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The Text of the Odyssey

Author(s): Thomas W. Allen


Source: Papers of the British School at Rome, Vol. 5, No. 1 (1910), pp. 3-85
Published by: British School at Rome
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/40310264
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THE TEXT OF THE ODYSSEY.


I HAVE to thank the Director for giving this article a place in the
Annual. The Italian collectionsfaroutweighthose of the restof Europe
on the subject of Homer; and the opportunityof collating the Vatican
kindnessof Father Ehrle,the
Odysseys I owe equally to the self-sacrificing
old
friendWilliam Bliss, who died early in 1909, and
good officesof my
the enviablequartersAugusto menseof the BritishSchool at Rome.
I.
The Manuscripts.
The Odyssey is contained so far as is known in the following
manuscripts: the descriptionsare my own, except where the contraryis
stated.
Berlin.

1. Be = Berlin,codices Phillipici, No. 182 ( = Phillips 1585, Meermann 307).


Membr.263 x 163 mm.,if.203, s. xv. At the end larOaiovvakfucpovTrxo-avcws.1
This book was collated by an anonymous,Classical Journal, xxxii. 178, xxxvi.251.
I have not seen it. Cf. below g.
Brussels.
2. Br = Brussels, Bibliothque Royale 11290 = 73^
Chart. 288x208 mm., if. 417, s. xvi. Hyp. per. tit. (often omitted);
paraphrase and interlin. notes in red ; marginal scholia ; very abundant v. 11.
withyp. Other later correctionsby a sixteenthcenturyowner. Signs : a single
bracket on the left hand, y 232-8, 244-6, 275-88, k 368-72, A.38-43, v 320-3,
ooWo-cvs,(2) fx9ows
TroSpas,
333-8, p 150-165. At beginning verses (1) tfrvyuv
t
of
lines
Two
series
140,
132,
138,
136,
misplaced,
(1)
134,
c
wpat
(3)
/xx^ots.
T42, 144, 146, 148, 150, 133, 135, 137, 139, 141, 143, 145, 147, 149 (renumbered
1 This descriptionis taken fromDie Handschriften-V
der KniglichenBibliothek
erzeichnisse
zu Berlin, vol. xi. 1890-1897.
2 Cataloguedes Manuscritsgrecs de la BibhothequeRoyale de Bruxelles,par Henri Omont,
1885, p. 25,
U

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School

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by another hand) (ii) after k 556 vv. 547, 549, 551, 553, 555 are repeated
(for the renumberingsee p. 81) ; whence it follows that the archetype was in
double columns,the sense runningacross, a usage common in s. xiii.1
See under e.
Cesena.2
3. C = Biblioteca Malatestiana 27. 11 (' i* Fila, xxvii0Plteo, ii in ordine').
Membr. 275 x 210. ff.202, a. 1311, Tit., no hyp. per. schol. Some glosses
and paraphrases; much correctedby late hands. At beginningif. v. 2 in a small

S. xiv. hand, irp\oyos yKtufJuacrriKos


s rrjv oSvcro-ctavrov bxrpov. hia Ppa\<V
rov irovqrovrrjv oWoiav. inc. irovqTaXfilv kol piqropis expl. /kcvctw
XaipaKTY]p<v
a>s v to irapvn. Cf. U (6).
At end a-r^pi els rov o/xrjpov(i) efe
fxvovOvcLTovy
alwvas ofirjpc(ii) rra irXeis. Signature : frtkuuB-qfirjvlTrpiWQ)tV8.ffiv Tif&iO'.
nal 8a tw Oe. Below in red,
t TiyvSciroXvTrXavos
KaepridSa Svcrrjos
6 KpqTY)S.
fiftXoV
6fl7)pr)V
VLK7}<f>pOS
<T\V

Over leaf in red


I* 3p\ov ofxrjpov
TTokvirXaKTOi
TYjvhf.
oSvarfjos
3
KTrjo'aT'afir . . raros iror iv apxicptvcriKprjrrjs.

See infra a.

Cambridge.
=
4. Ca Corpus ChristiCollege Library,81.
Chart. 397 x 225, ff.534 and blanks, s. xv.
Cont. if. 1-228 Iliad, 228-356 Quintus Calaber, 357-end Odyssey. Tit. hyp.
per.; occasional glosses, paraphrase,and scholia ; corrected throughout by the
hand of the scholia. Dr. Montague James, Provost of King's College, has
identifiedthe scribe with Emanuel of Constantinople.4 Used forthe Odysseyby
Barnes, knownto editorsof the Iliad as *Cant.'
See infrag.
British Museum.5
5. Hi = Harley 5658.
Membr. 225x145, ff. 260, a. 1479. Per. hyp. tit; no scholia; constant
corrections and v. 11. both by Rhosus and another hand. Signs : asterisks
6 564-72, straightline A 454~6, v 333-8. subscr. f. 259 v. ficreypd^rj
rrov ofxrjpov
1 A similarobservation(aboutVi
Z) is made by La Roche, praef.ed. p. xvii.
2 Muccioli,
CatalogusMalatest. Caesen. did/.1780 ; Albert Martin, Melange cfarchol.et
d'hisL 1882 ii. 224 sq.; Schrader,Hermesxxiv. (1894), 25 sqq. collatedone book (j8).
3 My notesdo not coincidewithwhatSchraderread. &{v)oua>TaTos.
4
Journalof TheologicalStudies. 1904, p. 44<.
5 Cf. E. Maunde
Thompson,C.R. 1888,pp. 103, 4.

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The Text of the Odyssey.

vo'creia va\<fjLa<ri jxkv rov kvTLfJLorjrov


avSps Kvpov papOoXo^iaov rov Kpvcnnavov
Xi/dc8c Itvvov Upcws p<i><rov rov KprjTs. em airo rrjs \v y/viyo-a>s^tXioorTw
evctTft)*
fxrjvbsavy ovcrrov Sacarr) iv pfirj. This and the
ftSofirjKOO-Tt)
TTpaKO(rto(TT>

nextthreeMSS. wereused byBentley(Platt,/.Ph. xxii.26).


See infraj.

6. H2 = Harley5673.
Chart.285 x 200,ff.213,s. xv. Per. hyp.tit; no scholia; a fewcorrections;
notes in Greek and Latin. At end the verses (1) ^uywvoSwro-cvs,
(2) rov
7T0\v7rkKT0V.

See //ra.

'
7. H3 = Harley5674 (' H ap. Ludwich).
Membr.275x180, ff.150, s. xiii. (early). Per. hyp.tit.; abundantscholia
whereplentifulattachedby signs; in varioushands,
(wherescantyunattached,
all contemporaneous).Signs: marksof omission$ 174-184, p 122, 124, 126,
t 4-12, diplaep 10-13.
asterisks
I use Ludwich'scollationof this MS., but have inspectedit myself. For the
scholiacf.Schrader's
quaest Od. 1890,pp. 140^.
Porphyrii
See infrac.
8. H4 = Harley6325.
Membr. 275x185, ff. 216, s. xv. Hyp. per. tit; glosses throughout,
by
Rhosus; veryfewv.11. Illuminated.
See infrad.
Sabbioneta.
about it
9. J. The MS. designatedby this letteris lost. Our information
made by Villoisonin hisEpistolaeVinarienses,
comes fromthe statements
Turici,
1783,pp. 36 sqq. Villoisongivesa collationof thisMS. enteredon themarginof
an Aldine edition(1524) in the Libraryat Weimar,whichbelongedto Nicolas
Heinsius(1620-1681)*ex dono patris.JThe noteswereby Heinsius,to judgefrom
ad exemplum
and he indicatedhis source in the words' correctum
the writing,
Vespasian!Gonzagaedi Columna.' Until the WeimarAldine has
manuscriptum
mustattachto these
whichI have not done,some uncertainty
beenre-examined,
statements. AboutVespasiano,Duke of Sabbionetanear Mantua (d. 1591) see
: Gonzagadi Mantova,tav. xiv.
LittaFamigliecelebri
willalso be foundin hislifebyIreneoAffb,
Information
Parma,1780,and in a
sketchby C. Yriarte,Cosmopolis,1896, April,pp. 124-145. His marbleswere
removedin the 18th centuryto Mantua,wheretheynow are; his books he
bequeathedto the Servitesof Sabbioneta,in whose possessionthese were in
Morelli'sday. By thetimeof Blume,IterItalicum,1824,I. 196,theybelongedto
me (Sept.1907)
theComune.The sindacoofSabbionetawaskindenoughto inform
that 'non esistonolibridi VespasianoGonzaga,ne si s ove siano.' Villoison
oftheMarciana,1778-1819)discussesthe
a letterin whichMorelli(Librarian
prints

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question whetherHeinsius saw the codex Vespasiani northof the Alps, or in Italy
on eitherof his two journeys(1646 and 165 1), Heinsius' own MS. of the Odyssey,
R 12, has no connection withJ. A related MS., not, however,identical,is U8.
See infra h.
Cracow}
10. K = Cracow 543.
See infra e.

Writtenby DemetriusTriboles of Sparta in 1469.

Florence,Biblioteca Laurenziana?
11. Li = Laur. 32. 4 (' L ' ap. Ludwich.).
Membr. 400x225, if. 476, s. xv. cont. Iliad, Odyssey (if. 270-445;,
Batrachomyomachia,Hymns, Epigrams. Tit. per. hyp.; occasional corrections;
no notes.
See infraf.
12. L2 = Laur. 32. 6.
Membr. 330x195, if. 400, a. 1465.

Tit. per. hyp.; no scholia. Variants.

At end irektiwOrjrj tov bfjuqpov


Scrtrcta
8lol XLP$^M0^ ivwov Trpea-^vrepov
ptxrov
tov Kprjrbscv Tt
a&v&$e&firjvbsvoefifipiovTprrjiv fioviova.
See infra d.
13. L3 = Laur. 32. 23.
if. 296, s. xv. Tit. per. hyp. ; no scholia; corrections and
Chart. 210x140,
v. 11.here and there by text-hand and another. At end t f /3/3\o$
avrrj^payKo-Kov
io-rlvcon Se kolItw <tAo>j/
tov <f>...\cf>ov
clvtov*.t (partly erased).

See infraf

14. L4 = Laur. 32. 24 ('G' ap. Ludwich).


Membr. 200 x 150, if. 234, s. x-xi. Tit. per. hyp.; no scholia; glosses, etc.
by several hands, all considerablylater than the original scribe. Signs, correctly
given by Molhuysen,p. 4, are non-criticalwith the exception of five small crosses
(equivalent to asterisks)a 97-102. A companion book to Laur. 32. 15 (D) of the
Iliad, which it much resembles. The oldest MS. of the Odyssey. Collated by
Molhuysende tribusHomeri Odysseaecodicibusantiquissimis,189^, to whichI owe
the readings.
See infra k.
15. L5 = Laur. 32. 30.
Chart. 285 x 190, if. 192, s. xv. Hyp.; spaces left for per. tit. and initials.
A fewcorrectionsby the firsthand.
1 I have not been able to finda
is
printedcatalogueof the Cracowlibrary; the description
takenfromLudwich,praef.p. xi.
2 Handini,
bibl.MediceaeLaurenlianae, 1764, ii. 126 sqq.
Catalogascodicum

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The Text of the Odyssey.

16. L6 = Laur. 32. 39.


Membr. s. xv. 185 x 130, ff.273. Tit. ; no per. hyp.; grammaticalnotes on a
and partsof ft,y.
17. L7=Laur. 91 sup. 2.1 (' N' ap. Ludwich).
Bomb. s. xiii. 260 x 190, ff.216. Tit. per. hyp.(in some books not writtenin).
No scholia, v. 11.,nor signs. A fewexegeticalnotes. Cont. Iliad and (ff.167-216)

Odyssey (a- 422).


See infra a.

18. L8 = Laur. conventisoppressi52 (gi Badia 2763) * ( = *F ' ap. Ludwich).


Membr. 240x190, s. xi, if. 296. Tit.; no hyp. per. (these added by a
late hand) nor scholia. Signs correctlygiven by Molhuysen, p. 7 ; theyare noncritical except a set of diplae to #c
232-40, 244-7 (these come from the first,not
the second hand). Marginalia sparinglyin firsthand, more abundant in later
hands. Collated by Molhuysen,op. cit.
See infra g.
19. L9 = Riccardiana 78.2 s. xv. 205 x 135; cont. inter alia '0 169-177,
20S-11, 408, 9, 479-8i, 1 27, 28, 34, 5, etc. usque ad versust 328-34/
20. Lio = Magliabecchiana g,2 s. xvi.-xvii.; cont. a 1-267, nvP-PerMilan, Biblioteca Ambrosiana?
77 inf. [ = 800].
Chart. 285x195, if. 302, a. 1468. Tit. per. hyp. No scholia; corrections
and v. 11. both by Rhosus and a later hand. Contains Odyssey a 384- end
tj 7rapov<ra
P/3\osa*v*&i*iipr*
voc^/^hco
(the firstquire is lost). Subscr. reXciatfi?
iff. By Rhosus.
See infrad.
22. M2 = B 99 sup. [=121] (- *B ' ap. Ludwich).
21. Mi=A

Bomb. 250x160, ff.190, s. xiii. Contains misc. and (if. 14-179) Odyssey
(a-< 134). Tit. per. ; no hyp. Constant epexegeticscholia;4 correctionsand v. 11.
by m. p. A fewlate corrections.
See infra i.
' f
23. M3 = E 89 sup. [ = 299] ( = E ap. Ludwich).
Chart. 260 x 190, if. 103, s. xiii-xiv. Cont. a-t. Tit. per. hyp. scholia4 and
interlinear glosses. Lemmata and glosses in red ; the rubricator corrects the
1 ' ndice dei codicigreciLaurenzianinon compresinel catalogo del Bandini,JStudi italiani
di filologadassica i. p. 144.
2 ' ndice dei codicigreciRiccardiani,Magliabecchianie Maruccelliani,'Studi ital. ii. pp. 525,
549. I have notseen thesetwo MSS.
3 Cf. Cat. Cod. Graec.Bibl. Ambrosianaedig. AemidiusMartini et Dominicas Bassi, 1906.
4 On whichsee Schrader,Hermesxxii. 346 sq.

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text and adds interlinearv. 11.. Largely restored by a fifteenthcenturyhand


(e.g. on ff.i, 2, 13, 14, 18, 23, 24, 70, 79, 87-102) : these readings are indicated
by M (3).
See infra m,
24. M4 = Q 88 sup. [688] (^'Q*
ap. Ludwich).
Chart. 290x210, ff.277 and viii blank, s. xv. Tit. hyp.,no per.; scholia.1
Signs : a single bracket,to the left of the text, at y 232, 244, 275, v 320, 333,
S 5O3, P 150, 475 <r33See infra e.
25. Madrid 27.
' Chartaceus in folii
modum,foliisconstans 278 ... saeculo xv. feredimidiato
exaratus' Iriarte,Regiae BibliothecaeMatritensiscodicesGraeci MSS., 1769, p. 122.
cont. ff.1-34 Orpheus, Argonautica,35-278 Odyssey (a-<). This MS. has not
been collated.
Modena.
26. Mo. = Estnse no.2
Chart. 277 x 190 mm., ff.199, s. xv. Tit. per. (oftenom.) ; no hyp. or schol.
Marginalia (gramm.,etc.) in differenthands. Titles in red and some additions
by Rhosus.
See infra d.
Moscow.
27. Libraryof the Synod, no. 472 (olim 286).
Membr. s. xiii. ff.157. Hyp. glosses. Not collated. The descriptioncomes
from the catalogue [in Russian] by Vladimir, 1894, p. 708. Mr. A. E. Cowley
translated the notice for me. Heyne (Iliad iii. 92) possessed a collation made by
C. F. Matthaei.
Munich?
28. Mon. = Munich, Stadtbibliothek: Augustanus 519 B.
Bomb. 245 x 160 mm., ff. 253, s. xiv. Cont. 1-249 Odyssey, 250-3, Batrachomyomachia(1-161). Tit. per. hyp.; glosses. V. 11.both m.p. and in a xv-xvith
centuryhand, whichlatteradds a 1-2 71 (ff.1-6) and y 131-178 (f. 23). Collated
by Ludwich, inspectedby myself.
See infrak and d.
Naples.
=
N
Biblioteca
29.
Naples,
Nazionale, ii. F. 4.4
Chart. 285 x 195, ff. 341, s. xv. Tit. hyp.; no per. Occasional corrections,
ooWo-cv's.
supplements,and glosses. At end </>vy<v

See infrad.

1 On whichsee
Schrader,Hermesxxii. 346 sq.
'
2 V.
Puntoni, ndice dei codicigrecidella bibliotecaEstensedi Modena,' Studi ital. iv.
3 This MSS. is omittedin the
BibliothecaeRegiae Bavaricae, by
Cataloguscodicum
I. Hardt, 1812.
4 Codices
Borbonicaedescriptia SalvatoreCyrillo,1826,
graeci manuscriptsregiae bibliothecae
ii. p. 142.

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The Text of the Odyssey.

Oxford.
30. O = Bodleian Library,Canonici graec. 79.1
Chart. 310 x 220, ff.270 + 2, s. xv. Tit. hyp. per. (oftenomitted); occasional
scholia. Extensive corrections by another hand. At end (1) rov 7roXvTrXdKrov
68v<r(rvs.
(2) J>vylov
See infrab.
Paris, BibliothequeNationale.2
'
31. Pi =grec 2403 (' D ap. Ludwich).
Bomb. 250 x 308, ff.308, s. xiii. cont. ff.176 V.-308 Odyssey (a-w 309). Tit.
3
hyp. per. ; glosses; scholia (scantyafterthe beginningof y). Correctionsin text
v. 11.withyp., usually by m.p.
and
a
later
hand
occasional
;
by m.p.
See infraI.
32. P2 = grec 2680.
Chart. 380x230, ff.448, s. xv. cont. (ff.256-448) Odyssey. Tit. hyp. per.
Occasional correctionsboth by firstand later hand. Latin glosses.
See infraf
33- P3 = grec2688.
Chart.392 x 245, ff.246, s. xvi. Tit. hyp. per. No scholia : a fewcorrections
hand. At beginningepigramv\\iiiKrjrosofxrjpe.
and v. 11.in a different
See infrab.
34. P4 = grec 2689.
Chart. 285 x 205, ff.356, s. xvi. Tit. hyp. per. Interlinearglosses in red
and occasional v. 11. by m.p. Rhosus' hand appears here and there, e.g. in the
*
periochato p. At the beginningin a modernhand Codex scriptusmanu Caesaris
Strateginifallor.'
35. P5 = grec2769.
Membr. 192 x 125, ff. 201, s. xv. Tit. per. hyp. in red by m.p. The
rubricator(who resemblesRhosus) correctsthroughout,fillsseveralgaps, and adds
lines in marg. Scholia in earlier books; occasional v. 11.; marginalia mainly
glossarialand by m.p.

See infraj.

1 Coxe, Catalogicod.
bibl.Bodl, pars tertia,1854,p. 78.
2 H. Omont,lnventairesommairedes manuscntsgrecs de la BtbL Nat. 11.p. 253, 111.pp.
25 sqq.
3 On whichsee Schrader,I.e. p. 347.

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io

36. P6 = grec 2894 ('S' ap. Ludwich).


Bomb. 255 x 175, if. 338, s. xiii. Cont. misc. and (if. 209-333 r>) Odyssey.
In two columns, text running across. Tit. per. (often omitted). Scholia and
paraphraseas faras y 48.1 No v. 11.or corrections.
See infraj.
37. P7 = supplementgrec 164.2
Chart. 217 x 155, if. 183, s. xvi. Cont. misc. and (if. 5-116) Od. (ol-k).
See infra k.
38. P8 = supplementgrec 100 1.
Membr. 275x255, 1 sheet ( = ff. 13,14), s. xv. F. 13 contains 752-101,
f. 14 r. y 425-434, f. 14 v. 8 1-24 Has been used as a binding.
8
39. Pal. = Heidelberg, Palatinus 45.
Membr. 222x160 mm., if. 234, a. 1201, 1202. Hyp. per. Scholia to a- rj.
Cont. if. 1-224 Odyssey, 225-9 Batrachomyomachiain four contemporary
hands,
of which the firstalludes to himselfin the words xtP*irakaydvovvlov TrcAcyptVov
tov airo t^s i$povar]s.
KOfti^ros

See infra b.

40. Pe = Perugia, Biblioteca comunale, D 67.


Chart. 285 x 195, if. 298, s. xv. Cont. (1-260) Odyssey; tit. hyp. per. No
(2) <j>vyu)v
corrections,scholia, or v. 11. A fewnotes. At end (1) tov iroXvirXyKTov
ooWtcvs.

See infra d.

Rome.
41. Ri=Vat. graec. 24.
Membr. 290 x 195, ff.261, s. xv. Tit. per. hyp. (collected at beginning and
end). No scholia; few correctionsand v. 11. At end inside cover emptusab
argyropulouna cumaliis xi similitersignatisb. manfredus. On this celebrated sale
see Voigt Wiederbelebungi
i. 369.
See infra i.
1 On thesecf. LudwichProgr.Regimont.1889, 1, p. 1.
2 F4 r. we findfivelinesin different-coloured
inks:

Cf. Estnse 245 (iii. G.I2)


X&pTtovxov.

rod fi4\apos (black).


fioicifiiov
Sonlfxiovrod fiap(lou (brown).
rov irpaavov (green).
BoKfxiou
rrjs Kivafidpcws(red).
doictfiiov
rod KovhtXlov
(black).
SokI/jliov
doKfiiovrov kov$i\(ov ko rod mcXavovical rod xP^ovP0" K0^ Tv

8 This
description,and also the readingsof the MS., are derived,fromP. C. Molhuysen
De tribusHomeri Odysseaecodicibusantiquissi/nis,1896, pp. 8 sq. Cf. also Ludwich, Progr.
Regimont.1888 ii., Schrader,Porphyriiquaest. Od. pp. 1635^.

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The Text of the Odyssey.

ii

42. K.2= Vat. graec. 25.


Chart. 395 x 210, ff.185, s. xv. Hyp., but per. and tit. usually omitted. No
81a xLP$fw>3^wqrpiov
scholia, or v. 11. Carelesslywritten: at end + crcActwefy
tov avOoTTovkov.

See infra /.

43. R3 = Vat. graec. 906.


Membr. 180 x 120, ff.278, a. 1422. Tit. per. hyp. Corrected throughoutby
a contemporary
hand : v. 11.and glosses here and there abundant. No scholia, or
signs. Gilded and illuminated. At end in red (faint)
8i \ipbsjiov Sicucvov
tov ^pvaroKOKicrj
to irapovfifiXov
+ Te\entiOr
yccopyibu
V TU $ ^ X" MVLOKTofipto
ivS.l+ .
See infra e.
44. R4 = Vat. graec. 915.
Bomb. 260x170, if. 238, s. xiii. (schol. A.1 quotes Tzetzes). Cont. misc.
(Theogn. Phocyl. Hes., etc.), if. 48-141 Iliad, 142-177 Odyssey. Tit. per. hyp.
Constant glosses; in places paraphrase; abundant scholia, entirely ut vid.
exegetical. Many v. 11.with yp., omitted lines added in margin with Sc, in the
textAciW In double columns,the text reading across. No signs; one passage
{y 232-8) markedwitha verticalline.
See infra a,
45. R5 = Vat. graec. 1302.
Bomb. 300x230, if. 218, s. xiii.-xiv. Misc., being several books bound
together: if.169-192 cont. Od. (a-f 285) in double columns,textreadingacross.
No per. tit.hyp. or scholia : a fewglosses, corrections,and v. 11.
See infrap.
46. R6 = Vat. graec. 1320.1
Chart. 300 x 225, if. 202, s. xv. Hyp., no per. tit. Exegetical scholia to a-8
o) ; glosses : a fewv. 11. The scholiast (contemp.) correctsand adds lines
and \/,
wherethereare scholia. At beginningfifiXov
rj$v<ro-ia
[monocondylion]tyfirfTpios
o rpa^avtosk
See infrag.
47. R7 = Vat. graec. 1627.
Membr. 415 x 270, ff.318, a. 1477 (companion to the Iliad, Vat. graec. 1626).
Tit. per., no hyp.,scholia, or glosses. All by Rhosus, and corrected throughout
- outwstvpoviv
by him in red [in the Iliad he alludes to his second archetype
:
the
Latin
version on the
KeivTai
v
Unfinished
ovts
fiifikiiu,
Tpu)/?i/?A.i<j>].
Tp<
rectos and the illuminationswhichare in the Iliad are wanting. Subscr.- tovtI to
Slcl \eip6s ifJLQv
itdwov p<spcrov
fii/3\iov7/T01ri tov ofirjpovoSvorcjafJLTyp</}rj
1 Seen

by Ludwich,Program.Regim. 1888, 1, p. 1.

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12

The British School at Rome.

Kvpov fjfiwvKvptov (fypayKia'KOV


KprjTos to ycvos ava\jxa<TtfiVtov cu8O"i/a)t<tou
rrjs yias
KapSrvaX.LOv
[Gonzaga] r$s cpoayas KaOoXiKtjskcu <irocrTo\u]sKK\rjo-as
/apta? vftas era airo t}$ x^ ycwiyrccosxiXloot rerpaKoa-Loa-rd3SofirjKoa-r(
iv pwfirj. The church
IvSiktovos Sc/cr^s firjvbso-7TTj8ptbv
tfiSfJLi'
TrevrtKaihtKaTq

of S. Maria Nuova now goes by the name of S. Francesca Romana.


was finishedon May 3 1 of the same year.
See infra c.

The Iliad

48. R8 = Vat. Palat. 7.1


Chart. 275 x 195, if. 200 a. 1436. Tit. hyp., no per. Scholia and glosses.
$v<rcrvs
Carefullycorrected. At end the verses (1) <j>vyv
(2) fiOov?iroSpa*
(3) rjprjKaq
ixOp&v(4) ttoBv
ftoywv. Signs : a single bracket to y 232-8, 244-6,
275-88, 77107, V320-3, 503-6 uv., p 150-165, 475-480, 0-230-2. The other
signs ( x -) are mere referencesto the scholia. Subscr. in cipher, as Catalogue.
See infra e.
49. R9 = Vat. Palat. 181.
Membr. 270 x 175, if. 207, s. xv. Tit. per.; no hyp.; no scholia. Carefully
writtenand corrected.
See infrag.
50.- Rio = Vat. Ottobuoni 57.a

Chart. 285 x 200, if. 204, s. xv. Hyp., tit. usually omitted. No per. nor
scholia. Correctedthroughoutby m.p. and by anotherhand, who adds v. 11.
See infra c.
51. Rn=Vat. Ottobuoni 308.
Chart. 200 x 130, if. 304, a. i486.
Subscr. as in Catalogue.
See infrag.

Hyp. per., no tit.Glosses but no scholia.

52. Ri2 = Vat. Regina 99.a


Chart. 230 x 160, if. 237, s. xv. Tit. per. hyp. No scholia. Written by
Rhosus; cf. the subscription232 r. (in Cat.), which gives the scribe's name as
Ioannes only; v. 11. added throughoutby Rhosus. At the end ^vywv8v<r<r*vs.
At beginningNicolai Heinsit.
See infra c.
53. Ri3 = Vat. Urbin. 125.4
Membr. 230 x 165. A single page, being the fly-leafof Urb. 125; s. xiii.
In 2 cols., the textgoing across ; cont. y 234-373. No scholia or notes.
1 Codd.MSSM Palatini Graeci. . . rec. et
digessitHenricusStevenson,1885.
2 Codd.MSSM GraeciOttoboniani
. . . rec. E. Feron et F. Battaglini,1803.
3 Codd.MSS.H Graeci
ReginaeSuecorumet Pit PP. //.... rec. et dig. HenricusStevenson,
188a
4 Codd. UrbinatesGraeci. . . rec. Cosimus
Stornaiolo,1895.

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The Text of the Odyssey.

13

54. Ri4 = Vat. Urbin. 136.


Membr. 310 x 170, if.435, s. xv. Tit. per., no hyp. No scholia.
See infrag.
55. Ri5 = BarberiniI 31.
Chart. 170 x no, if. 34, s. xvi. (?)
beginningCaroli Strozzae ThomaefilL

Cont. a 36-/3 in Greek and Latin. At

56. Ri6 = BarberiniI 93,


Chart. 215 x 140, if. 30, s. xv.-xvi. Cont. a-fi 19, with some v. 11. In the
same book are A and the Catalogue (dated 1548).
57. Ri7 = BarberiniI, 153.
Chart. 240x170, if. 61, s. xv.-xvi. Cont. y-e 102, portions of 6 and 1.
No hyp. tit. per. or scholia. Regular v. 11.
See infrag
58. T = Hamburg,Stadtbibliothek,15.1
Bomb. 278x180, if. 228, s. xiv. Cont. a- 67.
See infrap.

Collated by Ludwich.

59. Ui = Venice, Marc. 456.a


Chart. 375 x 255, if. 541, s. xv. Cont. Iliad, Quintus Calaber (ff.341-504),
Odyssey, Hymns, Batr. Tit. per., no hyp. nor scholia. Frequent correctionsby
the scribe,Rhosus.
See infrag.
60. U2 = Marc. 457.
Chart. 285 x 190, ff. 191, s. xv. Tit. per., no hyp., scholia, or notes.
Correctedthroughoutby m.p
See infra c.
61. U3 = Marc. 610.
Chart. 312 x 250, if. 190, s. xv. Tit. hyp. per. (collected at end) : no scholia,
a fewmarginaliain red. Frequent correctionsboth by m. p. and a later hand.
See infra d.
62. 4 = Marc. 611.
Chart. 280 x 195, if. 244, s. xv. Tit. per. hyp. No scholia except on firstfew
lines. Text much corrected both by firstand later hands. Cont. 1-45 Plut. vit
(2) ^vytovoSvo-o-cvs.
Horn.,46-244 Od. At the end verses (1) rovirokvirXaKrov
See infrad.
1 H. Omont,Centralblatt
vii. p. 358.
fr Bibliothekswesen,
a GraecaD. Marci bibliotheca
codicummstorum,
1740, pp. 245 sqq.

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The

i4

British

School

at

Rome.

63- 5 = Marc. 613 ('M' ap. Ludwich).1


Bomb. 270 x 185, ff.296, s. xiii. Cont. ir. monocondylion, 2r. id., 4-7
Batrachomyomachia,9 end Odyssey. Hyp. per. (these by a later hand), tit.,
scholia.
Hands : the textand originalscholia are all by the same hand. A smallerand
blacker hand has mended a number of pages with paper, and rewrittenthe lines
as may still be seen. This hand is not much later than
thus covered- faithfully
the first,and certainly of s. xiv. This hand also adds scholia. The text is
exhaustivelycorrected by both these hands, one over the other, and also by a
third,a thinspider-likeblack hand, also not verylate, about s. xiv-xv.
The scholia are attached by numerals and by conventional signs. The
Aristarcheansigns which appear have no relationto the scholia and are sporadic.
They consist of obeli, antisigmas,and asterisks.2 Scholia and variants get some'
what thintowardsthe end. In one place allusion is made to *anothercopy : a
o o-tC\oi.
/Ji/JAtco
93, 94 add. in marg. man. 2, withovktlarlviv ctc/dcd
At the end, verses (1) irov&vftoywv
(2) fiOovsTroSpas(3) o-tl^oltov rtjirtpv

Kara T tov (TKvkir^q koX yptjyopiov tov /?ao-iA.iKov


avOtapoi /cal iravrq fi\TrjroL
kcu
.
.
.
inc.
k
tw
ovk 0/xcA.ycTai
yAa, expl. tis yap Tpayio"K>v
Tpayo'KiV
ypafifLOLTioTov
AcoVtwvrj ftax7/(-0 m* s xv* T0^ iro\vir\KTOV.

