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BEST PRACTICES FOR ADULT FAITH FORMATION

Table of Contents


Introduction

List of Abbreviations

ADULT LEARNER

Helpful Tips for Effective Parish Faith Formation
Multiple Intelligences across the Life Cycle
How Adults Learn
Shared Christian Praxis
Inclusion of ALL Adults
Wisdom from Our Hearts Were Burning Within Us
Concrete Approaches to Adult Faith Formation Chart

CURRENT BEST PRACTICES (Six tasks of Adult Faith Formation)

Task One Promote knowledge of the faith
Task two Promote knowledge of the meaning of the liturgy and the sacraments
Task threePromote moral formation in Jesus Christ
Task four Teach the Christian how to pray with Christ
Task five Prepare the Christian to live in community and to participate actively
in the life and mission of Church
Task six Promote a missionary spirit that prepares the faithful to be present as
Christians in society

VARIOUS SETTING FOR ADULT FAITH FORMATION

Couples Preparing for Marriage
Divorced or Separated
Families
Married Couples
Older Adults
Parents
Single Adults
Young Adults

RESOURCES

Learning Media Center
Church Documents
Adult Faith Formation
Subject Areas
Catholic Publishers
Periodic Resources
Online Resources
Houses of Prayer
Retreat Centers


Art by Anne Kertz Kernion




SECRETARY FOR CATHOLIC EDUCATION
DIOCESE OF PITTSBURGH

www.diopitt.org 111 BOULEVARD OF THE ALLIES
PITTSBURGH, PA 15222
(412) 456-3100 FAX: (412) 456-3101
E-MAIL: kstubna@diopitt.org

J anuary 2011

Dear Colleagues in Catholic Education,

In his first pastoral letter to the Church of Pittsburgh, Bishop David Zubik challenged
each of us to do our part to make the Church of Pittsburgh the Church Alive!

Adult Faith Formation is perhaps the greatest challenge we face in our Church. Because of
the several generations who have not received a good understanding of the faith, the Church
must look toward many innovative ways to welcome a better understanding of the Church for
those who have not received such a good formation.

As catechetical leaders we realize that so many Catholic adults today have not moved beyond
the faith formation they received as young adolescents. In their pastoral statement on adult faith
formation, Our Hearts Were Burning Within Us, the U.S. bishops remind us of the importance of
growing in faith and discipleship throughout our lives, and call each of us as members of the Church
to a renewed commitment to adult faith formation. Lifelong (faith) formationmust be a
priority in the churchs catechetical ministry; moreover, it must be considered the chief form of
catechesis.

In response to the bishops document and especially to Bishop Zubiks challenge to all the
members of the Diocese of Pittsburgh, I am pleased to provide for you this catechetical resource,
Best Practices in Adult Faith Formation. I trust that you will find this Best Practices resource to be a
valuable tool in your ministry with adults.

Catechetical leaders from many parishes across our diocese have generously shared programs
and materials that have been successful in bringing adults to a rich and full understanding of the
beautiful gift of faith that has been passed down through the ages. We are grateful for their
contribution and hope that others will find these materials useful.

I am especially grateful to the Department for Religious Education and to Mrs. Maureen
Wood, director of the Office for Adult and Family Formation, for her efforts in bringing this manual
to fruition. Our plan is to continue to add ideas and materials to this manual that others have found
helpful in forming adults in the faith, thus enabling the Church Alive to become a reality in our
diocese.

As always, thank you for your dedication to this catechetical ministry and all that you do to
bring others to a deeper love of Christ and his Church.

With every best wish and prayer, I remain,

Sincerely in Christ,

Reverend Kris D. Stubna, S.T.D.
Secretary for Catholic Education







Office for Adult and Family Faith Formation
DEPARTMENT FOR RELIGIOUS EDUCATION
DIOCESE OF PITTSBURGH
SECRETARIAT FOR CATHOLIC EDUCATION
www.diopitt.org 111 BOULEVARD OF THE ALLIES
PITTSBURGH, PA 15222
(412) 456-3160 FAX (412) 456-3113


Dear Colleague in Adult Faith Formation Ministry,

I am happy to present to you the Best Practices for Adult Faith Formation for the Diocese of
Pittsburgh. This is truly a labor of love that has been in the works for quite a while. It was begun by my
predecessor in the Office for Adult Faith Formation, Christopher Chapman. When he was assigned to other
duties and I became the director of the Office for Adult and Family Faith Formation, this was one of the first
tasks on my list.

After much discussion, prayer and discernment, it was decided to structure this resource after the six
tasks of Adult Faith Formation content as outlined in Our Hearts Were Burning Within Us, the Pastoral Plan
for Adult Faith Formation in the United States. Thus, Knowledge of the Faith, Liturgical Life, Moral
Formation, Prayer, Communal Life and Missionary Spirit are fundamental aspects of Christian life and
foundational content areas for adult faith formation programs and opportunities. The responses that were
gathered are organized around these content areas.

It is our hope that this will be a growing, dynamic document, not static. If you have other ideas to add,
wed love to hear from you. We hope this is just the beginning of a sharing that will move us all into greater
strides with adults learning and living the faith. This is surely an important element of Bishop Zubiks vision
of the Church Alive, in which we read:

Adult Faith Formation. This is perhaps the greatest challenge we face in our church. Because of the
several generations who have not received a good understanding of the faith, the Church must look
toward many innovative ways to welcome a better understanding of the Church for those who
have not received such a good formationThere must be an appropriate investment of resources to
allow for well established adult faith programs. The end result of such an effort will truly be the
Church Alive! (no. 97)

This resource could never have materialized without the assistance of my dedicated committee
members. I owe a huge debt of gratitude to Andy Beckman, Barb McCarthy, Joe Killian, Marie Milburn, and
Gary Slifkey. They hung in there through our many meetings and multiple revisions of this document. I also
owe a great debt of gratitude to Kathi Probo for her invaluable contributions and to Debbie Andrulonis and
Mary Locante for their skillful typing assistance. I am especially grateful to all those wonderful parish
ministers who contributed their best practices for inclusion in this resource. It is our hope that these pages will
bring you many practical, helpful suggestions that can be duplicated or even better, act as a springboard for
your own creativity.

I wish you Gods blessings as you continue to grow in the love of the Lord and to share that love with
other adults in your faith community.


Maureen Wood, Director
Office for Adult and Family Faith Formation


Abbreviations


USCCA United States Catholic Catechism for Adults

AG Decree on the Churchs Missionary Activity (Ad Gentes Divinitus)

BA Blessings of Age

CA The Church Alive

CL The Church Living

CL The Vocation and Mission of the Lay Faithful in the Church and in the
World (Christifideles Laici)

CS The Church Sharing

CT On Catechesis in Our Time (Catechesi Tradendae)

DV Dogmatic Constitution on Divine Revelation (Dei Verbum)

FAA From Age to Age: The Challenge of Worship with Adolescents

GDC General Directory for Catechesis

LG Dogmatic Constitution on the Church (Lumen Gentium)

LTM Living the Mass: How One Hour Can Change Your Life

NDC National Directory for Catechetics

OHWB Our Hearts Were Burning Within Us: A Pastoral Plan for Adult Faith
Formation in the United States

RM On the Permanent Validity of the Churchs Missionary Mandate
(Redemptoris Missio)

RTV Renewing the Vision

SC Constitution on the Sacred Liturgy (Sacrosanctum Concilium)

SDL Sons and Daughters of the Light







Helpful Tips for Effective Parish Faith Formation

Getting adults to attend parish events is sometimes frustrating for leaders who are responsible for
implementing the adult faith formation programs. Parish leaders must make every effort to make it
happen through careful planning.

Here are some tips for effective adult faith formation:

1. CONDUCT A PARISH SURVEY
Find out what adults might be interested in studying or learning about, by putting together a simple
survey that could be inserted in the parish bulletin, placed in the pew or handed out after Mass.

Make the survey easy to complete by listing various topics that can be selected.

Use the information to plan your schedule of events for the year.

2. FORM AN ADULT FAITH FORMATION COMMITTEE
Successful and effective adult faith formation should have a good team of people.

Invite members of the parish staff, pastoral council, Catholic school and parish volunteer catechists to
serve. If unable to serve, ask them to help occasionally in the planning or evaluation of faith
formation opportunities for adults.

Use the adult faith formation survey to invite interested adults to serve on the committee.

Discuss the time and talent that will be invested by members of the committee as well as the rewards,
ownership, commitment and dedication.

3. PLAN AND PREPARE
Make use of the survey by brainstorming with members of the committee some ideas for effective
adult faith formation particular to the needs of your parish. Be sure to include ideas from staff
members: Catholic school principal and teachers, parish volunteer catechists, social concerns ministry,
evangelization ministry, music ministry and liturgical ministers, pastoral associate; as well as, parish
organizations: pastoral council, mens club, Ladies of Charity, Christian Mothers, etc.

Search for local talent who might become good presenters on specific topics of the Catholic faith and
practical topics as well (i.e. welcoming lapsed Catholics back to the Church, good Catholic parenting,
putting together a living will, what is an annulment?, divorced or separated Catholics, raising
teenagers in todays culture).

Talk to your pastor regarding a budget that would cover the cost of speakers, handouts, refreshments,
and other expenses. Make certain that you pastor is informed and approves all decisions of the
committee.







Advertise, advertise and advertise! Make use of the parish and diocesan website and the parish
bulletin. Ask neighboring parishes to place information in their bulletin or on their bulletin board.

Display fliers in Church, and other buildingsCatholic school, and parish religious education
programs (send information home with students, or ask to place information in parent news letters).

Advertise in local newspapers and in the Pittsburgh Catholic. Ask permission to place fliers in local
stores, banks and other places of business.

Remember that atmosphere and hospitality are very important. Create an atmosphere that is
welcoming, serve simple refreshments. Pay attention to the requests and particular needs of your
guests.

Honor those persons with special needs/different abilities. Be sure the building youve selected is
wheelchair accessible (including restrooms) and meets the needs of all persons who might have other
disabilities.

4. EVALUATION
Include a simple evaluation form with each program. Take time to discuss evaluations with members
of the committee.

Be sure to notice specific needs, interests, and concerns of participants throughout the year.

At the end of the year spend time with the committee evaluating the overall effectiveness of the
program in preparation for next years events.
























Multiple Intelligences across the Lifecycle

People learn in different ways. As a catechist, the more senses you engage in your teaching, the more
senses you will make and the better your students will learn and remember. Such experiential and interactive
methods often prevent or preclude discipline problems as well. Some people learn best by seeing, others
hearing, others smelling, others touching, and others tasting. The combination and engagement of all these
senses increases retention and facilitates effective learning.

Another good teaching rule of thumb highlights effective progression of activities. Tell, show, do, and
review This pattern in training another to do something applies to all learning. Introduce or tell students about
something, demonstrate it, let them practice, demonstrate it themselves, and evaluate with them what they
have done.

Another formula associated with Christian education is hook, look, book, took. This describes a
teaching method of introducing something in a very attention-getting way (hook), applying this to our own
lives (look), finding Scripture that speaks to the topic (book), and making something to synthesize the
leaning experience which one can take with them (took).

Of the various theories on leaning styles, Howard Gardner's theory of Multiple Intelligences adds
new depth to leaning style particularities. He cites nine intelligences which reflect various aspects of
intelligence.
9


Linguistic intelligence, which includes the abilities to read and write
Logical-mathematical intelligence, which exercises capability in solving problems and reasoning
Spatial intelligence which engages the capacity visualize, create, draw, and design in three
dimensions
Musical intelligence, which helps one to learn through song, music, and/or instruments
Kinesthetic intelligence, which involves movement, dancing or sports in the learning process
Naturalist intelligence describes a way of leaning which employs experiences in the outdoors or
with the things of nature
Existential intelligence is manifested by a desire and proclivity to ponder the deep and profound
questions of life
Interpersonal intelligence, the ability to learn from and in communication with one or more other
people
Intrapersonal intelligence, used personal reflection to learn

The theory is that people learn best in various ways, and this varies from person to person, perhaps
even to a degree from culture to culture. These intelligences are not exhaustive, there are likely many more.
The task of the catechist is to mix up one's methods in order to include learning activities which appeal to a
variety of different intelligences in lesson planning. This applies across the life cycle, with children, youth,
and adults.
9 Gardner, Howard, Frames of Mind. (New York: Basic Books, 1993)






How Adults Learn

In working with adults it is important to remember that they bring a unique set of needs and contributions to a
learning environment.

