copy, payable
at the time of request.

Certification Examinations
National Certification Board of
Therapeutic Massage and Bodywork
(NCBTMB)
Graduating students are eligible to take
the NCBTMBs National Certification
Exam for Therapeutic Massage and
Bodywork following successful
completion of the Tuina program. The
NCBTMB's National Certification
Exam is held in regional centers several
times a year.

Administrative and
Faculty Office Hours

Placement Assistance

Administrative staff and instructors are


available to meet with students before or
after class or by appointment.

The school does not actively seek


placement for its graduates. Employment
counseling is provided on request.

2010
201 1
Catalog
Student Conduct

Student Dress and


Personal Hygiene
Students are required to maintain a high
standard of personal hygiene and cleanliness during all aspects of AMTS programming, including classes, clinical work,
meetings, and events. The dress standard
requires clothes to be neat and clean, offering a professional presentation. Open-toed
shoes are not allowed during clinical hours.

Resolving Problems
or Grievances
A student having a concern or a grievance
with the school, another student, faculty
member, or school policy is advised to do
the following:
l. Address the person with whom the
concern relates and courteously seek to
remedy the situation.
.

3. Students with further concerns are


encouraged to schedule an appointment
with the schools Executive Director to
work towards resolving the matter.
4. If the concern cannot be resolved
after exhausting the foregoing
grievance procedure, the student
can file a complaint with the school s
licensing agency:
State Council of Higher Education
for Virginia
101 N. 14TH St.
James Monroe Building
Richmond, VA 23219
Tel: (804)225-2600
Fax: (804)225-2604
5. The school holds students, faculty, and
administrators in high regard as valued
members of our working and learning
community. Bringing attention to a
grievance will be viewed as an opportunity to improve administrative or school
processes and those involved in its resolution will be treated with impunity.

Student Records
Confidential records of student accomplishment such as grades, clinic hours,
and financial records are kept at the
school in a secured area, accessible
only to specified school faculty and
administration.

Student Policies

Students are expected to maintain a


mature, responsible attitude toward their
studies, as well as toward staff, faculty,
and other students. Behavior that is
unprofessional, disruptive or harmful
to fellow students, faculty, staff, school
property or reputation, is grounds for
dismissal.

2. If that does not work or the concern


relates to a school rule or policy, speak
to the Dean of Students, Student
Counselor or AMTS Administrative
Officer.

A cumulative academic record is kept


in each students permanent file. In the
event of unsatisfactory performance,
the Academic Dean or Dean of Students
counsels with the student, and a record of
the meeting is placed in the students file.
Student records are permanent and
confidential and are released only with
written permission from the student.
A students personal files are available
to the student by appointment.

Student Right to Know Act


In accordance with the Department of
Educations Student Right to Know Act,
the information in this catalog is made
available prior to a students enrolling at
Ancestral Mountain Tuina School.

29

Ancestral
Mountain

Faculty & Administration

Tuina School

30

Jason Redinbo, L.Ac.


AMTS Executive Director
AMTS Instructor
Board Member
Executive Director, Blue Ridge Center
for Chinese Medicine
Licensed Acupuncturist, States of
Virginia and Arizona
Instructor in Xingyi, Bagua, Qigong
and Chinese Medicine, North American
Tang Shou Tao Association (NATSTA)
Instructor in Xingyi, Bagua, Qigong,
Spirit Honesty Martial Arts School
AOBTA Jin Shou Tuina Instructor
TCM theory and tuina instructor at
Arizona School of Acupuncture and
Oriental Medicine and East West
College of Natural Medicine
Formal Apprenticeship with
Vincent Black in Chinese medicine
and Jin Shou Tuina
Masters Degree in Acupuncture, East
West College of Natural Medicine, FL
Craniosacral Therapy I and II,
The Upledger Institute
Continuing studies at the International
Acupuncture Training Centre, Beijing
China, and with Huang Gouqi from the
Shanghai School of Traditional Chinese
Medicine
Currently a TCM Committee board
member, North American Tang Shou
Tao Association; member of the
National Commission for Certification
of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine;
member, American Organization for
Bodywork Therapies of Asia; member,
Acupuncture Society of Virginia