64. U6 = Marc. cl. ix. No. 4 (gi dcxlvii). Consists of two books :
cy/o/xtaoriKs
(a) U (6) chart. 260 x 165, if.47, s. xv. Cont. ff.1, 2 wpXoyos
(as C) ; 3 sq. Odyssey a-f 190. Tit. per. hyp. interlinearglosses.

See infrac.

{b) U6 bomb. 255 x 170, ff.48-142, s. xiii. Cont. 1541-0). Tit., no hyp. or
per. Abundant scholia, mainlymythological. Correctionsby m. p. Signs : one
set of obeli, p 150 sq.
See infrah and/.
65- U7 = Marc. cl. ix. No. 21 (Nani 289).
Chart. 282 x 215, ff.480, s. xvi (?). Tit. per. hyp.,glosses. Correctionson an
exhaustivescale by m.p. and a later hand. Cont. Iliad and (f. 270 sq.) Odyssey
(a-ij/341). Portionsalso of Synesiusand Quintus Smyrnaeus.

See infraj.

66. U8 = Marc. cl. ix. No. 29.


Chart. 295x225, ff. 320, s. xvi. Tit., no per. hyp. nor scholia. A .few
corrections. The signsff and =are used as paragraphi. Latin paraphrase and
1 See Ludwich,
Progr.Regimont.1871, Schrader,Porph.qu. Od, pp. 153 sq.
* They are :-

antisigmas$ 214-223 m.p.


obeli 7232-8, 17251-8, A 38, 39, 435-442, /*376-388, I 174-184, 503-6, 078-85, 1T247,
249-51asterisksand obeli 6 564-7.
asterisks(dotted)v 430-3, | 160-4.

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The

Text

of the

Odyssev.

15

notes. This book was bought in 1823 of Carlo Michiel, and is in the same hand
as cl. ix. No. 2 (U9 of the Iliad), which came from S. Giovanni in Verdara at
Padua.
See infra h.
67. 9 = Marc. el. ix. No. 34.
Chart, s. xv. 265x190, if. 365. Tit. hyp. per.; glosses; scholia. Signs:
bracketsy 199, 200, 8 159-163, dots v 333-338 crosses p 150 sq , 475 sq. At
beginningFrancisci Attaris Cyprii /catiw <i'A<i)v.On the cover, to/a,fcvrcp.,i.e.
second volume to cl. ix. No. 33 (U13 of the Iliad).
Vienna}
Vi = Vienna, Hofbibliothekphilol. 5.
Chart,s. xv. 430x275, ff. 191. Cont. ff.1, 2 Herod, vit. ffom.,4-83 Iliad,
84-129 Quint. Smyrn.,130-end, Odyssey. Tit., no per. hyp. nor schol. Corrected
throughout(with/?) - v. 11.added by m. p. (Nessel, pars iv. p. 5).
See infra b.
69. V2 = philol. 50. .
68.

Chart, s. xv. 300x210, ff. 219. Tit. hyp., no per. ; schol. Occasional
correctionsby m. p. At end, viwios 8a/uXaskqXtovtoi$ypa\f/
(Nessel, ib. p. 50).
d.
See infra
'
70. V3 = philol. 56 (< Y ap. Ludwich).

Chart, s. xv., 300x210, if. 169. Tit. hyp. gloss. ; scholia; occasional v. 11.
8* afia
No per. At end : ciA.^6 fitfiXos
fiatov\IvSiktvCjvl
tq ScKarpto)
ripfia irtfiirrrj
</>povtra
rpnr\xv#cT8a|t $Ti g 0 H [1300J. The hand Eeems
ipaif/iSiov
archaistic,in whichcase the subscriptionis copied fromthe original. Cf. Ludwich,
Progr. Regimont.1888, i. p. 1. (Nessel, ib. p. 36.)
See infra b.
7L V4 = philol. 133 (' X' ap. Ludwich).
Bomb. s. xiii., 250 x 170, if. 146. Cont. c 45-w 59. Tit. hyp. per. ; glosses;
v. 11.,all in one hand. Scholia opposite the text, in a parallel column (not
continuous). Signs: () k 368-372, A.38-43, (*) t 4-12. (Nessel, ib. p. 77.)
Cf. Ludwich, Progr. Regimont.1889, I. pp. 5 sq., Schrader, Porph. qu. Od.,
pp. 1445^.
See infra tn.
72. V5= philol. 307.
Chart, s. xvi., 195 x 145, if. 90.
Per. ; glosses. (Nessel, ib. p. 147.)
See infrag.

Cont. miscell. rT. 1-90 Odyssey (a-).

1 Catalogus. . . Bibl. Caesareae Vindobonensis


. . . ed. Daniel de Nessel, 1690.

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i6

The British School at Rome.


Breslau.1

73. Wi = Breslau, Stadtbibliothek28 ('W ap. Ludwich).


Chart. 262x196, ff. 221, s. xv. Tit. per., no hyp. nor scholia.
forErnesti,ed. vol. V. add. p. 23.
See infra/.

Collated

74. W2=/tf. 29.


Membr. 350 x 255, ff.177, s. xv. Cont. Batrachomyomachia,Iliad (A-Z 356),
(ff.51-174) Odyssey. Tit. per. hyp.; no scholia. This MS. has not been collated.
'
*
(Known as Vrat. a forthe Iliad).
5.
75. Z = Stuttgartensis
S. xvi. Collated by Rieckher,Die zweisprdchige
StuttgarterHandschriftetc.,
Heilbronn, 1864.
See infrag.

The 'codex Mori1 (not to be confounded with the 'codex Mori'


of the Iliad, which Walter Leaf has identifiedwith the MS. Trin. Coll.
Camb. 983 = Ri6.35) on the authorityof which Barnes added 0 295 to
his text, is no manuscript,but the edition of Estienne (1566) numbered
Nn. v. 17 in the Cambridge University Library. Before formingpart
of the libraryof Edward Moore, Bishop of Ely, it had belonged to
Casaubon, who has left a considerable number of marginalia on it.
On the page containing0 294, 296 he says : Deest hie versusvide Cpa.
viii. The ed. Hervagiana (1541), whichalso belongedto Moore (numbered
Nn. vi. 4), in the same Library has no note on the passage. I owe the
'
'
suggestion that codex here meant a printed book to the perspicacity
of Dr. Montagu James, Provost of King's College, and the identification
of the volume to the energyof Mr. J. W. Clark.
Of these MSS. I have not seen Be, J, K, L9, Lio, Matritensis,
Moscoviensis, Pal., T, W2, Z. Of these L9, Lio, Matritensis,and
W2 have not been collated at all. The Moscow MS. was collated by
Matthaei,but the readingshave not been published(Heyne, Iliad iii. 92).
In the case of the others I have printed the extant collations. Further,I
owe the readingsof L4 and L8 (as well as Pal.) to Molhuysen,and of H3
Li (*/-o>),
Mon. and Pi to Ludwich, whose edition I have taken as my
basis.
1 Cat. Codd. Graecorum in bibliotheca
urbica Vratislavicnsiadservantur. . . 1889.
qui

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The Text of the Odyssey.

17

II
Families.
These seventy-sixMSS. fall into the following seventeen families.
was arrivedat, as in the case of the Iliad, by a process of
The classification
noting all cases of variants presented by ten or less than ten MSS.,
and castingthemup. The MSS. which agree most often in presenting
such variantshave a claim to the titleof family. I may say that such an
arithmeticalsystem is in my judgment the only one by which families of
MSS. can be made out. The possession in common of a strikingvariant
here and a strikingvariantthere is found to be casual. The reader will
hardlywish to have these calculations displayed in full; on the other
hand he may demand specimens. The relationshipsare generally very
clear : the single MSS. fall into their groups interconferendutn.
a =
b=
c=
d =
e=

C L7 R4
Pal. H2 OP3 V3
H3, M(3) R7 Ro R12 V2 V (6)
H4 L2 Mi Mo Mon. m. 2, P3 P4 Pe R5 U3 U4 U7
Us Br K M4 R3 R8 U9

g =
h=
i =
j =
k=
/=
m=
0=
p =
q =
r=

L8 Be Ca L6 Ri R6 R9 Rn R14 R17 Ui Z ed. pr.(Hi P5 R7 U7 m. 2)


J U6 U8
M2 Ri
Hi P5 P6 R7 U6 U7
L4 L5 Mon. P7, yp.R12
Pi R2
M3 V4
c- H3 (se. R7 Ro R12U2U (6))
e-\J$ (sc. Br K M4 R3 R8 U9)
g- L8 (sc. Be Ca L16 Ri R6 R9 Rn R14 R17 Ui Z)
^-Pal. (sc. H3 O P3 V3)

/ = Li L3 P2 Wi

are P8 R5 R13 R15 R16 T.


The MSS. whichresistclassification
I give firstspecimensof agreementbetweenthe membersof each
of the
to showthe relationship
; thenthecharacteristics
family,sufficient
familythusconstituted.For the latterI use the methodapplied to the
Iliad, C.R. 1899,in, viz. that of dividingthe peculiarreadingsof each
C

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18

The British School at Rome.

familyunderfourheads: (i) Alexandrian,


(2) ancientbutnon-Alexandrian,
coincidences
with
Eustathius
or
with
variants
(3)
(yp.etc.) in otherMSS.,
butnoteworthy.
(4) unguaranteed
a = C L7 R4
Specimensof Agreement.
a

7 avTolL7 R4 avT(vC ex w UV.


C L7 R4 ( + Ri ss.)
52 ko<l>p<v
134

8617TVOV
C L7

R4 rj&avC
176 <rav
186 v7Tovrj(
C L7 R4 ( + P2 corr.)
192 VT
fllVC L7 R4 ( + b)
201

438
]8 26
99
105
123
127
152
190
263
373

Te\<r<rOai
C R4

ypabcrL7 R4 ( + 0) ypairja-in
ras. C
TTtCL7 R4
C L7 R4
cto-ye
C L7 R4
TraptTOci
Tovom. C L7 R4
8'C L7 R4 ( + L8 m. 2)
iKrrjvCLj R4( + U5)
om. C L7 R4
/xv
vqvo\C L7 R4
C R4, ex a L 7
tivOrjceorOcu

y 87
185
8 82
653
99
484
109
296
77 283
332
0 425
1 448
O 372

X'CL7R4
WawC L7 R4 ( + c)
ryp6^qv<rvvC L7 R4
fiaivovTaC L7 R4 ( + L4 Ul)
C L7 R4 ( + H3)
p rjvtyti
8'om. CI7 R4 ( + H2)
7TVT0V
C R4 ( + P5 R7 U7)
C L7 R4 ( + M4)
SieXOiDfiev
ivV C L7 R4 ( + H3, Nuv.)
\kivKvkolLC L7 R4
Oh om. C L7 R4
PXoL7R4( + Pi V4)
C R4 ( + PI V4)
TTLfJiflV(x)

535 7P TotC R4 ( + Br Ca R2 V4)


v 167 fcV CR4(-hV4)

X 498
^

C L7 R4 ( + V4)
fKJ}7TV0VT0

T6VC L7 R4 ( + V4)

The relationshipof C and L7 was inferredby Schrader (l.c.) fromhis


collation of /3in C.
Characteristics.
i. Alexandrian:
P

ctra tis /xi) vo^o-as irpoo-OriKC


*os)*
26 ovt TTov. Inferredas Aristarchs
ean from the corrupt scholia 272 & opSnrn. Evidentlythe same as
6>>opo'wvrt,
quoted by schol.
oiJrcTrcVwKas)
(oir TrcTTTWKa?,

93by Cobet.

ii. Ancient:

iii. Eust. yp. :


a
a 176 co-avyp. H3 K
7 afrotPorph., Euseb.
Eust.
52 Ao<j)p)v.Inferred from the 421 evKpar)
wording of the scholia (eye- ^ 77 iroXviZpri<n.
V4 ss. (-eiV* Mon- at
Eust. -ioiarij).
ypairroKararrjvap\atavypa<f>yv,

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The

Text

:*
iv. Noteworthy

of the

19

tc
Xtvovs
om- (dispensable)
*
= irc&tfcv)
*8cs(ex 7rai8o'0i/
for
rot
<rvv
r^v <r^v
(development
of *V for^ in/ Pl)
322 irpivyc'tc for*pvy Zre
333, 4, 5 om. (barely dispensable
alone: ? an echo of the athetesis of 333-8)
W
cfr1forM8c 8'
IO3
forai
X52
IO5 fc for*
218 fu Myron (misunderstooddual
turnedinto an adjective)

"73
82
l87
295
303

a 146 cVwrav(common e.g. if,45)


2OI rcXWAu
kwcs(se. pyai,om. iroSas,as
P II 8<u>
p 62)
14 8' ftp(for8' v).
*9i fib IXttci( + T) fivftcet.
152 Wn7v( + Us)(cf.a2i4o8)
331 KarcSvWo (cf. Z 288, N17 H229
O 191)
for aW, implyingan asyn- i
y 9 i^
'
deton (cf. fotf'v. 78 for the
T
same word.)
*
. Wta %ov(relic of ^ov?)
*
^2
ys

forrpotforro
290 orpo^vro

Odyssey.

2I9 WW ^)

216 ktvo^v for jcn?o>^ (implied in


486 X^VvTs(?with^yoV,sc.ofthe X
8 82
414
82
(9 312
355
l 81

drivers)

k P2)
KTevu>iv

28 <7rTa
<rhvforiv (cf. A 359)
+ V4 U5 ss.) forrf Perhaps
^l62o[(
mVapforrv fikv
r<3 is usual, ol repossible:
(elsewhere
finiovurjfor ^voav
covers a ^igamma
of
epithet 5/xaa,fvyrfv)
of >?)
31*- Woito (misunderstanding
j^ciXoKas Nauck
w
om.
but
480(dispensable,
TraXv'as
(as v 212 7r(rTaXv'otTo) 479, 480
49* are dotted in P5 : cf.
of motion.Coincides
Kv0vPoLs(d3Lt.
v 333)
perhaps with Andron's view,
55
<&ov t;v, for
F.&.G.
350, that Aegiswpocrc^w^ lv^
8v
irpcxrc^civccv
thusinhabitedCythera,whither
Agamemnon8 517 was blown)

This familyconsists of comparativelyold members,s. xiii-xiv. C


and L7 have no scholia or signs: R4 abundant mainly exegetical scholia
at

(Tzetzes is quoted on \i), many v. 11.introducedby yp,omissionscarefully


supplied on the marginwith&>8ecorrespondingto Xeiireiin the text.2 One
passage, 7 232-8, has the single bracket common in e. The variants in
1 In this class I mark variantswhich have a
phoneticinterest,of whatevervalue, withan
asterisk.
2 Or a curiouskindof inversionof 55e, 5a
(e.g. 191, 01 09, 131, 1/161). A largeromission
(^ 203-276) is rectified
by the insertionof a small leaf between193 and 194, with this note: ot>
tol rScou56n olBa [202], curbrovrovrod <rrixovtf\rsiels rb /CTe/ijSAijfley
<pvk\ov./colfierarb
tteivo<f>4\\cis
airb rod fii-avd'
vXripadrjuat
&px*<r6ai
tepa Ka\a irpoffcitiawvi
[277], icaldtcpxcffdat
Kara rd^tv.
C 2

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2o

The British School

at Rome.

Class IV do not yield much: /391 preservesa digamma, 152 Uhriv avoids
the neglect of one and is probably right. The omissions z>333 W477
but it is disappointingthat afterso good a start in a, #,
are interesting,
the noveltiestail off.
= Pal. H2OP3

Vi V3.

Specimensof Agreements.
47 6\(X)oltoPal. O P3 Vi
93 8 Pal. OP3 Vi ( + Br)
95 \Ww Pal. O P3 Vi ( + k)
186 fOpuPal. Vi
192 cvTcPal. O P3 Vi ( + a)
214 KdTaXtfaPal. OP3 Vi (+ H3
L7 al.)
329 a hab. Pal. Vi
p 54 iOXrjviPal. O P3
151 iroWa Pal. O P3 Vi ( + k)
Pal. C<TT(U
l66 (7O-T<U
O P3 ( + H3)
172 St' is (cfc)Pal. O P3 ( + L4)
216 fowvPal. O P3 Vi
Ouv. P3Vi( + L4al.)
351 t/xci^Pal.
Vi ( + L4)
Pal.
O
402 xtttol
Pal.
O P3 ( + R2
y 151 eio-afiev ecra/ACV
R14)
313 ^tXwvPal. O ( + C)
Pal. P3 ( + L4 U7)
8 389 flaWo-rys
re
tPal. P3 Vi
7TO5
415 pyov
Pal.
P3
578 vrjlfi\avq
a

Pal. uv. H2
<>cpv
Pal. Vi ( + V4)
6(r<t>vL
H2
Pal. pO(x)7riV
/3o!TlV
Tavvo-o-c
Pal. H2 Vi
7Tt
o?vo7raPal. H2 O
Pal. H2 O
iair&v(r<r
Pal. H2V1
K<rOai
avrrj Pal. H2
TrvraPal. H2 O ( + H3)
TnjvrjvPal. H2 ( + H3 Pi JK)
8'om. Pal. H2 ( + H3)
XX! ayc iw Pal. H2 ( + H3)
224-0 om. Pal. Vi
Pal. H2 Vi
t) 45 o-KOTTcAotcrtv
c

45
231
2 72
346
349
372
408
27
47
73
107
126

aAA^cvPal. H2
52 /XaT?yA.^V
Pal.
ras.
Tv/ccTat
H2,
67
86 ikrjXaT Pal. H2, jcat rjXarai Vi

100 irvpyiv
Pal. H2 Vi
269

Pal.
<f>airK(V

H2

Pal. H2
299 TTp?afifiTO
in
ras.
oo-a
Pal., ocr' H2
331

6 om. Pal. O P3
7 IXcPal. OP3 V3( + L5 U8)
Pal. V3
IO aworrjX1
16 Pal. V3(+/)
21 oorisPal. OP3 V3
Pal. P3 Vi V3 ss.
62 7Tpl
o-r/icvos
80 <TTpa(f>r)vai
Pal. O P3 V3

ni viPal. O P3 V3
ib. s (tv Pal O P3 V3
112-9 om. Pal. O P3 ( +1 H3 L5)
168 9 Pal. H2 O P3 V3 ( + M4 U2
U8)
169 om. Pal. O Vi (space left)
Pal. O P3 V3
174 fjpTrafrv
Pal. O P3 Vi V3
186 paOvicXyoos

218 fiol pispes iralpoL Pal. O P3 Vi

v3

245 t om. Pal. O P3 Vi V3


ib. Oyvr)Pal. O P3 Vi V3

2 74
309
322
386
400
413

P3
XatOtPal. O, 7TtOt
Pal. O P3 V3
TTTwxcvtov
vrjo-aiPal. O P3 V3
veo-o-ivPal., vdo-LV
O V3
Pal. O V3
fivu>jjLv<
Pal. O P3 V3
rjyJLvV

420 tis in ras. Pal. rrjO P3 V3


Pal. irpsO P3 V3
454 Trarps

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The Text of the Odyssey.

21

Pal. beingdated 1201 and the othermembersof the familyto the


of V3 would be dated 1300,if we
xvthcentury(the archetype,
however,
as copied and thehandas archaistic),
therelation
regardthe subscription
betweenPal. and H2 O P3 Vi V3 is one of descent. This descent,as the
examplesgivenaboveprove,is genuine; but,like most cases of the sort,
it is broken. The collationwhichPal. receivedproducedvariantswhich
alteredthe stock; the resultingoffspring
(whichwe call r) are an objectof
and showhow,as in thecase of c e g a
lessonin theformation tradition,
of the archetypeout of
givenfamilyis oftentheproductof thealteration
to
itselfis,it is legitimate
thestrain. Whenweconsiderthatthearchetype
assume,the resultof a similarprocess,it is plain that thevalue of one
familyagainstanotherdependsuponexternalevidenceand arithmetic.
out of b.
Examples of r corrected
"
- w 30 a ins. Pal. m.2,space fora lineVi
_,
s
,x
a 47 yp. airoW, PaL m. 2, oW> O
oX(W(n PaL in ras. 0 P3
87 W. f t^rat Pal. m. 2, k ucqr*

Pal. H2 Vi)
(^Wv
I0 p
j8/*wvPal. in ras., /Wov
** O P3
/\
j "*
R y^\
*
p

~ W\>Y
^/ + irx
Pal. corr.,O(
K)
91 junpmNMrir

' O P3

Vi (x+ BrL5
158
0/ f Pal. corr.,

4/ in
ras. , . ,

199 ipvKavooxnv

Pal.,,PvKavov<nv

^ , ^ ,
v
276 peyapa Pal. corr, Vi
Pal.
vwiwiv
corr.,
' O
297
y/ '
.

corr. ( + N corr.)7
,v
,T
316 oTot Pal. corr., Vi

P3 Vi
v

371 av/l/mvPal., aoi&ivVi, otSV O


Pal. corr., O P3 Vi
P 55 /ATpovs
fort,
add.) ( + L4)
(cr

+ M2)
181 8c rot Pal. corr., OP3(
tv
334 ^eAXct Pal, 64*\Xcu O P3
Pal. corr., ?ao7C
332 tao7C
Vi, ao-zcc
H2
.
,

v
38 yp. <ovasPal., wvas H2 Vi
74 c^cpoi/Pal. corr., O

Vi ,(firjXov
120 firA<Pal. corr. O P3 v

Pal. H2)

^^
^ paJ Q ^ yj (^f
Pal. H2)
kcov

f*v
7P.
7H Pal. O P3 Vi \
(cV
5^ ^urSkoun
Pal.
tieyapoKTi H2)

,x r>
,
, s
^ ,
t 228o yp. Kpoiov
Pal., KcpotovO F3
y

Pal., ^cXyc cet.


308 tj/acAc
?r 53 amos Pal., avnov Pal.
O P3

corr.,

72 airaiwavQai Pal., airafivvao-OaiPal.


corr OP'? J
e
civ Pal., /xVciv
O
74 /x.77
s
356 fjTis $iv toSc1 Pal., t/tis <f>aivTai
'8

oftenbeenacceptedby the next


of Pal. has therefore
The correction
withthegreatest
copieras theproperreading. O P3 acceptedcorrections
Pal.
to
the
(For the peculiar
original
; H2V1 clove morenearly
facility
readingsof r,see pp. 57 sq.)
1 To judgefrom
andMolhuysen's
Ludwich's
reports.

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22

The British School at Rome.


Characteristics.

or notby hischildren
The family,
followed
thatis to say Pal.,whether
has thefollowing
peculiarreadings. The readingsof the children,which
it wouldbe misleading
to givehere,willbe foundunderr.
i. Alexandrian
:

1 228 fjyeprepov
(for iccpSiov; as </>epTpoi>,
A
Awtov
169)
None.
3O8 ^/X\
ii. Ancient :
480 xodxraTOfor ^oXccraro
a 329a c ttoo-Iv ififteftavla rptSaKTvXos
559 Trapa irpvfjLvr(Tia
(unmetrical, ex
:
/*32)
ij<f>avOri
ap. Julian.
k 15 7rA.tv
t 518 iravSapeo)
(fipovL4 shows that some
ap. schol. v 66

was feltin veas)


difficulty
18 om. (? dispensable)
106 /AcyaX^ropos
206 7rd\\ov
c\vts
(ex r 316 etc.)

iii. Eust. yp. etc.:


1 455 oXeOpovEust.
o 266 KaraAcfoj
(yp. H3 V4 Br)
K 399 KavxtcEust.
w 5 p' y*(yp-Us)

374 a\ao<f)pov(v

502a add. ( = \ 156)

iv. Noteworthy:
a 70 00 (a simple error,correctedby
m. 2)
195 om. (dispensable)
148 om. (? dispensable ? owing to irkT<T$ai, 7TTOVTO)

216 Ocuv( + Mon.)

\ 70 cV
348

COTO)

359 i/for crvv


426 cpcW (alpLV
P3)
483 to TrapoiOe
fji279 /Jtafor yma, as also o- 341

v 208 yivwrai
230 irvTa

8 75 om. (dispensable)

342 V'AporfY}
(eX Z13)
*4J5 Zpyov t Ittos tc (digamma)

549 O<r<l)aTafor irorvia

^304
*349 7tIotvoTra(with digamma)
372 l^airihva-e

100 irvpytv

183 vvfirjo-av
iirap$dfjLVOL

335 *vpeyapoKrw
0 435, 6 om. dispensable, but ? owing
to rpiTToSa434 TpciroV 435 rpittoBos437)
577 Ovfiv

Tpo77for KpYjr-q
WSOTJ(for <l)S_w)

139

oTnrT*for 7T7rcr'

149

kivov I <f>rj(rOafor <f>rj(rOa


| kcivov

408
412
425
470

TtTVKWficOa
^A0 for wpro
(for <rX6&s?)
o-X^
fjycio-Oov

39 /ca/cafor aAyca (perhaps with


eSocrav)

402 om. (? dispensable)


as above ^152)
*4o8 ko-Ooli
(fortSco-^at,
17 86 \rj\tar(right; see below)

154 om. (dispensable)

315

256

ex

6
in
174
186
218
420

om. (dispensable)
ivl <p<rtv
s o-u(possible)
ypirafaraWoficvqv
PaOvK\fjos
(unhomeric)
ifxolipirjptskralpoi
rrforts

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The Text of the Odyssey.


O 454
503
7T107
160

TTOLTpOS
(S 141, h. V. I3)
Slol kraipoi
rj avTov [ = Trj&] alev
ov yap for ovS*apa
198 TraAatvfor yipovra
279 Trapao-TaSov(possible)
^313 avris (possible, before 107;)
330 aVwyc
p 415 w for 80s
cr 286

23

t 584 to5tovrjfia

<f>185 Ply forJ3(rp.


194 avTws( + U6), as Bothe

for Tvciv(ex 165)


<f>vT*v<rai
S8pofi(cTriScSpoftcv
45 v 357)
cSu <>o9^cXtoto(ex v 35)
*ai 01s #cat
7rtovasalyas (ex /? 56)
407 \4y(r0aifor 7r/O-0ai
(N275)
429 cvt 8>;/Aa>
(ex u 210)

14
^237
241
a) 1 12

tos /c'

These readingsgive a good place among thefamiliesof MSS. Putting


aside 00 a 70 as an accident,b alone preserveswhat appears to be the true
traditionwithiXrfXarfromiXavvcorj 86. The otherforms(forwhich see
critical note) are produced by regular reciprocal contaminationfromthe
readingsiXrjXar9,
iprjpSar,i\rj\aTcu86,95, 113. On all threelines there
are monsters,whichshow the process. (W 284 we see the reverseprocess,
is a conjectureis less likely
iprjparat.)That i\rj\aTy
ipripSarai,iprjpSarcu,
Pal. also has remarkableomissions: a 195, 0 148, 8 75, 402, 77154, 6 435,
436, k 18, all or nearlyall possible. The reading eVl e 349 allows forthe F
in oipo7ra: othervariantsare due to association,the commonestprinciplein
the Homer MS. (8 342, 1 559, k 206, 502a, o 186, yfr
241, co 112, 407, 429) ;
ea>9or 315 shows us the process of metrifyingeco?. The 11.0 in, it 279
have claims to considerationon the groundof sense.
=H3 M(3) R7 Ro R12 U2 U(6).
Here again one member,H3, is of the xiiith century,the rest are 01
the xvth century; R7 and R12 were writtenby the same scribe,Rhosus.
Specimensof Agreement.
1 irvrtvH3 R7 Ro U2 U(6)
( + LiPe)
P 230 cV<pco-iv
H3 R7 Ro U2 U(6)
392 avrrjvH3, yp. U(6)
411 CVH3 RioU(6) (+0)
a

7 irVTrK0VTa
H3 U(6)

R7 Ro U2 U(6)
9 2/O70I/-H3

83 om. H3 R7 Rio

109 8'&reiT H3 2(6)( + fl)


185 ai/awvH3 Ro U2 U(6)

H3 Ro U2 U(6)
y 280 ^cAco-tv
336 Oacro-fieu
H3 R7
8 54
H3 R7
XPV^
H3 R7
251 vrjp(TOV

252 XoovH3 R7
467 evSodiH3 R7 ( + a Mon.)
788 norriosH3 Rio ( + Br P6 R3
R8)
163 iv 8' fccpiaH3 Ro U2 U(6)

( + )

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The British School at Rome.

24

ib. lv airrj H3 R7 Ro U2 U(6)

( + )

347 KdKOVH3 RlO

376
75
#584
t 138
223
242
k 43
123
A.128
206
530
604
fi 53
141
v 434
28
222
o
3
126
531
7T I
16
49
51

pa H3 Rio
KarOrjKav
H3 Ro
7T7rwfiva
H3 Ro 2
7TiKA.o-avTs
H3 Ro uv.
roa-Lv
H3 M(3) ( + /)
oifjLcXycv
O H3 Ro ( + k)
o^Kr(rLav
rS' H3 Ro U2 ( + )
vopW'H3 Ro LJ2
k^V^VH3 RIO> fort-R7
avwy H3 R7 Ro ( + n)
cmTcAAcv
H3 Ro
om. H3 U2
K\v<rrs
H3 Ro U2
vjai H3 Ro U2
(SaXevkclkov
H3 Ro
OvfxdH3 Ro R12 U2
ciyvsine i^H3 Ro
virofivyo-ao-a
H3 Ro
TroXvKprov
H3 Ro U2 ( + ef)
n-aro H3 Ro
kW; H3 Rl2 2 ( + )
t)SovH3Ro ( + k)
-TrtVaKas
KpL(v
H3 U2 ( + /^)
irapvrvov
H3 Ro ( + be)

ir 56 0c7ovH3 Kio R12 U2 ( + M2


P6 Ri)
66 7rapaH3 Rl2 U2
158 ctSmaH3 RlO - a R12
162 aXovroH3 Ro
215 wpro H3 U2 wproo"R12

^3 -^IO ^2
357 ki>X-vL
V7TV
417
H3 Rl2 ( + , /)

^ci H3 R12 U2 ( + K)
H3 U2 ( + L4 Pal. U6)
fi<t>ovSU
H3 R12 U2
TrpoTt
Karau'cratH3 R12 U2 ( + J R8
corr.)
3 afuycsH3 Ro Rl2 U2

p 130
237
379
537
cr

l. 7TLVfJLV
H3 Rl2

U2

336 Oapo-aXiosH3 Ro U2 ( + L4
Pal. Us)
350 apa roarivH3 Ro U2 (+/)
H3 R12
409 wtot
v 302 8' apa H3 Rl2 U2 (K U8)
H3 Rl2 U2
<f> 26 fjpOKXtUL

29 ^v om. H3 U2 ( +/)
66 om. H3 Ro U2 ( + Pal. Mon.
US)

202 lowrai H3 R12 U2 ( + a)


232 yavotH3 U2 Rl2 SS.

304 8'H3U2 ( + /^Pal.)

U(6) is a fragment,
M(3) is sporadic; R12 has not been collated
It
is
remarkable
thatall the xvth membersof the familythroughout.
lackscholia,andthatH3's amplecollection
has notbeenreproduced.
thereof
hands: the
H3 has been extensivelycorrectedby contemporary
correction
is oftencarriedintothecopy,and the familyevidencetherefore
deflected
: theyoungermembersI call 0.
outofc.
Examplesofo corrected
a 379 7to0it
H3 corr.,R7 Rio
y 14 xp*ZH3 m. 2, R7

,aV
it
*/
tt
292 Lopbavov H3, lapopavov U2
op
lapMvovU (6)

394 iirunrivSuv
H3 m. 2, R7 Ro U2
U (6)
OCiov m.
486
., , , , H3 2, R7 ^
ib- a/i^txovTs
H3 m. 2, R7
489 6pa-iXxoLo
H3 m. 2, R7 U2 U (6)

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The Text of the Odyssey.