Adults prefer self direction; they are take charge learners.

Individual experiences of adult learners are a rich resource for learning. Participants can often aid and
supplement the facilitator and class learning.

Adults are aware of their learning needs generated by real experiences such as marriage or divorce,
parenting, a new job, losing a job, and other transitional events. Adult learners needs and interests
serve well as starting points for learning.

Adults want to learn practical skills or acquire knowledge that they can apply directly to their lives.
Life or work-related situations present a more appropriate framework for adult learning than academic
or theoretical approaches.

Suggested Resources:

Stankard, Bernadette T., How Each Child Learns: Using Multiple Intelligence in Faith Formation, Twenty-
Third Publications, Mystic, CT, 2003.

Lowe, Edmunds, C., K., M. Murray and A. Seymour, The Ultimate Educator, National Victim Assistance
Academy (Advanced), Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Justice, Office for Victims of Crime, 1999.


























Shared Christian Praxis

Adult catechesis should respect the experience of adults and make use of their personal experiences, skills
and talents.
1


Shared Christian praxis is a term coined by the noted American religious educator Thomas H.
Groome, currently on the faculty of Boston College. The fullest explication of the term can be found in the
1998 revised edition of Groomes book Sharing Faith.
2
Since the book was first published in 1991, shared
praxis has become a widely used and accepted method of faith formation. It often is taught in undergraduate
and graduate religious education programs and in programs to certify catechists for parishes and schools.
Briefly, there are five components or movements in shared praxis. They are 1) present action, 2)
critical reflection, 3) dialogue, 4) the Christian story, and 5) the Vision that arises from the Story. The goal is
to bring the Christian story (preserved in Sacred Scripture and Sacred Tradition) into dialogue with the
individuals own lived experience. The hope is that this dialogue results in a vision that deeply inculcates the
values of the faith in the individual and brings about action that furthers discipleship. Groome puts it this
way: Christian religious education by shared praxis can be described as a group of Christians sharing in
dialogue their critical reflection on present action in light of the Christian Story and its Vision toward the end
of lived Christian faith. (p.184)
What does this look like in practice? While shared praxis will look different depending on the age,
culture, social setting, and so forth of each group, there will also be some commonalities. Here is one such
classroom approach: Generally, the lesson will begin with a Focusing Task (e.g., and open-ended question, a
small-group discussion) on the topic of the lesson. Next comes Life Experience, in which the learners name
how they experience the topic in everyday life. This is followed by Shared Reflection on the topic and the
Presentation of the Christian Story, in which the teacher presents the topic in light of Sacred Scripture and
Sacred Tradition. In the final movements, Owning the Faith and Response, the learners see how their own
story intersects with the Christian story and then decide on how the message of Christ demands a change on
their part.
Catechists who make use of the shared praxis approach find it a reliable and effective way to bring
about the primary goal of catechesis: to put people not only in touch, but also in communion and intimacy,
with Jesus Christ.
3


1
NDC, no. 48
2
Sharing Faith: A Comprehensive Approach to Religious Education and Pastoral Ministry; The Way of Shared Praxis (Wipf &
Stock Publishers, 1998)
3
CT, no. 5


















Inclusion of ALL Adults

In offering Adult Formation opportunities within our parishes, we, as people of Faith, must keep in
mind that the vision of Church is one where all people can worship together. Jesus invites all people to have
full participation in the life of the Church. This vision embraces the Good News of Jesus when it offers
educational and catechetical services and resources for all. As the United States Conference of Catholic
Bishops has written in the Pastoral Statement on Persons with Disabilities,

If persons with disabilities are to become equal partners in the Christian Community, injustices must
be eliminated and ignorance and apathy replaced
by increased sensitivity and warm acceptance. The leaders and the general
membership of the Church must educate themselves to appreciate fully the
contribution that persons with disabilities can make to the Churchs spiritual life.
Disabled individuals bring with them a special insight into the meaning of life,
for they live---more than the rest of us, perhaps---in the shadow of the cross.
And out of their experience they forge virtues such as courage, patience,
perseverance, compassion, and sensitivity that should serve as an inspiration
to all Christians. (Article #13.)

Including all people into our parish formation events may require nothing more
than extending a heartfelt invitation and pursuing it. Sometimes, however, the Faith Family needs to devise
innovative programs and techniques in order that all may participate.

Welcoming persons with disabilities into the fullness of parish life is the responsibility of every
member of the parish, according to the Best Practices Guide for Including Students with Disabilities. The
following tips are for consideration before pursuing any parish event. These may help to enlighten all
participants, so that everyone may live and grow as true witnesses for Christ.

Strategies:

Remember that a person who has a disability is a PERSON first, made in the image & likeness of
our loving God; we all have disabilities; on some of us they are more apparent.

Identify people in the parish who have disabilities by asking the staff, checking parish census,
scanning the congregation at weekend liturgies, and placing a short article in the parish bulletin
periodically inviting all to participate to respond with any particular needs they may have; contact
people with disabilities by phone or personal visit.

Learn appropriate language that is inclusive of all and reflective of the love of Christ; use it in all
speech and written notices for parish life; offer large print materials (18 or 24 point print), Braille,
hearing aid devices or interpreter services for worship and events.












Sensitize the parish to the gifts and needs of persons with disabilities by working as a pastoral
team; ask pastor to address inclusion concerns in homilies; celebrate a disability awareness Mass
once by year; include the needs of persons with disabilities in General Intercessions at Mass.

Welcome persons with disabilities and their families into parish life and parish programs by
inviting and assisting them for educational/formational events according to their interests and
abilities; advocate on their behalf to empower their independence and participation.

Work toward physical accessibility of the church and other parish buildings, including the
restrooms; coordinate a transportation program for parishioners who need such assistance.

Points to Remember
When You Meet a Person Who has a Disability

Speak directly to a person with a disability. Dont consider a companion to be conversational go-
between.
Converse with a person who has a disability as you would with anyone else. Explore your mutual
interests in a friendly way.
Offer assistance if asked or if the need seems obvious, in which case ask simply, Do you need help?
How should I help you? Respect the persons right to indicate the kind of help needed.
Talk about the disability if it comes up naturally, without prying.
Dont be embarrassed over common expressions that call attention to a disability----like asking a
person who is deaf if he/she has heard some news. You are more likely to be sensitive to the
expression than the person to whom you are talking.
Appreciate what the person CAN do. Remember that difficulties the person may be facing may stem
more from societys attitudes and barriers than from the disability.
Be considerate of the extra time it might take for a person with a disability to get things said or done.
Do not shout at persons who are blind. They have lost their vision, not their hearing. Use descriptive
language when directing someone who is blind. Indicate distances and obstacles which might be in
the way.
Dont provide words for someone who stutters or speaks with difficulty. Be patient and listen. If you
do not understand, be honest and ask the speaker/interpreter to repeat. When necessary, ask questions
that require short answers or a shake of the head.
Always face a person with hearing loss. Be sure the person can see your lips; speak clearly without
exaggerating lip movements. Use gestures to aid communication. When full understanding is
doubtful, write notes.
Dont move a wheelchair or crutches out of reach of the person who uses them.









Never start to push a wheelchair without first asking the occupant if you may do so. When pushing a
wheelchair up or down steps, ramps, curbs or other obstructions, ask the person if he/she wants to
proceed.
When dining with a person who has trouble cutting, offer to help if needed. Explain to a person who
has a vision loss where dishes, etc., are located on the table.
When you attempt to help a person with a disability, remember to participate with him/her. Dont do
things to or for him/her.
Always remember to see the PERSON first.



RESOURCES:

Best Practices Guide for Including Students with Disabilities, Diocese of Pittsburgh, Secretariat for Catholic
Education, Department for Persons with Disabilities, c 2009.

Parish Advocacy for Persons with Disabilities Handbook, Diocese of Pittsburgh, Secretariat for Catholic
Education, Department for Persons with Disabilities

Pastoral Statement of U.S. Catholic Bishops on Persons with Disabilities, National Catholic Office for
Persons with Disabilities, United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, Washington, D.C., c 1978, 1988,
2001.






For further information, resources, or support, please contact:
Department for Persons with Disabilities
Diocese of Pittsburgh
111 Boulevard of Allies
Pittsburgh, PA 15222
412-456-3119 (Voice)
412-456-3122 (TTY)
disabilities@diopitt.org














WISDOM FROM OUR HEARTS WERE BURNING WITHIN US:
A Pastoral Plan for Adult Faith Formation in the United States

Adult faith is clearly and explicitly rooted in a personal relationship with Jesus lived in the Christian
community. The Christian faith is, above all, conversion to Jesus Christ, full and sincere adherence to his
person and the decision to walk in his footsteps.
4
Our understanding of the person and the away of Jesus
continues to grow by our meditation on the word of God, by prayer and sacrament, by our efforts to follow
Jesus example, and by the sure guidance of the Churchs teaching.
5


Through intimacy with Jesus, a maturing adult faith opens people to a deepening relationship with and
an explicit confession of the Trinity.
6
Authentic Christian faith is radically Trinitarian,
7
and the whole
Christian life is a communion with each of the divine persons.
8


Adult faith is explicitly connected to the life, teaching, and mission of the Church. As adults mature, a
searching faith leads them to examine their lives, their world, and their faith more profoundly. In this quest,
they enter into dialogue with the gospel message as professed by the teaching of the Church and lived by the
people of God. Through this dialogical process they come not only to know, but to make the faith their own.
They acquire that ecclesial consciousness, which is ever mindful of what it means to be members of the
Church of Jesus Christ, participants in her mystery of communion and in her dynamism in mission and the
apostolate.
9


Adult faith is confident because it is founded on the word of God
10
and confirmed by the whole
Churchs supernatural sense of the faith.
11
The adult disciple seeks the clarity and knowledge of faith, so as to
find and accept it with all joy and peace in believing (Rom 15:13). Out of this conviction come the
willingness and ability to witness to the Christian faith whenever possible, to explain it whenever necessary,
and to be confidently guided by it always.

The most valuable gift that the Church can offer to the bewildered and restless world of our time is to
form within it Christians who are confirmed in what is essential and who are humble joyful in their faith.
12

The more this happens, the more it helps us create a climate of mutual esteem, reverence, and harmony in the
Church and learn to acknowledge all legitimate





4
GDC, no. 53; cf. CT, no. 5b; cf. CCC, nos.422-429.
5
Cf. Second Vatican Council, Dei Verbum: Dogmatic Constitution on Divine Revelation (DV), no. 8. In Vatican Council II: The
Conciliar and Post Conciliar Documents: New Revised Edition, ed. Austin Flannery (Northport, N.Y.: Costello Publishing Co.,
1992); CCC, no. 94.
6
GDC, no. 82.
7
GDC, no. 99.
8
CCC, no. 259; cf. CT, no. 5.
9
John Paul II, Christifideles Laici: The Vocation and the Mission of the Lay Faithful in the Church and in the World, no. 64
(Washington, D.C.: United States Catholic Conference, 1988).
10
CCC, no. 157; cf. 1 Thes 2:13.
11
LG, no. 12.
12
CT, no. 61.






diversity.For the ties which unite the faithful together are stronger than those which separate them: let there
be unity in what is doubtful, and charity in everything.
13


The adult disciple enjoys the fruits of the Spirit which are love, joy, peace, patience, kindness,
generosity, faithfulness, gentleness, self-control (Gal 5:22-23). Mature faith is open to the action and power
of Gods Spirit and cannot remain idle or unproductive. Where the Spirit is active, faith is fruitful.

Adult faith bears the fruit of justice and compassion through active outreach to those in need.
Recognizing also the connection of personal sins and social consequences, they pray and work both for
personal conversion and for systemic change and social transformation that will serve the common good and,
ultimately, the realization of Gods reign of justice and peace on earth as in heaven (Mt 6:10).

Adult faith bears the fruit of evangelization. While fully respecting the religious freedom and choice
of others, the adult disciple bears witness in the world to the gift of faith and to the treasure we have found in
Jesus and among the community of his disciples. In this process, the witness of the word is essential, but a
living witness in the service of love and justice speaks with special power today.


These are some of the characteristics of mature adult faith. But it is essential to remember also that
salvation is not the fruit of our innate gifts, our adult competence, or our achievements. Mature faith
recognizes that, however great or modest our competence or accomplishments, Gods favor is always a gift
and a grace. For by grace you have been saved through faith, and this is not from you; it is the gift of God
(Eph 2:8).