Berry Franko
AMTS Instructor
Formal Apprenticeship with Jason
Redinbo in Chinese medical theory
and practice, Jin Shou Tuina, and
clinical procedure, Laurel Creek Clinic
Jin Shou Tuina and Traditional Chinese
Medicine Program diplomate, 2009,
Ancestral Mountain Tuina School
Craniosacral Therapy I and II,
The Upledger Institute
Certified Massage Therapist,
Jin Shou Tuina, State of Virginia
Clinic Manager and Jin Shou Tuina
practitioner, Laurel Creek Clinic
NATSTA certified Gao Bagua
assistant instructor, Spirit Honesty
Martial Arts School
Christopher Hill, B.F.A.
Academic Officer and Dean of Students
AMTS Instructor
Formal Apprenticeship with Jason
Redinbo in Chinese medical theory
and practice, Jin Shou Tuina, and
clinical procedure, Laurel Creek Clinic
Jin Shou Tuina and Traditional Chinese
Medicine Program diplomate, 2009,
Ancestral Mountain Tuina School
Craniosacral Therapy I,
The Upledger Institute
Certified Massage Therapist,
Jin Shou Tuina, State of Virginia
Jin Shou Tuina practitioner,
Laurel Creek Clinic

NATSTA certified Gao Bagua


assistant instructor, Spirit Honesty
Martial Arts School
Executive Committee member, North
American Tang Shou Tao Association
Melissa Maynard, LMT
AMTS Instructor
Formal Apprenticeship with Jason
Redinbo in Chinese medical theory
and practice, Jin Shou Tuina, and
clinical procedure, Laurel Creek Clinic
Craniosacral Therapy I,
The Upledger Institute
Certified Massage Therapist,
Jin Shou Tuina, State of Virginia
Jin Shou Tuina practitioner,
Laurel Creek Clinic
Eli Schwartz-Gralla
AMTS Instructor
Formal Apprenticeship with Jason
Redinbo in Chinese medical theory
and practice, Jin Shou Tuina, and
clinical procedure, Laurel Creek Clinic
Jin Shou Tuina and Traditional Chinese
Medicine Program diplomate, 2009,
Ancestral Mountain Tuina School
Craniosacral Therapy I,
The Upledger Institute
Certified Massage Therapist,
Jin Shou Tuina, State of Virginia
Jin Shou Tuina practitioner,
Laurel Creek Clinic

2010
201 1
Catalog

Jody Franko, B.S.


AMTS Administrative Officer
Administrative Officer, Blue Ridge
Center for Chinese Medicine
Adjunct Professor, Radford University,
Department of Dance
Masters candidate, Career and
Technical Education, Virginia Tech
Assistant to the Director, Dancing Earth
Performing Arts Company
Program Coordinator, June Bug Center
Owner and artistic director, Mountain
Rose Dance Center
NATSTA certified Gao Bagua
assistant instructor, Spirit Honesty
Martial Arts School

David Wiley, PhD


AMTS Academic Dean and
Registrar Emeritus
Board Chair and Secretary
Doctorate in physics from Princeton
University, bachelors and masters
degrees from the Massachusetts Institute
of Technology (MIT)
Former senior administrator at MIT,
including Registrar and Dean of
Freshmen. Provided research and policy
support to MITs President and Faculty.
Billard Award for distinguished service
to MIT
AAU Registrar, Emeritus
Worked in the New Jersey Department
of Higher Education, helping to provide
educational opportunities for minority
students
Served as research staff at the Plasma
Physics Laboratory, Princeton University
Co-founder, Board member and Officer
of the $200 million Boston Community
Loan Fund

Virginia Lepley, B.F.A.