8 12 iXivrjsH3 corr.,R7
H3 corr.,Rio
132 KtKpaaTo
197 kH3 m. 2, R7
TT t>
,, ,
462 c^po-o-aTO
yp. H3, R7
500 i&fiao-crev
yp. H3, R7

25

H3 corr.,U2
383 aKuafxtvov
ir 233 8' av H3 m. 2, R12 U2

/\ XT
t>
^P 10-13 signs ( , ) H3 m. 2, R7
W
Rl2
25 virqovqH3 m. 2, rjirrjOLVY}

526 8cy ctsH3 m. 2, R7

U2

538 k<ltk\<l<t
yp. H3, R7

170 SctTmyo-TOs
H3 SS., Ro U2

c 181 Karpeij/tv
H3 corr.,U2 U (6)
296 TnjfiaH3 m. 2, Rio uv., U2 U(6)
0 27 om. H3 m. 2, Rio U2
yp. H3, Rio
342 fxaKptcrai
M (3) U2
ss.,
H3
539 <5Pto

299 KO7rptWovTcs
H3 corr.,U2
T 72 Amto'c
H3 corr.,R12 U2
81 irixirav
H3 corr.,R12 U2

325 8aro-(u
H3 ss. R12 U2

195 Ipya H3, Ipyaov Rio


R12

< 61 oyKiovH3 : y/aoWsR12 U2

ou

ov

U2 cpya

ovs

More examples mighteasily be quoted. The new family(0) thus


altered
R12, thoroughly
producedis,in thepersonof one of its members,
by Rhosus,partlyin thesenseof k (see p. 53).
Characteristics.

The peculiarlectionsof c, whetherrepresented


by H3 onlyor by H3
are these:
and itsoffspring,
i. Alexandrian:

231 firj^iv </>p<nv

Ar- (XP6""*) vulg- 0 355


7 367 XP"^1
8 712 r Ar. ct vulg.

347 koxov (for Ms)


X 128 <f>riK-q
(for <jnfo)

ii. Ancient:
a 32 PpoTolOeovsschol. Ar. Pac. 212

g
369 v^8is(probably ex ^8>s,vrjvfios
Hi M9)
28 ivftci
a

(avoidinghiatus)
X233to-Tao Zen. Ar. K291 ; laraao ^348 ycpov
^ 99abcd( = A254-7)
vulg.

111.Eust. yp. etc.:


flone
a

iv. Noteworthy :
I Trviw

/S 7 Ko/Aooi/Tas
: Ta 8', tci y cet.
*2II ra to-ao-t

vr8vno<;

7T 162 Xovro (se. vkdovro)


357 KixdvaA
o- 409 cittotc
t 325 SaccWcai
<^>173 omttov(agreeing with jStov)
232 ayavol (^209 P2 R7, yp. H3

Of theseit is clearthatlarao and ra iaaat are themostremarkable


;
the youngergenerationwereunableto retainthe hiatuses(cf./S91 ph
1 Wronglyascribedto thescholiaof H3 in mytext.

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26

The British School

at Rome.

e\7rea T xkvp cet), and the linguisticdevelopment of Homer continued


even down to the Renaissance. The peculiarities of o will be found
pp. 54 sg.
=H4

L2M1M0

Mon. m.2, N P4 Pe U3 U4 U7 V2.

Specimensof Agreement,
L2 Mo N Pe U3 U4
15 o-ttcWi
328 tol yc U3, yp. Mi P4, ss. Mo P4
N
Mo
Pe
P4
U4
234 pa\ovro
305 airwv L2 Mo N P4 Pe U4 yp.
Srjn Mo P4 U4 ( + P3)
Mon.
L2 Mo Ml P4 ( + R5)
400 u/a^i/Jc/^kt/
L2 N Pe SS.
Ml P4 U3 U4 ( + 0)
P 41 7/ycipc
516 /iycX>9
336 50' ot L2 Mi N P4 U3 U4
775 Mi P4 U4 ( + Pi)
L2
N
Mo
c
+
407 post 408
U3 ( Pi)
29 om. H4 Mi Mo P4 U3 U4 V2
408 om. Mi P4
173 yc H4 L2 Mi N U3 U4 ( + 0)
421 om. Mi Mo N Pe P4 U3 U4
189 xp H4 Mi P4 U3 U4 ( + 0 P3)
230 apyifaov H4 L2 Ml N U4
y 87 XvypvoXtOpovL2 Ml N P4 U3
U4( + r)
( + xM3Pi)
L2 Mi Mon. m. 2, N
240 -iripiKrj\aH4 L2 Mi P4 U4
230 rrjXtfiaxos
281 5 otc pun* H4 L2 Mi N P4 U3
P4 Pe
266 KXirrat^o-rpaMi P4 U3 U4
U4( + Pi)
+ P3U7)
( + P3)
365 frsH4MiP4U3U4(
216 airorarjL2 P4 U4 ( + /)
H4 P4 U3 U4 ( + ///
P3 R2)
409 Kv/xa
L2 Mi Mo N Pe P4
278 aO-qvituv
447 t om. H4 Mi P4 U3 U4 ( + M3
Pi P3)
( + 0)
8 63 y'om. Mi P4 U4 ( + r)
o 27 yc H4 Mi N P4 U3 U4 ( + Ri
118 cao-cicVt/xv.
L2 Mo N O Pe 2
U7)
H4 N P4 Pe U3 U4
( + Pi)
33 x
141 TotL2 Mi Mo Pe U3 U4
( + U7)
L2 N P4 U3 ( + 0)
in ^pecriv^o-ti/
276 ctTTCT
H4M1N Pe P4 U3
om.
Mo
N
U
+
4 ( 0)
U4 (U7)
293
a

This plebeian family,the second largest (of 12 members,whileg has


13), consistsentirelyof xvth or xvith centurycopies, withoutan ancestor.
Three, H4 L2 Mi, were writtenby Rhosus, L2 in 1465 in Bologna, Mi
in 1468 ; V2 by Antonio Damila, P4 by Caesar Strategus; traces of
Rhosus seem to appear in the periochae and headings of Mo, P4, V4 ; but
theeye is liable to err in identification
of a fewwordshere and there. An
archetype must have been extant at the Renaissance, which has now
perished, which produced this progeny. The circumstances resemble
those of the 'Paris1 group of the MSS. of the Homeric Hymns (cf. the
Macmillan edition,p. xxxiv).

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The Text of the Odyssey.

27

to each other. The second hand of


These MSS. are veryfaithful
in'
Mon.
their
altered
Mon.(s. xv-xvi.)
sense,and theyoungermembersof
b (especiallyOP3) are closeto them.
Peculiarreadingsof d.
8 545
77
727
29
281

n-cipav(? s) for Trcipaottcds


^cri for ov8c ti (a question)
XX(with hiatus)
om. (dispensable)
>s (cum Pi)
for cws
365 cds

i. Alexandrian :
H2
6 494
k 160
X 364

rjvycivAt.
8o'Xo>Aristoph. Ar.
&)v Zen.
iroXXaZen.

ii. Ancient:
I at
for K* ClKOOTto
* 34 r//XaTt
CIKOOTW
KOivTcpai
(cum U7)
92 XPVtJI'aTa
Apoll. lex.
v 14 TraX^o-t
Plutarch, Galen (-own)

)229 ypamas Apoll. lex. (afterpa^r?)

iii. Eust.yp.:
* 460 rc Eust.
75 cW.

re Eust.

( + f8);

^ 22I xav0a<m
#64
109
506
t 103

154 So-av (common :


S 522 O 694)

54 Xovrs
K

^
A
I, 1/) \
c. schol.
499 /
o-co-Oai
( = <ro-0)

iv. Noteworthy :
15 (schol.) 73> 8403, t 114, f 335
(as Nauck), cnrcco-ifor <nr<nr
305 arTwv for fxvOwv
yS137 ^ for ya>(impossible; intrusion
of explanation)
421 om. (dispensable)
y 20 if/vSa
a

*2 78 a^vcwv ( + 0), right.

yc for 8c
SaKpva 8' ck for 8ccpv8' tto
rot for rtva
ct7TT'
om., as Nauck (a dispensable

simile)

400
466
472
516

for -ci,as Hermann


/jL<j>Lp/3rKr}
cv for cvt
w^ctAcs
for ftcyaXaor jSapca
ftcy\o)95

7O

2I4

303
8 114
141
276
293

336 N 125

433^x^(4-0)

clearly
'

Eust. ( + yp. Br)


o-403 tttwyj
j
<2i6
^

0<f>0a\jJL(u
?rtfor apa
avrbv
ayx' avTwvfor a/JL<f>
ifiPaivov for tio-pawov

279

<^a7TTO/iVO5

T^Jr
TOO 8w for

T05 7Tp.
r

'; ,. .',
288
aAaAK^o-ot
348 7rt

4 c^o-a/xcv
200 av for ovv
216 0v7)T(ovfor ^cdtwv
as Nauck
580 cXkuo-o-c,

586 avafipaxw
ft 69 Ktivrjv
for -K
74 a/x<^t)3^Kt

399 XV or' ap forore Sr

v 1 1 2 avcpes Zpxovraiforav8p9i(rip\0VTai
68 w^ctX'
180 ei/ttvA)rjyaOir)
for t*kcovt*Or
195 8avv<r0ak fccoi/T*
olkIovt
o

436 iirap$dfivo^

27 yc for ti
33 airix^v for airtyiiv
for -ovs (*ouoT V4, not
49 cTTctyftcvv
as printed in my ed.)

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28

The British School at Rome.

Ill
221
238
363
451
477
7T 19
*i28

foroycriv
rjariv
as 1 103
cft/foivov,
aAAovadineroforaAAwvTkcto
ovvk'
ap' avrrjforowcKafi avn)
om. (dispensable)
or ap forore 877: cf. 363
om. (dispensable)
8c /cforSiJfx
(position given by
ftc: cf.Ei 18, O47 8 8crovvulg.)

for SiJJOfXeV
184 $U><TOfJLV
282 ^7 for ^^o-tv
361 oAAcdvfor aAAov
389 xprjfxaTakoXolaXts for %p. hrura

107 rocn8c forrr(nv


*2i6 TrciTps
rvoixofxevoLo
(ex T17, 19 :
obliterates/)
as Wolff
forTerAa/xcv,
311 TTA.a/xv
allv
atct
for
317
for/ca*'
avrrja-TLV
387 KaravTiKpv
(gloss)
/xiv
$ 125 />817for/xcV
forivr150 c/crctwcrc
forTavvovcri
ravvo-ovo-t
174

for 8^ TWV
2O5 TOVTWV
22
weovTCL
for irto-ovTa(ex Trcorra)
x
201 ^^1/8' for ^vp^v
for Tro-ais(rracriiavU3, as
471 7raard(ov

ti yc for/xijrot
436 /17
Nauck)
p* 70 airavra for e/caora: avoids
489 lo-rav forZaraO'
fore^epcetvot
digamma-neglect
^ 86 cfcpcctVctv
Jfor/couovTcs,
for
ov8c
or
koovtcs
ioktcs
435
99 ^8c
foraAX^ evtX^P9/
186 aXXwcvtxa>p<o
534 rjfxmpvye (? ttoAcv/uvoi)for
for-os,as Voss
or -ov
190 ravu^vAAa)
fiiTpov
for(fxxtivbv
201 cfxitiv
537 Karaivtraifor-vrat
( + Pi)
<r no

tov for la-av

174
t 19
v 84
86

cp^coforcpxcv
hrjvap forTrarpos
(possible)
forr^xara
r)xarL
for-t/77,
as Voss
afi<f>K(\vil/v

237 ipxfiwoi for vr)(f.voi

o)

350
5
306
370

forttoXcwv
7rA.tov
KLvrjo-ev
( + r)
om.
y'
8' forpJ(right,as edd.)

In this long list thereare some elementsof value :


(1) omissionsof dispensable lines :
421,8 293,6 29,0451, 7TI9
coincidenceswithmodernemendations:
7278, 8 293, 400, X 580, v86, 311, x 471, yr190, 335, 370.
174, co370
(3) The readings y 278, o 477, ir 184, 361, p 537, 0-403,<f>
were adopted, presumably through H4, the British Museum copy, by
Barnes, and his successors: d thereforesupplanted to some extentg (see
pp. 63 sq.) as the textus receptus.
The linguistic contributionon the other hand is not strong: the
observanceof the digamma at e 34 is the best detail.
U3 sol.
6 382 avhp&vKM.
(2)

1 For similar
1446, 1604, Kov H 255,
changes apparentlyto producemetre,cf. Ti&ovra-ts

for rpwiraaBatO 666,


KOfiovrasj8 7, yoovras k 209, arpopdaaBai for arpaxpaffdaiI 463, Tpoira<r$cu
II95, T n9> Kv**for KvrjA 639, SriiotcvS 226.

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The Text of the Odyssey.

29

=U5 BrK M4R3 R8 U9.


ofAgreement.
Specimens
19 oh krpoi(Ti
U5 Br M4 R3 R8
( + r L5)
21 Z8co-0<u
U5 Br K M4 R3 R8
,
( + P2)
113 y add. U5 Br K R3 R8 U9
401 yXi(Xov
U5 Br K M4 R3 R8
414 TTvOofiai
U5 Br M4 K R3 R8
+
( C)
U5 Br K M4 R3 R8
/3 5 /xcypoto
( + A)
37 S1cVl U5 Br K M4 R3 R8
( + J)
72 pt&v U5 uv. Br R3 R8
( + L5 Ro)
168 aXXa Kal ovtol U5 Br M4 R3
a

U9
U9
U9
U9

x 11
331
v 216
481
o 187

U9

tr 70
310
466
p 36
158
199
237

R8

o*242

240 av<j)
U5 K R8 (Li Pi)
y 219 or' U5 Br K R3 R8 U9 ( + J
Rio T)
U5 Br M4 R8 U9
283 <nripxLv
289 x* U5 uv. M4 R3 R8 ( + R2
R11 R17)
315 8^ U5 Br K M4 R3 R8 ( + J
Mon.) & U9
316 xrfMTa U5 Br K M4 R3 R8
( + R5 R8 Rl3) U9
8 149 pi* U5 Br M4 R3 R8
252 xpicr1
U5 Br K M4 R3 R8 (J)
284 U/xcVous
U5 Br K R3 R8 ( + P7)
435 irovTovU5 Br K M4 R3 R8
( + L5)
atorros
U5 Br K M4 R3 R8
567
Ui
+
(
Un)
c 221 /*'evlU5 Br K R3 ( + J)
0 84 xepo-iviXiovU5 Br M4 R3 R8
( + JL2)
116 os U5 R8 ( + R11)
2O6 7}CITOCnV
U5 R3
1 134 ti7
U5 R8

263
275
345
348

U9

U9
U9

364
369
37 x
386
403
t 114
209
252
532
534
v 134
362
379
^228

IvffU5 M4 R3 R8 (L6 T)
9 5tl U5 M4 R3 R8 ( +g)
U5 M4 R3 R8 U9 (+g)
otxwvrat
<fr>a%sU5 M4 R3 R8 U9 ( + /)
U5 M4 R3 R8 U9
po-ikxoio
( + /)
/*>
U5 M4 R3 R8 U9
U5 R8 U9 ( + J)
fiTxova-Lv
avwyeiU5 M4 R8 U9 ( + k)
/ft)h' Uvai U5 R8 ( +g) [not U9]
^ poW U5 R8 ( + JT) [not U9]
U5 M4 R8 U9
Ovfirjph
cpctVas U5 R8 yp. K ( + L2)
ipvo-asU9
o vo-rosUs M4 R3
ovS*otttttj

R8( + J)

fikurraU5 M4 R3 R8 (+/ J)
irpoirapoiOf.
U5 M4 R8 ( + J)
yfroiroU5 M4 ( + J)
XacpTifyvvarjaU5 M4 R3 R8
( + M2 Mon.)
XVU5 M4 R8 ( + J)
U5 M4 R3 R8 ( + J
irci^o-c&fictfa
M2)
o0"0"01
U5 K M4 R3 R8
KOLKXJ
O-TiCvOlTt
$ M4
favyOVTtS
R8 ( + M2)
U5 R8 ( + J)
7tt>xv
iv av U5 K
tovU5 M4 R3 R8 (+J)
U5 M4 R3 R8 ( + J)
eireiyofjLtvr)
t/c^rai
U5 M4 R8 ( + J)
Us M4 R8 ( + M2 Ri
ao-xXXwv
J Mon.)
<t>i\v
rpo^bs U5 M4 R3 R8 ( + J
Mon.)
Mm U5 M4 R8 ( + J)
/XTTOV
U5 R8 ( + M2)
7TcnW0ovU5 M4 R3 R8 ( + k)

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The British School

3o

<326 cVravvWU5 Br M4 R8 ( + U6
V4)
X 24 KaraU5 M4 R3 R8 ( + J)

at Rome.

x 29 v^ U5 M4 R8 ( + J)
331 fyOiOovUsM4 R3 R8 ( + J L2
Mon. R7)

The substantial unity of this family cannot be doubted, but its


character falls markedly off in emphasis after8. Br especially hardly
returnsto the fold. The father of the family is the xiiith centuryMS.
'
long knownas M/ and one of the principalsources of the scholia. It is
and furnishedwithvariantsto all but exhaustiveness.
correctedthroughout,
These variants have been followed by the xvth centuryMSS. (/), but to
no verygreat extent; othersources musthave intervened.
Examples ofp- U$ corr.
8 54
162
236
295
321
631

Br M4 R8
U5, xPv(rVv
yp. xPv(rVv
h' afia U5 m. 2, Br M4 R8
r' U5 m. 2, Br M4 R3 R8
aXXor1
U5 m. 2, Br R3 R8
TcpirfieOa
rjropU5 ras., Br K M4
pceos U5 marg., Br K M4,
R8 marg.

0 348a U5 marg.,M4 R3 in text


p 568a U5 interim.,M4 R3 R8 U9 in
text.
t 172 ycuan's U5 corr., M4 R3 R8 in
text.Br m. 2
^179 enOfoBaiU5 m. 2, Br M4 R8

Peculiar readingsof e:
i. Alexandrian:
100 rata' : rao-cu schol.
X 249 Tegcai Zen.
a j.
11. Ancient :

\ 110 idvas ( = idvrp Plutarch)


598 cVctra STrcSov&: iirl Sa^oVSc
Ar. Rhet. 1411b 33
r 163 icrr,Ap. lex. Sext. Empir.
iii. Eust. yp.:

8 284 U^cVous,
Eust. 1490. 10
$

26 ^Xov tc'kos,Eust. 1936. 39

iv. Noteworthy:
a* 2 1 ihivQai (f neglected)
*II3 Trpwrosy' t8c (//.)
401 ayxA.a>for afi<f>i\<
fi 43 on
168 Ua for o?S(? ex 167)

y 283 <nripytiw

8 149 k\vfor yap


162 t<38' for tw
fr XpZv
252 fXPtcr>
, nA
2 95 Tepir(fva

435 ^^
( + Lj)
KWov ( + L5; ex 383 as the
^
same yl [n otherMSS g go)
for^^
K(XAos
^
(withTohy?)
for
ir
V 3X4 ^ov
cyw(cf. 70)

394 fcp^O'

l X34 17 (with /xavcVei^)


/c209 yooovras, cf. p. 46.
for /Sporo's (to avoid
^ 77 ^^5
tautology ?)
for cv 417 K-7r\rjro
v 203 ttov for ?r (at the beginning of
the line)
285 tto/SoVtcs

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The Text of the Odyssey.


89 tol for t, re (correct)
for xpw
o 201 xp>i>
x
488 Zvs in fin. (? iOrjZcvs / re y')
for
cts
497 s

216 kuvov for kclOl (? iv)


283 fv
305 /xotfor rot
for vi'fctv
374 vixj/ew

537 /aa forrXa(P34)


foreya.v(as , 314)
7o
ir
olfor w
197

,/,

,
r
71 avrtovfor cyyvflev
/ 1
o ,

r
158 opowv (implying kumvos for

ucyapw

4l8

<>pOVOVTl
(T K for K iT

2 T
201
o

568 T)8' (? PK(TV)

o-

(B conj. Bothe)
3 8 for-cal
'
1

,u
,

371 ooraoi
^
VaVTW
T Hi
,
171 TpixayKe*

\\ o\
o
^
. . . TToAAwv
208
r)
7 avfaTO (yaptv
A

(
^
.

tor uctwvtcto
31 <rvvrivTTO

208o wX^ov
\/i /
c\
(cum /)

163 om. (dispensable,but perhapsex


x
11
homoeoteleuto)
.
.

-^

252

31.

a)

oo cTTovratrtor

29

",5

/ r

xt

cYovrat (cf. N 570

#to. Kcv
*
aX^Tai
lOrjrai
# for *e ycvrnai
'
'
_rt
88 irov for ttot'
for irXoffias
rfirXoffias
.
,
^04 vatov for vatcn.

The ancient survivals are valuable and the readings at 89, 0 201,
<r 3, $ 208. The almost complete absence of omissions (-^r 163 is an
exception) is remarkable: the linguisticevidence is verysmall.
The real interest of the whole familyconsists in the scholia and
the criticalsigns. The scholia of U5 are given,aftera collation by Cobet,
in Dindorfs edition (1855): a collection of scholia similar to these is
propagated in M4 (' Q,' collated ^originallyby Mai), and in Br, R 8, and
U9: these three MSS. must be considered by the next editor of the
scholia. R3 has v. 11.and glosses,but omits the scholia.
The familyalso has sporadic critical signs ; but,whereas in Us they
are the correct traditional Alexandrian symbols (obelus, asterisk,antisigma), in the xvth century members Br M4 R8 U9 (R3 omits them)
they have sunk to a curious half-bracketor curved line enclosing the
obelised passage on the leftside. This was the last stage of the notation
invented by the revisersof Alexandria,when a hasty Renaissance clerk
drew his pen down the margin opposite the lines they had starred or
obelised. Br M4 U8 have brackets only (Dindorf by some error calls
them *obeli' in M4 on 33):2 the bracket in M4 was noticed by
1 Br who resisted this, writes in his
right margin : yfi ei/s Kelrai ivravda 4p too <rrlx<oto6t<d,
2 Cf. La
and on the left ai 6 erepos crrixosUpxcrai ircl.
Roche, praef. Od. p. xxix.

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The British School

32

at Rome.

Ludwich,A.H.T. i. p. 530, and Schrader, Hermes, xxii. p. 365. U9 has


small single half-bracketsone to each line (8 159-163): the ordinaryhalfbracket to 7 199-200 : a pair of small dots to the first and last line
(v 333-338) : a cross to the firstline p 150, p 475. The dots are borrowed
fromordinaryscribes1practice. In otherfamiliesa verticalline in lieu of
the half-bracketis found as early as R4 (s. xiii) to 7 232-8, and in Hi to
X 454-6, v 333-338 (Hi also has a dotted asteriskto 6 564-572), R12 has
a wavy line against 0 399-401. U6 (s. xiii) has one set of obeli to
p 150-166. There is no parallel to this developmentin the MSS. of the
Iliad, which have sporadic signs not unfrequently,but the correct
Alexandrian types.
These signs have an historicalimportance,inasmuchas they reinforce
our deficientscholia : this will be seen fromthe table I append.
Scholia
to.

Us
-

232-238
244-246
157
( 275-288
' 33, 33, 34
368-372

to.
to.
~

obeli
- 1
~
-

* 38-43

60. obeli(38, 39)

v 320-3

a0.

I 5o3-5o6
p 150-166
475-480
330-332

to.
to.
to.
to.

7 199, 2OO

to.
-

333-338 to.

obeli
-

Br

M4

R8

(
(
-

(
(
-

(
(

(
(2
-

(
(
(
(
-

~
-

(
-

(2 (504-6)
(
(
(

(
(
(

U9
(

( I R4)

(,,P3V4;vers.om.V5R8.)
( (,, V4 ; J is said to have
1 obeli. The margin of.
[ R8 is covered.)

{a^g333}(8tndghtlneHi.)
-

ofR8 is covered.)
(themargin
(obeli U6 exceptto 151.)

U5 has other signs which are not reproduced in its descendants


(seep. 14). R8's witness against e 157 and M4/S against 1 33 sq. are
striking,but R8 may have used his bracket as a scribe's sign. The
marginof R8 is covered by a guard at v 333, 503. The crossesthat U9
appicts to the firstline of p 150 sq. and p 475 sq. are merely chiamateto
the scholia.
The brackets in p are evidence for the existence of ancient obeli
or asterisks on 7 244-9, K 275-288, X 38-43> v 320-3, 333-8, p 150-65,
1 Thereare no obeli in
U5, as Dindorfstates.
2 Not obeli, as Dindorf.

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The Text of the Odyssey.

33

475-80,<r330-2,and probablyforan Alexandrianathetesisofe 137,1 33sq.


of the members
k 368sq. The infidelity
of/ to V5 and the disagreement
theirloose dependenceuponV5, a conclusion
amongthemselvesconfirm
arrivedat fromthe readings. They must have used another copy
providedwithobeli,etc.,whereV5 omitsthem.
The survivaloftheAlexandriansignsis a curioussubject. Originally
and avyypdfiara
meantas references
to the Alexandrianvirofivrffiara
they
ceased to be necessarywiththe comingin of scholia. In theVen. A of
but as a rule
the Iliad theyare adaptedto referto the scholiathemselves,
or
numbers
to
text
the
scholiawereattached
marks,and the
arbitrary
by
criticalsignstherefore
atrophied. Eustathiusnoticesa fewin his Odyssey
MSS. (#564,253, 7t28i, butwith<f>aay
T4); in the second and third
passagetheyhavedisappearedin ourMSS.
/=Li

L3 P2 W.

Agreements.
4L 124
132
167
199
408
fi 134
183
226
285
6
7
46
120
325
381
461
476
^ 31
36
226
242
27a
414
480
485

Li W ( + U8)
irav<rfivos
aMv Li W (U8 J mg.)
iKwpr) Li P2 W ( + R16)
Li W ( + T)
ipvKOLvovv
ti Li P2 W
Li P2 W
8' hafiiv
ti}8' Li W
eveLi W ( + Mon.)
oIk M Li W
V lv Li P2 W
Mirq.om. Li P2
aZ Li W
Li P2 W ( + H3 m. 2)
Itnrovrai
om. L1P2W
Li P2 W
Trao-avro
(nrXdyxyoi
P2
Li
{cvjccrtf1
firjvLi P2 W
OoivrjaaaOaiLi P2 W
Li P2 ( + Mon. m. 2)
SrjLouv
Li L3 W
toSc pc
co-x*Li P2 W
cVaS^ Li P2 W ( + M2)
8VLi P2 ( + L5)
0<h
8<><rov<riv
Li
P2 W
ovt<d
8^
8^

189
245
442
456
v 6
92
98
no
113
272
303
526
03

80
168
v 387
i/350
a) 61
124
208

ikciLi P2 W ( + R7)
#<rLi P2 W ( + P6)
8c Li P2 W (4-U7)
o 8' avairvtwrosLi P2 W( + U8)
y7om. Li L3 P2 VV( + P5 Z)
oo-o-a7rW0L3 P2
L3 P2 ( + P6)
iroTTrimjviai
jSopcasL3 P2
y om. L3 P2 ( + P6)
0oi)vkiuvLi L3 P2 VV
Li L3 W ( + P6)
v<t>a(vov
Li L3 P W ( + Hi P5
KaTcXcfaTo
P6 K9)
vooTovLi L3 W ( + e)
W
L3 P2 rap<f>rjvai
rap<f>avai
KOL3 P2
Karav-njarl Li L3 W ( + Mon.
Rl Pi)
irXiovLi L3 P2 W ( + L5 Pi)
Li L3 W ( + L5 Pi)
y iv6rj<rv
Bavroio fipov Li L3 P2 W
( + Ls Pi)
Li L3 P2 W ( + L5 Pi)
kXtJcttov

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The British School

34

at Rome.

(The collation of L3 was not carried furtherthan was necessary to


establishits relationship.)
This family consists of four xvth century MSS., without scholia,
thoughpossessingoccasional corrections. Their fidelityis obvious,and it
was unnecessaryto recollateW, whichrestson Ernesti's evidence.
Peculiar Readings.
204a add. ( = 83,157)

i. Alexandrian:
Ax}
ir<ravro
y 461 <nr\yXva
136 ay>?p)
sec.
f 2)
(Ar. B447
207 to): to) piv Callistratus(rvcet.)

ii. Ancient:

*22 &**" forBArftu(avoi(Jsneglect


of F)
forcWc
#<
245
forPppv\v
412 lfxPpv\v

forty
4I7 J

426 ptvs for ptvor? (as Stephanus :


'pivov's tc omnes' in my ed. is
wrong;
or -ov
445 ttoAvkAvotosfor iroAvAAicrros

a 167 i\7rb)prj
t 61 rpcwrc&ivAthen. 12 A
163 cZo-i(schol. a 173 v.l.)

iii. Eust. yp.:


8
c
K
A

270
482
175
580
352
(1)426

Eust.
O"X
8c vXiyvEust. yp. Br U8
EuSt.
TT\OV
Tzetzes
^\k)o-
Eust.
Ovpy<t>
xat0^ Eust.

iv. Noteworthy :
ft 134 8? Saifioivfor 8c 8.
183 t^8j for t}A/
285

5
381
8 31
36
226
y

^242
c 74
98
l66

OVK 7Tt8;pOV for OUKCTt8>7pv(C7T

8. I 415, the same variant P41,


and cf. & 609)
8' V for 8' 7rt
om. (dispensable)
for /acv(as I 57, M318)
fjLrjv
for ^otny^vat
Qoivyo-ao-Oai
8^tootv,cf. p. 28
to8 cp^(cum /)
iXOoivfor t8)v
injuria for vrjfifyrm
(m.p.)
pV$Lfor ipVKOL

189 tKctfor /coi

(Cf.h. Apoll. 347)

for apJairvcvorros
avaTTvevoTOS
tvkiv? for yXvfccpos
(vttvos)
0VTlfor0VT
for \dfie
/?A(A.)
5 54 riOuvrai for Tt^vra
* 206 ^17877
for rjrfiu,rjeifci
om.
233 vfitv
32 7ro)(rat
K 386 al.
forafifipO(TLYjvf9iS
404 6p<f>vairjv
for
457 ^Auo-Kcfct r\a(TK-(as Bekker)
456
47 2
Cl87
0 186

533

for VKTLflVOV
S VKTlflVOV

66 </)\oictVtvfor <i'A.ov
o-tiv
251 ^aftcv for ijo/xcv
/catvA^v for <f>ai8Lfx
ib. ttvkvo.
'O8vo-(rev

(as 150, 197)


360 iirl for cvl
A 399 rji ar1oy for rji cri y'
403 yc fia\ovfivovfor //.a^cov/xcvov
(yc
fiaxcvfiwovBothe)
439 x^ov fr 8oA.ov,as ^> 137 : (presumably Axov was meant)
56O 8c flOLpaV fY 8' TI flolpOLV(pOS-

sible)
1 This

readingwas omittedby errorin myedition.

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The Text of the Odyssey.

