Course Professor Term Meetings

POEC 6361 POLITICAL VIOLENCE & TERRORISM (cross-listed in PSCI) Dr. Holmes Fall 2008 Tues 1-3:45 SOM 2.112

Professor’s
Contact
Information
 Office
Phone
 972‐883‐6843
 Office
 GR
3.209
 Location
 Email
 jholmes@utdallas.edu
 Address
 Office
Hours
 Tues
Thurs
9‐9:50
 
 General
Course
Information
 Course
Description
In
this
discussion‐based
seminar,
we
 will
cover
the
topics
of
terrorism,
political
violence,
and
 civil
war.

We
will
examine
concepts,
causes,
and
 consequences
of
different
types
of
political
violence.

 Additionally,
we
will
discuss
topics
relevant
to
research,
 including
discussions
of
different
approaches
 (quantitative,
qualitative,
and
formal)
and
a
perusal
of
 different
data
sources.

We
will
take
advantage
of
 literature
from
multiple
disciplines.
 
 Learning
Objectives

Course
content
is
designed
 enhance
students’
understanding
of
the
concepts,
 explanations,
types
of
evidence,
implications,
 consequences,
and
relationships
of
terrorism
and
 political
violence.

Course
assignments
aim
to
develop
 students’
analytical
ability
and
oral
presentation
skills.


 Required
Texts
&
Materials
 • Research
on
Terrorism:
Trends,
Achievements
and
 Failures
Edited
by:
Andrew
Silke

Routledge
 • Numerous
articles
available
in
electronic
format
 through
the
library’s
electronic
databases.
 • Free
subscription
to
Terrorism
Focus
of
the
 Jamestown
Foundation
http://www.jamestown.org
 • Plus
–
two
other
books
TBD.
 
 Course
Policies
 Grading
(credit)
 o Class
Participation
&
Weekly
Questions:


20%
=
 (days
you
are
not
leading
discussion)
 o Paper
1:
 
 
 


25%

 o Paper
2:
 
 
 


25%

 o Bibliographic
Essay


30%







Attendance
Class
attendance
is
required.

You
are
 responsible
for
all
announcements
and
information
 given
in
class.


 Weekly
Questions
Weekly
questions:
Each
week
(other
 than
the
weeks
you
are
leading
discussion)
you
should
 submit
three
questions
to
the
instructor
about
the
 week’s
readings.

These
questions
will
be
the
basis
for
 class
discussion
and
will
be
used
to
guide
how
we
 address
the
material
each
week.


 Late
Work
As
a
rule,
no
extensions
are
granted
for
 written
work.

Unexcused
late
papers
will
be
penalized
 one
full
grade
per
day.

However,
in
case
of
an
 emergency,
contact
the
professor
as
soon
as
possible
to
 see
if
an
exception
can
be
made
at
the
discretion
of
the
 professor.

Documentation
will
be
required
of
any
 emergency.


 Turnitin
All
written
assignments
must
also
be
submitted
 to
turnitin.com.

Please
go
to
turnitin.com
and
register
 for
the
class.

The
course
number
is
2368165
and
the
 password
is
bombs
 Cell
Phones
Due
to
receiving
numerous
complaints
from
 students,
this
policy
is
necessary.

If
you
allow
your
cell
 phone
or
beeper
to
audibly
ring
or
beep
in
class,
you
will
 be
penalized.

The
first
time
is
a
warning,
after
that
you
 lose
points.

The
penalty
starts
at
two
percentage
points
 and
will
double
every
time
thereafter.

If
you
answer
the
 phone,
no
warning
will
be
granted
and
you
will
be
 immediately
assessed
the
penalty.
 Student
Conduct
and
Discipline
The
University
of
Texas
 System
and
The
University
of
Texas
at
Dallas
have
rules
 and
regulations
for
the
orderly
and
efficient
conduct
of
 their
business.

It
is
the
responsibility
of
each
student
 and
each
student
organization
to
be
knowledgeable
 about
the
rules
and
regulations
which
govern
student
 conduct
and
activities.

General
information
on
student
 conduct
and
discipline
is
contained
in
the
UTD
 publication,
A
to
Z
Guide,
which
is
provided
to
all
 registered
students
each
academic
year.
 
 The
University
of
Texas
at
Dallas
administers
student
 discipline
within
the
procedures
of
recognized
and


1

established
due
process.

Procedures
are
defined
and
 described
in
the
Rules
and
Regulations,
Board
of
 Regents,
The
University
of
Texas
System,
Part
1,
Chapter
 VI,
Section
3,
and
in
Title
V,
Rules
on
Student
Services
 and
Activities
of
the
university’s
Handbook
of
Operating
 Procedures.

Copies
of
these
rules
and
regulations
are
 available
to
students
in
the
Office
of
the
Dean
of
 Students,
where
staff
members
are
available
to
assist
 students
in
interpreting
the
rules
and
regulations
(SU
 1.602,
972/883‐6391).
 
 A
student
at
the
university
neither
loses
the
rights
nor
 escapes
the
responsibilities
of
citizenship.

He
or
she
is
 expected
to
obey
federal,
state,
and
local
laws
as
well
as
 the
Regents’
Rules,
university
regulations,
and
 administrative
rules.