13
GS, no. 92; cf. John Paul II, Eight Address of His Holiness Pope John Paul II to the Bishops of the United States during Their Ad
Limina Visits, Ad Limina Addresses: The Addresses of His Holiness Pope John Paul II to the Bishops of the United States during
Their Ad Limina Visits; March 5-December 9, 1988 (Washington, D.C.: United States Catholic Conference, 1988); John XXIII,
Ad Petri Cathedram (On Truth, Unity and Peace), 1959.





















FIRST TASK
PROMOTE KNOWLEDGE OF THE FAITH PROMOTE KNOWLEDGE OF THE FAITH PROMOTE KNOWLEDGE OF THE FAITH PROMOTE KNOWLEDGE OF THE FAITH
Adult Education Classes
Adult Formation Classes
Adult Lecture & Discussion Series
Advent/Lent Guest Speaker
Awakening Faith
Bible Study
Book Discussion Group
Catechesis of the Good Shepherd
Creed - Basic Catechist Certificate Program
for Diocese of Pittsburgh
Lighthouse Catholic Media
Lighthouse CDs
Little Rock Scripture Study
Parish Book Racks
Pastors Forum
Question of the Week
Spiritual Reflections
The Faith Connection Email Newsletter
Women Gathered


SECOND TASK
PROMOTE KNOWLEDGE OF THE MEANING OF PROMOTE KNOWLEDGE OF THE MEANING OF PROMOTE KNOWLEDGE OF THE MEANING OF PROMOTE KNOWLEDGE OF THE MEANING OF
THE LITURGY AND THE SACRAMENTS, THE LITURGY AND THE SACRAMENTS, THE LITURGY AND THE SACRAMENTS, THE LITURGY AND THE SACRAMENTS,
ESPECIALLY THE EUCHARIST ESPECIALLY THE EUCHARIST ESPECIALLY THE EUCHARIST ESPECIALLY THE EUCHARIST

Anointing of the Sick
Baptism Preparation
Eucharistic Adoration
Focus on the Liturgy
Forty Hours Devotion
Mini-Catechesis
Ministry Workshops
RCIA
Sacraments - Basic Catechist Certificate Program
for Diocese of Pittsburgh
Sunday Liturgy Prep
Televised Masses
Tour of Church



THIRD TASK
PROMOTE MORAL FORMATION IN CHRIST, PROMOTE MORAL FORMATION IN CHRIST, PROMOTE MORAL FORMATION IN CHRIST, PROMOTE MORAL FORMATION IN CHRIST,
LEADING TO WITNESS IN EVERYDAY LIFE LEADING TO WITNESS IN EVERYDAY LIFE LEADING TO WITNESS IN EVERYDAY LIFE LEADING TO WITNESS IN EVERYDAY LIFE
Fair Trade Work of Human Hands Sale
March for Life
Morality - Basic Catechist Certificate Program
for Diocese of Pittsburgh
Movie Night
Pilgrimage to Rachel Weeping Memorial Calvary Cemetery
Social Justice Speaker Series
Theology of Movies






FOURTH TASK
TEACH CHRISTIANS HOW TO PRAY IN CHRIST TEACH CHRISTIANS HOW TO PRAY IN CHRIST TEACH CHRISTIANS HOW TO PRAY IN CHRIST TEACH CHRISTIANS HOW TO PRAY IN CHRIST
Annual Retreats for Men/Women
Centering Prayer
Experiential Stations of the Cross
Ignatian Parish Prayer Program
Lectio Divina
Living Rosary
Novenas
Parish Pilgrimage
Powerful Pray-ers















FIFTH TASK
PREPARE CHRI PREPARE CHRI PREPARE CHRI PREPARE CHRISTIANS TO LIVE IN COMMUNITY STIANS TO LIVE IN COMMUNITY STIANS TO LIVE IN COMMUNITY STIANS TO LIVE IN COMMUNITY
AND PARTICIPATE IN THE CHURCHS MISSION AND PARTICIPATE IN THE CHURCHS MISSION AND PARTICIPATE IN THE CHURCHS MISSION AND PARTICIPATE IN THE CHURCHS MISSION
Caregiver Breakfast
Catholic Conversations
Let the Little Children Come to Me
Martha and Joseph Ministry
Mens Breakfast
Middle Moms
Parish Pastoral Council Formation Diocese of Pittsburgh
Reflection Booklet
Service Outreach to Homeless Womens Shelter
St. John Neumann Night
Welcome Breakfast
Women Wisdom & Wine




SIXTH TASK
PREPARE THE FAITHFUL TO BE PRESENT IN PREPARE THE FAITHFUL TO BE PRESENT IN PREPARE THE FAITHFUL TO BE PRESENT IN PREPARE THE FAITHFUL TO BE PRESENT IN
SOC SOC SOC SOCIETYS CHRISTIANS WHO ARE ABLE AND IETYS CHRISTIANS WHO ARE ABLE AND IETYS CHRISTIANS WHO ARE ABLE AND IETYS CHRISTIANS WHO ARE ABLE AND
WILLING TO BEAR WITNESS TO THEIR FAITH IN WILLING TO BEAR WITNESS TO THEIR FAITH IN WILLING TO BEAR WITNESS TO THEIR FAITH IN WILLING TO BEAR WITNESS TO THEIR FAITH IN
WORDS AND DEED WORDS AND DEED WORDS AND DEED WORDS AND DEEDS SS S
Bereavement Support Group
Comfort Blanket Ministry
Day of Reflection
Focus on Outreach
Funeral Liturgy Planning
Funeral Luncheon Committee
Health Ministry Exercise Program
H.O.P.E Helping Others Seek Employment
Missions Outreach
Prison Ministry







First Task First Task First Task First Task
Knowledge of the Faith Knowledge of the Faith Knowledge of the Faith Knowledge of the Faith
14 14 14 14

(CCC nos. 26-1065, GDC nos. 84-85, 87)


Bring people to know, love, and obey Jesus Christ as the definitive aim of all catechesis.

Explore the Scriptures so that adults may be hearers and doers of the word.

Become familiar with the great teachings of Christianity (its creeds and doctrines) and their place in
the priority of truthsfor example, the mystery of God and the Trinity, Christ, the Church, the
sacraments, human life and ethical principles, and other contemporary themes in religion and
morality.

Study the Churchs teaching on the dignity of the human person in its social doctrine, including its
respect-life teaching.

Learn the richness of the Churchs tradition and understand church history.

Develop the philosophical and theological foundations of the faith.

Learn the meaning and practical relevance of current church teachings as presented by the pope,
diocesan bishop, Vatican congregations, and the National Conference of Catholic Bishops.













14
OHWB no. 91


First Task of Adult Faith Formation: To promote knowledge of the faith

The initial proclamation of the Gospel introduces the hearers to Christ for the first time and invites conversion
to him. By the action of the Holy Spirit, such an encounter engenders in the hearers a desire to know about
Christ, his life, and the content of his message. Catechesis responds to this desire by giving the believers
knowledge of the content of God's self-revelation, which is found in Sacred Scripture and Sacred Tradition,
and by introducing them to the meaning of the Creed. Creeds and doctrinal formulas that state the Church's
belief are expressions of the Church's living tradition, which from the time of the apostles has developed "in
the Church with the help of the Holy Spirit."
DV
National Directory for Catechesis


Young Adults

In their pastoral plan for young adults, the U.S. bishops state that the objective for parishes is "to help
young adults appreciate the teachings and traditions of the Church through catechesis, religious education
and pastoral care.
" SDL


A successful young adult ministry employs a number of strategies to reach this age group.
SDL

They include:

Offering a variety of programs such as evening presentations, discussion groups, and Theology on
Tap.
Form Scripture study groups.
Provide information and catechetical resources through the use of technology such as email
and the Internet.
Prepare young adults who have not received their First Communion or Confirmation
through an effective RCIA program.
Use marriage preparation to educate and connect young adults with the Church.
Provide annual retreat opportunities for young adults throughout the Diocese.


Adults

A mature adult faith is one that is living, explicit and fruitful.
OHWB
A living faith grows and
develops as the Christian matures and learns new things. It is a faith that seeks to understand more and
grow more in union with Christ. This is why the Church has declared on many occasions that the
Baptismal Catechumenate is to be the model for all catechesis, especially that of adults.
OHWB
An explicit
faith is rooted in Christ, radically Trinitarian in nature, and closely linked to the Church. A fruitful faith is
reflected in works of mercy and justice. It bears witness to the faith through appropriate efforts to
evangelize. It acknowledges that God's favor and promise of salvation are always gifts that cannot be
earned.









There are countless ways to promote knowledge of the faith in adults. Some of the more popular are:

Classes on doctrine, sacraments, Church history, and Scripture
Scripture study groups
Bulletin inserts and website articles
Online learning and distance learning
Small faith communities
Membership in such groups as RENEW, the Christian Family Movement, or Marriage Encounter
Lecture series by experts


Senior Adults

Senior adults may be in particular need of an "updating" in the truths of the faith. Many Catholics
end their formal education in the faith following the reception of the Sacrament of Confirmation and,
thus, have an incomplete understanding of what Catholics believe. This may be especially true in
Catholic moral teaching in areas of rapid technological change, such as stem-cell research, reproductive
methods, and end-of-life issues.

As the U.S. bishops have noted, senior adults often are looked upon as recipients of pastoral care
rather than as providers of care and active members of the parish community.
BA
But as they also note, many
seniors have the time and the interest to attend Bible study groups and other adult faith formation efforts.
Parish staffs should take care to schedule such efforts during the daytime-when seniors are more likely to
attend-and to combine catechetical efforts with time for socializing.





























Adult Education Classes


Description
This is the 8
th
year for this program that is growing in attendance. It is taught by Dr. William Switala, a retired
theology professor from Duquesne University. The classes are on Church history and Scripture. There is a
class in the fall and in the late winter or spring each year. Topics have included Early Church History,
Protestant Reformation, Justice and Rights (related to Church Encyclicals), American Church History,
Pittsburgh Church History, Introduction to the Old Testament, Introduction to New Testament, Writings of
St. Paul, Four Major Prophets, to name a few.


Objective
To provide a continuing education program for adults in the parish.


Who Should/Can Attend
Any interested adults


Time Frame
The 4-6 sessions per class are held from 6:30-8:00 p.m.


Suggestions/Comments
The sessions run concurrently with the CCD classes to encourage parents to attend while their children are in
class.









Contact: Dr. William Switala
Parish: St. Gabriel of the Sorrowful Virgin
Phone: 412-884-5910
Email: switalaw@yahoo.com


Adult Formation Classes


Description
We have offered a variety of classes at St Benedict. Our pastor taught a class on Church history. He
has also taught The Bible as Theology, which was in response to a class be taught at Peters Twp.
High School, The Bible as Literature. But we were innovative in offering a class on Cooking and
the Council where we learned about the results of the Second Vatican Council, and then went into the
kitchen and cooked. We had between 15-20 people and everyone took part in either setting the table,
preparing the ingredients, or cooking the foodwhich we all ate afterwards.

Objective
To bring members of the parish together to grow in their faith.
To experience communion over a communal meal.


Who Should/Can Attend
Adults


Cost
We had a good will offering basket which covered the cost.


Suggestions/Comments
Adult formation in the form of classes can be tough. Most of the classes started out with between 30-
50 people but dwindled with each session. The only class that didnt was Cooking and the Council
where we had 15-20 each time.
















Contact: Jay Speca
Parish: St. Benedict the Abbot Church
Phone: 724-941-9406 Ext 114
Email: Speca@stbenedicttheabbot.org


Adult Lecture & Discussion Series


Description
A regularly scheduled (once a month/every other month) series of lectures covering a broad range of topics on
the history, doctrines and teachings of the Church. The sessions are meant to be a combination of lecture by a
subject expert and discussion time as adults prefer to process information interactively.


Objective
To generate enthusiasm for ongoing catechesis of adults in the parish.
To increase knowledge and understanding of all aspects of the Catholic faith.
To build community in the parish around the gathering times of the sessions.


Who Should/Can Attend
All adults who desire to increase knowledge of the Catholic faith.


Time Frame
Approximately two hours, although individual sessions can be done as successive sessions over a period of
time if greater coverage of a topic is desired.


Cost
Stipend/mileage is paid for speaker/presenter. Cost of printing flyers if applicable (sample flyer attached).