35

Seras forScVasAa/Jc
561 AAa Sevpo for XV aye Stvpo o 102 Aa/Jc
173 fieWova-L
(? m. p.)
(neut., post-Homeric)
forTas (prob. right)
198 vijcmforcvijcrci
592 ras 8*avfxos

629 ndpOSTTCpfor 7TpOO"0V


for TrpocrrjvSa
jl 36 afJLtifitTO
68 flvcAAafor flvcAAat
148 KaT07rtv(vi;s) for KaTomrOc veos
(posthomeric)
347 2i>0aKaOeifievfor cv 8c K0i/xv
v

forc^t(new-Ionic)
407 0}

256
274
296
p 201
206

for (f)OLVS
VCOV
VOV
<t>dvS
for
//.cp/x^pifas fJLfpfxrjpL^at
for ariix-qaTifid<rov(ri
KaAActVctv
for KaAAiTreW
yepovrcsfor /ac'Sovtcs
vSpaovro for v8pcvovTo

r
2*^1 kraipwforhaiprjv

for vvltt
ivfvio"ir
(common)
ivSaWcrat ^or^ai for tv8.^rop (?)
Xcttolsfor \6trov(XcttosGalen)
tol SI for To.yap
iirl Opvovfor 7rlOpovov

27 8tos for ^etos


61 w for t) (posthomeric, cf. k 268)
138 avrwv for aurav
238 t^v 877for rrjv8c T
385 crvOta.tol ocaora for <rvKa<rraOta

79 avrts for avT9


tttto"'
IttXO
A.0>.for
139 7T7r(rc
w
= v

V 489)
for co-ccr^at
x 4o 7T(r0at
iif366 (oftoavfor w/jLoiariv

(an attemptat Karaft.)


fortofiv
28 tfvfiovs

237 4r*yr for ^yov


o

IT l8l

269 ^

vie*versa)

^.ya or

65
224
233
504
v 96

150 piWarc forpacrcraT*


for prtXxoto
(as fog
<^> 16 po-tA^oto

for tq5

^6)

for^tX, (cf. 1206)

80 rap<l>avaifor rpa^0rvaL

45g Ta^aXVtv

VTlEust n

.<7tforKaKal

Such a large categoryas the last in a familycomposedentirelyof xvth


centuryMSS. is noticeable. Coincidences with critics: one withTzetzes
\ 580, Stephanus 6426, Bekker 457, Bothe (nearly) \ 403 ; but thereare
only two variantsof linguisticinterest(S 242, 220), and the rest belong to
the ordinaryclasses of association and graphicalerror.
=L8 Be Ca L6 Ri R6 R9 Ru R14 R17 Ui V5 Z (P5 m. 2).
Specimensof Agreement
L8 R14 ( + R7)
a 175 fxtOiirrj
L8 R14
276 fidyapov
L8 Ril
314 8*avreTTpoo-cWc
316 tol L8 R14 Ui Z
346 <xp'av L8 Be R14 Ui
L8 R14
367 aviw T/vSa
L8
2
Ui
om.
381,
L8 R14 Ui Z
388 Ypxayopviv
423 p' om. L8 R14 Z ( + U3)

P 31 /WoitoL8 R14
190 crotL8 Be R14
L8 Be R14.U1 Z
251 irXovirifixoiTO
L8
8'
uovTas
R14
300
L8 Be ( + Pal. lirciv)
327 ctt^vvircpUrai
L8 R14 ( + C)
404 Iwficv
L8 Be R14
411 irirvaro
417, 8 om. L8 R9 R14
y 73 & <>' L8 Be R14 ( + Ps marg.)

D 2

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36

The British School at Rome.

y 146 ota L8 Be R14


L8 Be R14 ( + Pal.)
151 taVa/xV
314 8' L8 Be R14 ( + Pal.)
L8 Be R14 Ui
358 fl-curccrftu
aWav
L8
Be R14 ( + Uy)
490
8 60 8' afjLL8 Be R 14
90 yap L8 Be R14
212 s L8 Be R14
278 cratpov?L8 R14
376 a L8 Be
463 re as ixprjvL8 Be R9 R14
L8 Be R14
535 s cty
195 tvOaKaOrjcrro
L8 R14
L8 Rll (+P2)
224 yV<rOai
293 y' VL8 Ui
L8 R14
27 11/oTTou
116 fnro-
L8 R14 Z
160 yw tSovL8 Rii R14 V5 ( + y)
216 \ov<ra<rOaiL8 Rll
R14 V5
( + R5)
v) 5 aTr'L8 R9 R14
6 8' o-<6pov
L8 R9 R14
17 KcpTo/Atot?,
i&poi L8 R9 R14
79 h L8 R9 R14
^ 580 av0pU7TOi<nv
a7rao-tv
L8 Ui yp.Ri I
ib. ol^v L8 Ri i Ui ( + U3)
A 2O6 7TLVL
L8 Rll ( + U7)
at
.w//eo" t o : ikarivcov
.x /
t
Rn
320 i\a!lvov L8
0
_ __ , ,
,
f
cAartvatov
Be Ui Z: cAatvcovRl
n , r /, tot.
XT /tt v
348 lrifo L8 Ri, Ui (U7)
553 V&t L8 R 11 Ui

k 324
505
\ 104
284
438
^
9
179

L8 Ri i Ui ( + U7)
/*Xurvopfvr)
r*Mm L8R111
L8 Ri 1 Ui ( + 0)
TKio-^i
L8 Rn Ui ( + U7)
^v
ov,a L8 Rn Ui
L8 Rn Ui ( + U6 uv.)
itpoi-qv
L8 Rn Ui ( + U7)
^av

T ^Tt a t ^
4 t?
365a hab. L8 L6 Be Rn Ui
L8
L6
Ri
1Z
369
v^oS
&
L8
L6
Ri
1
Ui
374
( + R8)
441 xPi88L8Rii Ui

OtiosL8 L6 Be R9 Rn ( + L9)
L8 L6 Be Rll Z
vTTOTreirrqviai
fioiL8 L6 Rn Ui
L8 L6 Rll Z
air-qvpa
L8 L6 R9 Rn Ui Z
nvqarrrjpo-iv
L8 R9 Rn
Ui
itfatya/cco-crtv
( + L4)
o 27 ro t Ittos L8 Ri R9 ( + Mon.
U5)
234 ivl L8 Ri R9 ( + Mon. Hi)
246 ov&oL8 Be R9 ( + Hi)
it 13 ttcW L8 Ri R9 Rn ( + Mon.
U6)
L8 cwr'Ri iir'R9
131 ?tt'
18
^c'AtiovL8 R9 ( + U3)
p
43 post 44 L8 R9 ( + P5)
453 ov$' aAAwL8 R9 ( + P5)
577a hab. L8 R9 (P5)
or 97 rj\$v
ava L8 Ri R9 ( + ^)
105 fcwasTo-vasL8 Ri R9 ( + k)
L8 Ri R9 (yp. R12)
250 ex*v
t 17 KaraOtiofiw
L8 Be ( + U6)
L8 R9 Ui Z ( + ^)
155 o/AOKXiJo-avT*
L8 R6 R9 Ui Z
224 avrap cywvp<o
v 34 58* L8 Ca R6 R9 Ui Z ( + k)
43 toScL8 Ca Ri R6 R9 Ui Z ( + M2
R2)
49 p yap L8 Ca R6 R9 Ui ( + R2)
a
tqp
but Ui Z
7
L8 Ca R6
191 <rup<Trjs
^z-^ TQr\,u
/;t>
tt v
267 xcipa?L8 La Ri Ro R9 Ui Z
274 mwropwL8 Ca R6 R9 Ui
v 56
98
129
132
193
f 203

^^
L8 Ca R69R9z
2g8 yatW
g Ca Rl R6 R Ux z

( + U5 M2 R8)
&v L8 Ca R R6 R v z
( + Mon)
3JI eUvL8 Ca R6 Ux Z ( + P6)
L8 Ca R6 Ui Z, 5^rov Be
34O j^
Rl /+ \
^6 y>w L8 Ca R6 Ut z ( + Br)

374(* L8 Ca Ri R6R9 Ui Z

f 8os Lg Be R6 R Ux z
%
n rag Ca
^
T,
^ rXT0
Lg Ca y

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The Text of the Odyssey.


om. 8' L8 Ca R6 R9 Ui
X 109 OdXafjLov
Z ( + R3 M4)
L8 Ca Ui Z
116 fjLvvaaOai
Ri
L8
8c
o
Ui 8' olrjin ras. Ca
130
k
L8
kcu
Ca R6 Ui Z
eh
138
Ri
L8
R6 Ui Z
evOcv
Ca
140
144 tvOa 8v(8KaL8 Ca R9 Z ( + J
R3 R8)
186 8c XikwToL8 Ca Z ( + 1,5)
om. L8 Ca R6 Ui,
195 /xXaTrctyxu
in ras. Ri
209 os, om. o-'L8 Ca R6 R9 Ui Z
L8 Ca R6 Ui Z
215 TCTcAcVtfai
221 roio-i8JL8 Ca R6 Ui Z ( + H3
U2 U8)
254 cWx' L8 Ca R6 Ui Z
L8 Ca R6 Ui Z
270 fivxovci/8oi/
R6 Ui Z
L8
Ca
295 Xa^o5
299 8' emporroL8 Ca Ri R9 Ui Z
( + U6)

37

L8 Ca L6 R9 Ui Z
x 33 OopQvres
L8 Ca Ri R6 Ui Z
330 Avo7ca
L8 Ca R6 Ui Z (4- O)
333 npfirpicv
L8
334 /xcyAoio Ca R6 Ui
348 irtpci'ScivL8 Ca R6 Ui
351 es cvL8 Ca Ri R6 Ui (yp. U5)
373 aMots L8 Ca Ri R6 Ui Z
k' L8 Ca Ri R6 Ui Z
377 Z<t>p*
381 paOvv8>ov L8 Ca Ri R6 Ui Z
392-4 om. L8 Ca R6 Ui Z
L8 Be Ca R6 Ui Z
401 vKveo-(<r)iv
(jcTa/xcWs)
413 tovs 8tjL8 Ri tovo-8'rCa R6 Ui
Z
L8 Ca Ri R6 Ui Z
418 nyAm'Scs
L8
425 ti/axtcu Ca Ri R6 Ui Z
L8 Ca Ri Ui Z
440 KaTa/cooyAiJo-co-flc
( + O)
443 mcr&vL8 Ca Ri R6 Ui Z
497 Sdas L8 (-os in ras.) Ca R6 Ui

- the largest,since /has only 12 members- consists


This large family
of an xith centuryparent L8 (long known as * F ') and twelve xvth
centurychildren. The familyas a whole has no scholia. R6 only shows
co. Ui is writtenby Rhosus. The parentage
exegetical scholia to a-S, yrf
is regularforUi Ru R14 Be Z ; R17 is a fragment; Ca is constantin the
later books, but not in the former; V5 to judge frommy collations agrees
withthe juniors and occasionally with L8. The marginof P5 agrees with
The junior memberswheretheydifferfromL8 therebyform
g (v. p. 48).
I call q : as in the case of b c and e it is sometimes
which
a new family
possible to trace the graftingout of L8 : e.g.
Examples of q developedout of g.
a> urT
o
'
tt
Ui
a 175 Mein,
L8, jufcircio-i
L8
corr.Ui Z
L8
Rii,xpo)
225 xpo

L8
234 ipokovroL8 Ri, epovkovTo
corr.R11 Ui Z
279-292 om. L8, add L8 m. a, hab.
R7R11R14U1
L8 corr.R14
L8, <j)0ov4^i
346 <f>0ovi<>
Ui

367 olvtov>;v8aL8 R14, yp\^ofivOw


L8> hab RlI Ux
2 Qm Lg ^
add Lg m 2^

R1R11R14.
w L8 R Dl vTtW
gg ? ,
m. a, R. Ri 1
^^8
,t
Ri Ru R14
441 iitpwtL8, eirtpcwre
Ui

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The British School at Rome.

38
e

8 608 KCKXiWatL8, kckXcWqi Be


R14
L8, ajceSan}?Be
rj 106 /afccSn}?

ir' u>

t 233 irrjkOtvfjiiavL8, 7n/X0v


ctt' wRi
R11
Z
fiwv
* J6i Kara kvtjcttlvL8 corr. Rn Ui

R7

X 585 aAXflL8, a\\rvL8 corr. Rn Ui


0 2g2 ol L8, ov yp. L8, hab. Be R9

era
188 Saivvfxcvoi
L8, 8aur>vot
R9
ot

Ri 1

197 KaraKXw^s L8, ko.tk\OoiR9


o *
to*
to
T>
258 ov7T<ore L8, ov7r)Tt L8 corr., Be
"D

"D

,. T o
,x
To
_> ^
" OD
L8 corr. Ri Rqy
L8, ycXwv
35 VXw
'
'
Ui

Z(

t 356 XiyrpreXovo-a
L8 Ui,
eoxxraL8 corr. R9

oXiyr; 7rcp

But in most cases the process of creatingthe new familycannot be


traced- as is only natural when we are dealing with a period of 300
years.
The peculiar readings of the family,whetherof L8 only or L8 with
its descendants,are these:
:
i. Alexandrian

316 roi forxoi(Nitzschobjectedto

27 vl fifjLydpoL(nv
Aristoph. (schol.
ft 338)
1 387 cxoi/TcsAr. sec. Eust.

fJ-oi)
346 Tt t' ap' av for ti T apa
367 ovriov yvSa

4l9 om- (dispensable)


439> 44 om. (hardlydispensable)
4 om. (dispensable)
^

k 324 fiXto-o-o/xeviy
Aristoph.
X 597 KparaCis Ptol. Ascal.
ii. Ancient :

31 /XaOoLTO

C 122 afey^ Apoll. lex.

"'S^^
o 466

^
7raHerodian

/> o> tt
jxt
* 47 1 <*
ecodian
N
79i
r 203 ?<rX<
Plutarch
Pollux x. 77
387 irovXi,

iii. Eust. yp. :


89 to>s (cum C V4)
v 435 pvTTVra
p 305 /x^ov
" 59 om.
*r 5
X 418
co318
iv.

2S1 ^

V
^Xm'Scs
p^tva for ^vaS
Noticeable :

a 175 ficOtirri
(yp. H3)
276 fiyapov
a 314 tv 8' avTwpoo-L7T

Tl^

(tVlperhapsfrom

inligature)

*> vovras

^^^
_

(aXa) forw
^ o forroi

146 ota for o ov (i.e. TrcivtcrQaipass.,


as the
in Dio- Hal.)
V;L
3 6o 3> ^ ( = g^
90 yhipf()r ^
2I2 sforgs
278 iraipovs for apiVrovs
37g , for ot
445 typpnhy 8'
463 Ts ixpty for tco erexp^?
535 >s ctycfor s Tts T
77 avTvfor avrr;v
97 lywyc for cyw rot

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The Text of the Odyssey.


123
130
195
293

s for ecos
eyuiy for cycov
for viarr)
KaOrja-To
8' V V<cccr<rt

351 om. (perh. dispensable, prob.

owing to aMs, aM)


428 Trcrp^v
'ttov
27 tv' O7TOV
( = tva)

39 kol 8' Viot avri)

A 432 cpy' ctSvtafor Xvyp' ciSva


438 owcxa for c>e#ca
510 f3ov\rv
554 tyicofor c/xoi
3
59
179
v 56

I29 jtxotfor /xc

5 7T for V7T

1^2

6 8* (r<t)pov
17 KcpTOfiioisTr&craiv(? avriP6Xr(TaL

16)

448
496
520
r553
x 38
287
505
A 80

t/t;s(yp. M2)
cv B(>jj.a(nfor es 8</xaTa
yeveo-^)for ptkvdi
o-otfor rot
109 om. (dispensable), =^ 323 al.
147 cVctas
148 vairq for vl^l, cf. y 101
196 yaW for yo)vor yocW
for cTCKcv
262 ccrxv
266a add. ( = 261), possible
for /uvvci')
284 /Aivvi/tv

7TYJVpa(OV aTTTJVpUiV

244 cv /V-cv 8c for cv fikv-kv 8c


270 Xa^wv- mypwvfor A0ov- ttov-

for TreWei
119 7TjU,7r
208 fxoifor rot
I
294 cp&fxtvaifor cp/*i/
341 wTpwov for (OTpvvovV ( + P5 P7
Rio)
^ 133 aOXiVfor ac^Xov
286 v(r<ivcvTa for voV<^tKtovra
377 c^atpav for or<^atp|;
491 Trepc)vfor TrapcW( + L4)
284 vttfor 7Tt
(possible : sc. 'near')
for vKai
308 VKai
320 cXaTtvcov
353 8 /*'ariV atiuftfitvosTrpocrcctTrcv
for 8c 8cKT0Kat CKTTtCV*
^(TaTO8'
atvi?
apvwvfor otwv(against /)
ctt'for es
avTts for avTs
^as for Pc^as*

& ( = t1) for t'


for
yap /xci/
yap
^
for av^7rrov
avrjxj/av
Ocios for 810s,cf. 1 17

98 Ivmramjvuu

117 0cos for 8ios, cf ?r 1, cr 117


7^

39

pas.

45
78
104
123
X68
297
304
389
^
^OI
526
j 2g
^^2
io
2^

For this inversion cf.

@ 207, 256, $ 377, p 245


avrov for avros
Iv^ for cV 8'
bpVTaifor opoj/rai
yycXcwvfor ayycAXiov
tl for /xt/Sc
/x
/xiySc
for Trcpcnjort
(right)
H-cpao-cic
for y\a<j>vprj<;
K<a\i}s
cXc^crasfor cXcatpcov(vulg.)
Kovrqvfor koltov
g' icVatfor 8c cctv (common)
KaTapcaT0for KaraXi^aro
for dative
o-Tt^apous-w/xovs
^al for J^|/(U
8V for TYjX!
ante 24 (to give /xcraXAa a

government !)
I43 Om. (dispensable ?)
for Ka0ccTO
285 7rapcT0
29O irpviivfoi' Srjvav for TrpoTVoio-iv
cS^trav
r ^tosfor 8ios
v
357 Ktx?o*atfor Ktx^at
p I?7 ojKOV g^ ^ao-ros for irtOoir re
^^a, (cum /)
233a ad# ^p)
27g giyfluvwfor 8i/0vvciv
363 V for ^^
no^
^
^
ttoAv( = /x\a) for 7ro\v
404 /xctAa

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The British School

4O

at Rome.

p 479 cpwywcr'
(? = cpcvyoxr')for cpvcnrKr' v 374 ^Vwfor ^ctvots
525 rp^w Kv\iv8ftvosfor irpoirpo- <j>*5 ijpct for pec (right ?)
for /xvvqo-i
1 1 1 f {p-qo-i
KvXivSo/xcvos
(?)
for
cvei/cai
cm/ccv
o* 24 av#t? (T(ofJLydp<i)v
for Scvrcpovcs
196
217 Xe^) for 8ctfw
fxiyapov= ^219
222 t^v8' for twS'
107 Travpr)sfor iiravpy
for ca-Ta/xev
261 ora/Avai
(cf. 7; 294)
117 0ios for 810s
for KaTcSovrat
363 KaT'8oiKri
J53 81a for KctTa(vulg.)
for 7T(ror6V
369 7ri0i;(rasfor Trt^orcts
256 7Tk\)(T
(? right)
280 ^8c Kvfor aAA' ovk
400 Xi^T^p for aXrjrrjs
for v8/a>Jtovs
1 a7r\rTo
r
for wx 24 cut/at/tovs
68 twv 8' avTwvfor tcv81 avTov
1 7 KdTaOtiofJLtv
for Karafciofuu
for -17s (as it were a
for ^p^vvv-iyKcv
84 Trcppiprj$s
57 OpTJws-rjev
often)
participle, like <TKrj$LS
72 t) oti rot pvirapa Kara xpol tifiara
140 cv0vfor cv8ov
t/x,(u
(? rj on roi Kara 8^ pvirapa
200 om. (dispensable)
Xpot ctftaTa ct/xat). pinrapos is
not homeric
215 rerekea-Oaifor TcXcco-^ai(cf. a 201)
160 /cya? T for /xdKuTTa(? rjvs tc
254 7rct
x ^or 7r^v(right)
295 ^aA/cosfor ^aXKov (common)
/^eyastc)
299 c^cpovro for tyefiovTo
*34i oKtfor KotVy(cum /)
for
373 aAAois for a\\<i>
413 7rop(v) 7rpot
avTiov
for
377 oc^pa k for o^pJ av (? right)
478
avrtiy
4^3 T0^ ^ ^or T0^5 8c 8c (to avoid
481 to 8c Kat tctcAcct/acWlo-Tai for Kai
8 c flOip3)
/A^l/

569 tfor^

V* 42 T iKfJTLfur T 'KYjTL(avoiding
hiatus)
v / 7*p\r
v
v
for
49 MTp
Vap ( = 7Tp)
U^\ l7Tp
r v
v
o Yt
/
830 * for YtV
(right)

u^\
10 1 avnvai ,.//*.
for avriTi(? right)
& '

i
x

, x r

130 avros for avro)s


for >7
131 /XOt
, 5>N
v
r
CV
Sc
T
for 1/
150
^
v
QQ
r
188 ore Tts for otis
267 vctpas for Ypwv (unmetrical)
/
/
?tor iravo-outv
/^ om. , x
(?
274 7rav<T(ou.V
iv)
/ r
*
1 /
o avroL
/- *v
282
Tfor avrot wp(?
tw)

335 om. (dispensable)


/ , v /)
o
r
t
for

*348 Kpca
i7o-0oi>
/ 1 1r\

v /

Kpca wo-0tov

for'Tiovcrai
425 Tifjarai
(gloss)

for arfliV
\f 28 aTLflOV
for TrpocrrjvSa
208 Trpoorwira
220 om. (dispensable)
, /
r /
270 avcpas for avcpcs
I
9 r 9
r
367 wo-cfor wpo-c,as often
,#
/ * *
W IO9 WCTTOufor
^ VfJLfJL*
tcra>
214 TTToXitopov
(ex
377
r tor oouov
r
v
x
etc 1
r /
. /
227 pvTrotvrafor pu7ro)VTa
/
/
r
295 <>aovlor Troo-tv
v f
34 ^
. 4v
^^^
,>/,
^310 ucW ot for ov (? right)
/ 1
\
^54 om. (ex homoeomeso)
7
..v
f^
x, \

o
/ u
\
398 om. (ex homoeomeso)
o

457
^J/>8 7TOT6for T0T
(neglecting
/)
thegreatnumberof thesevariants,
thereis littlegood in
Considering
them. The omissions
are nearlyalways explicableon graphicalgrounds.

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The Text of the Odyssey.

41

We have instancesof the process of fillingdigamma-hiatusesat v 42, 348,


a simple neglect,448. Digamma is apparentlyobservedp 177 r 341 : jjpet,
(j>56 seems correctforHomer, $avr\vaiv 101 is possible ; teeis preferredto
is betterthan irepaayaL%297 ; but the two most
av x 254) 377 7Tp<rt
310 and the verb ir/cXcao-e
interesting11. are the particle fi<r<f>a
0-256.
Still the age of L8, its numerousprogeny,and the factthat Demetrius
Chalcondylas (p. 64) took a member of the familyas the basis of his
editionand thereforecontinuedthe g traditionas the printed vulgate till
Barnes,make L8 the most importantsingle MS. of the Odyssey.
The variants of the junior members (q) where theydiverge fromL8
will be foundp. 56.
= JU6U8.
This familyconsists of the xiiith centuryfragment(c S41-G)) U6, the
xvith centuryU8, and the lost Sabbioneta MS. of unknown date J. I
was at firstdisposed to think I had found the missing J in U8, which
entered the Marciana by purchasein 1823 and presumablyonce belonged,
like its companion,Iliad cl. ix. cod. 2 (U9), to S, Giovanni in Verdara at
to disprove
Padua. However,the discrepancies given below are sufficient
this. J must either be lost or be one of threeuncollated Odysseys : the
Moscow MS., that at Madrid,and the second Breslau MS. The age of
the Moscow MS. (s. xiii accordingto Vladimir) makes it ratheran unlikely
candidate ; Heinsius' meeting with J in the xviith century,whether in
Italy or North of the Alps, is against the Madrid MS. However, a
reinspectionof the Weimar Aldine mightalter the question.
Specimensof Agreements.
J U8 (cf.O87)
0 68 0/u8os
twi/
U8, J marg.( + L2 Mo)
y 134
TTvOio-Oai
204
J U8 ( = Bii9 etc.)
J U8 ( + C U5 UV.)
231 oraoicrot
c 248 W
J U8 ( + K P7)
J U8 (ex 427)
437 M <t>Pri

A* 41 P-a-rJ U8 (cumf)
fi422 cV8cJ U8
441 om.U6 U8 ( + P5) (? dispensable)
N
<?*
, x
452 aurxpaJ U8 foreX^ov(? ~ <x0Pa)
AA U6 U8>
* 6 W

222 cwAok^o^v M^k J U8


v 7 h to y1U8 T marg.

U6 U8 ( + T) - 16)
2I
77
U6 U8 ( + L8 Pal.)
279 f*ccnuuorov

k 320 \o J U8

38i ^

U6 U8 ( + Men.)

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The British School at Rome.

42
| 396
481
o 26
83
119
198

otKaScU6 U8
a<pa&VJ U6 U8 (+/) (right)
Savon J U6 U8 :*S6rj<nOcosEust.
*P7a J U8 fOr& TL
kl$lfxeU8, J marg.
U6 U8
i^K

208 <>tvri<ras
U6 U8
kolt ap ctoay^
285 vrji$' ivl TrpvfJLvrj

8' ap' avrovU6 U8 ( = ^417)


506 irapaOeiTrjv
J U8
7T279 ovXtU6 U8 (+^), cf. 72 al.
291 fi/3a\
SafivU6 U8 ( + Mon.)
= T IO

U6 U8 ( + P2 V2)
305 vLPV0rjfiv
U6
U8
p 185 /tcvai
( + k)
276 Xro-co
U8, J marg.and cf. ^739
E 811
409 v7r46rjK
J marg. U8 ras. (in
textu)
<r 15 pcfa J U8

J U8
0-57 arao-flaXcW
t 184 TrXoTcpw
J U8 (a syntactical
correction)
37 J T' STOlSt/AttTa
J U8
k4v
tc
U8
0cs
>s
396
J marg.
v 88 av forav U8 J marg.

J U8 ( + L4)
x 235 itot/vcov
385 iroWrjs J U8

X4 oartfiosJ U8
175 o(rrtsU8J marg.
179 iKUicrOai
J U8 (+/)
188 fxtrexyo-euv
U8 J marg.

(1)I92 7T(tSU6 U8

201 8' ttIU8 J marg.,8Jvi J


U8 J
215 ^Trctra
v
o-'
U8,
J marg.
285
U8, J marg.
382 cy?70s
394 OnfiovsJ U8
U8 J marg.xvx^v J
416 /xv'x/xi7
hrraraxpcvJ U8
534 k Tx>x*a-

Characteristics of h.
i. Alexandrian:
None.
ii. Ancient:
y 248 &pVPv
Ap. lex.
#c
320 Ac'fco(? ; XcfoAr.)
111.Eust. yp. :
y 204 TrvOivQai(Kara repoiav ypa^-qv
Eust.)

222 lirtkOvEust.
XlOoktlEust. L4 ss.
6 Kartpv\Ucrcn
Eust.
O1v<j>avTrv
324 re aA.t9ia-OrJTi
481 a^paSfysEust. ( +/)
2 8<(tort
&V* Eust)
iv. Noticeable :
The list of 'Agreements' may
sufficCi Association plays the
greatest part; one reading,
481, is right.

The connection between the members is loose : U6 agrees so often


with P5 etc. as to be a regular memberof that family(/), v. pp. 45 sq. ;
J exhibitsa markedleaning to e ; here it is not followedby U8, and thereforeclearlyis not identical with it.
P 37 8' ivl e]
y2i9 0T'JT
315 Srj e J Mon.

484 acfcovrc
op J

y 490 $5>kv
J R5
8 252 expo-'<?J
221 fi ivl e J

0 84 ytpvlvikwvchapose J L2

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The Text of the Odyssey.


3480add.p J L2

p 5680 hab.p J Mon.

X 513 Tpnv
p J Pi (right)

* 305 Pr,6r,^vJH3(=
/.
/

43

cr 242 ov8*otttt^ot vooros J

23 ^"T

V)

T tor / v
eJ
310 fiTxovarLV
/xcycxootip

1J

*'

eJ
275 TrpO7rapoLU
,
T

345 yV<HTO*J

p 158 ^poWJ

and cf. further<r 364, 369, 386, 403, t 44, 209, 252, 532, 534, v 134,
X 24> 29.
U8, withoutthe doubtfulsupportof J,has some value, as the following
peculiaritiesshow :
forccXScat
c 210 l/xc/pcat
(cf. N 813 H

i. Alexandrian:
None.

269 etc-)

338

ii. Ancient:
156 atcv Vschol. (KaKs)
162 ^)/xvJulian
: 0/wr
Ar.
486 ^/to-
(? 6cfii<T<r)
C0^Q*
A 158 irpS>Tov
Strabo, Porphyry ( + P8)
tt 249 a-dfjLov(Apollodorus ap. Strab.
453)
s

0 14S
233
294
341
396
t 393
405

iii. Eust.yp.:

20 Kf\^<oS
for-0a
x^
rponiS6m

342 epov
t 325 /*w

'

'

*
XXa ^ovcov iv
k 3743r^
(Eust. Kara rtva t<uv
vTlyP^a,r)
\ 510 rpoKov

^ 2o^ ^^ o ^2 7rp0T^1;gafor ^T^vSa


for /LtcraS 46 KaTa&y/xiov

282 *^Xflwithed.pr. (right)

276 S^XWSa, (v.l. Eust.)


iv. Noticeable :

for-ov
8 484 Trpovhma
fordVP^
511 &y\abv
as Nauck
826 Io-ttto,

for ^X(.<ri
^^
35 ,w<f)vi
as Knight
4o yeXo;ol,TS)

mi

" 25 ^"V*"

140 ^poS icavT*


* J9 ^oy1?o-ol

cf ~$

tj ore Trcpttoow tc p^ ( ? om. tc)


fern.
iTryjeravrj
^xTat for otx^at
ctcopoao-^c for t(ropa>T
8s p arv for & iavrbv
criSypoioKpdros,as Nauck.
(Tye for a-ev (? a^atpci Sim. for

fXatW>
S23 for <T

, tv ,

5
I Z
v
avoids
.., ...
t 204 vw (for8,
;
hiatus)

O"^8775noXvutO-flOV17TT [JivOoV,

4O2 TptV
y, as Knight
44 KaTaX.for _Xial
j^^

234 & r ^
455 fi<f>iirovTo

X 46 lX.rasfor^as
" 5
7* fr^ ^' y
112 ~^a
aiY5vforoi5"

The alternativeto the Aristarchean1. on t 486 is important,if the


it 249 is ordinaryassociation from"tfiotor
formbe uncertain; if cr/iov

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The British School

44

at Rome.

the effectof Apollodorus, who shall say ? Anticipationsare noticeable.


Nauck at 8 826 1 393, Payne Knight at a 40, 402. ^irrjXvOev 282 is
usually printed.
J has two noticeable readings:
as Hesych*
0 392 <f>apo$
forvrjXirtis,
ckciotoswith ed. pr. for it 317 vrKirU%^
II.
82
efecto-ros
179. (perhapsancient)
<apos
'
Several ' obeli are reportedfromJ by Heinsius x ; U6 has obeli to
p 150 sq., but U8's large signs (^"and =) are lectionarynot critical; e.g.y
? 375-7 7T247 (nere US has an obelus equally non-critical),318.