Students
are
subject
to
discipline
 for
violating
the
standards
of
conduct
whether
such
 conduct
takes
place
on
or
off
campus,
or
whether
civil
or
 criminal
penalties
are
also
imposed
for
such
conduct.
 Academic
Integrity
The
faculty
expects
from
its
students
 a
high
level
of
responsibility
and
academic
honesty.

 Because
the
value
of
an
academic
degree
depends
upon
 the
absolute
integrity
of
the
work
done
by
the
student
 for
that
degree,
it
is
imperative
that
a
student
 demonstrate
a
high
standard
of
individual
honor
in
his
or
 her
scholastic
work.
 
 Scholastic
dishonesty
includes,
but
is
not
limited
to,
 statements,
acts
or
omissions
related
to
applications
for
 enrollment
or
the
award
of
a
degree,
and/or
the
 submission
as
one’s
own
work
or
material
that
is
not
 one’s
own.

As
a
general
rule,
scholastic
dishonesty
 involves
one
of
the
following
acts:

cheating,
plagiarism,
 collusion
and/or
falsifying
academic
records.

Students
 suspected
of
academic
dishonesty
are
subject
to
 disciplinary
proceedings.
 
 Plagiarism,
especially
from
the
web,
from
portions
of
 papers
for
other
classes,
and
from
any
other
source
is
 unacceptable
and
will
be
dealt
with
under
the
 university’s
policy
on
plagiarism
(see
general
catalog
for
 details).

This
course
will
use
the
resources
of
 turnitin.com,
which
searches
the
web
for
possible
 plagiarism
and
is
over
90%
effective.
 Email
The
University
of
Texas
at
Dallas
recognizes
the
 value
and
efficiency
of
communication
between
 faculty/staff
and
students
through
electronic
mail.
At
the
 same
time,
email
raises
some
issues
concerning
security
 and
the
identity
of
each
individual
in
an
email
exchange.

 The
university
encourages
all
official
student
email
 correspondence
be
sent
only
to
a
student’s
U.T.
Dallas


email
address
and
that
faculty
and
staff
consider
email
 from
students
official
only
if
it
originates
from
a
UTD
 student
account.
This
allows
the
university
to
maintain
a
 high
degree
of
confidence
in
the
identity
of
all
individual
 corresponding
and
the
security
of
the
transmitted
 information.

UTD
furnishes
each
student
with
a
free
 email
account
that
is
to
be
used
in
all
communication
 with
university
personnel.
The
Department
of
 Information
Resources
at
U.T.
Dallas
provides
a
method
 for
students
to
have
their
U.T.
Dallas
mail
forwarded
to
 other
accounts.
 Withdrawal
The
administration
of
this
institution
has
set
 deadlines
for
withdrawal
of
any
college‐level
courses.
 These
dates
and
times
are
published
in
that
semester's
 course
catalog.
Administration
procedures
must
be
 followed.
It
is
the
student's
responsibility
to
handle
 withdrawal
requirements
from
any
class.
In
other
words,
 I
cannot
drop
or
withdraw
any
student.
You
must
do
the
 proper
paperwork
to
ensure
that
you
will
not
receive
a
 final
grade
of
"F"
in
a
course
if
you
choose
not
to
attend
 the
class
once
you
are
enrolled.
 Student
Grievance
Procedures
Procedures
for
student
 grievances
are
found
in
Title
V,
Rules
on
Student
 Services
and
Activities,
of
the
university’s
Handbook
of
 Operating
Procedures.
 
 In
attempting
to
resolve
any
student
grievance
regarding
 grades,
evaluations,
or
other
fulfillments
of
academic
 responsibility,
it
is
the
obligation
of
the
student
first
to
 make
a
serious
effort
to
resolve
the
matter
with
the
 instructor,
supervisor,
administrator,
or
committee
with
 whom
the
grievance
originates
(hereafter
called
“the
 respondent”).

Individual
faculty
members
retain
 primary
responsibility
for
assigning
grades
and
 evaluations.

If
the
matter
cannot
be
resolved
at
that
 level,
the
grievance
must
be
submitted
in
writing
to
the
 respondent
with
a
copy
of
the
respondent’s
School
 Dean.

If
the
matter
is
not
resolved
by
the
written
 response
provided
by
the
respondent,
the
student
may
 submit
a
written
appeal
to
the
School
Dean.

If
the
 grievance
is
not
resolved
by
the
School
Dean’s
decision,
 the
student
may
make
a
written
appeal
to
the
Dean
of
 Graduate
or
Undergraduate
Education,
and
the
deal
will
 appoint
and
convene
an
Academic
Appeals
Panel.

The
 decision
of
the
Academic
Appeals
Panel
is
final.

The
 results
of
the
academic
appeals
process
will
be
 distributed
to
all
involved
parties.
 
 Copies
of
these
rules
and
regulations
are
available
to
 students
in
the
Office
of
the
Dean
of
Students,
where
 staff
members
are
available
to
assist
students
in


2

interpreting
the
rules
and
regulations.
 Incomplete
As
per
university
policy,
incomplete
 grades
will
be
granted
only
for
work
unavoidably
 missed
at
the
semester’s
end
and
only
if
70%
of
 the
course
work
has
been
completed.