Suggestions/Comments
Consistency is key so that participants become used to attending sessions on a regular basis. Parishioners can
be an excellent source of speakers and the best promoters of the program, although some due diligence is
wise.












Contact: Joe Killian
Parish: St. Alexis - Wexford
Phone: 724 935-0877
Email: dre@stalexis.org


Advent/Lent Guest Speaker


Description
On Wednesday evenings during Advent and Lent, Our Lady of Grace has a special 7:00 p.m. evening Mass.
Once during Advent and once during Lent, this Mass is followed by an adult faith formation program with a
guest speaker. Topics are connected to the season. The program begins at 7:30 p.m. with a brief welcome,
opening prayer and introduction of the speaker, followed by the speakers presentation lasting 30 to 45
minutes. Around 8:15 we break for light refreshments and fellowship for 10 to 20 minutes. Then we
reconvene so that the speaker can take questions. The program concludes around 9:00 p.m., but people are
welcome to stay and continue socializing. If the speaker has books or materials to share or sell, we encourage
them to do so, and if necessary, we find a volunteer to help manage this. We may conclude by passing out a
prayer connected to the evenings reflection and praying this together.


Objective
To help parishioners enter more deeply into the celebration of the seasons of Advent and Lent.
To help parishioners grow in their spiritual lives and understanding of the faith.


Who Should/Can Attend
Adults and families.


Time Frame
About 2 hours


Cost
$100.00 to $250.00 speaker fee, plus the cost of refreshments, which can be kept simple.


Suggestions/Comments
Take advantage of the connections that you have to local speakers. Advertise as thoroughly as possible within
the parish and outside the parish. This program combines prayer, fellowship and education, providing a rich
formation experience. It is a response to the interest that many parishioners have in going deeper or doing
something extra during Advent and Lent.






Contact: Marie Milburn
Parish: Our Lady of Grace, Scott Township
Phone: 412-279-7070
Email: m.milburn@olgscott.org

Awakening Faith
(Paulist National Catholic Evangelization Assoc. www.pncea.org.)


Description
Through essays, scripture and open discussion groups deal with areas of Spirituality, Jesus, the Holy Spirit,
the Mass and the church. Meetings foster reflection, prayer, and sharing in a setting of hospitality and
acceptance. A speaker or outside leader is suggested to facilitate the sessions.


Objective
To invite inactive Catholics to return to the church.


Who Should/Can Attend
We invite those who have been away from the church, who still think of themselves as Catholic, people
who are indifferent or apathetic, who have not had enough involvement with the Church to think of
themselves as being away.


Time Frame
6 sessions, usually conducted weekly for an hour and a half. 4 additional sessions are available to continue
the initial discussion period. Sessions begin with time for hospitality, icebreakers, reflection, discussion,
sharing and prayer. Our sessions began with the first week of Lent.


Cost
Program preview pack $59.95, includes Leader guide, Participant booklet. Individual booklets are available
for all participants (we chose not to purchase them because of cost). Leader simply copied the essay portion
of each session.


Suggestions/Comments
We did an online Webinar to learn more about the program and the expected results. It indicated that even if
you did it for just 2 people it would be worthwhile. The small group setting was very conducive to open
discussion. We had at least 6 regular attendees weekly and plan to conduct the additional 4 sessions.








Contact: Claire Hildenbrand
Parish: St. Angela Merici Church
Phone: 412-672-9641
Email: st.angela.merici@verizon.net

Bible Study


Description
Many forms of Bible Study are offered in different settings. Guest speakers are invited yearly to enhance our
understanding of scripture.


Objective
To draw individuals closer to Christ through prayer and scripture.
To promote a better understanding of the written word.
To form community.



Who Should/Can Attend
Adults


Time Frame
1-1/2 hours




Suggestions/Comments
Weekly reflection and study of upcoming Sunday readings or weekly reflection and study of a particular book
or theme in the Bible are two approaches that can be used.
















Contact: Barb McCarthy
Parish: St. Ferdinand Church
Phone: 724 776-1357
Email: barb@stferd.org

Book Discussion Group


Description
The group selects a reading list of seven to eight books from a variety of authors, including biographies,
autobiographies, essays, summations of church documents, etc., and then meets monthly to informally
discuss the books, sharing insights, opinions and/or criticisms.

Objective
To offer adults the opportunity to grow in their faith, to explore other points of view, and to deepen their
understanding of the Church and its doctrine.


Who Should/Can Attend
Anyone interested in the books being read.


Time Frame
Monthly from September to April (excluding December).















Contact: Lynne Aber
Parish: St. Anne, Castle Shannon
Phone: 412-833-3578
Email: LAber@dmclaw.com

Catechesis of the Good Shepherd


Description
Catechesis of the Good Shepherd (CGS) is a model of faith formation based on the Montessori Method which
lays the foundational relationship between the child and Jesus the Good Shepherd. CGS is grounded in the
pedagogical method of the Liturgy and the content of the Holy Bible. It is a developmental approach, with
three levels: Level I for ages 3-6, Level II, for ages 6-9, and Level III for ages 9-12. One cannot be a
catechist for this method unless one completes 90 hours for Level I, 90 hours for Level II and 200 hours for
Level III with a formation leader who is certified from the National Association of the Catechesis of the Good
Shepherd.

Objective
To offer a process for adults/older teens to be certified in working with CGS Level I children ages 3-6 in a
Level I Atrium.
To learn to listen to God with children.
To grow further in our personal relationship with God.


Who Should/Can Attend
Any older teen or adult who wishes to grow in their relationship with God.
Any teen or adult who works with children ages 3-6.
Definitely every parent and grandparent!


Time Frame
90 hours for Level I. Courses are offered in various models in a retreat setting: 2 week-long sessions,
one day/month throughout the year, 4 segments of 3-day clusters, or other options determined by the
formation leader and hosting parish.


Cost
Varies depending on formation leader and location, between $300 - $1,000 per course.


Suggestions/Comments
Over 8 parishes in the Pittsburgh. area offer CGS for children. So far, St. John Neumann and St Kilian
have been sponsoring CGS formation courses.
Call Celine at Saint Kilian Parish if you would like to host or attend a Come and See information session to
be introduced to CGS.




Contact: Celine Mitchell
Parish: Saint Kilian Parish
Phone: 412-600-7097 (cell phone)
Email cmitchell@saintkilian.org

Creed: The Profession of Faith


Description
This is a doctrinal component of basis certification addressing the topics of: God, The Father Almighty,
Creator of Heaven and Earth; Jesus, Gods Word Incarnate; Paschal Mystery; Holy Spirit: Revelation of the
Trinity; and Church. Formal material regarding Prayer in the Christian Life is also addressed in this course.
Both Scripture and prayer are utilized in each lesson.


Objective
To ground the catechist in an adult understanding of the faith.
To enable the catechist to translate this same faith in appropriate ways to the age/grade level of students he or
she will be teaching.


Who Should/Can Attend
All catechists and any interested person.


Time Frame
15-hour Program


Suggestions/Comments
See next two pages for Advanced/Renewal Certification Courses.




Cost
$30.00












Contact: Sharon Hachman
Parish: Diocese of Pittsburgh
Phone: 412-456-3110
Email: shachman@diopitt.org

Advanced / Renewal Certification Courses
May be offered as Enrichment (10 or 15 hours) or
Workshop (3 or 5 hours) only

CREED
Christology: Study of Christ
Church History
Ecclesiology
Eschatology: Study of the Last Things
Mariology: Study of Mary
Pneumatology
U.S. Catholic Catechism for Adults
MORALITY
Beatitudes
Commandments & Beatitudes: Laws & Invitations
Journey from Faith to Justice: Social Teaching of the Church
Present Day Threats to Human Life
Social Justice
PRAYER
Encyclical on the Rosary
Experiences of Prayer
Prayer, Journey with Jesus
Praying the Psalms
SCRIPTURE
Acts of the Apostles
Gospel of John
Gospel of Mark
Gospels for Contemporary Christians
Infancy Narratives
Introduction to the Old Testament
Keys to Studying Scripture
Letters of Paul
New Testament for Contemporary Christians
Old Testament for Contemporary Christians
Passion Narratives
Prophets
Synoptic Gospels
Teaching the Parables of Jesus
The Pentateuch

SPIRITUALITY
Spiritual Formation
Spiritual/Moral Character of the Human Person
The Transformative Character of Suffering
Traditions of Catholic Spirituality








METHODS
Advanced Methods
Children's Liturgy
Creative Teaching
Creative Teaching for Catholic School Teachers
Gifts and Fruits of the Holy Spirit
Growing in Faith: Stages of Development
How to Use a Catechetical Textbook
How to Use Media
Introduction to Sign Language
Liturgical Seasons: Advent, Christmas, Epiphany
Liturgical Seasons: Lent, Easter, Pentecost
Maintaining a Peaceful Classroom
Methods for Teaching Sacraments
Methods: Special Needs Inclusion
Middle School Ministry
Motivation/Enthusiasm
Pittsburgh Saints
Sacramental Preparation: Sacraments of Initiation, Healing, Service
Saints for Advent, Christmas, Epiphany
Saints for Lent, Easter, Pentecost
Saints for Ordinary Time
Scripture & Prayer (intermediate grades)
Scripture & Prayer (primary & intermediate grades)

SACRAMENTS
Introduction to Christian Ritual and Worship
Preparation for Confirmation
Preparation for Eucharist (Includes Reconciliation)
Sacraments of Initiation & Policies
Understanding the Sunday Eucharist













Lighthouse Catholic Media


Description
Lighthouse Catholic Media is a great resource to have available in a parish for continual spiritual
development. Lighthouse Catholic Media CDs topics include: conversion, evangelization, marriage, family
life, prayer, stewardship, the Church, Pope, sacraments, parenting, the Bible, Mary and the saints, music and
more.


Some of the speakers on these CDS include: Matthew Kelly, Dr. Scott Hahn, Archbishop Fulton Sheen, Mike
Sweeney, Fr. Larry Richards, Mother Teresa, Father Corapi, Jeff Cavins, and more.


Objective
To help all to grow closer to our Lord and live lives according to Gods will.


Who Should/Can Attend
Any can purchase a CD from the Lighthouse display set up in the Parish. CDS are for all: parents, children,
teens, young adults, single, married. Everyone who wants to be inspired.


Time Frame
Depends on which CD or topic is chosen.


Cost
Suggested Donation is $20.00 for a bundle of 7 CDS or $3.00 a CD.


Suggestions/Comments
For additional information visit www.LighthouseCatholicMedia.org or call 847-488-0333
Our Lighthouse Manager at Sts. John and Paul Parish is Mark Cotter.










Contact: Kate Bianco
Parish: Saints John and Paul Parish
Phone: 724-935-2104 x23
Email: kbianco@stsjohnandpaul.org

Lighthouse CDs


Description
Our Bible study group subscribes to the Lighthouse CDs. After we are finished using or listening to them,
we label each CD with a tag inviting people to Bible study, and another tag to take home the CD, pass it
around and then return it to the box in the church vestibule for others to use. I will alert the parishioners
periodically in the parish bulletin, as to the CD titles that are in the box. It seems to work well.


Objective
To engage the parish in ongoing Bible study.
To encourage parishioners to get involved in regular Scripture study.


Who Should/Can Attend
All adults.


Time Frame
Varies










Contact: Jean M. DiDonato, D.R.E.
Parish: St. Cyril of Alexandria
Phone: 412-734-0505
Email: stcyrilreled@yahoo.com


Little Rock Scripture Study (LRSS)


Description
This Scripture study began in 1974 as a Catholic alternative to evangelical Protestant Bible studies such as the
Bible Study Fellowship. It has, for many years, been a ministry of the Catholic Diocese of Little Rock in
partnership with Liturgical Press, which provides the materials.

There are four elements to a typical study:
1) daily personal study
20 minutes a day using a Bible, commentary, and study guide
2) small-group sharing
led by a trained facilitator
groups of 8-12
several types of questions
3) wrap-up lecture
approx. 20 minutes
sums up important themes
can be a local speaker, but very good DVDs and CDs are available from LRSS
4) conversational prayera simple method of shared prayer in four steps

There is a wide variety of studies available, varying in format and length. See the LRSS website:
www.littlerockscripture.org.

Objective
To bring people to a greater understanding of the Bible, an awareness of Gods living presence in sacred
Scripture, and an appreciation of how the Bible can be applied to daily life.