=M2 Ri
This is the firstof severalsmall families(theothersare /and m\or
rathercoincidenceswhichit seemed desirableto indicateby a separate
letter. The xiiith centuryMS. M2 (amply equipped with scholia)
the xvth centuryRi (whichwe have already
seems to have influenced
is denotedby i.
ofL8) : theiragreement
seen amongthedescendants
Specimensof Agreement.

a 315
fi 40
99
245

[irjKtTi( + b h r)
/aA.a(+//i)
rev ( + H3 R7)
<rK
( + L4 R4 Ui al.)
fiax^o-a-atrOat

y 32 bOa fo(+/U8)

I OI fil fivrjaaiM2 ( + U8) fii^vr)(raLRi


(fiOLfivrjcrai
vulg.)
M2 Ri (+/U8)
153 /<i.iWas
256 y om. M2 Ri (+/)
8 292 ry M2 Ri (+fyp. 4)
317 rjXOovM2 Ri (+/)
420 cym'/fyrai M2 Ri
( + R7 U8)
EuSt.
452 v9'M2 Ri ( + P2 R5)
485 8^ ovt) M2 Ri ( + d)
M2 Ri ( + /R5 R7)
508 /uu/xi/6
812 k&t) M2 Ri ( + R5)
t M2 Ri
845 fjL<rcrr)yv<s
67 fifJLrj\ci
M2 Ri ( + R11, yp. H3
R7)
221 ^5M2 Ri (+/)
356 aXXov M2 Ri (+/)

54
341
569
1 262

Kara M2 Ri ( + P5)
M2 Ri (-oire d e f)
l<rop<i)OLT
pai<rccrOaiM2 Ri ( + P2 R17 U2)
kcu Oeoi a\\oi (+/^)

271
k 412
/x 84
327
v 84
267
134
O 434
506
ir 56
66

M2 Ri ( +fk P6)
0* iKtTrjcriv
cnrapovcivM2 Ri ( + ^) Eust.
M2 Ri ( + ^/)
i<ra<l>(Kr}Tai
2>cois /ivM2 Ri ( + b)
M2 Ri ( + ^)
irpvfJLvrjs
M2 Ri (+/)
irpoa-LOVTa
cpiW M2 Ri {+&)
M2 Ri (+/)
flL\j/aTO
irapaOeirjvM2 Ri ( + ^ rMon.)
Otlov M2 Ri ( + r)
o-otM2 Ri ( + eg k\ as Voss.
OvjirjptsM2 Ri (+/^5)
Trpocrc^ M2 Ri ( + L4 L8)
M2 Ri (+^ J)
imxKkttol
hab. M2R1 (+^
to'Sc M2 Ri (+g)
aTroSiWi M2 Ri ( + J M4 U2)

267 fjXdonev
M2Ri( + ^ P6)

p 199
<r 51

263
413
v 43
53
1a
38-43, 157-9, 602-4, t 306, 346-8.

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The Text of the Odyssey.

45

These examplesprovethat,if this pair do not showany great inas to be mergedin


theydo notinclineso farto anyone family
dependence,
it (outof41 exx. i=b in 4,/in i^g'm 5,h (U8) in 5).
Characteristics.
i. Alexandrian:
None.
.
11. Ancient:
None.
iii. Eust. yp. :
3 420 fxefirjTai
k 412 (Tirapovnv
I 142 o8' apa yp. H3 K U5

8 845 fi<r<rrjyvs
t'
IO4 o/8'(H3 marg.)
A.545 rrjforTTjv
A (tolas \t
it 66
Voss.
fi2
g0
forg^ K1;VSj
cf. /? 11
KVS
p
v 188 otc forVis
"*2 so*'
i. Eust. yp. :

iv. Noticeable :
p 599 ScicAu^o-asyp. U5, gl. H2 K V3
Eust.
T </>89 AAa xat a>s for aXA.'kccdv
re irivS1
(right; (Tirtio'.v
y 342 o-TTcto-i/
7TLOVL4)

(fJLTaypL<f}OVT^)

y=Hi P5 P6R7U6U7.
t 541-)are s. xiii; Hi (written
P6 and U6 (defective,
by Rhosus),P5
Rhosus'
resembles
and corrector
hand),R7 (by Rhosus)U7
(the rubricator
has
abundant
U6
s.
xvi.
or
xv
all
s.
are
scholia,P6 on a-y 48,
341)
(a-yfr
are
without
them.
rest
The
books.
in
the
early
P-S
Specimensof Agreement.
<x201
P 219
300
376
y 128

Tc'WflaiP5 R7
ante 218 P5 U7
ffom. P5 U7 ( + Pl R5)
P5 U7
iij/rj
vovKoi cVt^povaftovXyv
P5 U7
(+g)
131 prj 87v P5 U7 ( + Pl)
266 KaTafJLvrjo-Tpri
P5, yp. *aTa R7
S 58 Tlfty
P5 R7 U7
84 pePovsPS U7
398 ywaiKwvP5 U7
497 TrapesP5 U7, R7 marg.(+g)
821 rbvP5 P6 R7 ( + Pal.)
119 footsP5 R7 U7 ( + P3)

c 221 $bsP5 R7 U7 ( + / Pal. m. 2)


3o2 avarX^iv P5 R7 ( + W, Pal. ss.)
t 269 o-Treipas
R7 U7
V 52 /*\at^X^cvR7 U7 ( + Pl)
109 ttovtovPs R7 U7 ( + a)
0 17 apP5P6( + R4)
P5 R7 U7
257 y\a<l>vp6v
288 IxavouvR7 U7
332 TKCUP5 R7 U7
P5 R7 U7 ( + L4)
56S ayda-ecrOai
1 10 <f}opL<n
P5 R7 U7
P5 R7 U7 ( + L8)
329 nirpov
P5 R7 U7 ( + R10)
383 cvpv(rav
k 39 ye P5 P6

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46
k 124
174
227
273
426
467
516
X 3
16
17
94
#.
/a 66
228
469
478
o 213
234
283
244
322
it 176
181
219
230
238
296
429
430
461
463
p 122
154
167
221

The British School at Rome.


tiOcvtoP5 R7 U7 ( + Ui)
7T0U
P5 R7 U7
dctSa P5 R7 ( + yp. L8)
lirtTP5 R7 ( + T)
ttoiO'P5 P6 R7 U7 ( + Z)
vOevP5 U7 ( + T)
tcXco-o-'
P5 R7 ( + T)
iOifieaOaP5 U7 ( + T)
P5 U7 ( + T U8)
KdTaScpKcrai
ot' P5 R7 U6 U7 ( + T)
P5 R7 U7 ( + Mon.)
tJX0S
18*7
P5 U7
c?tisP5 R7 U7 ( + Ui)
t om. P5 R7
rPo6; P5 U6 ( +^ U8)
Woi P5 U6 (+c^ L4 U8)
Hi P5 ( + r)
oto-crat
Hi P5 ( + Ls M2)
8uo-7rA.T}Tts
tot Hi PS (+g)
oikX^9 Hi P5 ( + k)
8' ava Hi P5 ( + Pal. R9)
yema P5 U6
P5 U6
t) to irapoidev
Xct^ovR7 U6 ( + Pal.)
8a/cpva
?8oo-avP5 U6
at P5 U6 ( + Mon.)
KaXXctVeti/
P5 R7 U6
P5 U6 ( + Mon. Pal.)
<f>ayfxv
UfjwosP5 U6 ( + L5)
8? P5 U6 ( + k)
covTtt
P5 U6
'
KaTafxopav
irctVTa
P5 U6
rotP5 U6 ( + k)
OUOIOP5 U6
ttoU^s P5 P6 U6 (+/k)

375 Som. P6 U6 (+g)

P5 U6 ( + 0)
p 506 teypw
OT 64 fta(TlkY
P5 P6 U6
88 toV8'P5 P6 U6
100 avL(TxfiVOV
P5 P6 U6
P6
U6 (+^ Us)
P5
154 0v/xos
241 8vWai o-T^vatPs P6 U6 ( + k)
P5 P6 U6 ( + k U8)
307 &rra<rav
P5 P6
338 KKO<>s
341 icu P5 P6 U6 ( + )
id. Karl P5 P6 U6
P5 P6 U6
fivOto
rjVLiraTre
388 xaXcirw
407 0cusP5 P6 U6
413 hab. P5 P6 ( + 1 R9)
t 24 oAV ci ns rotP5 P6
'
57 ?vP5 P6 ( +g)
114 avrwP5 P6 U6 ( + Mon.)
P5 U6
144 ottttotc
184 a/xaP5 P6 U6 ( + Mon.)
200 yatV ^5 ?6 U6 (+k)
230 covrcsP5 P6 U6
288 7rto-7ri/8)V
P5 P6 (yp. U5)
om.
P5 P6 U6 ( + k U8 Z)
291, 292
^pt P5 P6
6tp^o-Tat
320 /xglX'
TrepiovoraP5 P6 ( + g)
356 oXty?y
P5 P6 ( + Mon.)
371 Kara SwfiaQ1
407 y)8^ P5 P6 U6 ( + k)
P5 P6 U6 ( + L5)
419 oTpwai/TOS
P5 P6
432 7rapvrj(rbv
7roo-o-iv
Ps P6 U6
444 rjX.vU
474 o o-t' lywycP5 P6 U6
P6 ( + Bl*)vrj\rjTLS
P5 U6
498 vrj\rTLq
( + Mon.)
506 Slos P5 U6 ( + Mon.)
P5 P6
52S flV(
P5 P6
576 tv8

betweenPS P6 U6 continue
These examplesmaysuffice
(coincidences
in (j>y
The
connection
xvth
betweenthe
centuryMSS. is constant;
x, yfr).
U6 (whichwe have seenis also a memberofIt)entersabout,and P6 not
beforeo\ There can be no questionof ancestry,but the stock as
in the firsthalfby the fourxvth centuryMSS. and in the
represented
latterby thesamereinforced
by twofromthexiiith,has somecharacter.

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The Text of the Odyssey.

47

PeculiarReadings.
Alexandrian :

fi 205 ovkcti xp<rlv cpeiyia irporKao'i


XP^V fr owcr'cper/AaTrpo^Kca

a- 64 /3a(ri\.r
(fort. Ar.)

Ar.
335 kko<I>(s
ii. Ancient:

/3376 t'^ Strabo,Apoll. lex.

0 288 xavcWfor cox ; Choeroboscus


An. Ox. ii. 222, 6
k 39 Srjiiovfor yaiav ; Dio of Prusa
SttTTcSOvSc
SctTTcSoi/
\ 598 7TtTa
^),
(cTTCtTa
SaTTcSovAristotle
f 228 t' om., Clement Alex.
ir 181 r) to wapo&v, Julian
t 446 8' om. ( + Mon.), Porphyry
...
.
111. Eust.
yp.
_
K 174 7TOUEuSt.
,v / /,
tt
3^1
^

t8o
u
0-407'
t 288

aAV<rvaLyp. \JK
. ,
-r^

Eust.
avewyc
. N '
icos Eust.
.

/ ,s

xt

Tr 1 \

cTTto-TTcVSwv,
yp. U5 (as Knight)

X6)00"^ryov (x*P(rosperhaps
caused the confusion)
irl
for^^
4?6
^cTa ^
v I45 ^fe
for<f>0ivv0u

jy6 yema for ycVciov


23O 0(rav for i^p^
(g]#)
KClT^oZpav for 7ra<rav\r0p I22 ^^
^v ( = ^ 497 aL)
for /xcypoto
Oolo
X67
^ 5I T0-L(TL
& Ka\ ^rUnr^ iroXvrXa^%lo*
'OS.forTotsScSoAo^povciov/xcTc^
ttoXv/x^s
88 tvV for t<58'
.
,
100 avtcTYoacvot
tor avacryoucvot
A^
,
,
*f
341 faTaforota
" *
oo
\ ^ '
>/i r
T7Vt7ra7T
YdACTT)
UW) iOr 7Ta7TT388
/
r~
o
a
povrairpoo-nvoa
\\ *
ix^ >\\ "
t

58 Tt0>7

84 kpcftovs
(apafiovsPal.)
398
^257
k 39
430
X 68
232
243
526
547

( = 8 305 al.)
ywatKwvfor ^ct<DV
for
-rjv
y\a<l>vp6v
yc for T
fttvfor o-c^cas
for /xcyapoto-tv
KareAcwrcs
/xyctpots
cA.i7rs
a/xa Tracas ttiWv for ttuciv a/xa
Treta-as
for -01/
7TpiOTc0t
v
aAAoi ftcvfor Iv^' aWoi
8c

8tKao-av rptav

for 8c

Tpwwv

hUao-av (Slktj does not make


position)
for 7T7rA.^6Vos
/*108 [ifivr)[ivos

av ts TOt

(By)
144 oimre for cts ot
or 8' clkovctov
171 tov fivOovcvKTTnJcr)*

iv. Noticeable :
8

24 aAA tts rot tor aAA

forcpcwo /x*
aveipeat^8c jucraXAts

( = ^37)
230 covT5as Heyne (right) : ovtcs, cet.
for 7roAAakcl iad\d.
272 ov8c 8o/xoi/8
( + Mon.), = p 527
432 irapvrjaovfor Trapvrj<rov
for ^A.07ro8oav
444 ^Xv^c ttoo-ctv
474 o u orerJeywye for ov8c <r*cycjyc
for^c fi/)(? ifjL4v<-<f>v\(r525 UfjiV(
(Tiv)
for a ittoa)o
135 atTtwvTO
340

l^OUTai

for 77 <f>6Urai

0 183 covtwvfor coWo*


X I29 ^pccrao'^at for (>paecr0ai
^294 <^ao5 for 8aos

Transpositions(\ 232, 547, /x205) and alternativephrases(8 398, />122,


0-51, 388, T171, 272) are characteristicof these variants. One (t 230)
coincideswith Heyne and is printed.

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The British School at Rome.

48

Peculiaritiesof the individuals.


for pVKV9
i 302 avrJKV
as E. M.

P6:

and Schol. A 173 B 5

#cno totlv Ar. oicTLvcet.


v 23 TcrX^Kvta,as Plutarch

P5:

3 416a avrap Tretp iiri vrja Karr-

XvOov
978c6\a<T<rav
( = 407)

I36 yijpwvAr.

of thisfamily.
Examples of furtherdevelopment
and
Hi P5 R7 U7 are severelyand exhaustivelycorrectedthroughout,
in
the
The
was
time
of
and
collation
made
at
the
that into^-.
writing,
correctionswe may easily see John Rhosus. The rubricator,who is the
correctorof P5, has a hand like Rhosus' ; Hi is correctedbothby Rhosus and
another; Ry by Rhosus. U7 is somewhat later, and perhaps a copy of
text and variants together. In the companion book to R7, viz. Vat. 1626
'
<
( = V18 of the Iliad), Rhosus refersto his second copy : correcting^ 253,
sq. which are dislocated in 'ViS'he says ovtco?Keivrt,iv fap<ftt,/3\co
and again ovtco?evpovv fapcfii/SXco.This second copy we see in the
case of the Odyssey was a member of the g family,and therefore
perhaps the original of Ui ( = Marc. 456, containing both Iliad and
Odyssey), which is in his hand, e.g. Ri (bought from Argyropoulos,
v. p. 10) or R6. Ui bears the coat and ex-libris of Bessarion and is
thereforeolder than his death in 1472 ; but was unavailable in 1477, to
whichyear Vat. 1626 and 1627 are dated at Rome.
7 73 ffor P5 marg.g
Hi P5 ss.g
59 rrjk6$L
77 avTovP5 marg.g

x / ov tx
/
130 TTcpirpoTTiosHi Trtpirpomov
g
w
133 air<j)0i$ovHi airtyOiOcvg

w*o
Hi ^Wko,
135
f^ov
I5O v,yp. V<vUlrjevg
I58

ScpSeCTKCTOHi

455 kolttjv
P5 ss. g
o 24, 25 f a P5 : 25, 24 g
40 ivOaKevP5 marg.q

rucv Hi P5 marg. q
197
'
. %>
,
d^.
P5 SS. g
p 525 irpoxvvkv\ivohVO$
0" 24 avrts cru)
fteypwv,yp. P5, g

59 reddot P5, om.g


y iqi av~vaip ss
^ ^ ^ ^ p& Qm ^

g
fcpKCCTKCTO

= L4 L5 Mon. P7 R12 m. 2.
a

Specimensof Agreement.
cvMon. m. 2 L5 ( + ^/)
71 7racriv
L4 ras.L5 P7 ( + >R7)
151 froXXa
Mon.m. 2 L5 P7 ( + ?
93 fiaOto-crav
235 ovn L4 L5 ( + P3)
Pal. U5 corr.)
245 fixto-Oai
L5 Mon. ( + P2 P6)

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The Text of the Odyssey.

49

18275 or'7TiTa
L5 Mon. ( + R11)

k 348 Tews,om. fievL4 L5 Mon. ( + Pal.

2 aciW L4 L5 ( + Pal. Ul)


267 8' ap L4 L5 ( + Pal. T Ui)

67 avro'01yi;pa L4 Mon. ( + A T Ul)


134 ipveivL4 L5 Mon. ( + i)

4OO VVaiTCLVT<V
L4 P7 ( + Pal.)

462 hrcipovL4 L5 SS. ( + R11)

3 149
389
495
573

rotL4 L5 ( + /Ui)
s L4 L5 ( + P2 P4 P5)
8o>VL4 P7 ( + T)
L4 L5 Mon. (+/Pal.
k(lty)\vOov
Ril)

582 rcXcWasL5 Mon. P7 ( + R4 R5


Rio Rii)

L4 L5 ( + 1 Pal. T)
659 fivrjarTrjpa^
L4 Mon. P7 ( + j L8
665 too-o-wvS'
Pal. T)
8m
L4 L5 P7 ( + Pal. T Rii)
679
771 apTvvct
L5 Mon. P7
780 ap L4 P7 ( + ?T)
< 60 opwpciL5 Mon. (+g)
82 TraposyL5 Mon. (+^/)
115 rjvL5 Mon. (+^-)
150 lycvL5 Mon. ( + ?)
260 cV L5 Mon. (+/ L8)
/^. avr^s L5 Mon. ( 4 L8)
300 ^ pot.L4 L5 Mon. (+/T U5)
369 a\Aa L4 L5 (+/R11 T)

372 om. L5 Mon. ( + L8)

2 /?/?apt/AVoS
L5 Mon.

159 o-c c8von L4 L5 Mon. ( + M3


OT)
180 fio-iL5 Mon.
213 om. L5 Mon.
L5 Mon. m. 2
232 7repLx^vrj
241 rt/u&ratL5 Mon. corr. ( + ?)
L4 P7 ( + Ul)
310 7TOTt
L5 Mon.
7} 213 TrXct)
0 33 8i70aL5 Mon.
L5 Mon. ( + Ui)
53 rjprvvovTo
206 irdXrjv
L4 L5 Mon. ( + RlO T)
226 ov8crt L4 L5 ( + P5 Ui)
215 ov8cL4 L5 Mon.
L5 Mon. ( + P2 U3)
263 aTpi'8ao
267 ^\0o/xV
L5 Mon. ( + / P6)
k 42 o-vyxctpas
L5 Mon. (+^Rio)

Ul U7)

0516

iv L4 L5
fi.V7)a"rqp(Tiv

ir 73 cycoL5 Mori. ( + U3)i


176 efoipScsL4 L5 Mon.
438 OSK 7rlL4 L5 ( + Rl2)
461 81' L4 L5 Mon. (+J)
p

42 ax//<f>fjLtjv
oij/ecrO'L4

L5

( + P2)
L4 L5 Mon. (+/g)
119 Sdfirja-av

Mon.

150 ri}s L4 L5 ( + Br V4)


154 rot L5 Mon. (+/)
'
183 rpvvovTL4 L5 Mon. (+y p)
L5 Mon. (+
185 t/^cvai
L4 L5
241 irovaSrjfAov
322 t' om. L4 L5 Mon.
L4 L5 Mon. ( + Amarg.)
409 virdrjKc
567 pitpvraL4 L5 (+^)
or 88 f)\vO*
L4 L5 Mon. (+g)
va
L4 L5 (+g)
97 ^1/
L4 L5 ( + M2)
105 Kto-o
ib. uVasre crvasL4 L5 ( +g)
118 'A/x^tVo/xos
I4 L5 ( + U8)
cu vatc238 o 8cKa eKToaSev/xcypwv

raovrwL4 L5 ( + U8)

L4 L5 ( + U2)
326 CVcVctTTCI/

374
383
t 73
122
137
192
200
222
227
317
403
407
518
v 188
204
259

x^pos L4 L5 Mon. ( + R12 U2)


ovTiSavoiarw
L4 L5 Mon. (yp.R12)
IkvuL4 L5
om. L4 L5 Mon.
SW L4 L5 Mon. (+y)
L4 L5
ycVcT*
L4 L5 ( +J)
yatrys
rotL4 L5
8at8aA.os
L4 L5 ( + 0)
/totL4 L5 ( + U6)
OeiaiL4 L5 Mon. ( 4-
y^ srfL5 Mon- (+
L4 L5
iravhaprj
7r'
vwra6a\(i<ro'rs
L4 L5
pa
8c fjioiTrapciat
L4 L5 ( + U8)
KaQeUL4 L5
E

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So

<f)223 oBva-rja $acf>povaL4 L5

v 329 vo(rrr(TLV
L4 L5

L4 L5
336 avrov
L4 L5 ( + U8)
395 Kcpas
X *57 ^Pas L4 L5
to303 yopcwo
L5 Mon.( + a)

oL4 L5
369 vSpwv
374 0av/mov
L4 L5
L4 L5 ( + U8)
<t>17 o^t\
86 SctXot
L4 L5

The xth century


MS. L4 (Ludwich's' G'), theoldestoftheOdysseys,
the xivthcent. Munich MS. Mon., the xvth centuryFlorentineL5,
and the xvith centuryfragment
MSS.,
P7 (a-/r),all well-characterised
memberof cywas
maybe unitedintoa family. R12 also, a xvthcentury
corrected
by RhosusintoMon.
The connection,
as maybe seen fromthelistgivenabove,is notclose:
intheearlierbooksL5 leans to Mon.or itscorrection,
in thelatterto L4 ; k
leansamongthefamiliesto^*,and L5 byitselfcoincideswithUi (885 80ty
Rll
264 epya> 292 toS1,359 a<f>vaa6fievoL
132 ^etXe1i/eefcpdavTo,

The familyhas no signsnorregularscholia.


by a xv-xvi cent,handintod.
PeculiarReadings.
i. Alexandrian
:
l 24 cr/xos
as Apollodorus

ii. Ancient:
Apoll.

298 Tw8p)sgen.
1/216 xovtcs Plutarch
<^> 86 SctXotHerod. Eust.
iii. Eust. yp. :
8 771 priW Eust.
0 128 ttoX,Araros
.
o2
tktw

2 /Sc/fep^/xcvos
forap^/xcvos
(fofiapr)is
a
variant
on foPaprjora
H-*v

t 122)
180 yja-L
for (rrja-L(posthomeric)

k 416 avrrjv Ar.

A 74 K<XKKiai\
^KOLvrj,Herod.
lex#

\Jl=q).

Mon. itselfis corrected

Eust. (ex 129)

213 om. (dispensable)

ircpix^V for Trcptxcucrat


wA.o
for irAciW
for OavfiavcovTes
Oavfxa<rovTs
I\c for A/?
2I4 oto-vfor oo-o-ot
^371 opxwurOai for opxrj(ra<TOai
K IO3 ^P for V"*P
for Mcv
SSi
^
^
7raXaia tc
343a a(^^* Kat P^0ls KKaorTO

232
V 2l3
^ IO8
j86

JoXXdT\eprs <
awns for avriK

P 26 SUkforH yP.H3 V3

/cs~
/
^^'
>\
/c
v 369
avSpwi' 0t(xoTa8<i)/^aT), yp. f (cf.
and
298
0-417)

Eust.
^,223 SvvrjaSaltpova
x i57 WpaS
iv. Noticeable:
c 372 om. ( + L8)(? dispensable)

tt 14 ai/Ttov( +q)

- * ^7)

''4o7
,
,
36 8ta (9a<vfor Toma KipK^

374 0<Wv,yp-H3 Eust.( = a382) f/6i ^ ^-^


5l6 M^^p^tv

- . m
. ,for
.,
v
^crrvpcr
(abolishesdigamma)

24I ^ova %wvfor^^


322 yapforyapr7

s^

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The Text of the Odyssey.


7T567 pi^ovraforpiiavra
<r383 ovTihavotuivfor ovk ayaOoicri
(possible)
t 122 om. (dispensable, but prob. ex
homoearcho)
forttcXcv
192 yeVcT*

51

r 222 rotforol (obliteratesdigamma)


v 188 lir cupca vorraOaXdaroysfor otis
ericas i(ra<f>KrjTai
<366 avrouforavr#
for aKovTia-av
eywovroauuTrfi
X 255 Q-mpr
s ckcXcvcv

There is nothing remarkable here except ovnhavolcnv a- 383 ;


pxweada 6 37 1 might be regarded as a survivalof an aorist in ae ; the
other linguisticvariantsare forthe worse,as f 180, 0 516, t 222. Ordinary
associationappears X 343a, fi36, 1/188, ^ 255.
The members of the family have more value, and the best claim
among copies of the Odyssey to the title of IndependentMSS.

u
i. Alexandrian:
a 225 8at Ar., SI cet.
A.531 pcvaiDid. /tatcet.
cet.
Ar. (X 74 v 26) Kt7T 2 /c^a/xcV)
cet.
t 116 fxrjSe
fioiAr.,/x^8'/iv
ii. Ancient:
Apoll. Dysc, tto^v cet.
p 126 7TO0T/

iii. Eust. yp.:


3 l68 Tv& /lu/xOrpas,y/o.H3
*
29g ^g^ Ipco-^atf 6 for^8' pUcrOai
^ 22O sa^xVK^v T Kavtvtas Eust.
(^t) cf. t 394

The v.' 1. f 298 suggests the possibility of a digamma in epeadcu.


The etymology appears undecided.
iv. Noticeable :
a 318 lorro)forcarat
y 396 om. (? dispensable)
8 162 IW&u for^Trco-^at
235 Uot foroft*(ex.236)
TrpocrcciTrc
398 ayLCifioixhrq
for^7To-
508 !/x/?aX
^
forraXa-rrevOea
222 raXaa-L^pova
(not of
thingsin Homer)
ry161 om. (? dispensable, or owing to
tvov~tvov)

for afxtifieTo
t 368 afxtiftofxtvos
Trpoo-etnre
vrjkuOvfiu( = 8 47 1)
for vaq (some objection
K I5 ^w
was feltt0 v>a%. cf#
^^^
2I om> (dispensable)
for ctvl (9^0-t (as
3IO iv wpoopoL(rL
220)
x l8o petponiyqTrpoo-cctTTcv
for fxtiptTo
Trorvta
^T^p
for^^ ^ a*T(3
3g8 fo(r0l5pMrroi
for
cK&aa^cv
^
5 ^Vo-a^v
ff28o a7rs;\^pos
foraro-i/xoi/
^ap

Association accounts formost of these variants.


E 2

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The British School

52

at Rome.

Mon.
for TaAao-t^povos
p 114 fieyaXiqTopos
245 pisopcWfcrv^ptfwvopeas,
P 3J3 &"}" Ar., a^v cet.
c^ P 69
[o 297 RepotsMon. m. 2, but the original
for-rrapvai
or
not
irpoiKrrj
34**
(ex 352)
readingwas^cpas
vas,
for
cet.
*>*
&*
(right)
358
<tas]
i. Alexandrian:

T
T fivOoV for <f}(Vrj(TV
(T 2OO t7T

Ancjenf .

^Vfo,^
iii. Eust. yp. :

o 168&. forfcfc
V x3
u

55 AWcftix1* 19 cf. O 572

cf. o- 122
199 Wp Eust. forio-Trcp,
iv. Noticeable :
foravrjp
^209 v8p<i)v
7T285 vil/r\6v
forvij/rjXov
fiara forxprj
fiara (common)
315 KTrj
for re /eyAco?
432 t' K7rayA.w9
(possible)

for ftcyapwv
30 Oa\dfJL(v
for
51 7rpo8/x,) fXyp(
)
^ f ;ot /^

JJ Jovafor^

6 imKafl7riafor {,KafJi7ra
(late)

forTpa7rc'^
Tpa7r'^s
alkvforaicl
^ foru (right: a common error)
for fxeypu
/xcyapots
7ro^^
fr X^l/
7ro\vx^l/
kciAAos
KaXXos
forfi<t>repoi
354 /A<^oTpa)
(right)

35
146
282
296
^156

The readings at p 358 v 199 <282 i|r 354 are to the credit of Mon.

L5.
i. Alexandrian:
8 705 <tkto
Ar. (Pal. corr.Brinterlin.)

f 33 foal forco-o-cat
* 38 ery)Kv
for^yjkcv
foreWtfcU,eXiv^cts
433 Xia-Oels
/ tor
/
%
/-^
A

11.Ancient:
14 KLfiapnov KififiepHov
72 o-iovforiov as Ptolemy Euergetes ff
forS^cir
44 8t0>i/
(cf. OpvovRn, p. 57)
72 ^a^Vfo-^at for-ao-^ai
a- 179 irwtyacrfcu
Apoll. lex.
for cnjye Jx0 (to
I42 ^y
Wp^co
*
avoid hiatus)
iii. Eust. yp.:
7T330 voV^ttt^os yp. P2 ( = a 185 al.) * l86 ^<TaLforVW^at
T 227 ScuSaXosfor8at8aXov(possible)
^ 322 fcpoWa, yp. KVi
X 80 ofci xa^^ ^or aA.ro8' eir avr
iv. Noticeable :
( = a 99 al.)
atK
forat k4 ttoOiZevs
Zcvs 8w>7(n
P 144
239 fitXdOpovfor fi&aOpov, cf. the
8<5o-i
othervariants
(poss. as ed. pr.)

The preservationof Ptolemy Euergetes* preferenceon e 72 is the


characteristicof this MS. The 11.at /3144 t 227 are noteworthy.

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The Text of the Odyssey.

53

k 240 /catrpi\as for /cat8efta$

k 239 8e/xa?Tfor rpt^as re, yp. U5

applied to R12 (s. xv.,see underc


Amongthe extensivecorrections
p. 25) by its writerRhosusare somewhichcoincidewithk or itsparts:.
. . ,v
,
/ l|/-^
/ tt \
134 ipvLvk(+ t): cpvcrasRi2 ( + U2)
7 . /x u
*v
/x

* 432 r rAc Mon., S< ,yaAo,S)yp.


r WydU R12
p 420 YaA7rnv
Mon., vp. KI2

\
/.
T t VT
/>
567 p?ovraL4 L5, R 12 ss.: pfavTa-

*a' ovTiavoicrivutXets
R12 :
'

x , ,
,
wavpowriKat owe ayaOoicriCet.

Mon>>yp Rt2
^.
o.
g,
n
Mon ^
Ri2
3Sg
a z.
a
x * * ot
>c~
^,
309 avopwv
yp. vpwvot Kara
,

\
R12 :
cet.
fjLvrja-Ttjptv

//1
\/r
t
o- 356 iieyauvuov Mon., yp. K12
-^
M
Ajr
% c
n
V
iv/r
X x"2 ^a Mon., yp. R12
JVLon,
Kat
ouTtoavowrtv
, ,
383 TravpoTcpourt
c
A/r
t>
0
r r (0 202 t7Tftv
Mon., yp. R12
/
t
ouTtoavotTtv
L5 ; yp. TrwporcpoMn

/=Pl

R2.