An
 incomplete
grade
must
be
resolved
within
eight
 (8)
weeks
from
the
first
day
of
the
subsequent
 long
semester.

If
the
required
work
to
complete
 the
course
and
to
remove
the
incomplete
grade
is
 not
submitted
by
the
specified
deadline,
the
 incomplete
grade
is
changed
automatically
to
a
 grade
of
F.
 Webct

Webct
is
used
in
this
class.

This
is
how
I
will
 communicate
with
you.

You
are
responsible
for
 announcements
made
through
webct.

Please
select
a
 forwarding
address
in
your
mail
preferences
if
you
do
 not
regularly
check
your
utdallas
email.


 Disability
Services
The
goal
of
Disability
Services
is
to
 provide
students
with
disabilities
educational
 opportunities
equal
to
those
of
their
non‐disabled
peers.

 Disability
Services
is
located
in
room
1.610
in
the
 Student
Union.

Office
hours
are
Monday
and
Thursday,
 8:30
a.m.
to
6:30
p.m.;
Tuesday
and
Wednesday,
8:30
 a.m.
to
7:30
p.m.;
and
Friday,
8:30
a.m.
to
5:30
p.m.
 
 The
contact
information
for
the
Office
of
 Disability
Services
is:
 The
University
of
Texas
at
Dallas,
SU
22
 PO
Box
830688
 Richardson,
Texas
75083‐0688
 (972)
883‐2098
(voice
or
TTY)
 
 Essentially,
the
law
requires
that
colleges
and
 universities
make
those
reasonable
adjustments
 necessary
to
eliminate
discrimination
on
the
basis
of
 disability.

For
example,
it
may
be
necessary
to
remove
 classroom
prohibitions
against
tape
recorders
or
animals
 (in
the
case
of
dog
guides)
for
students
who
are
blind.

 Occasionally
an
assignment
requirement
may
be
 substituted
(for
example,
a
research
paper
versus
an
 oral
presentation
for
a
student
who
is
hearing
impaired).

 Classes
enrolled
students
with
mobility
impairments
 may
have
to
be
rescheduled
in
accessible
facilities.

The
 college
or
university
may
need
to
provide
special
 services
such
as
registration,
note‐taking,
or
mobility
 assistance.
 
 It
is
the
student’s
responsibility
to
notify
his
or
her
 professors
of
the
need
for
such
an
accommodation.

 Disability
Services
provides
students
with
letters
to
 present
to
faculty
members
to
verify
that
the
student


has
a
disability
and
needs
accommodations.

Individuals
 requiring
special
accommodation
should
contact
the
 professor
after
class
or
during
office
hours.
 Religious
Holidays
The
University
of
Texas
at
Dallas
will
 excuse
a
student
from
class
or
other
required
activities
 for
the
travel
to
and
observance
of
a
religious
holy
day
 for
a
religion
whose
places
of
worship
are
exempt
from
 property
tax
under
Section
11.20,
Tax
Code,
Texas
Code
 Annotated.
 The
student
is
encouraged
to
notify
the
instructor
or
 activity
sponsor
as
soon
as
possible
regarding
the
 absence,
preferably
in
advance
of
the
assignment.

The
 student,
so
excused,
will
be
allowed
to
take
the
exam
or
 complete
the
assignment
within
a
reasonable
time
after
 the
absence:
a
period
equal
to
the
length
of
the
 absence,
up
to
a
maximum
of
one
week.
A
student
who
 notifies
the
instructor
and
completes
any
missed
exam
 or
assignment
may
not
be
penalized
for
the
absence.
A
 student
who
fails
to
complete
the
exam
or
assignment
 within
the
prescribed
period
may
receive
a
failing
grade
 for
that
exam
or
assignment.
 If
a
student
or
an
instructor
disagrees
about
the
nature
 of
the
absence
[i.e.,
for
the
purpose
of
observing
a
 religious
holy
day]
or
if
there
is
similar
disagreement
 about
whether
the
student
has
been
given
a
reasonable
 time
to
complete
any
missed
assignments
or
 examinations,
either
the
student
or
the
instructor
may
 request
a
ruling
from
the
chief
executive
officer
of
the
 institution,
or
his
or
her
designee.
The
chief
executive
 officer
or
designee
must
take
into
account
the
legislative
 intent
of
TEC
51.911(b),
and
the
student
and
instructor
 will
abide
by
the
decision
of
the
chief
executive
officer
 or
designee.
 Off‐Campus
Instruction
and
Course
Activities
Off‐ campus,
out‐of‐state,
and
foreign
instruction
and
 activities
are
subject
to
state
law
and
University
policies
 and
procedures
regarding
travel
and
risk‐related
 activities.

Information
regarding
these
rules
and
 regulations
may
be
found
at
 http://www.utdallas.edu/BusinessAffairs/Travel_Risk_A ctivities.htm.

Additional
information
is
available
from
 the
office
of
the
school
dean.




