Está en la página 1de 10

Allium sativum L.

, commonly known as
garlic, is a species in the onion family
Alliaceae.
Its close relatives include the onion, the
shallot, and the leek.
Garlic

has

been

used

throughout

recorded history for both culinary and


medicinal purposes.
It has a characteristic pungent, spicy
flavor

that

mellows

and

considerably with cooking.

sweetens

A bulb of garlic, the most commonly


used part of the plant, is divided into
numerous fleshy sections called cloves.
The cloves are used as seed, for
consumption (raw or cooked), and for
medicinal purposes.
The leaves, stems and flowers are also
edible.
The papery, protective layers of 'skin'
over various parts of the plant and the
roots attached to the bulb are the only
parts not considered palatable.

What is usually referred to as a head of


garlic is, in botanical terms, a bulb, i.e., a
subterranean reserve structure derived
from a cluster of leaves.
The single leaves are known as cloves of
garlic.
Some cuisines make minor use of fresh
garlic leaves.

Alliaceae (onion family).

Strong

and

characteristic

odour,

which is markedly different in fresh


and fried state.
The pungency of fresh garlic vanishes after cooking or frying.

Garlic is easy to grow and can be grown


year-round in mild climates.
In cold climates, cloves can be planted in
the ground about six weeks before the
soil freezes, and harvested in late spring.
Garlic plants are not attacked by pests.

They can suffer from pink root, a disease


that stunts the roots and turns them pink
or red.
Garlic plants can be grown close
together, leaving enough room for the
bulbs to mature, and are easily grown in
containers of sufficient depth.

Phytochemicals

Allicin
Beta-carotene
Beta-sitosterol
Caffeic acid
Chlorogenic acid
Diallyl disulfide

Ferulic acid
Geraniol
Kaempferol
Linalool
Oleanolic acid
P-coumaric acid
Phloroglucinol
Phytic acid
Quercetin
Rutin
S-Allyl cysteine
Saponin
Sinapic acid
Stigmasterol
Alliin

1. Culinary uses
2. Medicinal use and health benefits

Garlic is widely used around the world


for its pungent flavor, as a seasoning or
condiment.
Depending on the form of cooking, the
flavor is either mellow or intense.
It is often paired with onion, tomato, or
ginger. The parchment-like skin is much
like the skin of an onion, and is typically

removed before using in raw or cooked


form.
An alternative is to cut the top off the
bulb, coat cloves of garlic by dribbling
olive oil (or other oil based seasoning)
over them and roast them in the oven.
The garlic softens and can be extracted
from the cloves by squeezing the (root)
end of the bulb or individually by
squeezing one end of the clove.
Oils are often flavored with garlic cloves.
Commercially prepared oils are widely
available, but when preparing garlicinfused oil at home, there is a risk of

botulism if the product is not stored


properly.
To reduce this risk, the oil should be
refrigerated and used within one week.
Manufacturers add acids and/or other
chemicals to eliminate the risk of botulism
in their products.
In Chinese cuisine, the young bulbs are
pickled for 36 weeks in a mixture of
sugar, salt and spices.
In Russia the shoots are pickled and eaten
as an appetizer.
Garlic leaves are a popular vegetable in
many parts of Asia, particularly Chinese,

Vietnamese, Cambodian, Laotian and


Korean cuisines.
The leaves are cut, cleaned and then stirfried with eggs, meat, or vegetables.

Atherosclerosis( fat deposits inside the arterial walls)


Heart Attack Prevention
High Cholesterol
Hypertension (High Blood Pressure)
Cold Prevention
Insect Repellent
Cancer Prevention
Antimicrobial