AMTS Librarian
Board Treasurer
Former Vice President, Levy Madison,
NYC metro area advertising and
marketing agency
Directed strategic marketing and
creative services for Fortune 500, 1000
companies and non-profit organizations
Co-founder/publisher, Womens Q&A,
national monthly newsletter for women
Currently a member of the Business
Marketing Association, International
Association of Business Communicators,
Art Directors Club, and the North
American Tang Shou Tao Association
Mary Wiley, M.Ed.
AMTS Student Counselor
Board Member
Certified Educational Psychologist
and counselor
Counseling and School Psychology
Masters Degree from Boston University,
and a Certificate of Advanced Educational Study in School Psychology
and Counseling from Boston College
Co-founder of the Erehwon School in
Princeton Junction, NJ; psychologist for
the Minuteman Regional School District
in Massachusetts and for the Montgomery County School District in
Virginia; clinician at the Tekoa Group
Home in Floyd County, Virginia; and
family counselor and assessment clinician.
Adjunct faculty member, Lesley College
Graduate School, Cambridge, MA.

Faculty & Administration

Yarrow Delauney-Yard
AMTS Instructor
Formal Apprenticeship with Jason
Redinbo in Chinese medical theory
and practice, Jin Shou Tuina, and
clinical procedure, Laurel Creek Clinic
Jin Shou Tuina and Traditional Chinese
Medicine Program diplomate, 2009,
Ancestral Mountain Tuina School
Craniosacral Therapy I,
The Upledger Institute
Certified Massage Therapist,
Jin Shou Tuina, State of Virginia
Jin Shou Tuina practitioner,
Laurel Creek Clinic
NATSTA certified Gao Bagua
assistant instructor, Spirit Honesty
Martial Arts School

31

Ancestral
Mountain

Tuina School

Officers & Governing Board

AMTS Officers and


Governing Board
Responsibilities
Executive Director
Jason Redinbo
Serves as AMTS chief executive officer
Develops and maintains AMTS vision,
mission, and school culture
Responsible for curriculum development
and implementation
Manages AMTS operations
Strategic development including
marketing, public relations, financial
planning, and human resources
Compliance with safety regulations

32

Academic Officer
Dean of Students
Chris Hill
Provides day-to-day academic
administrative support for AMTS
Advises students on academic matters
and addresses performance issues
With the Executive Director and others,
plans the ongoing development of the
AMTS program and curricula
Reviews the major instruments of
academic policy and communication,
and oversees the grading process and
maintenance of academic records
As Dean of Students, provides day-today contact for general student concerns
and facilitates student preparation for
NCBTMB testing

Administrative Officer
Jody Franko
Serves as AMTS Administrative officer
Responsible for AMTS administration
and daily operations
Strategic development and continuous
improvement of AMTS daily
processes, policies and procedures
Works with the Executive Director in
achieving the schools mission
Board Chair
Academic Dean and Registrar Emeritus
David Wiley
Works in partnership with the Executive
Director in achieving the schools mission
and addressing issues faced by the school
Provides leadership for the Board of
Directors, which sets policy and provides
oversight of all of BRCCM's programs,
and to whom the Executive Director is
accountable
Monitors school financial planning
and financial reports
Supports Board's role in strategic
planning
With the Board, evaluates annually the
performance of the school in achieving
its mission
As Academic Dean and Registrar
Emeritus, provides oversight of:
academic program, policies and
procedures, AMTS catalogue, and
maintenance of academic records;
mentors staff regarding academic
administrative matters

Board Treasurer
Virginia Lepley
Oversight of school finances and administration of fiscal matters, including audit
Reviews annual budget and brings
to Board for approval
Oversees development and Board
review of school financial policies
and procedures
Plays a leading role in fundraising and
strategic planning
Board Secretary
David Wiley
Ensures effective management of records
and maintains records of the Board
Manages Board meeting minutes and
communication with Board members
Maintains an understanding of legal
documents, Board policies, by-laws, IRS
letters, as they apply to Board business
Board Members
David Wiley, Jason Redinbo,
Virginia Lepley, Mary Wiley,
Michael Waitzkin, Pat Sharkey
Regularly attends Board meetings and
other related meetings
Participates actively in committee work
Volunteers for assignments that help
the school achieve its mission
Stays informed about Board and committee matters, prepares for meetings,
and reviews and comments on minutes
and written proposed actions
Actively participates in the Board's
annual evaluation and planning
Participates in fundraising for the school

Ancestral
Mountain

Tuina School

144 Silver Maple Lane, NE


Pilot, VA 24138
540.651.2682
email: amts@brccm.org
www.brccm.org