3

Paper
Objectives
and
Guidelines

 
 Substantive
Expectations
(First
Two
Papers):
 In
the
first
two
papers,
you
should
demonstrate
a
general
understanding
of
the
issues
raised
in
the
 book.

The
object
of
this
critical
review
should
be
to
identify
the
central
issues
that
assigned
readings
for
 the
week
and
the
book
address.

Students
writing
papers
will
present
their
analysis
in
class
(~15
 minutes).

In
addition,
you
should
be
able
to
evaluate
different
theories
and
approaches,
identifying
the
 relevant
assumptions,
definitions,
strengths,
and
weaknesses
of
each.

Finally,
you
should
be
able
to
 create
a
critical,
engaged
argument,
using
the
texts
as
evidence.

The
paper
should
take
into
account
the
 following
questions:
 1. What
is
the
purpose
of
the
book,
what
is
the
theoretical
concern,
and
what
concepts
are
 developed?
 2. What
is
being
studied,
i.e.
what
is
the
unit
of
analysis
and
the
scope
of
the
study?
 3. How
is
it
being
studied,
in
terms
of
what
variables?
 4. To
what
degree
does
the
study
conform
to
the
criteria
of
the
logic
of
scientific
explanation?

Or
 does
it
conform
to
an
alternative
form
of
inquiry?
 5. Are
the
conclusions
suggestive
or
proven?

Do
the
data
support
the
inference?


 6. What
is
the
book’s
significance?

How
does
it
fit
into
the
literature?
 7. How
does
the
book
challenge
or
add
to
our
understanding
of
development?
 8. What
are
the
strengths
and
shortcomings
of
the
book?
 To
accommodate
seminar
discussion,
the
critical
analyses
will
be
due
no
later
than
24
hours
in
advance
 of
seminar
meeting
time.

Students
shall
post
the
paper
on
webct
for
the
other
students
at
least
24
 hours
in
advance
of
the
class
and
the
paper
author
shall
also
place
one
copy
in
the
instructor’s
mailbox.
 
 Students
writing
papers
will
present
their
analysis
in
class
(~15
minutes)
and
help
lead
discussion.

The
 matrix
for
grading
presentations
is
as
follows:


 • Presentation
Style:

(25%)

(e.g.
professional,
well‐organized,
maintain
eye
contact
with
 audience,
speak
loudly/clearly/slowly,
able
to
respond
to
questions
easily,
time
management)
 • Content:
(50%)
(e.g.
organized,
logical
flow,
overview
of
issue
provided,
clear
arguments,
 supporting
information
provided,
use
of
outside
research,
integrate
course
material
into
 presentation)
 • Discussion
Questions
(25%)
(provision
of
stimulating
and
relevant
questions
relating
your
book
 to
the
other
required
readings)
 Final
Paper
(Bibliographic
Essay)
 Exemplars
can
be
found
in
the
Annual
Review
of
Political
Science.

In
general,
you
should
provide
a
critical
 evaluation
of
the
included
sources,
compare
and
contrast
them,
group
them
substantively.

See

 faculty.tamu‐commerce.edu/droyal/Writing%20a%20Bibliographic%20Essay.doc

 for
an
excellent
guide
to
writing
a
bibliographic
essay.

Please
note
that
in
this
assignment,
students
may
use
the
 MLA
style
of
documentation.

For
all
others,
please
use
footnotes.
 Style
Expectations

 Format:
 1.

Use
footnotes.
(See
The
Chicago
Manual
of
Style
for
details).
A
summary
can
be
found
at

 http://www.libs.uga.edu/ref/chicago.html

Use
the
documentary
note
style
‐not
the
author
note
system!!!

This
 is
not
the
MLA
form
of
citation.

MLA
citation
is
an
author‐date
system.

If
using
Microsoft
word,
under
the
insert
 menu,
choose
reference
and
then
footnote
to
automatically
number
the
reference
and
place
it
at
the
bottom
of
 the
page.

The
style
is
as
follows:
 
 Examples
of
footnotes:


4

1 2


David
Stafford,
Britain
and
European
Resistance
(Toronto:

University
of
Toronto
Press,
1980),
90.
 
James
F.
Powers,
"Frontier
Municipal
Baths
and
Social
Interaction
in
Thirteenth‐Century
Spain,"
American
 Historical
Review
84
(June
1979):
655.
 
 Bibliography:
 Stafford,
David.
Britain
and
European
Resistance.
Toronto:

University
of
Toronto
Press,



1980.
 Powers,
James
F.

"Frontier
Municipal
Baths
and
Social
Interaction
in
Thirteenth‐Century
Spain."
American
 Historical
Review
84
(June
1979):
649‐67.
 
 According
to
The
Chicago
Manual
of
Style,
"the
full
reference
of
a
note,
as
in
a
bibliographic
entry,
must
include
 enough
information
to
enable
the
interested
reader
to
find
it
in
a
library,
though
the
form
of
the
note
need
not
 correspond
precisely
to
that
of
the
library
catalog."1
 
 2.



Use
a
12
point
font.
 3.



The
text
should
be
typed,
double
spaced,
and
have
one
inch
margins.
 4.



Do
not
add
extra
spaces
between
paragraphs.
 5.