Who Should/Can Attend
Adults and older teens

Time Frame
Weekly sessions of about 1 hours (preceded by a meeting of small group leaders if numbers so require).

Suggestions/Comments
Catholics believe that in sacred Scripture, God speaks through human beings in human fashion as the
fathers of the Second Vatican Council put it (Dei Verbum, #12). The human dimension of the Scriptures was
poorly understood before modern biblical studies. One particular strength of LRSS is that it takes seriously
both the divine and human dimensions of the Scriptures by using the insights of recent Catholic biblical
scholarship.




Contact: Andrew K. Bechman
Parish: St. Scholastica, Aspinwall
Phone: 412-781-0186, Ext. 18
Email: andybechman@saintscholastica.com


Parish Book Racks


Description
Our Lady of Grace has book racks in three different locations around the church, with books from Ignatius
Press. Ignatius has an excellent selection of books on Catholic doctrine, prayer, lives of the saints and
religious art and is the leading publisher of the writings of Pope Benedict XVI. Since we are a bookseller, we
receive a 30% discount on orders of 1-4 books, a 43% discount on orders of 4-24 books, a 45% discount on
orders of 25-49 books, and a 47% discount on orders of 50-99 books. Our book racks are managed with the
help of our St. Vincent de Paul Society. Envelopes are placed within each book with a label listing the price
and instructions to put payment in the envelope and the envelope in the poor box. Profits benefit the St.
Vincent de Paul Society. An order of about 50 books is place about four times a year by the Adult Faith
Formation Director. When new books arrive, a sale is held in the church hall after each weekend Mass,
during which parishioners can purchase any book at a 25% discount. If a book has sat for six months without
selling, it is returned to Ignatius for a refund; the church is responsible for the cost of shipping.

Objective
To make excellent spiritual reading available to the members of our parish, so that they can grown in faith and
understanding.

Who Should/Can Attend
Most of the selections are for adults, but some are for children and teenagers.

Time Frame
Books are available year round; an effort is made to provide selections that reflect the liturgical seasons.

Cost
Because of the discount offered by Ignatius Press, the parish makes a small profit from the sale of books,
which is given to the St. Vincent de Paul Society.

Suggestions/Comments
To set up an account as a bookseller, contact Ignatius Press: 1-800-360-1714. To view the selection of titles
available through Ignatius, visit: www.ignatius.com .











Contact: Marie Milburn
Parish: Our Lady of Grace, Scott Township
Phone: 412-279-7070
Email: m.milburn@olgscott.org

Pastors Forum


Description
Fr. Sam Esposito, Pastor of Saint Benedict, writes a weekly forum in our parish bulletin based on the readings
of that Sunday. He relates it to what is going on in our parish as well as in the world.


Objective
To provide an additional communication outlet from pastor to parishioner.


Who Should/Can Attend
Everyone is welcome to take a bulletin or they can subscribe to have the bulletin emailed directly to them.


Suggestions/Comments
A lot of parishioners read Fr Sams forum. In fact, I have had people tell me that they look forward to
reading it.

























Contact: Jay Speca
Parish: St Benedict the Abbot Church
Phone: 724-941-9406 Ext 114
Email: Speca@stbenedicttheabbot.org

Question of the Week


Description
Fr. Sam Esposito, Pastor of Saint Benedict, invites parishioners to email or send him a question that they may
have about their faith. He answers one of the questions every week. He will also answer or respond to issues
that arise in the parish.


Objective
To reach our parishioners and give them a means for communicating questions/concerns/ideas.


Who Should/Can Attend
Everyone is welcome to take a bulletin or they can subscribe to have the bulletin emailed directly to them.


Suggestions/Comments
This has been very successful. People can go to our website and send Fr. Sam an email with a question
anonymously. He gets some very interesting questions.







Contact: Jay Speca
Parish: St Benedict the Abbot Church
Phone: 724-941-9406 Ext 114
Email: Speca@stbenedicttheabbot.org

Spiritual Reflections


Description
Once a month a short spiritual reflection is placed in the bulletin along with a question for meditation and an
invitation to take action on a topic of faith formation.
Monthly Themes
1. Baptismal Covenant.
Find out baptismal date and celebrate pull out pictures, videos and memorabilia.
2. Church as Community.
Attend parish functions and invite family, friends and neighbors.
3. Christian Discipleship.
Discover who may need help in your neighborhood and reach out to them.
4. Holy Gratitude.
Make a list of the ways God has blessed you and create a litany of thanksgiving for your family
prayer.
5. Stewardship conversion.
Donate to our collections for the homeless.
6. Prayerful Living.
Sign up on the Prayer Calendar to pray for the parish.
7. Grace-Full Living.
Examine your life and relationships to see if there is anyone with whom you need to make
peace and then do so either in person, a phone call, a letter or, if not possible, in prayer.
8. Sacrificial Giving.
Give up something and make a donation of the money saved to charity.
9. Christian Worship.
Enter into worship fully listening for the Word of God for you.
10. Community Outreach.
Reach out to those in your family or neighborhood in need of service and volunteer
for one of our ecumenical or parish outreach programs.
11. Parish Ministries.
Thank those in ministry for their service.
12. Parish Vision.
Share with us what you would like our parish to be in the future. Write it out and put
it in the collection basket.

Objective
To utilize the bulletin for faith formation through reflection and response.

Who Should/Can Attend
The entire parish.
Time Frame
Once a month.

Contact: Bernice Dumitru, Pastoral Associate
Parish: Church of the Resurrection
Phone: 412-563-5589
Email: bernicedumitru@msn.com or bernicedumitru@verizon.net

The Faith Connection Email Newsletter


Description
The Faith Connection newsletter, produced by RCL Benziger, is distributed weekly (sample copy attached).
This can be done as an email/in regular mail or as a bulletin insert. Included in each weeks edition are
various reflections/prayers/information/questions on the themes and messages of the Sunday and daily
readings.


Objective
To increase preparedness for the Sunday liturgy.
To improve focus on the liturgy/readings throughout the week.
To encourage families to develop an ongoing routine of reading and reflecting on the Scriptures.


Who Should/Can Attend
Distributed to all adults who desire to more deeply prepare for the Sunday liturgy as well as the readings for
daily Masses.


Time Frame
Weekly


Cost
Basic Membership is $199 per year.
Premium Membership is $249 per year.


Suggestions/Comments
Since RCL is our religious text book publisher (Faith First), this resource ties very nicely to the materials that
our students receive in our school and religious education programs. Parish publishers should be consulted for
similar resources that may be a better fit for the specific parish. An email approach is ideal if the mailing list
is well developed and maintained, because it provides access to these very attractive and brightly colored
resources.








Contact: Joe Killian
Parish: St. Alexis - Wexford
Phone: 724 935-0877
Email: dre@stalexis.org

Women Gathered


Description
Women Gathered is a Bible study, reflection and prayer community for women. All women of our parish and
beyond are invited to be a part of this wonderful, prayerful community of women.


Objective
To grow as women of faith in a setting of prayer, caring, listening, inspiration and community.


Who Should/Can Attend
Any woman.


Time Frame
1-1/2 hours weekly














Contact: Barb McCarthy
Parish: St. Ferdinand Church
Phone: 724 776-1357
Email: barb@stferd.org






Second Task Second Task Second Task Second Task
Liturgical Life Liturgical Life Liturgical Life Liturgical Life
15 15 15 15

(CCC nos. 1066-1690, GDC nos. 84-85, 87)


Understand, live and bear witness to the suffering, death and resurrection of Jesus, celebrated and
communicated through the sacramental life of the Church.

Understand church doctrine on the Eucharist and the other sacraments.

Acquire the spirituality, skills and habits of full, conscious, and active participation in the liturgy,
especially the Eucharistic liturgy.

Value the dignity and responsibility of our baptism.

Understand the roles of the laity and ordained in liturgical celebrations and Christian mission.

Understand and participate in the Churchs daily prayer, the Liturgy of the Hours; and learn to pray the
psalms, an essential and permanent element of the prayer of the Church.
















15
OHWB, no. 92







Second task of Adult Faith Formation: To promote knowledge of the
meaning of the Liturgy and the sacraments.

Since Christ is present in the sacraments,
SC
the believer comes to know Christ in the liturgical celebrations of
the Church and is drawn into communion with him. Christ's saving action in the Paschal Mystery is celebrated
in the sacraments, especially the Eucharist, where the closest communion with Jesus on earth is possible as
Catholics are able to receive his living Flesh and his Precious Blood in Holy Communion. Catechesis should
promote "an active, conscious genuine participation in the liturgy of the Church, not merely by explaining the
meaning of the ceremonies, but also by forming the minds of the faithful for prayer, for thanksgiving, for
repentance, for praying with confidence, for a community spirit, and for understanding correctly the meaning
of the creeds."'
GDC
Sacramental catechesis prepares for the initial celebration of the sacraments and provides
enrichment following their reception.
National Directory for Catechesis

Young Adults

The goal at this age is to invite, empower and enable young adults to participate in the life of the Church
through worship and sacramental life. FAA Some strategies include:

Encourage homilists to address a wide range of life's issues.
FAA

Invite young adults to be liturgical ministers, and provide necessary training.
FAA

Provide opportunities for and encourage continued use of the Sunday readings for daily
reflection.
Unite young adults with the prayer of the Church by encouraging them to pray the Liturgy of
the Hours.
Young adults can be blessed publicly at Mass when joining the parish, moving away, going on to
college, going to military or mission service, entering seminary or religious life, during pregnancy,
at the birth of child, etc. They can also be prayed with and for during times of unemployment.



Adults

Adults of all ages can benefit from faith formation efforts to deepen their understanding of, and appreciation
for, the Eucharistic Liturgy and the other Sacraments. Parishes should have a Liturgy Committee comprising
parishioners representing all the different groups in the parish. The pastor and staff can benefit from
hearing the recommendations of the parishioners regarding Liturgy and this is also an excellent
opportunity to catechize these parish leaders.

Here are some other ideas:

Several times a year, schedule a "Teaching Mass," in which a commentator explains the meaning
of the Eucharistic Liturgy. A carefully crafted script here can be a great way to reach a large
number of people at once. One idea is to focus on the Liturgy of the Word in the fall and the
Liturgy of the Eucharist in the spring.
Consider scheduling the Koinonia courses on the Liturgy and the Sacraments of Initiation.


Promote the special events at the Diocesan Pastoral Centers that focus on Liturgy and
Sacraments.
Keep a well-stocked parish library that includes books and DVDs that parishioners may
borrow. The Appendix to the Guidelines includes a listing of sources for good catechetical
materials.


Senior Adults

Seniors often are a neglected group when it comes to liturgical involvement. Every parish can make special
efforts to help them participate fully and enable them to give witness to their lives of faith.

Large print worship aids, good sound systems, accessible Church architecture (ramps, handrails,
non-slip flooring) are all signs of welcome for seniors. Consideration can be shown/offered to
elders during periods of kneeling or long periods of standing
Older parishioners should continue to be included among the liturgical ministers and be mentors to
various liturgical ministers. They should be represented on the parish Liturgy committee.
They should be included as "Pray-ers" on behalf of the community; this ministry is available to
the homebound as well as those who are not. (see Ministry of Praise in the Appendix) Seniors
should also be included as "composers" of the intercessions for Mass and consulted in homily
preparation.
Seniors can make good RCIA sponsors, sponsor couples for marriage preparation, and can be very
active in sacramental preparation and bereavement ministry.
Elders should be anointed in the community setting-during Mass when possible.
Milestone wedding/religious profession anniversaries (and any wedding/religious profession
anniversary yearly after 50!) should be celebrated with blessings during the Sunday Liturgy, with
the parish community. Grandparents and great grand-parents can also be blessed.













Anointing of the Sick
Description
The Sacrament of the Anointing of the Sick is administered after all masses on the third Sunday of the month
at St. Wendelin Parish, Carrick. Anyone who would like to receive the sacrament simply sits in the front
pews. They are anointed on the forehead and hands. This monthly reminder is helpful in making all
parishioners aware of the purpose of the sacrament and making it readily available to them.


Objective
To make the Sacrament of the Anointing of the Sick readily available to those who would like to take
advantage of it.


Who Should/Can Attend
Any fully initiated Catholic who is suffering from physical, mental or emotional sickness and would like to
ask for healing.