This family,like *',approximatesto a typographical


expression. It
xiiith
may,however,
providea connectionforthe somewhatcharacterless
*D
no
has
R2
scholia.
Pi
MS.
(Ludwich's ').
century
ofAgreement.
Specimens

Pi R2, as Nauck
<r/3aivov
ttoXXol
add. Pi R2 ( + Br)
7rVavPi R2 ( + a)
Ow Pi R2 ( + a Br)
Pi R2 ( + a Br)
438 cvS'v<rTpo<j>o<;
7T 14 KtpvasPi R2 ( + H3 Ui)
Pi R2 ( + Ui)
p 112 17e/*
t 103
118
ft238
v S6

8 497 iv om. Pi R2 ( + P6 q)
Pi R2 ( + ^) yp.U5
826 cTrcTat
c 409 KVfiaPi R2( + </w)
101 TjpfaroPi R2 ( + dm)
Pi R2 ( + M3 P6)
^ 152 Srjpbv
309 ficVriPi R2
Pi R2, yp. V4
0 73 ivyKtv

(R2 was notcollatedaftert.) In otherplaces R2 oftenadheresto q\


witha (see p. 18) and m (p. 54) offers
Pi, whichhas somecoincidences
ofitself
ft 22 8tsPaveesApollonius

ft64 atcvforaict (printed)

m= M V4.
These two xiiithcenturyMSS. are both fragmentary.
M3 has a-t,
is
therefore
e 45-1.
for
V4 e 45-w 59. The portionavailable comparison
Agreements.
I98

OLVTLOS
M3 V4 ( + H3)

321 y ap M3 V4

337

TTOTtV M3 TTOTl//V4 (for TTOT^v)

378 yp. avotatM3 V4

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The British School at Rome.

54

*7 35 &&K
KpovtW,yp. M3 V4 ( + R4) :
in text. P7
'
LT x
Tr , , 7 *n\
M3 V4 ( + / P6)
X52 oiypv
213 /caom. M3 V4
M3 V4
298 ttc/aci^cto
342 wpa-eoM3 V4 ( + R2)
6 18 tw yap, yp. M3 V4 (in text.R 11)
251 mudareM3 V4 ( + L8)

409 KVfxa
M3 V4 ( + d I)
479 Mv ^3 V4 ( + 0 Pi)
t 60 iovTiM3 V4 ( + Pi R8 T)
*
a
61 ^om M3 V4 (+^ Pi R8 T)
88 om., add. mg. M3 V4 (om. H2)
ex homoeotel. with90
ip 1 rjp&TOM3 V4 ( + d/)
159 a1 iSvouriM3 V4 Apoll. Dysc.

After1 V4 seemsto inclineto a. BothMSS. have scholia,V4 some


signs(see p. 15).
The coincidence
withApolloniusf 159 is noticeable.

0.

This family,partlyof c stock(cf.p. 24), partlyof unknownsource,


ofc and thefollowing
members
containsthedivergent
peculiarreadings:t 116 \d\La
* 329 a^Xaros
425 IttolctOc
(with& a/Aa?)
ii. Ancient:
x 9g iyKaTOrj^
c 314 7ra<rcrvfXvov
( + U7) evidentlythe
II5 s^, 877afor8^cts
same as air^crv^vovthereading *I24 T0*t
$' ^^
to avoid hiatus
of Demetrius Ixion 431
53O cVcVcXXcv
134 ipvaciv (ipvaai: ovtws at ?ra<rai o 354 <j>0ipai

i. Alexandrian:
104 cVxart^vAr.

(rX^6v
schol.)

iii. Eust. yp.


t 72 o XtTTco
Eust. yp. U5 ( + Mon)
AtTro'o)
seems Alexandrian
iv. Noteworthy:
8 17 8tosforfotos
119 vacr0ai(this not cvvwacr^atis
the reading) ,
2 72

T OptVTl

w IO5 ^ v^^i

X15 Kacrtyvi/T0V9
2I5 Spo-c( + ^)
P 87 7rlW^ori Ka^ov( = 90)
472 /?X>JcrTai
T 81 7r>7rav
158 avevpi(TK(
446 hXofarjv
v 9 orpweroforpiWo, cf. T272
(O

4a

T^/V

/ATa

^jepCTlV

)((i)V

7TTTO

forKVfjLCL,
cf. P99
296 ?nJ/Aa
raxvs pyc^oVr^s ( + KU8) =
for
49
334 avS^cracra avSiqcacra
a)
forrot
<rov
22 vavcriK\LTOv
8fJLavT0s
72
('OfiavTOS
is perh. ancient)
332 fi v

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The Text of the Odyssey.

55

M(3) only.
c. schol.
0 63 fioip forfioxxr'
1 462 Srj fiaibv(schol. B 380 o fxkvto ir\rjp4s
<a<r
/3aiv)
Rio only.
$ 182 axofiatEt. Flor. Milleri (a^o/xat)
O 411

for j8\c(TO"t
7TO-Crt

X 461 avriovrfvSaforap;^ ayopViv


Rl2.

o 399-401thissignin marg.,|
In the text and among the frequentv. 11.are one or two novelties.
A source of tradition, otherwise unknown, was extant about
1300-1400, whichgives these farfromnegligeable contributions.

Descendants of Us, partly having absorbed the correctionsof their


froman unknownsource. The
archetype(see p. 30).,partlydifferentiated
membersare of s. xv or xvi. R3 was writtenin 1422, K in 1469.
Agreements.
Br M4 R8
a 185 <j}(TTrjKev
Br
K
7Tov
M4 R3 R8 U9
196

( + <:/

part)
Br M4 R8 U9
ft137 too-ovtov
257 kvaaro Br M4 R3 R8 U9 ( + P7)
300 & cowras Br M4 (from the
ligature cv-)

Br M4 R8 U9
7213 fJLrjT(ra<rOai
Swkcv
fciVia
M4 U9
490 ?rap

2
141
153
p 14

&ov Br M4 R8 ( + * Rn U (6))
Br M4 R3 R8
yevtcrOai
iriupovBr M4 R3 R8
M4 R3 Br corr.
/^vict

Peculiar Readings.
i. Alexandrian:

ii. Ancient:
!*>, schol.p 85
y I99, 200, 244-6, 8 158-160, t 275-8, ^235
216
r^Vaxo,, schol. T 298
v 320-3, 333-8, p 150-65, <A
"iust.
yp.
475-80, o- 330-2 ath. Ar. ;
bracket/. (See the full table o" I26 toiovtovforrotouyap, Eust.
iv. Noteworthy:
p. 32 whichshows how the sign
*8
a
in some cases survivesonlyin
141 ycvcV^atfor tScV&u (suppresses
digamma)
member.)

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The British School at Rome.

$6
8 461, 63I

aLp6flVOS

for XP
707 xp<*>v
*e 34 y ckoo-t(suppresses digamma)
VV fOl( = flOl)
3OO /XT/
127 aTrcSwrcTOfor V7T-

0 437 yacrrpiv (perhaps Alexandrian as


subst.)
7t 105 7r\rj0vsfor nX-rjOvi(perhaps from

the belief that -aiaro was


singular)

T 358

TOLOfor (TOtO

529 aTTotvafor c8va (ex A 13 al.)


< 49 tw for toV

I92 <7<V( = fA.w)


^ 1 98 vp\Ofivrj

o> 161 Vrro/v


(common)
398 oSva-el (correction of the strange
o&vo-tvs)

437 ^^owo-t
539 irpoUi

P 555 Tczratfonys

?(=^-L8).
The cases in which^ showsthe corrections
of L8 havebeenalreadywe
have
in whichthemembers
now
to
manner
the
illustrate
given(p. 37) ;
ofq holdtogether,"where
we cannottracetheprocessoftheirdifferentiation
fromL8.
yap bis Be R 14
a\\o5 Ru Ui ss.
R6 Rl7 ( + R2)
(58t
p'RiUiV5(+/)
or8cRu Ui V5 (+/)
Ru V5 ( + R2 P7
^o7r\i}o-tas
Mon. Pal.)
109 yvi)Ru V5 (+/)
180 Tya-tRiiV5
217 0iosRu Ui V5

y 22
c 356
455
{ 15
43
57

275 KatKCTis Ru

Ui V5 ( + H3 m 2)

281 a Rll V5
; 67 tct1Ru Ui ( + H3)
107 kcu poaritav Ri

p oo"ovo X9

Kaipocre R14

kcu

t Be R9 R14 Z
-q258 ovirt
1 496 be Be Rn Ui Z ( + M(3))
Rll Ui ( + R2
K l6l KOLTOL
KVTJa-TLV
U7)
\ 74 oo-o-aRu Ui (L4 corr.)
92 hab. Ru Ui ( + U5)
o 157 Kix<ov
Ca Ui Z ( + R2 L4 Mon.)
7T459 rjSl Ri Ui Z
v 46 om. Ca R6 Ui Z (4-R2)
R6 R9 Ui
381 ireOoio
R6 R9 Ui
387 KaTavo-Trjv

x I46 om- Ca R6 Ul Z
317 om. Ca R6 Ui Z

401 KaTa Ca R6 Ui Z ( + U2 U6)

The peculiarreadingsofq are these:i. Alexandrian :


None
ii. Ancient :
iV?^

w 29 ^v Eust.
33 ypao Eust.
2I? lrt Vvo^ Eust as Voss
iv. Noticeable :

hi. Eust. yp.


197 cr/Ltcv
(+/ marg.)
395 K^o> cu7Ts(fcpat7Ts
quidam
Eust.)

c 184 8c vvv ( = 8c, cf. 8^ K) for vvv


260 avrot? for avr ( + R2 R5)
455 Set for c58
^217 Otios for 8tos

vvv

ap.

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The Text of the Odyssey.


*

258 o* re = ofcrore)
0 5oia (-508)

t 385
437
\ 82
o
A

57

5oo^(XarW
.

iuavra
om. (? dispensable)

V
1
*\
ty<i>
(implying
?)/
/p
F/ 5 wucvoi
a v

n / ->v
, /> w
/ 1
v 229 avTipo\r)<r*%
(implying kolkovvoci?)
<r 282 ou

/ 1111
-ii
v 40 om. (dispensable,
but possiblyex

: nc , r m,
homoeomeso
or certainly
152 before153
123
kA
^KaT
orro ,(right)
157 I*
9 253 yoy

>
o
r
r om. /jui \
X46
(dispensable)
,
/,.
,/
3170m.
(dispensable:
perhaps ex
homoeomeso, kcucwva7ro,Kca
v
351

CN

ov sine es

^ ' om. (? dispensableformula)


^^
484 om. (^dispensable)
kiV>^ ^
49i om KivrS)

Omissions are a featureof this family: few,however,if any, can be


defended. Chance has preservedthe rightdivisionof syllables v 157.
The individualshave some peculiarities:Rii : 72 Opvovfor iou,with gloss ptfyavov..1 do not know if the
or piyvov; both herbs are oftenmentioned
gloss is intendedforirrjyvov
in
with
alov.1 The latterit is well knownwas desired
Galen
by
conjunction
and
actually stands in L5.
by PtolemyEuergetes
as Aristophanes
83 orevaxrjori,

k 351 otic a\a 8c, as Zenodotus


Ui.

123 yi>g,as Herodian (yi^ H2)

r=H2 0 P3 Vi V3
This familyconsists of the childrenof Pal. where they depart from
their parent,whetherin obedience to the alterations made in Pal. in the
xvth century2 (for which see above p. 21), or following some other
unknown source. The latter may have been d> with which O P3 often
coincide (see p. 21).3

1
e.g. vi. 638 Kiihn.
2 Or
ap. Molhuysendo notallow me to appreciatetheage of
perhapsearlier,butthefacsimiles
thecorrectors.
3 Some further
agreementsamong the membersmay be collected: ( 61 %xovraO fxov*a
rat

made into txovffaH2 ; 1713 -nvpavficatcH2 Vi ; 028 /xvrj(TT^p$


H2 OP3 ; 192 kKovreH2 O
H2 sol.
( + al.) ; 234 ipiwbs H2 P3 V3 ; 297 <pp4vas

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The British School at Rome.

58
i. Alexandrian:

0297 v>]7ri<riv
( + N corr.)?

None

P 105 TrapaOoLTO

ii
Anripnt.
li. Ancient
:

X 591 <W Teles.

x 130 yX airov, An. Ox. i. 253. 1


<o244 Sainiotriv^Apoll. lex. in
y.
iii. Eust. yp. etc. :
v 342 m^o-i Eust. (KSucrO
<^ 216 &ri<r0cEust.
iv. Noteworthy:
a

87 #CV
LKTJTaifor K VY}Tai

X 375 *po<t>pvw(unmetrical)
v

o,
/-%\
JA1 86 7rapc7rATO(r)

4 ^

. . ?&wl for xat'potm. .


37? xat'povTS
|8ovTs. cf p 3g
o 345 &"1 forovtlv
349 ^7forcf(right)
"37O Tcis sine ^
as Voss for0 av
^329 8c k7cXcyxca
x 56 5o-o-aforooro-a
^238

a7T)8aVfor 7T-

O alone :i. Alexandrian:

iii. Eust. yp.:


Eust. (fort.Ptol. Ascal.)
cet.
Aristoph.,atavdtTois
y 246 fli/aros
p 232 7r\vps
: Kovpoi-ipov
t 74 Kovpoi for Kovprj
.
,
^ vr
Pl
lv XT
,
^ .
Noteworthy:
'
Aristophanes
ii. Ancient:
331 irpo7jK
Plut. w/. Z^?w. ii. 109

7T238 ^ KV(+ H3) for tKV

^ ^45 peramv for. ^tottktB'


Homeric)

(post-

P3 alone :ii. Ancient:


A 134 c^aXosHerod.

iv. Noteworthy:
^316 ScSaco-^atfor-a<r^at

This is not a despicable harvest off a xvth century group. "H o 349
and 7/ tcev7T238 are correct ; Be te <f>329, Sarfjjuoa-vi]
co 244, e%dkos X 134

as good as the contrary: iffvaeiX 591 is perhaps an accident,reft>?


it 370
is once nearerto T7709. The survivalsin single MSS. of the xvth century,
such as O and P3, are remarkable.
These 13 families and 4 sub-families include all the collated MSS.
with the exception of the scraps P8, R13, R15, K16, the s. xiii-xiv
The
fragmentR5 (a-f 285) and the xivth century Hamburg MS. T.
connection of L8 Be Z, Pal. V3, U5 K was established by Ludwich
ed. pp. xiii-xv. La Roche (ed. pp. xiv sq.) connected Vi, V3, Pal. ; H3, U2,
U(6) ; Ui Z. The otheridentificationsin eithereditioncan hardlystand.
R5 has some independence:

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The Text of The Odyssey.

59

Peculiar Readings.

8 89 BtivOai for Orj<r0ai


a 117 KrrjfiT(T(riv
for
123 rrj 8' apa y'
297 vrfTTLa\fivaL
(if
vrjmaxevficvai,
.
192 epca>/Av
intelligible)
226 h-qnBvra(conceivable with vfor
/3 105 va\vO7CvR5 avXvcovccv Ar.
8')
(schol. t 150)
t7T
t'
oil
468
198
yp. H3 Zen. (on 379)
ap
606
86
TrcipiTOS
y
yp pa
for KCfcAtarai
608 KV/cXiarai
103 fjiovfivrjcra^
664 8c fttvquidam ant.
133 ov8c bis
807 ^cov Eust.
177 es 8c epvOpuv(cf. schol. H3 /u/*a$
for rryXo^t
8c opos ipvOp&v Itvlas Karcvav- 59 -nyXofo
Ttas xiov' Even so we expect
122 0181)R5
210 rvvfxoLO
Kfor cs)
447 avrap Vet Kara jxrjp1 Karj kol
<nr\.yyyirr(ravTO( = 461)

Its connectionsare with 0 (/3 255 8 12 ; a 246 it shares with Rio


Apollodorus'readingaafico)and r (a 50 $ 161 8 796 #). Traces of tradition
persisty8105, 8 468, 664, 807.
I have not been able to place T.
III.
The relativeimportanceof these familiesmay be seen in the following
table :Alex.

Anc.

Eust. yp.

Noticeable

4
4
o
4
2
6
7
6
11
3
5
8
3
2
3
2
o
o

36
72
16
99
57
79
174
55
31
7
37
27
i6
12
20
o
o
o

24

/
q
r

9 (signs)
o
o

a
b
c
d
e
/
g
h
1
y
k

/
m

U8

L4
L5
Mon.
Pi

2
o
3
4
2
3
4
o
o
o
2
2
4
1
1
o
o
o

I
2
1
4
3
3
6
2
5
o
7
4
1
2
o
o
1
1
2
o
3

1
5
2

19
28
13

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The British School

6o

at Rome.

The last categorywas partiallyanalysed in II. It seems betternot


to subdivide it numerically.
If we compare these figuresand the similarlist of featuresof the MSS.
collated forthe Oxford Iliad {C.R. 1899, in),1 the followingobservations
are suggested.
The number of MSS. and families is 72 and 17 in the Odyssey,
against 107 and 15 in the Iliad (but it must be rememberedthat the 107
MSS. used for the 1902 Iliad are only about half of the total number
extant). The number of coincidenceswith ancient readings is about the
same, and the third category is not materially different.The fourth,
unconfirmedpeculiar readings,is larger in the Odyssey,probablybecause
the total of MSS. is smaller. Had there been more MSS., fewerof these
readingswould have been peculiar.
The differencesin the paradosis of the Iliad and the Odyssey follow
fromthe lesser popularityof the latter. At all periods, apparently,the
Odyssey was considered inferiorto the Iliad : in the firstinstance no
doubt on account of the historial importance of the Siege of Troy
comparedwiththe repareia of Odysseus' nostos,but also on moral grounds,
in proportionas the characterof Achilles is better than that of Odysseus
(Plato, Hippias min. 363 B). The Iliad had a militaryvalue,Plut. v. Alex. 8
(iroXefiiKrj^/0T^9 i<f)8iov).2 The output therefore of the PifiXioircoXcu

was less, and has left its traces in our materials: 200 mediaeval MSS. of
the Iliad against 70 of the Odyssey, 42 Iliad papyri against 18 of the
Odyssey,3the scanty Odyssey scholia,and the absence of a carefullyedited
copy of the Odyssey like the Ven. A of the Iliad, all tell the same tale.
Thereforethe sources of the text of the Odyssey were fewerand closer
together. The membersof the familiesabed e f gj announce themselves
at sight and fall into their place with no ado. While this facilitatesthe
1I

repeatthetablegivenC.R. I.e. of thefiveprincipalfamiliesof Iliad MSS.


Ancient.

Pap. Eust.

Unconfirmed.

e
2
8
28
2
8
4
/
2
40
g
5
h
64
49
7
6
i
8
27
2 The nval view,thatthe
is of course maintainedby Aristotlein the
Odysseyis moralising,
Se rb (Taxppov
Poetics,and elsewhere: Anth.Pal. ix. 522 'OSua-erer/s
ypd/xfia.
v mat is 10
say in me twoferientequoted Deiow(p. 05). ine real totalsl cannotestimate,
but theyare probablyeven morein favourof the Iliad.

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The Text of the Odyssey.

6i

task of the collator,t impoverishesthe character of the tradition. There


are two marked absences : in the Iliad the most remarkable result of
collation was the family h, which contained a very high proportionof
Alexandrian readings; thereis no such familyin the Odyssey. Secondly,
in the Odyssey there are no independent MSS.
In the Iliad, Vi, Vio,
V16, Ui were as characterisedas any family; in the Odyssey,the MSS.
whichresistclassification,R5, T, and practicallyPi, have fewpeculiarities;
the MSS. whichmay mostjustly be called independent are the members
of kyviz. L4 L5 and Mon., and furtherU8. Everythingis on a smaller
scale. Again it may be observedthat in the Odyssey excellence and age
go together. The oldest, MS. L4 is of some distinction,while its brother
D (Laur. 32, 24) of the Iliad is practicallynull. The xith centuryL8 is
the most influentialsingle MS. ; the xiiith centuryPal., H3, U5 are heads
of familiesand also contain the best scholia ; the familya, wholly xiiith
and xivth century,has good connections; while the xvth centuryMSS.,
withthe exception of the scholia and signs in the progenyof e, and some
membersof j\ might be dispensed with. In the Iliad the xvth century
MSS. are among the most remarkable. Notice also must be taken of the
facilityfor collation given by the limited tradition,and how the scribes
availed themselves of it : many MSS. are so closely and systematically
correctedthat, what between text and margin,they contain the whole
tradition: e.g. P5, Br, Mi, M2, M3, M4, Ui, U3, U4, U7, R3, R4, R7> R8,
R9, Rio, R12, R17, L2, O, Hi, Ca, Mon., V4.
The attempt to connect the families among themselves and to
continue them furtherback does not lead to certain conclusions. The
followingdetails may be given :
In the first12 books ad agree 10 times,//agree9 times,fi agree
10 times,gj 21 times.
Agreementsamong the other families do not rise above 7. We see
thereforethat the powerfulL8 goes far to capturing/ with its two s. xiii
members P6 and V6 ; the xiii-xiv cent, a lends some descent to the
plebeian d\ f reinforcesthe desolate M2 Ri, and /, the poor family
constructedout of Pi and R2, is countenancedby d thoughnot by a (al
agree 3 times), k, the familywhich includes the oldest MS., the s x
L4, is equally balanced between/(S) and g(6); and no doubt if we had
older MSS. we should findthem more independent,the process of collation
having had fiveor six centuriesless to exert itself in.

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62

The British School

at Rome.

Of the ancestors of these groups nothing can be said. We must


await the evidence of the Papyri ( IV).
In the meantimetwo othertestes must be heard : Eustathius and the
editio princeps.
Eustathius.
We miss Neumann's useful collectionof Eustathius' readings on the
Iliad (Eustathios ais kritischeQuelle fr den Iliastext\ 1893. With his
conclusionp. 154 that Eustathius used for the Iliad a MS. resembling*L/
that is hyI cannot agree) ; I have thereforehad to tabulate Eustathius'
readings as far as \i (the force of nature could no furthergo), with these
results: Eustathiusagrees witha in 18 cases,b in 13 cases, c in 15 cases,d in
25 cases, e in 25 cases,/ in 38 cases,g in 32 cases, h in 7 cases, i in 26 cases,
/in 28 cases, k in 35 cases, /in 13 cases, 0 in 6 cases,/ in 9 cases, q in 8
cases, C in 3 cases, L4 in 12 cases, L5 in 2 cases, Ui in 1 case, U8 in 10
cases.
This plainly is no result: fkg come in the firstrank,/ ide in the
next : the rest nowhere. Either,if Eustathius used one single MS. at all,
it was one unlike any we have, which seems improbable (as most of his
readingsare covered by one familyor another),or he used no one in particular. This conclusion,suggestedby La Roche, ed. p. vi is supportedby his
unmethodicalsystem of citation,and his divergencesin quoting the same
places. The point is fortunatelyof no great importpassage in different
ance, as his unsupportedreadings are not many (see below). In the list
above it may be noted how unsubstantiatedh appears, and how poor a
'
show the derived families 0 p q make. This perhaps agrees with their
origin,childrenof xith and xiiith century MSS. Eustathius of course
lived in the xiiith century.
Readings in Eustathius which appear nowhere else are (in books
a-fi).
a

41 7T7TT'
ap

78 rbv uv.
347 ov Srj

ft105 irapaOtirj
192 k om.
336

OTTvUlUV.

382, 393 W T'


y 166 a &/

y 188 iXQeiv
283

o"irpxui<TW

383

ttjv

114

aKOVtiV

422 ikaau
8 26 to>y

X95 \
416 Ka8 foravOi8\ as Bentley

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The Text of the Odyssey.


8 433 Va
443 to yap av
509

521
595
644
673
744
208
210

p' om.

avros for rjroi


y7 om.
7
^8c kcXcvov

Trap'c/xoi
^s for tJs
*7 90 cu8' for rat 8'
26l

pX<rOoV

rj 41 tao-i/
180 fieyapa
277 rj^ripxi
315 kj om.
0 12 7rv0crOc
39 7rVT(r<n

63

1 148 o-<iri
108 ^urcuovTat
262

fjLrjndacrOai

278
458
25
31
433
A 3

kripw
TTortfor 81a
irpoo-rjKcv
v;n;A.t;
cXa^ous for Av'kovs

as 0 /
TtOficarda(=t'
0/Aco-0a,
cet.)
136 8' eratpotfor & \aol

515

tOV
TTpoditCTKCV

/a I2O avrov
200 7rao-tv for ctt' crtv (graphical
<D= a)
229 XP^ Aa^wv uv.
441 ^apv^Sews

These lectionscall forno comment. Some are probablymisprints.


To thesereadingsmaybe added thementions
madeby Eustathiusof
criticalsigns (see p. 33), and his statement(1921.57) that some MSS.
containedpicturesof the Homerichouse(v. on % 126). There is such a
diagramin H3 on <r102,a plan of the housein R4 01}a no, and a sketch
of theaxes and the bowin P6 on <f>
136. The iota subscriptsometimes
from
Eustathius
is
an accidentdue to his age or theage ofthecopy
quoted
of his commentary.As a scholiast,
a reporter
of theopinionsof ancient
the
amount
of
scholia
grammarians, scanty
Odyssey
gives Eustathiusan
he has notin theIliad. A new edition,long a desideratum,
importance
is promised
Rkein.Mus. 1907.295 sq.
by Edgar Martini,
EditioPrinceps.
Homerwas firstprintedat Florencein 1488 (Legrand,Bibliothque
of DemetriusChalcondyles.We are
Hellniquei. 9) underthe editorship
nottoldwhatMSS. Demetriusused,butit is notdifficult
to discoverthem.
A collationof the finecopy in the Queen's College Librarywiththe
results:
Odysseyyieldsthefollowing

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The British School at Rome.

64

abcdefghijkl
a
634233610214

644244600005
7313141913222
5
6553

210313411543
131336706533
{
v
353443603233
0
72385218061125
*
53I2429O5433
K
2II23OI2O47I2
A
547681
fi
547681
v
I31325

*
p

<r
t
v

10

10

295595
053495

425655
2034113310106.30
3134
^412353803720
X623I7223I282I
^614161

047
047
OI2OO

15
l6

33053
3I263

28
12

78

84 141

30

20

133366

68

15
15
12
17
l6

444485
513442

89

805653

19
81 350

12
12

3
3
3

242
OOO
220

061397
10

00

10

630

41

13

01

103
IO3

O3365
O2472
O

o
p
000
OOO
OOO
212
III
031
011
001
352
OI4
014
OI4
102

31

83 125

107 63

abcdefghijkl

013
OI3
103
000
201

101

17
o

22

41

The printedbook agrees overwhelmingly


with gy and is to be
reckonedas anotherchild of that mightyparentL8. The agreement
from6 onwards,and reachesits maximumin <r,t, v,
beginsto be striking
other
the
families
e comesnext; therestareon a level,withthe
%. Among
exceptionof //,the membersof whichwere perhaps unavailable. The
derivedfamilies
: m and r gave no results.
op q also are feeblyrepresented
Demetriustells us he was eclectic,and used Eustathiusand thecommentatorsto forma readabletext: praef.(Legrand p. 14) a^Spa yap rjfiiv

7t\lvcv
Pfca
Sta <77rofS^9iypcTO </>'
o<Tovolv re TvhtopOtuaaadai r re
ical toU tou ^varadiov vTrofivtffjbCKnv
*O[ir)pov iroirujLaTdy
irpo<Tyjpy](ia^kvoi^
/cal tcl tv <TVyypa<j)e(ov
wepl avrov 7T7roiiyj,va.

The modernvulgateof the Odyssey,from1488to 1711 (thedate of


Barnes'edition),was therefore
foundedon thefamily
g.
The lectionsintheed. princepsnotfoundin manuscripts
are these:

y 144 pitfilV fOr pfai


& 123 rrj 8' a/o*aSpTJaTrjj om. a/x'
l62 7TO/X7TS
for TTOfJUTOv

295
347
7J 33

T* 7TO-6V
tl om.
tXOoi

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The Text of the Odyssey.


I

99 V7}Va\8' 1/

O I98

aVYCT

26 Tl for TOl

7T 417

SiS often
VVLTTTV

\ 344 vfXfiLv
O

65

557 imavtv(misprintforiviavw)

Other vv. are doubtless misprints. These readings are very


and showthat,as we mightexpect,Demetriusdid notfindit
unimportant,
necessaryto correctthe Odysseyas he correctedthe Hymns (ed. 1904,
pp. xxxiii,xxxiv).
IV.
The Papyri.
numberof Odysseypapyriwhichhave so far
Out of the considerable
variantsof sufficient
offer
thefollowing
importance
(1910) beenpublished,1
to requirequotation:
f 1= Ox.Pap. 773: ft304-410: s. ii a.d

^ 2 = Ox. Pap. 774 : y 226-231 : s. iii a.d.


s. i. a.d. ; published by Kenyon,
^ 3 = Mus. Brit. Pap. 271: 7267-497:
J. Ph. xxii. (1894), 238 sq., Wessely, Mittheilungenaus der Sammlung der Pap.
ErzherzogRainer vi. 1 sq.; has scholia and signs.
$ 4 = Ox. Pap. 565 : 8 292-302 : s. ii-iii a.d.
f 5 = Ox. Pap. 775 : 8 388-400 : s. iii a.d.
6 = Faym Towns 7 : 201-328 : s. i a.d. early.
ty 7 = Ox. Pap. 778: k 26-50: s. ii-iii a.d.
? 8 = Faym Towns 157 : k 366-402 : s. i-iii a d.
f 9 = Ox. Pap. 569: A.195-208: s. ii a.d.
10 = Ox. Pap. 780 : A 47I~545 : s- " A-D-(?)
5$11 =Fayum Towns 310 : A.557-610 : s. i-ii a.d.
f 12 = Berlin (?) 154a: $ 15-441 : s. vii-viii a.d. (?). (Ludwich's A) : publ.
by Landwehr,Philologusxliv. (1885), 5S5 sq.
f 13 = Amherst23 : o 161-210 : s. iii-iv a.d.
Decennial Publications
f 14 = Cairo Museum 10397 : o 216-253 : s. ii a.d.
*
of the Universityof Chicago, 1st ser. vol. 5 (1904), p. 1 Greek Papyri fromthe
Cairo Museum, etc/ by E. J. Goodspeed.
$ 15 = Ox. Pap. 571 : 7T1-8 : s. i-ii a.d.
V 16 = Ox. Pap. 782 : p 137-193 : s. iii a.d.
f 17 = Ox. Pap, 783 : p 410-428 : s. i B.C. (late).
f 18 - Ox. Pap. 572 : o- 1-93 : s. iii a.d.
? i9 = Hibeh 23 : v 41-68 : B.C. 285-250.
1 See the Comptesrendusof Cronertand Blass, Archivfr Papyrusforschung
1903 and 1904.
F

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66

The British School

at Rome

f 20= Ox, Pap. 448 : x 3>1~~xf'


242 : s"i A*D
^ 21= Geneva(?), Nicole Revue de Philologiexviii. 101 (1894): y 364-402
(?age).
^ 22= Tebtunisvol. iii. (ined.): a 81-102 : s. ii B.C.
IP23= Ox. Pap. vi. 953 : 8 97-259 : s. ii a.d.
24 = Ox. Pap. vi. 956 : \j/
309-356: s. ii-iiia.d.
v. p. 4) : t 534~599*s. iv-v
f 25= Pap. Berlin10568{BerlinerKlassikertexte

A.D.

d. Wiss.1904,
dersdchsischen
f 26= Pap. Leipzig3 (Blass,Berichte
Gesellschaft
211
:
:
iv.
s.
A.D.
pp.
sqq.) rj67-126

These MSS. I have classified under three headings (1) Alexandrian


readings (2) readings unattested but possible (3) coincidences with later
MSS.
Alexandrian.