Number
the
pages.
 6.



Include
a
title
page
with
your
name,
course
title,
and
date.
 7.



Include
a
bibliography.
 
 Style:
 1. Include
an
introduction
and
conclusion
with
appropriate
outlines
and
summation
of
the
main
points
of
your
 paper.
 2. Use
topic
sentences
in
your
paragraphs.

(Please
–
no
two
sentence
paragraphs
or
two
page
paragraphs!)
 3. Do
not
use
a
casual
tone.

(For
example,
do
not
use
contractions
such
as
“can’t,”

“wouldn’t”,
etc.)
 4. Avoid
speaking
in
the
first
person.

(For
example,
“In
this
paper
I
will
…”)
 5. Spell
check!
 
 Sources:
 1. Cite
often.

An
overabundance
of
citations
is
always
preferable
to
too
few.

Cite
as
if
you
want
the
reader
to
 be
able
to
easily
refer
to
your
sources
when
you
refer
to
facts,
quotations,
and
interpretations.


 2. If
someone
else
says
it,
you
must
give
credit
to
him
or
her.

If
you
repeat
the
author
verbatim,
you
must
 quote
and
cite
the
author.

If
you
paraphrase
his
or
her
words,
you
must
cite
the
author.

Failure
to
do
this
is
 plagiarism.


 
 A
good
reference
for
writing
standards
and
references
is
the
Chicago
Manual
of
Style.

If
in
doubt,
 please
consult
it.


1

Chicago Manual of Style, 13th ed. (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1982), 487.

5


 


Adapted
from
Duke
University
guidelines
for
writers
 AVOIDING
PLAGIARISM

 
 Take
time
to
make
careful
choices
among
‐‐
and
learn
to
use
‐‐
the
research
 tools
available
to
you.
You
will
probably
find
that
your
favorite
Web
search
 engine
is
not
adequate,
by
itself,
for
college‐level
research.
Consult
with
your
 professor
or
a
librarian.
You
may
need
to
use
specialized
research
tools,
some
of
 which
may
require
learning
new
searching
techniques.

 Expect
to
make
trips
to
the
library.
While
you
can
access
many
of
the
library's
 resources
from
your
home
computer,
you
may
find
that
you
need
to
make
 several
trips
to
the
library
to
use
materials
or
research
tools
that
are
not
 accessible
remotely.
Of
course
you
will
be
seeking
the
best
information,
not
 settling
for
sources
simply
because
they
happen
to
be
available
online.
 
 Allow
time
for
gathering
materials
that
are
not
available
at
UTD.
The
Interlibrary
 Loan
office
can
borrow
articles
and
books
from
other
libraries,
but
this
process
 takes
additional
time.
 Allow
time
for
reading,
rereading,
absorbing
information,
taking
notes,
 synthesizing,
and
revising
your
research
strategy
or
conducting
additional
 research
as
new
questions
arise.
 Sloppy
note‐taking
increases
the
risk
that
you
will
unintentionally
plagiarize.


 Unless
you
have
taken
notes
carefully,
it
may
be
hard
to
tell
whether
you
copied
 certain
passages
exactly,
paraphrased
them,
or
wrote
them
yourself.
This
is
 especially
problematic
when
using
electronic
source
materials,
since
they
can
so
 easily
be
copied
and
pasted
into
your
own
documents.

 
 Identify
words
that
you
copy
directly
from
a
source
by
placing
quotation
marks
 around
them,
typing
them
in
a
different
color,
or
highlighting
them.
(Do
this
 immediately,
as
you
are
making
your
notes.
Don't
expect
to
remember,
days
or
 weeks
later,
what
phrases
you
copied
directly.)
Make
sure
to
indicate
the
exact
 beginning
and
end
of
the
quoted
passage.
Copy
the
wording,
punctuation
and
 spelling
exactly
as
it
appears
in
the
original.
 Jot
down
the
page
number
and
author
or
title
of
the
source
each
time
you
make
 a
note,
even
if
you
are
not
quoting
directly
but
are
only
paraphrasing.


6

Keep
a
working
bibliography
of
your
sources
so
that
you
can
go
back
to
them
 easily
when
it's
time
to
double‐check
the
accuracy
of
your
notes.
If
you
do
this
 faithfully
during
the
note‐taking
phase,
you
will
have
no
trouble
completing
the
 "works
cited"
section
of
your
paper
later
on.
 Keep
a
research
log.
As
you
search
databases
and
consult
reference
books,
keep
 track
of
what
search
terms
and
databases
you
used
and
the
call
numbers
and
 url's
of
information
sources.

This
will
help
if
you
need
to
refine
your
research
 strategy,
locate
a
source
a
second
time,
or
show
your
professor
what
works
you
 consulted
in
the
process
of
completing
the
project.
 You
must
cite
direct
quotes.
 You
must
cite
paraphrases.
Paraphrasing
is
rewriting
a
passage
in
your
own
 words.
If
you
paraphrase
a
passage,
you
must
still
cite
the
original
source
of
the
 idea.

For
detailed
examples
and
a
discussion,
see
Appropriate
Uses
of
Sources.