Time Frame
10-15 minutes









Contact: Rev. Ed Wichman
Parish: St. Wendelin Parish
Phone: 412-882-1480



Baptism Preparation

Description
Our Baptism Preparation is primarily offered every other month at our parish and is facilitated by our Baptism
Preparation leaders. The elements of the Baptism preparation program can include: welcome, prayer-
Scripture, overview of the sacrament of Baptism, small group discussions, video, Catechesis of the Good
Shepherd based Baptism presentation, handouts/resources, guided meditation, letter writing(we invite those
present to take time at this session to write a special letter to their child(ren) soon to be baptizedspiritual
music is playing in the background during this timewe ask those present to take their letter home and save it
to give to their child(ren) years later at Confirmation), closing prayer. Some preparation gatherings also
include the opportunity for the group to gather in the Church to witness and celebrate a Baptism that is taking
place that day.


Objective
To lift up this most precious gift of Baptism in the lives of all.
To provide an opportunity to come together to listen, to share, to prepare, to discuss, and to enter into the
wonder of the richness of this sacrament.


Who Should/Can Attend
Parents/God-parents/child(ren) to be baptized can attend.


Time Frame
1 to 1 hours


Suggestions/Comments
This Baptism preparation program was created in collaboration with our Baptism preparation team, and St.
Alexis Parish.













Contact: Kate Bianco
Parish: Saints John and Paul Parish
Phone: 724-935-2104 x23
Email: kbianco@stsjohnandpaul.org

Eucharistic Adoration


Description
Every Friday following the 9:00 a.m. Mass parishioners are encouraged to pray and keep watch before the
Blessed Sacrament.


Objective
To promote prayer and devotion to the Blessed Sacrament.
To provide parishioners an opportunity to come away for a while to a quiet place.


Who Should/Can Attend
Anyone


Time Frame
9:00 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.









Contact: Barb McCarthy
Parish: St. Ferdinand Church
Phone: 724 776-1357
Email: barb@stferd.org

Focus on the Liturgy


Description
For a series of eleven weeks, at the Liturgy we focused on one aspect of the Liturgy and catechized the
congregation through word and action. The homily highlighted the focus. A catechetical teaching on that
aspect was included in the bulletin, a visual poster was placed at all entrances as a reminder and a suggestion
was made as to how to incorporate this in daily life.

Themes:

1. Come let us worship the Lord, with hearts full of kindness, mercy and forgiveness.
Focus on the dispositions for coming to worship and the penitential rite.
2. Lift up your voice in song. Reach out your hand to greet. Offer your heart in praise, in worship, in love to
the Trinity. Glory to God in the Highest. Focus on song and gesture in worship.
3. We are called to listen to, learn from, delight in and live the Word of God.
Focus on the Liturgy of Word.
4. We believe in our Mighty God who hears and answers our prayers.
Focus on the Creed and Prayers of the Faithful.
5. We celebrate Eucharist with hearts full of Thanksgiving.
Focus on the Liturgy of Eucharist as our worship of Thanksgiving.
6. What we offer is an act of Worship and continues the mission of the Church.
Focus on what we offer to God in the Offertory.
7. Christ loved us and gave Himself up for us.
Focus on the offering Christ made of Himself and the Eucharistic Prayer.
8. Father forgive me as I forgive others.
Focus on our family prayer, the Our Father as preparation for Communion.
9. Those who take and eat are One Body in Christ.
Focus on the Communion Rite.
10. God speaks to us in the silence of our hearts.
Focus on Liturgy as prayer and the times of silence.
11. Take the Word to the nations. Shine the Light of Christ! May the witness of our lives transform
the world anew. Focus on the Rite of Dismissal.

Objective
To lead the congregation to that full, conscious and active participation called for by the very nature of the
liturgy by focusing systematically on the various parts, attitudes and movements of the liturgy to heighten
their understanding and awareness of their meaning.

Who Should/Can Attend
The worshipping assembly

Time Frame
Eleven weeks during liturgy.

Contact: Bernice Dumitru
Parish: Church of the Resurrection
Phone: 412-563-5589
Email: bernicedumitru@msn.com or bernicedumitru@verizon.net


Section B



40 Hours Devotion


Description
The Blessed Sacrament is exposed for three days and parishioners are encouraged to sign up on the sheets
provided to spend some time in prayer before the Blessed Sacrament.


Objective
To focus on the 40 Hours Devotion as a source of Gods blessings and graces on the parish, the school and all
the families of St Gabriel.


Who Should/Can Attend
All are welcome and encouraged to attend.


Time Frame
Monday 11 a.m. - 4 p.m., Tuesday 10 a.m. -8 p.m., Wednesday 10 a.m. - closing


Suggestions/Comments
Provide sign-up sheets to be sure all the time slots are covered.




















Contact: Fr. John Haney
Parish: St. Gabriel of the Sorrowful Virgin
Phone: 412-881-8115
Email: sgabeschurch@yahoo.com


Mini-Catechesis


Description
After Holy Communion invite the congregation to be seated for a brief faith formation session centered on the
Scriptures of the day not incorporated in the homily, the feast or season of the Church Year, the saint of the
day, a point in church history suggested by the Scripture, current events or a timely moral issue.

These would be occasional sessions remaining sensitive to the weather, the climate in the church and the civic
events that may be occurring.

This could also be planned to create a series on the sacraments, social issues, prayer etc., (in the spirit of the
Holy Fathers teachings at the Angelus).


Objective
To utilize the liturgy as the primary source of faith formation to maximize the number of adults that are
reached.


Who Should/Can Attend
The assembly


Time Frame
Occasionally during Sunday and weekday liturgies after Holy Communion.


Suggestions/Comments
Keep it brief, engaging and informative.












Contact: Bernice Dumitru
Parish: Church of the Resurrection
Phone: 412-563-5589
Email: bernicedumitru@msn.com or bernicedumitru@verizon.net



Ministry Workshops


Description
We offer workshops for each liturgical ministry where we explain its history, what it means to be in ministry,
our parishs mission statement and how it is related to their ministry; as well as how they are to perform their
ministry.


Objective
To evangelize our liturgical ministers and, eventually, the parishioners in the pew.


Who Should/Can Attend
Each minister should attend their specific workshop.


Time Frame
1 - 2 hours


Suggestions/Comments
I have received a good response with these workshops. I do follow-up sessions called Prayer and Formation
sessions with the liturgical ministers where we faith share, pray, and discuss their ministry. (I have ministers
asking when the next session will be). I try to do these 3 times a year for each ministry.










Contact: Jay Speca
Parish: St Benedict the Abbot Church
Phone: 724-941-9406 Ext 114
Email: Speca@stbenedicttheabbot.org


RCIA


Description
The RCIA is a process for full initiation with the Catholic faith. It is rooted in forming not a persons
religion, but their Catholicism as a way of life affecting all aspects of their life consciously. RCIA is a
multi-step, self-paced process. Ministers and leaders serve as educators and coaches offering encouragement,
but do not push a candidate along the four-step process. The individual discerns their relationship with God
and the Church as they decide to progress toward full initiation. This is facilitated by a process of continual
education in sacred Scripture and routine sessions in the teaching and doctrine of the Church along with the
experience of the weekly Sunday liturgy. To support those interested in full membership with the Catholic
Church, the RCIA offers instructors who concentrate on Bible teaching, instructors who present topics of
doctrine and Catholic teaching, sponsors whose responsibility is to accompany a person preparing for full
membership and integrate them into experiences of the greater Church, and pray-ers whose sole task is to
offer daily prayer for all those in RCIA.

Objective
To more closely study and apply the Sunday readings after being dismissed following the homily.
To present doctrinal sessions each week following a curriculum built on beliefs of the Church, sacraments and
prayer, moral teaching.
To discern ones readiness to become a full member of the Catholic Church.

Who Should/Can Attend
The RCIA is oriented toward individuals who have an interest in full membership with The Catholic Church.
Full membership is defined as receiving the sacraments of Baptism and Confirmation. Individuals who enter
the RCIA are unbaptized, baptized in another Christian faith tradition, or baptized as a Catholic, but have
never received Confirmation.

Time Frame
Minimum of one year, however, this process is self-paced

Suggestions/Comments
Have two sets of catechists one for Sunday Scripture lessons, and one for doctrine lessons this way a
person can join the RCIA at any time of the year e.g., if someone comes in January, they can begin by
attending the Sunday Mass/lesson, but will not start the doctrinal lessons until the following fall.

Evangelization brochures, bulletin announcements, websites. Also create a culture on the staff as children
register in the school/religious education, offer information to non-Catholic parents; with clergy when couples
come for marriage, refer non-Catholics to the RCIA; in marriage preparation, offer a short segment on RCIA;
put periodic updates in the bulletin about the number of people in the process; offer a neophyte spotlight in
the bulletin from a recent initiate telling of their experience of RCIA.

Celebrate the rites meet with the music director and plan the rites as parish celebrations. Educate the
community when the rites are and explain each one. Include that information in the prayers of the faithful
regularly, not just during Lent.


Contact: Deacon Joe Compomizzi
Parish: Saint Elizabeth of Hungary Parish
Phone: 412.882.8744
Email: deaconjoe@st-elizabeth.org
















Sacraments: Celebration of the Christian Mysteries


Description
This is a doctrinal component of basis certification including the topics of: The Sacramental Economy and
Actions of the Church; The Sacraments of Initiation, Part A: Baptism and Confirmation; The Sacraments of
Initiation, Part B: Eucharist; The Sacraments of Healing; and Sacraments at the Service of Communion.
Formal material regarding the Traditional Prayer (Our Father) is addressed during the course. Scripture and
prayer are utilized for each lesson.


Objective
To address an adult understanding of the faith.


Who Should/Can Attend
All catechists and any interested person.


Time Frame
15-hour Program


Cost
$30.00


Suggestions/Comments
It is geared toward all catechists working with any age group cradle to grave; religious education and school,
special religious education, youth ministers, catechists for adults (marriage preparation, preparation for infant
baptism) and RCIA catechists.

See next two pages for Advanced/Renewal Certification Courses











Contact: Sharon Hachman
Parish: Diocese of Pittsburgh
Phone: 412-456-3110
Email: shachman@diopitt.org


Advanced / Renewal Certification Courses
May be offered as Enrichment (10 or 15 hours) or
Workshop (3 or 5 hours) only

CREED
Christology: Study of Christ
Church History
Ecclesiology
Eschatology: Study of the Last Things
Mariology: Study of Mary
Pneumatology
U.S. Catholic Catechism for Adults
MORALITY
Beatitudes
Commandments & Beatitudes: Laws & Invitations
Journey from Faith to Justice: Social Teaching of the Church
Present Day Threats to Human Life
Social Justice
PRAYER
Encyclical on the Rosary
Experiences of Prayer
Prayer, Journey with Jesus
Praying the Psalms
SCRIPTURE
Acts of the Apostles
Gospel of John
Gospel of Mark
Gospels for Contemporary Christians
Infancy Narratives
Introduction to the Old Testament
Keys to Studying Scripture
Letters of Paul
New Testament for Contemporary Christians
Old Testament for Contemporary Christians
Passion Narratives
Prophets
Synoptic Gospels
Teaching the Parables of Jesus
The Pentateuch

SPIRITUALITY
Spiritual Formation
Spiritual/Moral Character of the Human Person
The Transformative Character of Suffering
Traditions of Catholic Spirituality





METHODS
Advanced Methods
Children's Liturgy
Creative Teaching
Creative Teaching for Catholic School Teachers
Gifts and Fruits of the Holy Spirit
Growing in Faith: Stages of Development
How to Use a Catechetical Textbook
How to Use Media
Introduction to Sign Language
Liturgical Seasons: Advent, Christmas, Epiphany
Liturgical Seasons: Lent, Easter, Pentecost
Maintaining a Peaceful Classroom
Methods for Teaching Sacraments
Methods: Special Needs Inclusion
Middle School Ministry
Motivation/Enthusiasm
Pittsburgh Saints
Sacramental Preparation: Sacraments of Initiation, Healing, Service
Saints for Advent, Christmas, Epiphany
Saints for Lent, Easter, Pentecost
Saints for Ordinary Time
Scripture & Prayer (intermediate grades)
Scripture & Prayer (primary & intermediate grades)


SACRAMENTS
Introduction to Christian Ritual and Worship
Preparation for Confirmation
Preparation for Eucharist (Includes Reconciliation)
Sacraments of Initiation & Policies
Understanding the Sunday Eucharist


















Sunday Liturgy Preparation


Description
The Formation Office posts Sundays Gospel, a commentary, and a question on our website so parishioners
can prepare for Sundays liturgy.