Coincidences.

Unattested.

1*1

401

I2

y 228 fleosc ... (s fort,ex t)

y 227 ctTrasPi corr.

^3

y 41 5 rots 8' hriff(?)

: kcwcor Ka/cr k
y 286 fc]aKt[vos

[] Sofjiivrjv?

^368 Saowrcu cdikl


407 om. k L3 M3 Pal.

K T al.

483 '8'
487 om.
492 irOLKiXa
fiaivov

Li P7 Ui Eust.
364 6fjL7j\iKrjL
t
: iroifxivag H3
469 Trot/xcva

Mon. Pal.

*472

^ ^
voivo;(O5vts

479 dv (?) 1 L4 R5 R7 T
490 8c rot? Trap jcivia OrJKev

e/Ls U8

? 4

V5
$ 6

?7

^//>/^ vv. 321, 357, 396, 400, 417, 458, 461, 472, 484, 486.
8 292 ray ft Pi

290 ifiio
Zen. with
<J I H3
-

288 afi<j>a8ivov(?)
328 ov8e (?)

M4
296 8iA0<i)/xv
*
298 ^8c cpeo-^ai L4

38 co-o-t(??)

46 T

^8

'#9

8 399 om. L4 U8

k 377 . . x KTTa/xtvrj
-

31 hriXkafitcip

L8
34 7r<r<n
42 veio-ofJLtOa
iq
k 368-72

L4 Pal.

om. efikj

A 207 iVcfcAjov
Pi al.

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Pal. Eust.

The Text of the Odyssey.


Alexandrian.

^10

fll

A,604 ath.,om.

c L7 Pal.

*$12

Coincidences.

Unattested.

^ 532 Tpwco-crt
(?)

67

A (539 fiifiuxra
vulg.)
superscr.; bgj
545 fiv
(544 a<f>U(TTqKi
vulg.)
\&%ffcegij
(603 6a\!r<5
vulg.)
-

f 17 iravporepov
(?)
36
50
73
408"

(?)
7rpoccnre
coropcjo-av8'
9om.
TeTVKaifieOa

^13

o 206 ttI(as Dntzer)

o 168 8tosMon.
172 fiocPorph.

^ 14

0222

bceik
0217 7roTpvP(v
kiriQovTo
vulg.)
(220 ^8'

f 15
ty 16
^17
^} 18
$19

^i*:
-

diplaeo247,

t*
250

(?r 1 KAWflsvulg.)

vulg.)
(p 187 yVcrOaL
-

P4I7

aXXwt(?)

0-78

aAA

(name)

v 45 Bapo-u (?)
for olhev
46 c[t7rv]

o- 65 tvpvjxaxos re kclI avrivooq

bcegij

Mon.

v 55 ttTrco-Tix*
Mon.

48 7TOv]o)V

5 1 poas Ka[t ] ra [
51a
Jetasa7r[
5 2 vJtTVOS . . V TTLk[

53 om. (dispensable)
55a
>o/*[
58a
]<r^cvafo;vc^ovot[
68

f 20

KOfii^c for ko/uo-(T

X T3 yxovT^[s
\
186 8c eXvvTO

X 37 Tfl/Eust.
128 cvTosetorai^y Mon. Eust.
e

251 /*^8' a/xa


252 ayjc^' a c| (?)
274 tG)]v&

: o<^pa 1877s0/ Br
234 o<^p8t/s
255 ckcXcvtcv
a/
Mon.
275 P/3\rKLvj

287

278

0/OCTl
[t' a/fpiTO/A]v[^

1/^192 o^>/oaTX(r[(ra

287

tf Mon.
OLKpT/V

P5
7ro\vKpTOfied e

F 2

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The British School at Rome.

68
^21

Alexandrian.
-

Coincidences.
y 373 re P7 ss. Eust.

Unattested.
8c Aaos a^at7 372 Oafipr)<rc
(OV

(395

T 7TLOV0' VUlg.)

373 Oav]fiaa-v
owov epvOpov
394 fJLeXirjbta
400 7rap 8c] 01
^22

85 ottl for o<pa

9 1 a7T(t)7rtv

V 23

92a add. ( = 8321)


-

8 249 Kare^r) K
251 avctpwrwv
(avrjp<T(Vdfl )

(252 cywvcAocovVUlg.)
H3 corr.
254 /t"//A

f 24

^ 345 p*om.

^25

t 581 om. (dispensable)

*$26

*7 95 cp^pa8ar'

^317 ^yXacd/Mon. US
gjp Mon. Eusc
318 a<j>UovTo
(320 om. vulg.)
07 86 cA^XSaT'ss. uv.; /.

These characteristics
maybe summedup as follows:y
^

I
2

Alexandrian.
-

tf 3
V- 4
V 5

^6
T 7

y 8
V 9

^io
^ii

13
$>^

14

IP 15

yi6
y 17
y 18
^19
^20
<^2T
Tj*22
^23
^24
^25
^26

6
1
1

?2
?2

1
1

? 1
-

1
1

?5

Later MSS.
2
I

?4
-

Unattested.
?I
?I

?1
1
10
7
-

4
3

I
I
I

3
2
I

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The Text of the Odyssey.

69

The strongly-markedcharacterof V3, V19, V20, and ^21 is evident.


The noveltiesof T19 it must be rememberedare mainlythe additionof new
lines. The papyri it is plain offerthe same genus of variant as the
minuscules.1 They show,however,littletendencyto continueone minuscule
family back rather than another: the coincidences of IP3 and V7 are
about evenlyspread : V19 has one coincidencewith Mon., V20, which is
the most fertilein anticipations,agrees 5 times witha, 5 times withj\ 3
times withk. The length of the fragmentgives some weight to these
figures,but the evidence as a whole comes to very little.
V3 is importantforits scholia, onlytoo scanty. The diplae in IP3 V14
deserve notice: the strictlynon-criticalsigns were the firstto go : among
the minuscule MSS. of the Iliad and Odyssey fewsurvive (on k 232-40,
244-7 in L8> <10-13 in H3). The most strikingfeatureof the papyri is
the practically entire absence of Alexandrian connection, whether as
anticipation or as obedience: this characteristicis common to the Iliad
papyri,and clearly negatives the view if any disproof be needed that
the late-classicaland mediaeval vulgate was formedunder the influenceof
Alexandria.

V.
The ears bound into sheaves, a report may be expected on the
harvest. The most vital and interestinginformationwe may hope
fromnew collationsis upon the extent to which phonetic development in
the Homeric text took place duringthe diplomaticperiod,in otherwords,
how far the paradosis was still working in the age of Triclinius and
Tzetzes. I do not mean itacismsor trivialvowel-changessuch as ayaOalai
but substantialsigns of the survival of the epic dialect : e.g.
for ayaOfja-Ly
how at # 211 H3 has ra taacri9while its children insert7' ; the absence of
the usual augment,as & 2 ; Tv%(fiiresistingrvxoifu X 7 and redprjra^
holdingout againstTedvei&ras; primitivevowels visible in XovTo,yooiev,
aicovTa<;>
oTceflee?,
and a numberof singularalternatives,
arpo^oovro(cf. pp.
whole evidence
the
with
be
treated
must
This
however,
subject,
28, 40).
the limits
far
outrun
would
and
the
as
well
as
Odyssey,
together,the Iliad
of an article.
1 Omissions: 407 in y 1, 7 487 in y-3, 5 399 in 5, k 368-72 in y 8, \ 604 in #11, and
y>
7472 in y-3. Additions: v 51 a,
r 581 in y-25. Linguisticsurvival(?) f 298 in ^6, deterioration
in
22.
a
a
a
in
fy 19, 92
55 a, 58

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The British School

70

at Rome.

Two points may properlybe consideredhere: omissionsof lines, and


the extent to which Alexandrian readings have made theirway into our
MSS.
A.- Omissions}
Omissions of one or more lines are usually determinedby graphical
conditions,i.e. various formsof homoeoptosis,which in hexameter verse
especially has an extensive and subtle effect.2 Deduction made of all such
cases, the omissions in our mediaeval MSS. are considerable. A second
distinction has to be made between omissions which interruptthe
constructionand sense, and those which do not. The former,which are
comparatively few, must be regarded as casual inexplicable errors- a
categorywhichhas to be admitted. Such are /3271 (r), e 235 {q)} k 21 (L4),
^441 (r U8), 7T3I8 (Mon.), 7458 (R4 V4), 1/83 {dr Pi), 302 (q\
386 {q).
The rest, though the proprietyof the omission of some of them is
disputable,do not absolutely interferewiththe continuity. They amount
to about 240. These may be classed under these heads : (1) Formulae,
which maybe insertedor omittedwithoutdamage to the context : (2) lines
found in other places and more in place there(a well-knownAlexandrian
category): (3) supplements to the sense or syntax. Further, a few
correspondto athetesesor otherancientcriticisms,
thoughthegreat majority
are independent.
Formulae.
a 148
P 393
426
y 396

ttotolo om. L4 L6 R5 R6
Kovpoi8c KprjTrjpas
iirt<TT\f/avTO
*v& a^T> gAA' ivrjo-cOta yXavKunris
'AOyvrjom. L4 M2
2A.K0V
8' tOTl'a\VKOL
V<TT
0H1. H3 ( = 0 29 l)
piirTOlCLfioCVCTL
ol fievKctKKovTs
oTkVSc
om.
KaoTos
L4
2/?av

1 La Roche, ed.
praef. pp. xii, xiii has a simpleenumeration.
.four cases may be distinguished:homoearchon,
and one
homoeomeson,homoeoteleuton,
whichI mustcall ' heads and tails,' i.e. wherethe end of one line affects
thebeginningof thenext,
or viceversa. Homoeomesonis exceedingpowerful.
(1) Homoearchon: a 381, 2 8432,? 629 X 218, 407 | 434 p 338, 339 t 458 v 83
<t>i9, 334, 335 X 146 276, 533. (2) Homoeomeson: 0 408 6 182, 435, 436 1426, 563
* 517, 5l8 476 0 451 p 277, 314, 395, 547 t 466 v 46, 152 <f>122, 123, 302, 318 X 317,
: a 139 5 75. 293, 753 e 247 tj 80, 288
329 iff178, 179 (?) a 217, 398. (3) Homoeoteleuton
1 89, 361, 437 \ 513-515 0 48 <r119, 120, 155 <p109, 189 ^ 241, 242. (4) ' Heads and
Tails': 8432 21 402 A 545 v 258-261 <r119, 120 t 18 0*354. These examplesare
takenfromthe Oxfordedition. The MSS. exhibitan infinity.For a list fromthe Hymns,see

J.H.S. xv.272sq.

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The Text of the Odyssey.

71

r iyivovroom. /0 P2 P7 R14 U8
y 416a avrap cttcip rjyepflev
ofirjyepes
8c TToVai yvUU O1T1.^3
8v(TTOT V\k\lQ%
<TKl6<VTO

487

8' cAacav irpoOvpoio/cataWovcrrjsIpihovirovom. all but/^"/


493 c#c
3 57 Sarrps 8c KpctaW
TrtvaKasirapiOrKfv
actpas
Tt'0ctxpwrctaKvVcAAaom. a b eg R5
58 TravrotWwapa, 8c <r<t
.
to hi<TTV)(ov
airapKa. Athen.
( = a 141, 142)
399 rot yap eyejtoi Tavra fidX!TpcKCwsKaraX^)Om. ^5 L4 U8
^ 27 6<l>p i7T)
Ta ju,^u/xoscvtoT^(To-tvavwyciom. ^ L4 and Pal. m. 2
464 NavoriKaa Ovyarepfiyakyropos'AXklvooloom. R9
1 30 cv (nriccTLy\a<f>vpoi(ri
Xikaiofiivrjirocnvttvai om. all but O Br C Pi V4
vti/
Ivt
omci*
531
Ixovra om. all but P3 P7
AacpTC)l^foy
iirl
k
8c
Kal
avToi
OaXa-arjsom. g U5 U8
547
firjiicv prfyfiivi
Om. all but / L2 U2
x 265 kolIfi1\o<f>vpfJLvo<;
rea TrrcpocvraTrpoonyvSa
kt\. om. ^8 efijk
368-372 x^PvtPa 8*/x^roXos Trpoxo)rc^vc <f>pov<ra
om. /"^
twca irTCpevra7rpoa"rvSa
430 Kat cretas <j>(vr<ras
456 8toyVs
XacprtaS^ 7ro\v^xal/' 'OSvo-o-cvom. all but ^"^ L2 P6
om. all but flb dgl
8' rolara fiaKpa.reXo-Orj
470 fxrjvv
<I>0wvt(v
7Tpl
om.
hrca
Kat
L4 Pal. P3 U5 U8
482
irpoa-qvha
fiLV<l><vr(ras Trrtpfvra
om.
'Ohvo'O'cv
L4 Pal. R2 Ro U8
,7
504 8toyV
iro\viir\av
\apTiBrj
om. all but^? L2 P6 U7
A 60
i
om. all but q U5 Eust.
//.
92
om. all but "*
ctti
6
K
8c
aurot
Kal
OaX.cra"r}%
/Srjfiev prjyfjuvi
/a
om.
aXa
TVTTTov
8'
147 c^5?
cpcT/Aots all but bipq
ftvot
7roXt^v
4 154 rcrai /ix^atvav tc xtTivatc cf/xaraKa\ om. bcghl k
o 63 Ttjkyja.yp%
vs 'OSvaor^o? Ocilo om. all but ^,//
</><As
139 8aTa ttoW imOea-a xapitpfiiirqiraptovTWom. all but dfgh

Eust.

aVTOLp 7TtTTOCTtOSKat c8t/TVOS ^ IpOV VTO O1H. ^"

143

tsvwp(ava/Sava arvvfJL<f>ur\oi<n
ywaitVom. "^ Eust.
tc
tc
7Ti
p oftotrv TcXcuriyrv tov opKOVom. g P5 Eust.
avTap
om. dj k Yi
reXicrOr)
Trcpt8' fjfMTafxcLKpa
</}$lv6vtu}V
firjvv
Totcrt8c KipvKt.%
fievvStpcTTtxtpa9cx^uav om. r R7
8tos 'OSvco-cs om. cghijk
vts AacpTao 7roA.vrA.as
R4
om. ^
Kat /icTCCtTrcv
o o*<^tvvcf>pov(i)v
ayoprJo~aTo
P6 U8
om. all but bcdfPi
KvSto-Tc
avaf av8pwv'Ayaficfiviuv
9ATpct'8?7
om.
8J
cegh
TcXio-Orj
7rcpt rjfiara xaKpa
<f>6ivvTU)v
143 firjvov
'OSvo'O'cvom. R8
7ro\i>/xr;xa|/>
542 StoycvcsXacpTtctSiy

49
59
15 $
< 270
X 191
< 53
121

p
<r
t

occurtwiceormore.
formulaic
(2) Phraseswhichthoughnotabsolutely
/2

8* wo AiTrapourtv cSiJcaTO KaA.017rc8tA.a( = c 44)


4 TTOO'O't
outi Svviyo-CTatctvcKa t<v&( = A 562)
191 7rprai8' c/A7n7s
kcAcv^ov ( = A 483)
Kara.
8'
$V
Kvfxa StaTrpiJo-o-ovo-a
429 17

5 783 7rvTaKaTa fiopav vd O*lara Acvko.TrcVao-o-av


( = 0 54 ai.) om. akq
8oKctotros 6 <rTx^schol., cf. 8 58 above
Eust. TTcptTTs

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H3 Pal.

The British School at Rome.

72

6 157 SaKpvcrL
Koi (TTovaxQcnkoXaAyco-tOvfiovip\6(v( = 88) om. acij L4 Pal.
ktA. ( - rj 7 5- 77) om. a gij k
evl 6vfjL<2
313-315 *K*vT0Lklvtjye <\<x
<f>pover]cr'
=
T
#cat
rj 225 KTrjcTLV
ifirjv8/(ds
inf/pc<f>e<s
/cyaSw/xa( t 526) om. R9 (a supplement
of the accusative)
0 33 5 & tfitvai Trps 8w/xa <t'AovTCTtTy/xcvos
^Top ( = /? 298) om. all but djr

CP7R7

k 201 kXcuovhe At'ycwsOaXipbvkoto. SaKpv ^eovres


202 AA' ov yp Tts irprjis
( = 568) Om. g L4 R2 V4
iyiyvtrofivpofiivouriv
2 53 OTOtO"tV
XcTCt 7rptO"K7TTa)
VtX^PH* (=211)

Om#^^ bllt /> L2 P7

315 kol\ovSaiSakeoVyV7r68c OprjwsTrocrlv


rjev( = 367) om. L4 T U8 Z om. Ar.
475-479 a>s <^>av
avrap ifioi y' hrtireiOeroOvfibsyqvtop
ktX.
a>s t6t fxkvirpiravrjfJLap
( = 183-186) om,/ H3 Eust.
X 109 T7cA.6ov
os iravr i<f>opakoXTrvr*iiratcovu(=//. 323) om. L8
343 os &rj<jiavrKiv
rzv(^rj 156) om. ^"^
vpvTrpoycveoTcpos
TratSa
A
kcu
tos
604
"Ufas xpuowcoYAou ( = Hes. Theog. 952) om. C
fiy\oio

f n L7 Pal.

fX 1 4O

141
207
v 289
347
348
428
369
370

ath.

V>/tT Kat CTCtpOtS* aVTOS 8? t 7Tp KV \vY)S

^ KaKcosvciat, XcVas a7ro Trctvras


cratpovs ( = X 113, 114) om. bgij Eust.
7r<r<ri
irapao-rabvavSpa cKao-Tov( = k 547) om> L4
jli\l)(loi<s
re
T
158) om. L4 Pal.
KaXjj fiy\r #catayAa cpya ISvyj( = /7r
8*
^cpoctS^s
orfXpOi, avr}s avrpov kirrfparov
pv vvyL^ival vrji$$KaXovrai ( = IO3> 104) om. g k L7
ol ro /otovKaTSov<nv( = 396) om. o IJ5
vSpjjvfivrj(rr^p(v
tw k4v o TVftjSov
ftcvCTTOM/o'av
TTava^atot
^8c KKat <o 7rat8t/xcyakXcos^par' ViVo-cd( = a 239 o> 32) om. bgik Eust.

vlskt\. ( = 0 337-340) om. all but


515-517 avrap iwrjveXOrjcrw
'OSva-oyos<>kos

adfl

8' 6V Vfl<OLKKLfl7\iaKLTCLl
O I 1 3-1 19 8ct>p(i)V
KtX. ( = 8 613-619)

0111. b H3 L5

ir 317 at To-' aTifiov<nkcu at vr/XtriScs


cto-tv( =t 498 ^418) Om. a I L4 R6 Ul
o Kara Spar 'OSuo-orrjos
Oeoio ( = 0-417) om.^ Mon.
p 402 SfiuHv
o* 413 NtVov ^a8tftosvts 'ApT^rtSaoavaKTos ( = 395) om. all but^"//' Pal.
AA' /i,
WptV7T7r/X^*
TV^I/CC yap p^OflVrjVY]V$
om. ^/ ( = 334 335)
es AovX/xtov 7ToA.v7rvpov
292 av8po)v corTTpwTwi/
v 145 eyx05 ^X(V-lxa T<? 7 ^w 'fvvcs pyot eirovro ( = )8 II) om. / L5 Pl
- <r
<t> 66 a/xc^tVoXos 8' apa ot kc8v^ inTcpOe 7rapOTrj (
211) om. M2
T 29I

U5 U8

219

OvXrjV TYfV7TOT fl O"VS rjka(TV \VK< BVTL

126

^/XtS 8* /JL/XCfia<x>TS
CLfl Cl^/XC^' OvSc TI ^/Xt

Mon.

Pa .

220 Ilapvr/o-vS7
\OvtclcrvvvlxnvAvtoXvkolo( = r 394, 395) om. Mon. U6
386 a>s ap' tyvrjo-ev,rr 8' aVrcpos cttXcto[vOos ( = p 57 al.) om. ^
8k cxao-ros0707<vyotat7rvoA.^pov( = H 507) om. all but dfr
X 43 Trdirrrfvev
<<tt
Xovra { = \ 402) om. all but dfr
\/ 48 atfxaTtKoi XvOpt7T7raA.ay/Avos
127 Ak^s 8viyo"o-^at,
oo-?;hvvayls ye irpecrriv( = N 785, 6) om. all but^ U2 U8

Eust.

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The Text of the Odyssey.

73

163 K8* .(rafiwOov/3rj8c/as$avToi<rw6filos (==y 468 al.) om. C


) 479 ov yap &rjtovtov fikvi/3ov\cvo-asvov avrr
480

kO<J)V', ( = 23, 24)


)S 7T0l KClVoUS'OSwTCVS aTTOTtTCTat

01X1.7, 480 OIT1. U6

(3) The third class consists of such omissions as are not explicable
by graphical considerations,and do not fall under (i) and (2) ; and must
thereforebe regarded as cases of dispensable supplement: viz. a line or
lines not strictlyessential to sense or grammar(s. = sense, g. = grammar)
but whichassist one or the other.
)S 140 vfia.KTrjfxarcSovtcs a/ut^o/xcvotKara,oikous om. U5 (s.)
KcAaSovT'c;rtolvorrairvrovom. d (s.)
421 Kparj^</>vpov
*
IIaAA8'
h.Qy\vaxf)V
KovprjvA tos cuyl6\olo om. O (? g.)
y 42
/ca
fnrrjs
(g.)
209 irarpr c/xw ifio' vvv 8c xprj tctAol/u-cv
om. R121
pKtyap Trpoavrov schol. H3
TrcpiTTs,
308 AyiaOov SoXofi-qnvo o TrarcpakXvtovcxra (s.) om. k
/catalSoirj irapaKorv (s.) om./"
381 avTw /catTratScoro-t
8 75 oco-a TaT)' acnrera iroWd' crifiosft' l^ct ctoropowvra
(s.) Om. Pal.
Om.
/cat
H3 Pal. Rll
(s.)
<j>*povres
273 'ApyctW Tpwccro-t
<^vov
/c/pa
om.
Kat
ms
*
L4 L6
(s.)
NcVropos yXas
303 TryAc/xaxs ^pw?
8 330 SrjfUvl Tpwvo^t 7ro"XT
irq^ar 'A^atot (s.) om. R9
(s.) om. abcgij k
432 /caltot 8*^Trapa 0tva 0aXcra"qscwpvTrpoto
irviu fjoOiirp (s.) om. C
469 avpiy8' k irorafiovxj/vxp^J
7AX/ctvoto
(g. nom.) om. ^
( 213 Nauo-tKaa Ovyrrjp/AcyaXifropos
ot
vtt
LO-ravr
aOavrois
aTrrjvrjs
(s.) om. L4
cvaXiy/ctot p
77 5
161 ot8c 8c cv fxvOov
TroTiSeyfitvoL
ia-\av6(vrai(s.) om. L4
8' ap' crav vcot^8c 7raA.atot
0 58 ypofjivivTroXXot
(s.) om. ab dgi L4
oirccrt
430 Kat ot cywt8*aActow ifiov 7rcptKaXA.es
yjfiaraTravra
ftc/AnyftcVos
^^P* fi$v
431 XP^*OI/
tj
tc Ocolo-iv(s.) om. U8 Z
Att
aAXoto-tv
cvt
432 a"irvb\ jLtcypa)
6 ef /cv^yaTcpcs, c 8' mees rj/3<(VTes
k
(s.) om. T (or ex homoeomeso with 7)
8c
TroTvta
A 546 Tv';(o-iv
(s.) om. U5
/xijriyp
ft<^''AxtA^O9' eOrjK*
v 82 Trvresap' pft^^cvTcsv7rTrA'yy^o'tv
t/xo-^A^s(s.) om, a
cVapiJyots(s.) om. U5
391 o-ivo"OtTroTva^ca ore /xotiTp<f>pacrcr
CTt^os schol.
v7Toi/octTat
o 345 vcpcs ovnv itcqraiaXrj Kat 7rrjfiaKat aAyos (s.) om. gk
t<3 ctt' aAyca 7roAAfjLoyycrrj
7T 19 fiovvovTT)\vyTOv
(s.) Om. ^
v7rcAct7rov

c8ovtcs
otttoAcW
(s.) om. dq Pi Rl
pa rrj 7rpoTcp7/
50
cSvvavro
8'
ovk
(g. aecus.) Om. U5
rrv
Kt^vat
^a
vapepxofihrqv,
357
ypovs (g. aCCUS.) om. a di
p 432 atya /^A' AtyuTrrtWav8pov7rcptKaAAcas
ovpavbvect (s.) om. beij H3 Mon.
565 tw vjSptstc /3lt)t cnSrpov
tc Kat cpvrct(s. gnome) om. H3 L8 Pal. U5
o- 131 ttolvtovocroratc yatav cVt Trvctct

Plutarch

Perhapsin obedienceto the schohon.

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74

The British School at Rome.

ava TrAat TreptK^Xa viov KKaoyx,ei>a


\oXku) (s.) om. R2
Kat Siwa ev$Vap aV8pcs v7Tp/XVOVTS
eirwov (s.) om. d I
77 T0"> ottoIos cot Kat otv K)(pr
flavos eXOoi (s.) om. //
122 <f>rjSe SoLKpirrrXwuv
fi <f>p4vasotva> (s.) om. k
/Jc/fopiyoVa

<r 309
62

v 335 yw<urff oorts aptoros av^p Kat Acurra irpyo-LV


(? g. object to KaTa*A.ov)
<j>244
308
X 200
^320

s 8' apa Kat ro S/xcuc


myvctou 'OSvt^os (s.) om. Mon.
wavTwv(s. or g. ?) om. a k 0 Br
cts E^tovpaa-tXria,Ppor&v SrjX-qfiova
au0t XiXuTTTO
<os 6 /Av
ra^ets Xowcvt 8eoyb>
(s.) om. ^
7rVras*'OSvtctcus8' otos v?rcK<^vy
viytfieXaivrj(s.) om. all but 0// U8

Coincidenceswithancient atheteses are few (7 209, 8 58, 783, A.604,


j/391), and it is by no means certain that if the scholia were fullerthe
coincidences would be more numerous. The additions, however, are
identical with the class of lines which Alexandrian criticismendeavoured
to indicate if not to expel by means of its symbols. The MS. evidence
seems to show that the Homeric vulgate was still alive in the middle-ages,
and that the tendencywas to its increase,whetherby formulae,lines found
in other passages, or additions thought desirable to ease the grammar1
or to amplifythe sense. The evidence we have collected shows how near
theprocesswas to completion; only certainMSS. resistedit ; and resistance
to the process is what we mean in this case by ' omission.' Each passage
the textual critic must consider on its merits,forabundance is as natural
to epos as terseness; but on the whole the MS. omissions do not seem to
admit of another explanation, than that of imperfectlyaccomplished
amplification. We cannot credit the mediaeval scribes with consciously
assisting this process: the additions, ascribed even by the Alexandrians
accrued in the course of history,throughthe agency of the reciter,
to~Tti/9,
as long as the poems were recited; and in later times through the private
reader, who added what he took for omissions to his copy. Collation
incorporatedthese additionswiththe body of the text,and collation is the
sphere of the scribe. The converse process, viz. addition of lines in a
minorityof MSS., or in isolated MSS., may be studied in the apparatus.
B.- Survivals of AristarcheanReadings,
The Aristarcheanreadings which are found in our MSS. are shown
in the followingtable. Aristarchus has been treated as generously as
1 For instance,to

providea pendantverbwithan accusative.

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The Text of the Odyssey.

75

possible,and scholia with ovtox;or 97ypa^t] have been invariably taken


as giving Aristarchus'reading. The total,however,is so small ( 15 1 recorded
readings as against 664 on the Iliad) that the results may justifiably
be suspected. It might be maintained that Aristarchus neglected the
Odyssey,or lefthis judgment upon it to be inferredfromhis pronouncements on the Iliad, though there is no direct evidence for such a view.
But the remarkable paucity of readings, from tt onwards, and the total
make the ordinaryview much more probable,
absence of any on v and yfr,
lost
a
have
we
that
great deal of material bearing upon the
namely
Odyssey. This coincides with the smaller number of Papyri and MSS.,
the scanty scholia, and the relative brevityof Eustathius. The figures
thereforemightseem negligibleconsideringthe scanty data ; but it is to
be noticedthat the percentageof total survivalsis nearly the same in the
Odyssey as in the Iliad :
Iliad 55 per cent. (yW Odyssey 56*6 per cent.
When these survivals themselves are analysed the results are some:
whatdifferent
Iliad

All MSS
Minority
Sporadic

...

...

...

18
36
45

Odyssey

27p.c.
5P-C22 p.c.

(Decimals are neglected.) The total of Aristarcheansurvivals in either


poem is thereforeverymuch the same ; but the Aristarchean reading has
forcedits way into unanimityor into a considerablenumberof MSS. more
frequentlyin the Odyssey than in the Iliad ; the number of casual or
sporadic survivalsis less in the Odyssey than in the Iliad.
This result agrees with the facilitywith which the Odyssey MSS.
fall into families,and withthe comparativeabsence of independentMSS.
Summary of AristarcheanReadings found in MSS.
a

0
y
5

C
V
e

Readings.
IO

Confirmed.

4
14
19
15
7
6
8

3
6
II
7
4
3
5

All
=

=
=
=
=
=
=
=

MSS.
1

1
3
1
1
2

of the Odyssey.

Minority.
2

One or Two.
I

3
5
4
4
1
2
3

4
3
2

1 C.R. 1899,p. 432.

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The British School at Rome.

76
i
K
A
/i
^
I
0
w

Readings.
8
10
14
6
2
7
5
2
2

Confirmed.
6
7
9
4
2
4
2
2
2
1

p
a
t

4
5

0
X

10
1

(t

=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=

151

86

Minority.
5

23
4

2
1
1

'
-

1
2
-

All MSS.
1

One or Two
-

3
2
2
2
1
1
2
2

2
2
2

23

47

16

VI.
What is the originof the variants in the diplomatic Homeric text- of
the variants in general and the Alexandrian variants in particular?
I endeavoured C.R. 1900,p. 291 to explain the Alexandrian variantsin the
Iliad MSS. as the result of the ' adscription and absorptionof marginal
readings/ This explanation did not satisfy Mr. Walter Leaf who (Iliad
vol. ii. 1902, p. xxiii.) says *this seems to me to explain nothing,for it
raises the obvious question,whence came these variants? '
The origin of variants in literarytexts where there are not special
conditions involved,such as in the case of Homer recitation,or double
editions,incomplete draughts,and other specific circumstances,such as
are sometimesinvolved,is to be sought in the accidents naturalto transmissionby hand-labour: omissions,transference,
substitutionof one word
for another; and in the comment of the reader.1 The spread and

1 This is often invoked


vir tipos, aid is 5e els
by Galen xvi. 202 <paverai rolvvv irpo<rypa<f>cv
xvi. 634 $?\ov 8ti irapaycypavrat
Tofacpos vnb rod fitfiKioyp<f>ou
xeraBeiffOai
; cf. also 909.
rovro trpstipos* rx<* $' tij kclIirpoff4ypa\pep
veicev avr ovf KaBirepeidBafxev
is uxfivriffiv
iv
Tot fiCTwirois
Tckrotavra vpoffypdfpciv.
Ir ris ruv n*Taypaq>6vTvv. . els rb ixpos avrb n*T46r)Kcv.
The meaning of tSaQos is *text,' Keipcvov,not as in the Lexx. * original ' : as ih, xvi. 837 fi4\ava
4v avr$ t$ 5<^6t,
Karh.5e t5 /tcttov
fifvviroKctTTToovos
[margin] vwb rod AiovKoupidou,or simply
'manuscript,' ib. 468 &AK01 5e iv rots irvv ira\aio?s itid<f*ois
yeypdtpdaiotirco(pacriv:cf. also 468,
'
'
: xvi. 80 iyiorc y&p faep kvbs vpyfiaros
634, xviii. 2. 863, 909. Another word for text is S<f>os
forras Tffiwp
ypadprup, elro ttjs fihprpas ypafrjs Karh. rb vcpos oiS<rr)s}
rrjs 5' Mpas 4n\ Orepa
rwp peruirlup . . . 6 irpSbrosficraypfup rb &i&\op ctfKprepa
ypa^tp. Schol. Find. O. v. i ovtt
t y5^ 4p fiProts 4tia<pioisovk %p, 4p 8e ro7s AiSvfxovuirofip-fipafftp
ihycro UipBpov. Cf. furtherfor
firwiropGalen xvii. 2. 1 1, nerma xvii. 2. 194, fiermop and pwtop (tergum) xv. 624.