 You
must
cite
ideas
given
to
you
in
a
conversation,
in
correspondence,
or
over
 email.
 You
must
cite
sayings
or
quotations
that
are
not
familiar,
or
facts
that
are
not
 "common
knowledge."

However,
it
is
not
necessary
to
cite
a
source
if
you
are
 repeating
a
well
known
quote
such
as
Kennedy's
"Ask
not
what
your
country
can
 do
for
you
.
.
.,"
or
a
familiar
proverb
such
as
"You
can't
judge
a
book
by
its
 cover."

Common
knowledge
is
something
that
is
widely
known.
For
example,
it
is
 common
knowledge
that
Bill
Clinton
served
two
terms
as
president.
It
would
not
 be
necessary
to
cite
a
source
for
this
fact.
 These
types
of
sources
should
be
cited
as
well:
 Printed
sources:
books,
parts
of
books,
magazine
or
journal
articles,
newspaper
articles,
letters,
 diaries,
public
or
private
documents.
 
 Electronic
sources:
web
pages,
articles
from
e‐journals,
newsgroup
postings,
graphics,
email
 messages,
software,
databases.

 
 Images:
works
of
art,
illustrations,
cartoons,
tables,
charts,
graphs.

 
 Recorded
or
spoken
material:
course
lectures,
films,
videos,
TV
or
radio
broadcasts,
interviews,
 public
speeches,
conversations


7

Date
 8.26.2008
 Tuesday

 9.2.2008
 Tuesday


Topic/Books
 Week
1:
Introduction
 Week
2:
Definitions


Readings
 Syllabus
 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. David
C.
Rapoport,
“The
Fourth
Wave:
September
11
in
the
History
of
 Terrorism”
Current
History,
Volume
100,
Number
650
(December
2001)

 Weinberg,
Leonardo;
Pedahzur,
Ami;
Hirsch‐Hoefler,
Sivan.

“The
Challenges
 of
Conceptualizing
Terrorism.”
Terrorism
&
Political
Violence,
Winter2004
 16/4
 Ganor,
Boaz.
“Defining
Terrorism:
Is
One
Man’s
Terrorist
Another
Man’s
 Freedom
Fighter,”
Police
Practice
&
Research
3
(December,
2002):
287‐304.
 Grob‐Fitzgibbon,
Benjamin.
“What
is
Terrorism?
Redefining
a
Phenomenon
 in
Time
of
War,”
Peace
&
Change
30
(April,
2005):
231‐246.
 David
Claridge,
“State
Terrorism?
Applying
a
Definitional
Model,”
in:
 Terrorism
and
Political
Violence,
Vol.8,
No.3,
pp.47‐63
 Charles
Tilly
“Terror,
Terrorism,
Terrorists”
Sociological
Theory
Volume
 22
Page
5

‐
March
2004
 Beril
Dedeoglu
“Bermuda
Triangle:
Comparing
Official
Definitions
of
 Terrorist
Activity”.
Terrorism
and
Political
Violence,
Volume
15,
Number
3,
 October
2003,
pp.
81‐110(30)
 Sartori,
Giovanni.

1970.

“Concept
Misformation
in
Comparative
Politics”

 APSR

64:
1033‐53.


9.9.2008
 Tuesday


Week
3:
Challenges
of
 Research

 


1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 


Andrew
Silke
Ch.
1.
An
Introduction
to
Terrorism
Research
Research
on
 Terrorism
 John
Horgan
Ch.
2.
The
Case
for
First‐hand
Research
Research
on
Terrorism

 Andrew
Silke
Ch.
3.
The
Devil
You
Know:
Continuing
problems
with
research
 on
terrorism
Research
on
Terrorism
 Avishag
Gordon
Ch.
6.
Terrorism
and
Knowledge
Growth:
A
databases
and
 internet
analysis
Research
on
Terrorism

 Fred
Schulze
Ch.
9.
Breaking
the
Cycle:
Empirical
research
and
postgraduate
 studies
on
terrorism
Research
on
Terrorism
 Andrew
Silke
Ch.
10.
The
Road
Less
Travelled:
Recent
trends
in
terrorism
 research
Research
on
Terrorism
 A
Jongman
“Database
Section:
Dimensions
of
Contemporary
Conflict
and
 Human
Rights
Violations”

Terrorism
and
Political
Violence,
Volume
13,
 Number
2,
Summer
2001,
pp.
143‐177(35)

 Rachel
Monaghan,
“Single‐Issue
Terrorism:
A
Neglected
Phenomenon?,
 Studies
in
Conflict
and
Terrorism
23
(2000):
258.


8

9.16.2008
 Tuesday


Week
4:
 Civil
War
and
Terrorism
 Walter,
Barbara
and
Jack
 Snyder
eds.
1999.
Civil
 Wars,
Insecurity,
and
 Intervention.
New
York:
 Columbia
University
Press.
 Bates,
Robert,
et.
al.
2003.
 Political
Instability
Task
 Force
Report:
Phase
IV
 Findings.
(Public
release
 May
10,
2006.)
 Collier,
Paul
and
Nicholas
 Sambanis.
2005.
 Understanding
Civil
War:
 Evidence
and
Analysis
 (Africa).
Washington:
The
 World
Bank
 Week
5:
Causes
of
 Terrorism
–
Economic
 Focus
 
 Gurr,
T.
R.
1970.
Why
men
 rebel.
Princeton,
NJ:
 Princeton
University
Press.
 