Objective
To help parishioners be more aware of the Sunday liturgies by reading and thinking about the Gospel ahead
of time.


Who Should/Can Attend
Adults


Time Frame
Weekly


Suggestions/Comments
This is new but the number of hits on the website has increased over the last few weeks.





















Contact: Jay Speca
Parish: St Benedict the Abbot Church
Phone: 724-941-9406 Ext 114
Email: Speca@stbenedicttheabbot.org


Televised Masses


Description
The diocesan Department for Media and Technology produces the Mass for Shut-ins that cablecasts on the
Pittsburgh Cable News Channel (PCNC) and The Retro TV Network (RTV) on Sunday mornings at 6:00
a.m. Check your local cable system for listings for PCNC and RTN. The department also records and
cablecasts certain diocesan events from Saint Paul Cathedral and makes available these videos through the
Learning Media Center.


The Mass from Saint Paul Cathedral cablecasts on the Christian Associates Channel (Comcast Channel 95
in the City of Pittsburgh) at 8:15 a.m., Monday through Saturday. On Sunday mornings, the Mass cablecasts
at 8:00 a.m.


Daily Mass from Saint Mary of Mercy Church is televised on WBGN-TV (check your local cable system) or
on the Christian Associates Channel (Comcast Channel 95 in the City of Pittsburgh).


Objective
To proclaim the Gospel and the teachings of the Catholic Church by using all available forms of media
including the internet and television.


Who Should/Can Attend
Anyone. It is especially beneficial for shut-ins.










Contact: Department for Media and Technology
Parish: Saint Paul Cathedral; Saint Mary of Mercy
Phone: 412-456-3116
Email: lectronicmedia@diopitt.org


Tour of Church


Description
Provide a prepared diagram of the church with clearly marked areas and sacred vessels displayed. (See
Sample from St. Mary, Glenshaw). Provide descriptions of each item in the church. Invite the parent or
guardian to do the tour with their children stopping at each numbered area on map diagram to read the
description to the children.


Objective
To provide basic understanding about the sacred space used for worship and devotions unique to our
Catholic faith.


Who Should/Can Attend
Families, catechists, RCIA groups each at different times for emphasis to the particular group.


Time Frame
45 minutes: 30 minutes for tour, 15 minutes for questions or observations to be shared.


Suggestions/Comments
It was very helpful to have our sacristan by the main altar to show the altar stone placement as well as speak
of the thurible and monstrance since they are not used frequently at this parish.

See next page for diagram of the church used for this tour.
















Contact: Rose Stegman
Parish: Saint Mary Glenshaw
Phone: 412-486-5521
Email: stegmanr@stmaryglenshaw.org












Third Task Third Task Third Task Third Task
Moral Formation Moral Formation Moral Formation Moral Formation
16 16 16 16

(CCC nos. 1691-2557, GDC nos. 84-85, 87)


Understand how the entire Law of the Gospel is contained in the new commandment of Jesus, to
love one another as he has loved us.

Study the Ten Commandments, the Beatitudes, and the moral teachings of the Church, and live in
accord with them.

Understand the dignity, destiny, freedom, and responsibility of the human person.

Understand the meaning and nature of sin and the power of Gods grace to overcome it.

Learn how to acquire and follow a well-formed conscience.

Recognize, defend, and live by the truth of objective moral norms as taught by the Churchs
magisterium in its moral and social teaching.

Promote a thorough catechesis on the Gospel of life so that respect for life from conception until
natural death is honored in personal behavior, in public policy, and in the expressed values and
attitudes of our society.

Live a lifestyle reflecting scriptural values.



16
OHWB no. 93



Third task of Adult Faith Formation: To promote moral formation in Jesus
Christ.

Jesus' moral teaching is an integral part of his message. Catechesis must transmit both the content of Christ's
moral teachings as well as their implications for Christian living. Moral catechesis aims to conform the
believer to Christto bring about personal transformation and conversion. It should encourage the faithful to
give witnessboth in their private lives and in the public arenato Christ's teaching in everyday life. Such
testimony demonstrates the social consequences of the demands of the Gospel.
CT

National Directory for Catechesis


Young Adults

As with all adults, the primary object with young adults is to assist them in forming their consciences so that,
throughout their lives, they are prepared to make good moral judgments according to Gospel values.
RTV

Young people today need considerable help, support and guidance as they enter into romantic
relationships; move away from home, friends and their faith communities; and enter the workforce.

All of the adult faith formation strategies discussed elsewhere in these guidelines are appropriate for helping
young adults learn about the moral life. Some specific strategies include:

Use the Ten Commandments, Beatitudes, Catholic Social Teaching, and the moral teaching of the
Church as a way of promoting conscience formation.
Provide opportunities for pastoral counseling and/or spiritual direction.
Influence conscience formation in young adults by lived example.
Encourage frequent use of the Sacrament of Reconciliation.



Adults

The U.S. Bishops have identified seven content areas for adult faith formation in the moral life:

Understand how the "entire Law of the Gospel is contained in the 'new commandment' of Jesus,
to love one another as he has loved us, and promote each disciple's formation in the life of the
risen Christ.
Study the Ten Commandments, the Beatitudes, and the moral catechesis of the apostolic
teachings, and live in accord with them.
Appreciate the dignity, destiny, freedom, and responsibility of the human person, together with
the reality of sin and the power of God's grace to overcome it.
Learn how to acquire and follow a well-formed conscience in personal and social life, clarifying
current religious and moral questions in the life of faith, and cultivating a Christian discernment
of the ethical implications of developments in the socio-cultural order.
Recognize, defend, and live by the truth of objective moral norms as taught by the Church's
Magisterium in its moral and social teaching.



Promote a thorough catechesis on the Gospel of life so that respect for life from conception until
natural death is honored in personal behavior, in public policy, and in the expressed values and
attitudes of our society.
Live a lifestyle reflecting scriptural values of holiness, simplicity, and compassion.
OHWB


By the time an individual reaches adulthood, he or she will have strong opinions on some moral issues
and ambivalent feelings about others. Most will be unfamiliar with much of Church teaching on moral
issues. In particular, adults who stopped their formal formation in the faith early in life will lack
understanding of the reasons behind Church teaching.

Pastoral experience has shown that adults learn best when they are given the opportunity in small groups
to discuss Church teaching on moral issues in light of their own lived experience. They are especially
interested in knowing and struggling with the Church's teaching on such "hot button" issues as:

Stem-cell research and its possible applications
End-of-life issues, including the use of artificial feeding and ventilation
Human cloning
Human sexuality, including issues surrounding divorce and remarriage
"Just war" theology as it applies to the various wars and conflicts in the world today

The catechist should encourage an atmosphere in which adults are free to express their opinions, even
to disagree openly on issues. A stance of respectful listening while challenging the learner to new
insights can be an important tool in conversion of heart and mind. It is useful, too, to have on hand a
list of local spiritual directors who can assist the adult who is struggling to live the Gospel life more
fully.

Senior Adults

Like all adults, seniors will have extensive experience in facing moral issues. In particular, they likely
will have survived the death of a spouse, child or other loved one. They may also have needed to make
difficult decisions regarding medical care and end-of-life issues. Seniors who have faced such difficult
issues may be a good resource for others. They can be especially effective in organizing grief groups,
family support groups, and other ministries.

In his 1999 "Letter to the Elderly," Pope John Paul II "The signs of human frailty which are clearly
connected with advanced age become a summons to the mutual dependence and indispensable solidarity
which link the different generations, inasmuch as every person needs others and draws enrichment from
the gifts and charisms of all." (n. 10)


Fair Trade Work of Human Hands Sale


Description
A Fair Trade sale provides a market for artisans and farmers in developing countries to sell their products at a
fair price.


Objective
To raise money for the parish or a parish charity. (see cost below)
To provide an opportunity to talk about Catholic Social Teaching and Global Solidarity.
To provide a great parish community building event.
To provide an opportunity for volunteers of all ages to work together.


Who Should/Can Attend
It is great to have parishioners attend and/or volunteer but usually sales are also open to the public.


Time Frame
Sales can be one day or over a weekend, with shopping available after weekend Masses. A sale, depending
on size, can be held in conjunction with another parish event.


Cost
Depending on how you do the sale affects cost. At our sale we ask for donations of cookies from volunteers.
Then we have fair trade coffee available for people to taste along with the donated cookies. We have a
donation basket there and we have usually been able to cover a lot of our cost through those coffee/cookie
donations. In addition, the parish would make between 10%-15% profit on net sales which can be used to
cover promotion and shipping costs or support a charity. Sales can be done through Catholic Relief Services
www.crs.org/fairtrade or Ten Thousand Villages www.tenthousandvillages.com which is a Mennonite based
organization. There are also many other fair trade organizations.


Suggestions/Comments
Our sale was sponsored by the Justice and Charity Outreach Committee but it could be sponsored by different
parish committees or several together. The focus of a fair trade sale can be expanded to include raising
money for or giving out information about other justice issues. Our parish has included Bethlehem
Oliveworks, the River Nile School project that supports one of the Lost Boys of the Sudan and his efforts to
build a school back in the Sudan, Partners in Progress, a locally based organization that works for sustainable
rural development in Haiti and other similar organizations. We have also done this sale in conjunction with
neighboring parishes and this is a great way to collaborate across parish lines. It helps with the volunteer pool
as well.

Contact: Mimi Darragh
Parish: St. Valentine Parish
Phone: 412-831-8312
Email: mimidarragh@aol.com


March for Life


Description
Beginning with Respect Life Sunday in October, our school children help by having our Birthright and
Genesis roses available after all Masses (suggested one dollar donation for our babies and moms). I speak to
our students and have information in the bulletin on pro-life activities. We have coffee, juice and doughnuts
after all Masses; pro-life materials are available, and slides are shown in the Family Life Center.


The 7
th
and 8
th
grade and high school students are encouraged to attend the March. At the beginning of
January, we begin talking up the Marchs pro-life activities. We take one adult for every five students,
although younger children must be with an adult.


Objective
To raise awareness about pro-life issues in intergenerational settings.


Who Should/Can Attend
We encourage all parishioners and families with children


Time Frame
Our two 48-passenger buses leave after a 5:30 a.m. Mass on January 22
nd
and return at midnight.


Cost
$20 roundtrip, but we never turn anyone away. Many people sponsor a student. We usually break even.


Suggestions/Comments
We also have a Mothers Day flower sale. On that Sunday I have all the school children help. Proceeds go to
our Crisis Pregnancy Centers.










Contact: Ms. Carolyn Sopher
Parish: St. Thomas More
Phone: 412-257-0780

Morality: Life in Christ


Description
This is a combination of topical material from the Catechism of the Catholic Church and foundational
material for the Catholic Vision of Love. Topics include: Dignity of the Human Person; Created Both Free
and Responsible; the Problem of Personal Evil: Sin; Salvationthe Moral Law, Grace and Justification;
Human Community/Social Teaching; and Guidance in the Practice of Love of God and Neighbor.


Objective
To provide for catechists and any interested adults good opportunities to be well informed about the faith they
will pass on to their students and children.


Who Should/Can Attend
All catechists and any interested person.


Time Frame
21-hour Course


Cost
$40.00


Suggestions/Comments
The first six lessons based on an adult understanding of faith draw upon Scripture and prayer and integrate
objectives for the Catholic Vision of Love. The seventh lesson is necessary for those catechists who will be
teaching the Catholic Vision of Love Lessons to Grades 5-8 and is option for all other participants. The
seventh lesson covers the Foundational Principles for the Catholic Vision of Love, the student background
and the four specific lessons for each grade level 5-8.