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The Text of the Odyssey.

77

intercommunicationof variants is due to the process habitual in the


ancient book-worldknownas collation(avTifikr),
avriPWeiv,<rvvavTi/3\r)<;
CJ.G. xii. 132. 5).1
Let us hear Strabo. Strabo (790) says therewere two writersin his
who
day
composed a book on the Nile. The books were almost identical,
nal TJeTn^eiprjaet ravr
ttXtjvyap t}<? rl-ea)? rd ye dWa teal rfj <f>p<rei

'
*
ia-Ti Kelfxevairap /j,<f>oTpoi<;.
Therefore/says he, I, having no copies
at hand for collation, collated the one with the other* (airopovfievo*;
etcOarpovOarepovvrfaXov). Which the
avTiypafaw 9ttjv avnftoXrjv
he
to
oracle of Ammon. This anecdote is
leaves
the
plagiarist was
intelligibleonly if we realise that an ancient historian or geographer,
wishing to utilise the statementsof a given book for scientificpurposes
did not ventureto do so until he had procured a second copy of the book
in question, and by a collation of the two copies eliminated graphical
errors. He would naturally erase or correctthe errorshe found in one
copy in the sense of the more correctversionof the other.
To do so was indeed the duty of the publisher himself,but a duty
oftenneglected,as Strabo again tells us (609) in his celebratedaccount2 of
the Peripatetic corpus which was brought to Rome by Tyrannio and
published by /3i/3\io7r&\airive? ypa<f>ev<n <f>av\oi<; xpfievoi koX ovk
r&v els irpaaiv ypa</>oavTifiWovres, onep /cal eV- t&v aXKcov o-vfifiaivet,
Where
this had not been
/cal
iv
/cal
ivOBe
'AXel-avBpea.
fieveov/3i/3\cov,

as Galen xvi. 80),


done thepublishedbook was aBipBcTov
(or veiravpffcoTov,
'
or*to use a moretechnicalterm,aanyhy unpointed/
f
...
This expressionwe findin Stephanus of Byzantium: 3 Ava/cropiov

iv
/cal EYW09 Bey o irpo rjfi&v ras v ttj>ftaacXiSi <r^o\a9 hia/c(TiArara$
Be
eoi/ce
Sia
aa-nyel
(v.l.
yevel) iv
8i<f>0yyov<f>r)<riv.
avWoyfi Xfecoi/
to Ovlkov
...
Bca
tov
I
evpofiev. Hftpa?
rjfieU yap
Tervyy/cevaifiifiXty
HappvTios, evprjra tcal aoavWfia)? f) ic\<ti<iv anyel (v. II. yevel,
1 Wattenbach,Das Schriftwesen
im Mittelalter,
pp. 265 sqq. has somepatristicexamples.
2
Repeatedby Plutarch,Sulla 26.- In the anecdoteabove Diels {Rh. Mus, xxx. 11 n.) missing
thepointthinksavnypdtpavels t^ vti&o^v a *lateraddition.' As if such additionsweremade !
etc., has at least two referencesto
Strabo, who is full of 'readings,' ypaipai,01 neraypi<povTest
and the ancient
: the MSS. ofThucydides(374) whichgave theformUlMw) forMefli/a,
avriypaipa
MSS. of Homer (550). The earliestoccasion in antiquitywhen a graphicalerrorentersinto
considerationappears to be Polybiusxii. 4 a, 4 rovro yhp ow5'&veh eUeie Hirovrod <rvyy
paleos
(a numerical discrepancy in Ephorus).
flvai rb Stirrcofia,rov e ypa<f>4ws
ofioKoyov/xevus

* borneot thefollowingpassageswere utilisedDy l^enrs,Anstarcnusp. 340, ana Deioremm


by Villoison,Diatriba, pp. 135 sqq. Few have made theirway intothe manuals.

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78

The British School at Rome.

In ayevelwe have a gloss, and apiv shows how it


apivei)fiifXqy.
came in.1
'
*to
: to punctuate,
*,Tet,v
prick has variousmeaningsin palaeography
'
*
to putin accentsand breathings,
and to dot wordsrequiringcorrection
and so to correctthem. For the second sense I borrowEpiphaniusIV.
S nves Kara
p. 3, Dind. fromGardthausenGr. PaL p. 282 : eVe8?7
icai ireplirpoo-cpSav
TaSe. The wail of the
eari^av ret?ypa<f)$y
irpoaiphLav
scribe 'Eiridov 'AOrjvaovar^avTo^ rrjvKaOoXov has more point if we

to thelipoawhia(Antk.PaL ix. 206) :


supposehimadding7rpoaa>Siai
irXr^Ovo^rjh'aiSjjXcov
ravroXoycovkclvovoov
<f)v
2
ras i%(pa; Sval*'
j-va/icov \7TTO9

3
rvcov, pa^9, ivoVyo/joc
6/xfjLar fiov KKfirjK}

kclOoXov.
Se <f>pa)
T>/9kclOXov
ttjvBvvrjv

The exuberanceofComatas'metaphors
(ib.xv. 38) makesit uncertain
ifhe punctuated,
or
he
corrected
accentuated,
;
mayhavedoneall three.
t9 'Ofirjpeov?/3l3\ov<;
evpwv K.o/j,y)tc<;
re teovSaficosiariyfievas,
i(f>Oapfieva<;
<TTl~a<
Biea/jbiXevaarara? eT%z>G>9,
a
9 ^prjaTLav,
ty)v airplay xevpyfra<;
ypyra<;8' itcaivovpyijaa ttjv evXPVa"r^av*
ivrevdev o ypfyovre?oifc iafj>aXfiv(<;
9 olkfiavOdpetv.
/naOrjTiaxriv

The same achievement


is sungin 36 and 37.a
St&cv is used ofcorrection
literallywhenit impliesthe denotingofa
word
and
dots
small
other
faulty
by
signswhichwarnthe reader,or carry
hiseye to thecorrection
in the margin. I have beenshownminutesingle
dots placed above faulty words withoutfurthercorrection. It is
1 Under
Sia roda
retipaxria
Stephanushas the usual expression: eV 5e tois tov TloXvlaropos

rb fii&kiov.
7) Trpdori)
(rvWaB-f),aAA.'%v atitpOeeTov
vp4drj

2 "Evfffiai,
Scratches,' are probablyaccents. Vat. 1553 (theol.s. x-xi) has an index; *xiV
M\rosairri<pv\\aCC^ dia/cata
ivevi)Kovra'6 i avrav a^vtrra{sc. rough,unlevigated
; one of the
eight remains,in this condition), ^riyfiara could mean lettersin general: Aelian ap. Suid. in
'AvaZeveiv
(KaraScye','Xriyfxara).

3 Scribes
koI
eyes sufferedfrom the white material : Galen iii. 776 irpwropi\v tSv ypa<f>4a>v
/xaXiad'Brau iv \evicaiisZiQdpais yp<pocaiv,>s kol}xVlv
^zblocs air up rrjv o<\iiv.

4 Even the ' interlinear


: schol. Lycophr.275 koLal ficv
gloss findsits expressionin literature

\etsovtws xov<TlirP^&v ovkcti yp<po'y p d<f>e <rv 5e r avr as /*e <rov r 5>v (tt l\(av.

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The Text of the Odyssey.

79

to laboura pointfamiliarto all palaeographers.I referto


unnecessary
:
MS. Munich17 (quotedbelow),and Galenxvi.80,Dioscurides1
procedure
X.V iiri(TK\rpovSia tov v> kol kclt avrov tov \
ypfai oifc 7r<T/e\r)po$

avodevimdU /carpcodev
-mar^ev(se. X-).Cf. xvii. 557 al. Joann. Alex,
6
I
from
borrow
Lehrs) uses KaTavT&iv* A book which had
p. (whom
*
compared clause byundergone revision might be called /cetcfoXiafivov,
'
in Plat, retnp. ii.
Proclus
clause ; iv to9 /cetccuXio-fievois
vTiypQos
schol. Nub. Vesp. ad fin.
218. 1 Kroll, /c/c(o\i<TTat,
The possessorthen of a /3i/3\ov
aariyh or Btpdcorov
proceeded to a
collationof his own. This is implied by Strabo, and is carried out before
our eyes by Gakn. This most learned and conscientiousof men has the
'
followingreferencesto copies' in Kiihn's first14 volumes:
V. 659 (Hippocrates)
OVTMSy

C7Tt TtO"t 8c

892

(XVCV TOV

8c Six&S ^8c rj prj&is, Vt tkti ply avTiypoL<f>oi$


ypd<f>Tai

CMTIV.

TLva hvcnrvoLav aXXd tis twv TraXatwvj8t)SA.toyp<^(tv


ovk ovv 6/acAXcwapa\Lij/LV

& ovt%\ov <j>$a<rvK$o0fjvai


riliapTtV)7Tt

to pifXov i(jyv\dxOrjT titenos

fiXPL &vp tovt' avro to (T^aX/xa, tivwv fxkv oAtywpo)? 6fxiXovvTu)vtois twv 7ra\at>i/
8c
/3lfi\0l$ S lYjT*t XctVct Tl, \LV\Tt 8i' TpOVyp/X/AaTOSipY]Tai yVip&LV VL(V

ov yap Srj /xotcs


to \onrbvov To\fX(avTU)V
aAAa Trpo&Otivcu
ros vvi/ot
//,6V
yvo)ptvT)i/
iv
rjo-av,ov8' Irot/iotirapaypafew TroXaiavXi^iv o-aurcos ytypafifieirjv
irpouQcv*vx<zptis
Kavv
auros
s
ivravOa
onrao'Lrots avTtypa^>ot5,aA\' iirLO'Yjixrjvaa'OoLL
fivov
^v,
pXv
tcXcws ^ 8icup(ris yypcnrTai.
i/t<3 kto) Se Ttv cTTtSry/Atojv
/Wt7r)s,

His

severity with

regardto the readerand studentis to be noticed1. Sim.893. The following


:
instancesdisplayhis ownexactitude
iw avTiypac/xavTrapaXcXctTrrat
: sirn.
kol aio7ri0TOTTOis
896 Iv rots 7r.ct(rroi5
899, 900.
vi. 473 OLpXV^ cart avTou [toC1 SiatViys)8tj8Xtov]KaTa /acv cvia tojv avTiypd^oyv
.
, V aXXois 8c ^8c
^8c
ovo" oX)5 at cu </}povTai, kcu fiivTOL koll to rats
512 cv Trt 8c Twv vTLypd<f}O)V
apcTats ci/Tto"tvovx ovt<s aXXa ^petats ycypaTTTat.
727 ycypaTTTat fivToi StTTws cv Tots avTtyp^ots Tovvofiaf yaXcot /acv cV Tpto-t
o-uXXajSats KaT* ci/ta, yaXcwvu/Aot8e cv ttcvtc /caT*aXXa.

ctv 07 cav. KaTpu)syap cvp(TKTaycypa/i/^ci/ov,c' Tttrt/aci^ cts c /cat t t^s


641.
TrpoTcpas trvXXajS^s tcXcvtjo-/s,cV Ttcrt8c jjlovov cts c. Cf. 541 (Holcades),
xii. 401 cv Tto-tvavTiyp<^ots cupov ov^ v8aTi, XXa crreaTL pKTt).
514

ov /xct' ofovs aXX jlct oijvKparov yiypaTTTai.


^ Tt(r ^ v o.vTLyp<f>o)v
XX'
ycypaTTTat /xcv cv Ttcrt twv avTtyp^xov ov 7raXatoTcpa 7rapaj8Xr/TtfC(os>
*2
7raXatoTaTa.
Cf.
939, 945
wrcpflcTiKJS
553

814

1 The director of Laur. 32. 9


apologises for exactly this error in the case of his scribe : (250 v.)
5cit& Kaiccivov
$? ravra <tkoituu {sc. the marks to rectify the text) fir}b\vt$ ypa<f>i
iitfupnevov
ical r$ (rpAXfiari5t' yvoiav /x^irpoa<rx^vovTtosevpr}Kvai

2 'Ev AAy,however,whichoccursso frequently


in vol. xii., meansv
among his prescriptions

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The British School at Rome.

8o

xiii. 23 cv tutl 8c iw avrtypfjxvpeyfiovycypaTTTat.


39 17 Kara

Cf. 105, 215.


'53
537

nva

t<ov avnyp.<j><v ov k<$v5>vapiOfibs pK, aAAa Spa\fi7j yeypairrai.

irpoKiTai tw acj)OpL(TfM(
o^cSv iv airatri rots avny p<f>0LS*ovtcd 8c kcu Auy/jiV
VaXXt avriy p<f><aciipov .7ri'8asipvdpas Xrpav a.
ov /caT*
Ttva /x,cvtwv avTLypd<j)<vairtcrTiyiiivov rb 8' yeypairrai, Kara tlvol 8c

726
8' o"rjfjLavw
rj rov vos rb di.
ypafi/irjv vwOev e\ov /ajcpV, owrrc ^toi /Ap)7
269 ypa<j>Tai 8c ov fivov j&oraVats, aAAa Kal ?rc8ioi9 8i7ru>s 0*71^0?.
810 fcat ti KaT*Ttva twv avriy ptfxav ovk fiTnara o-' crpov.
971 cV Ttrt t>i/ avTiyp.<f><Vovk ot8' 07T(s /c' <rl ycypa/x/xcVot,KaflVcp cv
crcpois pij.

To such trouble was this encyclopaedic physician put by the uncertaintyof ancient books. He and others,it is well known,wrote out
and when that was useless,in
their prescriptionsin full (\oypafifiT<o<;),
verse (Galen in heroic hexameters!) in orderto guarantee the proportions.
His investigationof the Hippocratean text (vol. xv sq.) was not undertaken with a philological or antiquarian object, but to guarantee the
correctnessof the medical encyclopaedia.
The practiceof collation,implied by Strabo and carriedout by Galen,
was continueduntil the inventionof printing,and even after. A much
read book, like the Bodleian Plato (Clarke 39) bears the learningof nearly
twentyreaders. In the Odyssey we have seen how the older MSS. as
L8 of s. xi, Pal., Us, and others of s xiii. are overlaid with strata
of corrections; how new families (0 p q r) are produced by the
incorporationof these corrections; and how many Renaissance MSS.
exhibit everyvariant and its opposite,that is the whole tradition,between
two covers (p. 61). The results of this habit are palpable, but explicit
references
to sources,if not rare are so faruncommonthat a small collection
not
be
out of place. Any working palaeographercan add to it. (I
may
omit h twi, v aw and yp. as too frequent.)

5. X and XL
ov Trapaa-irovhalov
Heidelberg 398 (Arrian,etc.) ff.40, 54 8t>pdmu
avrLypaxfrov.
Vat. 1524 (theol.), f. 31 r. c kripovavnyp<f>ov.
&\\y avTiSOTy,Bf3\l(j>etc., as is shown by the alternatives tivU 893, 4v &\\ais ypa<pais7*0,, 838,
= prescription,ordonnance,as well as ypcupfi
= reading, is unknown
iv &\\ais avvayosyais 836. - Ypa<p-i)

to our lxica.

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The Text of the Odyssey.

8i

Vat. I2 (ThllC.) cv aAAwi avnyp<f>(.


Ven. 454 (Iliad), f. 248 v. ttoAis 81a tov l ctxc to avnfiokov, f. 246 r. ra /?i)3A.ia
&OL(TiaV L\OV CIS TO Tj, f. 322

X. OUTOS O OTl^O?

\P> 5 5 8] OV\ CVpcOrj CV TO) 7TaAoUO)

A.

U5 (Ven. 613), f. 11 v. ovk alv iv ripo) j3ij8 o otxoi [a 93, 94]

ko tovto to fiifikiovKara to iavrov avTiypa<j}OV


Munich 17: f. 171 k^i(T)6r
s ^v
cv run tVois, f. 235 id. and 810 /catTrap*^/xtviv iroWois
hvvarov rvyap 8t<0ap/cVov
^w/ototsto irapov fifiKovivr x^y* ^ 277 id. and O7rov8c 8vo*vo^T(s
et^cv kokkiSlol
sim.
if.
Hardt's
449, 452, 465, 467. (From
[scarlet dots] irWrja-av,
Catalogue.)
Vat. 1626 (Iliad a. 1477):
xj/255 sq. ovts KctvTativ iripu) /?i/?A.ta>.id. outcdscvpov V krpi/Jt/JXtw.
Br (Brussels 11 290)
f. 180 r. K547, 549, 551, 553,' 555 are repeated after 556; both here and
where they occur before they are marked in red, with this note : oi o-tl\ol ovtoi
to 8c Tpov
ovs opas Sia koklvov crty/A^s[red dots] cto-tvifiirpoaSev ytypafjLfAtvor
on-i

<r9e

ovk otSa 8c to ottolovc^ct KaXws. (Cf. R9 at <j>353^ ovk


avrifiokov ct^cv e/xwpoo-Otv
IT

oT8a ct o-Tt^os.) On 027: interlin. Actt cVos iv aXXwfivPkiw.1


Vat. 1404 (var.) s. xiv avTifi\rO\v
o\ov.2
Hi ^ 508 aXX! a\ov tvpov ourws tov Trapvo-Tt^ov.
L8 t 291, 2 m. r. vacant secundum altos codices.

Such is the originof variantsin general. Is it also the originof the


variantsin Homer ? The source of the Homeric variants is two-foldand
consecutive- oral and manual ; the alternativeswhichsprang to the lips of
Bards and Homerid recitersand later rhapsodes; and the contributionsof
the scribeswho propagated the poems and theirreaders in historicaltimes.
1
Equivalents for \eiirctare numerous : in the Odyssey MSS. the condemnatory word is split
and one syllable is placed before, the other after,the superfluousline : e.g. va . . . . cat 087 Br, a 93,
408 O, cf. vacat L8 p 233, 577 al., vacant /x22i U3, jSokot p 91 Rio, op ....
yes 0501 Ui,
4\Ktit 179, i^ 48 O, vn4p ....
earn B 637 U 13. Tlepiaas is common.
irap ....
The reverse, a space left accidentally blank, is apologised for with X^Brj ('K^Bri' Roe 18
a. I349f. 90 r.) ; \d$os Ven. ix. 16 (s. xv.) f. 246 V. excuses a repetition. A bolder tone is sometimes
taken: Vat. 1347 (s. xv. ) r4\os + koI yhp rk tyctfs ovx evpov iv foriyp<f>ois,
S>are Ky> avy icy
irapKinov. u 5e cvpovovk tiv hfK&Kvqaaypacpeiv,&<rirepovde ra itpSora. oaris 5e ivrcvl-CTair$ fii$\i(p
rortpovtcosar\e7avyyv</xrv
ix^rUf ei 5c pi) avrbs 4<xut<aWou fx^ray pa<ptw ovk ivdea, iytb 8e
tovtois LpKov/xai,
xaiptTUGOLV
yovv oi &W01.

2 So thes. x. Paris Demosthenes


at the end of the Ylapa.tr
2934 : vTejSA^ty
pafieia. Aiwpdccfxivov
(-to) whichdoes not necessarily
implycollationis more common; see the facsimileof the
A

BodleianPlato praef.p. v; add Ven. 454 f. i7r. o>. Such expressionsas %<as56 %\6ovBarocci
121f. 57 v. are probablyattributable
to a reviser.
G

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82

The British School

at Rome.

The MS. variants in Homer are amply accounted forby these conditions
Do theyalso explain the 55 or 56 per cent, of Aristarcheanreadingsin our
MSS ? Aristarchus*readings, it is now admitted,were all or nearly all
taken from MSS. extant in his time. One might thereforesuppose that
the 55 per cent, were direct descendants of these MSS., circulated and
propagated on the usual lines. Several considerations,however,impede
this conclusion. In the firstplace, the maximum of extant Aristarcheanisms is only 55 ; the remaining45 have been hardlytreated,if the ordinary
processes of copying are invoked to account forthe facts: moreoverout of
these 55 per cent,only about are universal,\ are foundin about half the
MSS., and the remaining are sporadic. Unassisted clerical tradition
would hardly have rejected 45 per cent, altogether,and another 14 per
cent, all but entirely. Secondly, there are no traces of these survivals
whereon this theorywe should most expect to find them- in the papyri.
It is notorious that in the papyri- from s. iii B.C. to s. v A.D.- the
Alexandrian readingsare practicallynil. We cannot, if we advance that
the actual Aristarcheanismshave been propagated by ordinaryprocesses,
explain this gap of eight centuries. As faras we can followantiquity,up
and down, the manuscriptsof the poems show no sign of contact with
Alexandria. Thirdly, the view, perhaps the common one, that this
percentageis due to the directeffectof Aristarchus'edition(and thatof the
otherAlexandrians) is negatived by the very doubtfulcharacter of that
*edition/ To. *affect' the
must have
publishingtrade,Aristarchus'e/cSo<r9
been a real edition,copied and floated in considerable numbers1: if such
had been the case (1) the papyri must have shown at least some trace of
it, and they do not ; (2) its readings could not have been doubtful. Once
issued a book was stereotyped: as we say, littera scripta manet. When
Polybius (xvi. 20) wrote to Zeno to point out mistakesin his book, Zeno
admittedthemyvovshvvarovelvat ttjvfieTadeav Bia to TrpoeKBeSco/cevac
ras
<rvvT];i<;.

But it is notorious that Aristarchus' readings were a bone of


contentionbetween his immediate disciples, Dionysius of Thrace and
1 Such as thoseof
and Dioscurides: Galen xv. 23 'Aprefiitiupos
6
Hippocratesby Artemidorus

Kairhav koviv 4voi-fi<raror&v 'itiroKprovs&i&\(t>v,vtioKifiT)cra<j<xv


ov fivov napa
iviK\7fd\s
'A5pmv<Vy avTOKpdropiaXXa icl vvv kolvwsvirbtroWup (nrovda(ofi4privt
&<nrepkoI f rod cvyyevovs
avrov Aio<ricovp(8ov.
iroAAct/uevoZv afHprcpoifieryparpav,
vitaWrrovres rh.5 iraXatas ypcups. . .
w5 irwsypampas.
irpbs8e Tots vo\\(hs ical T^jvSetV vvv -npoKixvr\v
hQiv ifn-ffWa^t
KaTriTwy,

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The Text of the Odyssey.

83

Ammonius,the latterhis actual successor in the school.1 How could such


a disputehave lasted fora momentif Aristarchus'editionhad existed and
been available for reference? It has been suggested that there was no
'
edition/and that e/cSoai?meant the act of editing- a criticism,in the
active not the concrete. This was actually the case with Crates of Mallus
whose diorthosisof Homer consistedof eight books.2 The definitenessof
are quoted (v. C.R. 1901, p.
the expressionsby whichAristarchus'itcSaet,?
256) seems to forbidthis extremeview. Did then the edition once exist
and was it lost ? Galen (xv. 23) gives a choiceof explanationsof the loss of
a treatise: the writerhad no successors,or did not publish in his lifetime;
or his writingswere despised and forgotten,or malicious enemies hid or
destroyedthem; or firesand earthquakes,as had lately happened at Rome,
destroy libraries. The fireat Alexandria in 47 B.C. has been thoughtof
by Wilamowitz {Horn. Untersuchungen297), but that is too late to
account for the dispute between Ammonius and Dionysius.
Aristarchushad disciples, he was very celebrated, no <f>6ovep<;
hid or
his
been
for
editions.
Had
how
could
reason,
lost,
any
destroyed
they
as
been
are
?
A
made
have
quoted,
they
{C.R. I.e.) in
they
suggestion
1901, is still the best I can offer,namely that the Aristarchean/c&oai<$
consistedin a copy of the kolvtjwith criticalsigns on the margin making
- the obelisk and the asteriskto atheteses of
referenceto his commentaries
lines,the diplae to judgments about words and forms. As therewere two
'
and as the referencein the
editions/with doubtless differentarj/Meluy
ai-jfielaneed not be immediately clear, there was room for dispute: to
settlethese disputes and also to relievethe learned public of the necessity
of consulting Aristarchus' commentaries, Didymus and Aristonicus
compiled their manuals. This suggestion appears to be confirmedby
Pap. Tebtunis 4, which, of s. ii B.C., the centuryof Aristarchus,has a
vulgate text withcriticalsigns.
Upon any hypothesis,the influenceof Aristarchusdown to the point
at which the papyri stop was nil. Why then does it work in the
1 The uncertainty
is notunlikethatas to Chrysippus'
: Galen xi. 151
teachinguponphlebotomy

ovtievlra avra tealrb irvrwvHeivrarov fin /?)5'aurois rots <rvfx<poi5otyap abruv [rav /xadrfruv]
rt\raisiiev rov 'Epaffiffrparov
fiaBt\raiid Xpvafairovrov Kvitiiov,ovvep 5i) irpwrovrb $6y/xatout' v
ovt>yap Kflvois bycoXoyeiraiirepl rrjs Xpvairirovyvfir\sov$4v. The
fi^i xpw#ai <p\&oTOfxia'
explanation also seems the same, Chrysippus' works were lost : id. 221 ^5rf vdvra iroA.caA.6f,,
KivBvpeveiira0?i>.
ra X.pv<riirirov
KaBjairtp
2
'IAtaSos ko.1'OoWo'etas iv fiifi\oisO*. Suidas in v.
<rvv4rae
8ipdco(Tiv

G 2

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84

The British School

at Rome.

Byzantine period, s. x-xv A.D., in the irregular proportionswe have


calculated? My answer is that given (C.R. 1900,385), that the Alexandrian
readings in our text are escapes from marginal scholia. Brief critical
scholia, consistingalmost entirelyof readings,are given us occasionally in
the papyri: V3 of the Odyssey (s. i A.D.), ^14 of the Iliad (s. ii
A.D.), T2 (s. v A.D.), V21 (s. ii-iii A.D.), (C.R. 1904, 140). They must
have become more frequent towards, the end of the Old World,
the period when independent commentaries were fused into running
annotation. This period may have varied with differentauthors: we see
Proclus (d. 485 A.D.) manufacturingscholia on Orpheus (C.Q. 1908, 65).
In the case of Homer we find Stephanus of Byzantium quoting the
commentariesof Epaphroditus and Phiioxenus as still extant in his day.
The body of scholia in the Ven. A of the Iliad were prefaced by an
epitome of Proclus' Chrestomathia; they can thereforehardlyhave come
into existence before s. vi. This is exactly the period between our last
papyri and our earliest minuscules (the firstis the codex Mureti of the
scholia minora,s. ix). During this period the Alexandrian readings were
broughtinto systematicproximityto the text of the poem, the scribeas he
contemplated his archetype and the owner as he read his Homer were
liable to be affected by them : e? tovSckjh)? vito tov /3i/3\ioyp()ovre /cal

rov KvpiovfiTaT0eiTai.While the ' scholia ' were a separate book, the
of an Antoninian grammarian,this was not equally the case.
vTrfjLvrjfia
The phenomenon comes under the general law of the relation between
text and comment. The intrusion of the Alexandrian reading varies
directlywith the abundance of the comment: in the Odyssey, where
scholia are scanty,intrusionsare few; in those books wherethe scholia are
fewestintrusionsare nil.
A particularcase of this law is to hand in ourprincipalHomeric MS., Ven.
454 of the Iliad. This greatbook was, as I hope to have shown,/. Ph., 1899,
161 sq. written all by one scribe, in three portions: text, outer or
minuscule scholia, inner or semiuncial scholia. The scribe correctedthe
text he had writtenat two moments,which may be distinguishedby the
colourof theink of the corrections:first,as he wrotethe text itself,second,
as he wrote the inner or semiuncial scholia. The inner scholia are in
close proximityto the text, and wherewe findan Alexandrian reading in
these scholia and the same reading superscribedas a correctionover the
text, both in the same tintof ink,it can hardlybe denied that the scholia

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The Text of the Odyssey.

85

suggested the. correction.1 The reader may now examine the facts in
Domenico Comparetti'sfacsimile.
The cases are these:
A 124 7tovAr. A ss.

B 798 389 fih Ar. A ss.


T

I
K

801 irpori Ar. A ss.


Ar. A SS.
99 Trcirao-Oc
Ar. A SS.
295 a<l)vcr(rfvoi
362 avrrj Ar. A ss.
661 fopXrjiccivAr. A ss.
842 ifrvpi&v Ar. A ras.
Ar. A ss.
513 tt(T(toi
Ar. A ss.
112 virCOi/iw
Ar. A ss.
79 cVcrpaTTc
291 TraptoraoAr. A marg.
Ar. A marg.
463 emSuxrofitO'
Ar. A corr.
Xas
<TKoinrv
515
Ar.
184 ao-TcpoTr^v A ss.
230 lav Ar. A ss.

M 16 1 fiaWo/xivtov
Ar. A ss.
Ar.
A
ss.
ovSc
404
N 10 6Xao(T(TKOTnrv
Ar. A corr.
28 ryvoyj<rav
Ar. A ss.
103 7rap8a\tW Ar. A marg.
627 7TpAr. A ss.
O 301 atavrt Ar. A ss.
737 ti Ar. A marg.
P 202 l<tlAr. A ss.
231 t<3 Ar. A ss.
2 100 apcw Ar. A ss.
477 KparcpovZen. A ss.
Ar. A ss.
T 391 iv Kopv<f>fjs
Ar. A ss.
2 avc\/v)(ovTo
X
ant. A ss.
247 Kpoo"vvr}$
ant. A ss.
O 616 jAxXtJiov

It is unfortunatethat we cannot exhibit the next stage, a copy


of Ven. A containing these corrections as part of the text, but no
MSS. known depend directly on Ven. A : the family/ is a kind of
collateral descendant. However the process of absorbing corrections
has been amply illustratedfromthe Odyssey MSS.
My answer then to Mr. Leaf and to Herr P. Cauer (who has
treatedthesubjectin his Grundfragender homerischen
Kritik? pp. 41 sq.) is
that the Aristarchean readings whether in the. Iliad family // or
in the MSS. generally of both poems are due in the first place to
the ancient and mediaeval habit of collation, and specificallyto the
position of the Aristarchean readings on the margins of the texts.
The mental habit of the monk,waveringover his much laden archetype
is given in the remarkof R9 on <353#,ovtcolSa el <7Tt^;o9.
1 I said the contraryI.e. p. 171; but in the light of the experiencegained by combining
back.
collationsintoapparatus,I take the statement

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