 Petersen,
Roger.
2001.
 Resistance
and
Rebellion:
 Lessons
from
Eastern
 Europe.
New
York:
 Cambridge
University
 Press.
 Kreuger,
Alan
B.
and
David
 Laitin.
2003.
Kto
Kogo:
A
 Cross‐Country
Study
of
the
 Origins
and
Targets
of
 Terrorism.
New
York:
 Russell
Sage.


1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

Collier
P,
Hoeffler
A,
&
Rohner
D,
2007,
“Beyond
Greed
and
Grievance:
 Feasibility
and
Civil
War”,
Available
at
 http://www.csae.ox.ac.uk/workingpapers/pdfs/2006‐10text.pdf

 Paul
Collier
and
Nicolas
Sambanis,
2002.
“Understanding
Civil
War:
A
New
 Agenda.”
Journal
of
Conflict
Resolution.
46(1):
3‐12.
 Azam,
Jean‐Paul
and
Anke
Hoeffler.
2002.
"Violence
against
civilians
in
civil
 wars:
looting
or
terror?"
Journal
of
Peace
Research
39(4):
461‐85.
 Ross,
Michael
L.
2004.
“How
Do
Natural
Resources
Influence
Civil
War?
 Evidence
from
Thirteen
Cases.”
International
Organization
58
(1):
35‐67.
 Weinstein,
Jeremy.
2005.
“Resources
and
the
Information
Problem
in
Rebel
 Recruitment.”
Journal
of
Conflict
Resolution
49:
598‐624.
 Kalyvas,
Stathis.
2001.
“'New’
and
'Old’
Wars:
A
Valid
Distinction?”
World
 Politics
54
(1):
99‐118.

 Fearon
J,
2005,
“Primary
Commodity
Exports
and
Civil
War”,
Journal
of
 Conflict
Resolution,
49,
4:
483‐507
 Regan
P,
&
Norton
D,
2005,
“Greed,
Grievance,
and
Mobilization
in
Civil
 Wars”,
Journal
of
Conflict
Resolution,
49,
3:
319‐336
 Di
John
J.
2007.
“Oil
abundance
and
violent
political
conflict:
A
critical
 assessment”

Journal
of
Development
Studies
Volume:
43


Issue:
6


Pages:
 961‐986.
 Kruger,
Alan
and
Jitka
Maleckova.
"Education,
Poverty,
and
Terrorism:
Is
 There
a
Causal
Connection?"
Journal
of
Economic
Perspectives
17(4):
119‐ 144.

 S.
Brock
Blomberg,
Gregory
D.
Hess
and
Akila
Weerapana,
“Economic
 conditions
and
terrorism”

European
Journal
of
Political
Economy
Vol
20.
 Issue
2

(2004):
463‐478
 Murshed,
S.
Mansoob.
2002.
“Civil
war,
conflict
and
underdevelopment.”
 Journal
of
Peace
Research
39
(4):387‐93.
 Burgoon.
2006.

“On
Welfare
and
Terror:
Social
Welfare
Policies
and
 Political‐Economic
Roots
of
Terrorism.”
Journal
of
Conflict
Resolution,
50(2):
 176
‐
203.
 Ehrlich,
Paul
R.,
and
Jianguo
Liu.
2002.
“Some
roots
of
terrorism.”
Population
 and
Environment
24
(2):
183‐
92.
 Crenshaw,
Martha.
1991.
"The
Causes
of
Terrorism."
Comparative
Politics
13
 (4):
379‐399.
 Humphreys
M,
2005,
“Natural
Resources,
Conflict,
and
Conflict
Resolution”,
 Journal
of
Conflict
Resolution,
49,
4:
508‐537
 Brancati
D,
2007,
Political
Aftershocks:
The
Impact
of
Earthquakes
on
 Intrastate
Conflict,
Journal
of
Conflict
Resolution,
51:5:715‐743
 Buhaug,
Halvard.
2006.
“Relative
Capability
and
Rebel
Objective
in
Civil
War
 Journal
of
Peace
Research,
vol.
43,
no.
6,
pp.
691‐708,
Nov
2006


9.23.2008
 Tuesday


1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

9

9.30.2008
 Tuesday


Week
6:
Elections,
Parties,
 and
Violence
 
 della
Porta,
Donatella.
 1995.
Social
Movements,
 Political
Violence,
and
the
 State:
A
comparative
 analysis
of
Italy
and
 Germany.
Cambridge
 University
Press.
 
 Political
Parties
and
 Terrorist
Groups
Edited
by
 Leonard
Weinberg.

 Routledge
1992.


1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

AK
Bohara,
NJ
Mitchell,
M
Nepal.
2006.

“Opportunity,
Democracy,
and
the
 Exchange
of
Political
Violence:
A
Subnational
Analysis
of
Conflict
in
Nepal”
 Journal
of
Conflict
Resolution,
vol.
50,
no.
1,
pp.
108‐128.
 Schatzman,
Christina.
2005.

“Political
Challenge
in
Latin
America:
Rebellion
 and
Collective
Protest
in
an
Era
of
Democratization”
Journal
of
Peace
 Research,
vol.
42,
no.
3,
pp.
291‐310.
 Beer,
Caroline;
Mitchell,
Neil
J.
2004.
“Democracy
and
Human
Rights
in
the
 Mexican
States:
Elections
or
Social
Capital?”
International
Studies
Quarterly,
 Escobar,
Cristina.

2002.
“Clientelism
and
Citizenship:
The
Limits
of
 Democratic
Reform
in
Sucre,
Colombia”

Latin
American
Perspectives,
vol.
 29,
no.
5,
pp.
20‐47.
 Serres,
Philippe.
2000.

“The
FARC
and
Democracy
in
Colombia
in
the
1990s”
 Democratization,
vol.
7,
no.
4,
pp.
191‐218.
 Gibler
DM
2007.
“Bordering
on
peace:
Democracy,
territorial
issues,
and
 conflict”
International
Studies
Quarterly
51/3:
509‐532



 Richards
DL,
Gelleny
RD.
2007.

“Good
things
to
those
who
wait?
National
 elections
and
government
respect
for
human
rights”
Journal
of
Peace
 Research
44/4:
505‐523



 Klopp
JM,
Zuern
E.
2007.

“The
politics
of
violence
in
democratization
‐
 Lessons
from
Kenya
and
South
Africa”

Comparative
Politics
39/2:
127+
 Johnston
P
2008.
“The
geography
of
insurgent
organization
and
its
 consequences
for
civil
wars:
Evidence
from
Liberia
and
Sierra
Leone”

 Security
Studies
17/1:
107‐137
 Eaton
K.
2006.
“The
downside
of
decentralization:
Armed
clientelism
in
 Colombia”
Security
Studies
15/4:
533‐562

 Alonso
S,
Ruiz‐Rufino
R.
2007.
“Political
representation
and
ethnic
conflict
in
 new
democracies”

European
Journal
of
Political
Research
46/2:
237‐267

 Brancati
D.
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 Daniel
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10.7.2008
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Decentralization
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1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

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Week
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Democracy
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 Globalization
 Tuesday
 
 Western
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 Cas
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 Edited
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 Northeastern
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1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

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Montague
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Stohl
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Hank
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11

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1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 
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12

Week
12:
Game
Theory
 11.11.2008
 and
The
Study
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Terrorism
 
 Tuesday
 Political
Economy
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Todd
Sandler
 OUP

 
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Robert
A.
Dying
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Random
 House

2006



 
 Bates,
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2001.
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 Week
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Suicide
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 11.18.2008
 
 Making
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suicide
 Tuesday
 missions
/
edited
by
Diego
 Gambetta.
Oxford
;
New
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:
Oxford
University
 Press,
2005
 Bloom,
Mia
Dying
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Kill
 The
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Terror
 Columbia
2005
 
 Ami
Pedahzur,
ed.,
The
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of
Suicide
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 The
Globalization
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 Martyrdom
(London:
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2006)


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Anthony
Oberschall
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The
Contribution
of
Collective
 Action
Theory”
Sociological
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22
Page
26

‐
March
2004
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T.
and
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G.
A.
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 What
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in
Researching
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Achievments,
Failures
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the
Trajectory
of
Terrorist
Campaigns
in
Western
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Weinberg
and
Louise
Richardson
Silke,
Andrew,
ed.,
 Research
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Achievements
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Failures
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Andrew
and
Barbara
Walter.
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The
Politics
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 Extremist
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International
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56
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 Lake,
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A.
2002.
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Understanding
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 Kalyvas,
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2004.
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 Pape,
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2003
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 Atran,
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2003.
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 Moghadam,
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2003.
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Studies
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Conflict
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26
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65‐93.*
 Bruce
Hoffman
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Gordon
H.
McCormick,
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Suicide
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Studies
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Conflict
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Terrorism,
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2004,
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 Mohammed
M.
Hafez,
“Rationality,
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Making
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A
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1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

13

Week
14:
Psychology
&
 11.25.2008
 Sociology
 Tuesday
 Marc
Sageman
 Understanding
Terror
 Networks

University
of
 Pennsylvania
Press
2004
 Horgan,
J.
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The
 Psychology
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 Charles
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 Cambridge:
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2003.
 12.2.2008
 Week
15:
Responding
to
 Terrorism
–
connecting
 theory
to
practice


1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 1. 2. 3.

Michael
Addison.
2001.
 Violent
Politics:
Strategies
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 Ashgate.

 
 Jeff
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No
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Out:
States
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 Revolutionary
Movements,
 1945‐1991,

 Cambridge
University
 Press,
2001.
 12.16.2008
 Paper
Due
 Tuesday


"Psychology
and
international
relations
theory"
/
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M.
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P.
E.
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49
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Post,
E
Sprinzak,
LM
Denny
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Interviews
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35
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‐
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Political
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2003
 
“When
Hatred
is
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in
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Journal
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 Journal
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46(5):
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Kalyvas,
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 Sander,
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