See next two pages for Advanced/Renewal Certification Courses









Contact: Sharon Hachman
Parish: Diocese of Pittsburgh
Phone: 412-456-3110
Email: shachman@diopitt.org

Advanced / Renewal Certification Courses
May be offered as Enrichment (10 or 15 hours) or
Workshop (3 or 5 hours) only

CREED
Christology: Study of Christ
Church History
Ecclesiology
Eschatology: Study of the Last Things
Mariology: Study of Mary
Pneumatology
U.S. Catholic Catechism for Adults
MORALITY
Beatitudes
Commandments & Beatitudes: Laws & Invitations
Journey from Faith to Justice: Social Teaching of the Church
Present Day Threats to Human Life
Social Justice
PRAYER
Encyclical on the Rosary
Experiences of Prayer
Prayer, Journey with Jesus
Praying the Psalms
SCRIPTURE
Acts of the Apostles
Gospel of John
Gospel of Mark
Gospels for Contemporary Christians
Infancy Narratives
Introduction to the Old Testament
Keys to Studying Scripture
Letters of Paul
New Testament for Contemporary Christians
Old Testament for Contemporary Christians
Passion Narratives
Prophets
Synoptic Gospels
Teaching the Parables of Jesus
The Pentateuch

SPIRITUALITY
Spiritual Formation
Spiritual/Moral Character of the Human Person
The Transformative Character of Suffering
Traditions of Catholic Spirituality


METHODS
Advanced Methods
Children's Liturgy
Creative Teaching
Creative Teaching for Catholic School Teachers
Gifts and Fruits of the Holy Spirit
Growing in Faith: Stages of Development
How to Use a Catechetical Textbook
How to Use Media
Introduction to Sign Language
Liturgical Seasons: Advent, Christmas, Epiphany
Liturgical Seasons: Lent, Easter, Pentecost
Maintaining a Peaceful Classroom
Methods for Teaching Sacraments
Methods: Special Needs Inclusion
Middle School Ministry
Motivation/Enthusiasm
Pittsburgh Saints
Sacramental Preparation: Sacraments of Initiation, Healing, Service
Saints for Advent, Christmas, Epiphany
Saints for Lent, Easter, Pentecost
Saints for Ordinary Time
Scripture & Prayer (intermediate grades)
Scripture & Prayer (primary & intermediate grades)


SACRAMENTS
Introduction to Christian Ritual and Worship
Preparation for Confirmation
Preparation for Eucharist (Includes Reconciliation)
Sacraments of Initiation & Policies
Understanding the Sunday Eucharist






Movie Night


Description
Periodically our parish offers a religious or inspirational movie to the parish. Movies we have shown in the
past are Therese, St. Anthony, Francis & Clare, Molokai, Elizabeth Ann Seton, Mother Teresa and St. Rita


Objective
To educated adults and children about the lives of people who love God and Gods people.
To offer inspiration and hope.


Who Should/Can Attend
Adults and children depending on the movies rating.


Time Frame
1-1/2 to 2 hours











Contact: Barb McCarthy
Parish: St. Ferdinand Church
Phone: 724-776-1357
Email: barb@stferd.org

Pilgrimage to the Rachel Weeping Memorial
at Calvary Cemetery


Description
Calvary Cemetery in Hazelwood has a beautiful memorial, Rachel Weeping, for unborn children lost to
abortion and their mothers. In front of the memorial in the form of a cross are paving stones inscribed with
the names of children whose mothers have asked for them to be remembered there. In October, a small group
of pilgrims caravanned from Our Lady of Grace to Calvary Cemetery. Our pastor, Fr. Richard Infante,
obtained permission to celebrate Mass at the beautiful Our Lady of the Rosary Mausoleum/Chapel, which is
within walking distance from the Rachel Weeping Memorial. After Mass we prayed a Litany for Life at the
memorial. In May, we returned to the memorial and planted flowering trees, shrubs and hosta plants to
beautify the area. Afterward we prayed the Divine Mercy Chaplet.


Objective
To make a prayerful journey, employing our bodies, as well as our hearts and minds, to honor the lives of
children lost to abortion.
To pray for the children, their mothers, and all those suffering on account of abortion.
To pray for an end to abortion.


Who Should/Can Attend
Families and single parishioners, including children at their parents discretion.


Time Frame
We chose to make these pilgrimages on Saturday afternoon. Because of the funeral schedule at Calvary
Cemetery, do not plan to arrive before 2:00 p.m. The length of your stay at the memorial will depend on the
activities that you plan.


Suggestions/Comments
If you are interested in planning a similar pilgrimage, contact Sr. Pat at Calvary Cemetery 412-421-9959.










Contact: Marie Milburn
Parish: Our Lady of Grace, Scott Township
Phone: 412-279-7070
Email: m.milburn@olgscott.org

Social Justice Speaker Series


Description
We had three talks on Sunday afternoons, given by professors from Duquesnes Theology Department. The
first was by a woman who teaches courses on theological ethics Catholic social thought, the second was by
her husband who teaches courses on care of creation, and the third was by the two of them speaking on how
they try to live as a young Catholic couple (with a baby) in todays world.


Objective
To introduce parishioners to the teachings of the Church on social justice.


Who Should/Can Attend
Adult parishioners


Time Frame
This event occurred on Sunday afternoon after our last Mass. The talk was about 45 minutes followed by
questions and a continuation of the discussion over light refreshments.


Suggestions/Comments
We were pleased that such knowledgeable speakers from Duquesne were willing to come to our parish to give
this series.


















Contact: Barbara Matera
Parish: Saint John Neumann Parish
Phone: 412-366-5885 Ext. 18
Email: bfmatera@yahoo.com


Christian Theology of Movies


Description
"What shall we say the kingdom of God is like, and what parable shall we use to describe it?" Mark 4:30

Just as Jesus used parables to help the people of his day reflect on God and themselves, many movies (the
parables of our time) have underlying theological themes that connect with our faith and with proper
reflection can help us gain insight into where God is leading us in our own lives. Many times the writers and
directors themselves unknowingly (but sometimes knowingly) include theological themes of faith, hope,
conversion, the dignity of persons, healing, salvation, redemption, freedom, resurrection and forgiveness,
among others. Sometimes there are direct scriptural parallels. The idea is for us to start watching films
through a theological lens so that when one of these themes is present it will awaken something in us that says
"Ahhhh, that's an image of self-sacrifice!" which reminds us of Christ. Or "That character is involved in a
conversion," which might cause us to reflect on our own ongoing conversion. It takes some practice, but it's
not long until we see religious themes popping up in all kinds of movies - even ones that seem far removed
from religion. Participants will watch the movie and then spend time discussing it using questions prepared by
the facilitator.

Objective
To engage in the teaching method of Jesus, using parables, to combine theological ideas with engaging
stories.

To enable the Church to reenter the surrounding culture, help decode its images interpret its stories and probe
its values.

Who Should/Can Attend
The focus should be on adults and young adults, though can expect children to show for films like Shrek and
Finding Nemo, (excellent movies for this endeavor, by the way). Advertising for the event should include the
movie's rating and why it rated like that. Sometimes it is helpful to use the USCCB's rating instead.
You'll find a different crowd (but possibly a few of the same people) attending than might sign up for a six
week course on the Book of Jeremiah.

Time Frame
2 to 3 hours

Suggestions/Comments
Comfortable space, comfortable seating, as big a screen as possible (a video projector shown on a white wall
works fine!), movie snacks, etc.
A motion picture license is generally needed and highly recommended! Please read the FAQ page of the
Motion Picture Licensing Corporation at www.mplc.org
Sometimes, making arrangements to show your film at a local theater can complete all of the above
suggestions.

Contact: Deacon Tim Killmeyer
Parish: Holy Trinity
Phone: 412-787-1472
Email: timkillmeyer@verizon.net

Christian Theology of Movies


For various reasons over the years, the church has sometimes tried to separate itself from secular culture,
offering its own popular diversions, forcing many spiritual questions to remain in secular discourse.

Church attendees, inundated by images from the web, DVDs, TV, advertisements, cable, and movies, find
themselves dividing theological life from perceived life. A separation develops between the ideas about God
on Sundays and the entertaining stories, images, and emotional truths Hollywood provides the rest of the
week. This is why Jesus spoke in parables, combining theological ideas with engaging stories.

Images linger in our memories: two dying lovers clasp during the final moments of a Titanic disaster; a
Kingdom as small as a mustard seed blossoms into beauty; a "True-man" (Truman) adrift at sea shouts
defiantly at his manipulative Creator; a woman sweeps her home searching for a lost coin; a hollow vestige of
an English teacher trembles at life's horrors while Saving Private Ryan.

A well planned Theology of Movies program can help our people see through the surrounding culture, help
decode its images, interpret its stories, and probe its values. Christian leaders can join the cinematic dialogue,
feel its heartbeat, hear its questions, and direct the journey towards spiritual enlightenment.

Just as Jesus used parables to help the people of his day reflect on God and themselves, many movies (the
parables of our time) have underlying theological themes that connect with our faith and with proper
reflection can help us gain insight into where God is leading us in our own lives. Sometimes the writers and
directors themselves unknowingly (but sometimes knowingly) include theological themes of faith, hope,
conversion, the dignity of persons, healing, salvation, redemption, freedom, resurrection and forgiveness,
among others. The idea is for us to start watching films through a theological lens so that when one of these
themes is present it will awaken something in us that says "Ahhhh, that's an image of self-sacrifice!" which
reminds of Christ. Or "That character is involved in a conversion," which might cause us to reflect on our own
ongoing conversion. It takes some practice, but it's not long until we see religious themes popping up in all
kinds of movies - even ones that seem far removed from religion. Have you ever taken a real good look at The
Matrix?

How does one go about drawing spiritual analogies from the movies? Like anything else, "sanctifying our
vision" develops over time through practice. There have been a number of books written on the subject and
despite the disheartening mass of Christian publications attacking a film's surface content, a few Christian
publications (and websites) have managed to offer substantive observations regarding the wealth of spiritual
images in the cinema.

There are basically two approaches that can be taken: one made possible through movies with obvious
religious subjects (like The Apostle, The Third Miracle, Entertaining Angels, The Dorothy Day Story, or
Joshua), and one that involves making metaphorical connections to a movie's narrative. The latter usually
includes character types or drama that reflects biblical truths. The triumph of good over evil (Star Wars), a
white clothed redeemer comes down to the once perfect garden (farm) to confront evil taking over the land

and returns riding toward the sky (Shane), the importance of community (Babe ), or the discovery of
unconditional Love (AI Artificial Intelligence) are good examples. A character type may be a "Christ
figure," or someone who comes from outside a community and transforms it for the better, usually in a
sacrificial nature. (One immediately thinks of movies like One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, The Spitfire
Grill, Edward Scissorhands even Superman.) This isn't meant to imply such a character entails the essence
of Christ or exhibits perfect behavior, but can serve as a striking metaphor for his impact on our world.

The point isn't to congratulate ourselves on our ability to make connections and formulate modern parables
out of the cinema, but to help others see how the narratives and themes that appeal to them on a deep level are
symptomatic of spiritual realities. Love, sacrifice, justice, mercy, community, service, equality, and other
themes are elements of the biblical narrative that are often reflected by good drama. Movies have a structure
(setup, confrontation, and resolution) that our episodic lives seem to lack, and therefore show us how our lives
can fit into a larger, universal pattern like the metanarrative provided by scripture.

In addition, spiritual metaphors (which often highlight "mythic" truths deeply embedded in our culture) don't
have hard and fast rules and there are bound to be many interpretations of any particular film. Take The
Truman Show, for example. One perspective might be that Truman represents Adam and humanity's free will
rejection of God, while another might contend that Truman represents humanity saved through redemptive
love and its liberation from a false god, while another might believe Truman is a Christ figure leading the way
beyond the dishonest and broken society around him. None of these views are "right" or "wrong," but serve as
memorable pictures of several theological truths. That the film takes great pains in establishing the creator of
Truman's world as a godly figure is a given, through his control of "nature," through references to "the Big
Guy" up above, and through scenes depicting his voice booming down through the clouds. Good theological
dialogue can arise from the interaction of interpretations, and specific views will often reveal unexpected
truths about us.

Movies can serve as modern parables in the sense that they often convey spiritual truths in basic metaphorical
contexts. New Testament scholar C. H. Dodd defines a parable as "a metaphor or simile drawn from nature or
common life, arresting the hearer by its vividness or strangeness, and leaving the mind in sufficient doubt
about its precise application to tease it into active thought." The best films will evoke a similar experience.
Parables are often contrasted with allegories (used more frequently in Old Testament books like Daniel)
which are mythic stories or events where every detail symbolizes an intentional meaning thereby promoting a
series of messages. Biblical analogies in the movies shouldn't be understood as representing spiritual truths in
every detail, but like parables, should be used as dramatic stimuli with one primary meaning.

Here are some suggested questions to ask oneself when approaching a film from a theological standpoint
(some films have study guides available on the internet or for purchase in book form):
-What are the film's assumptions about God?
-What is the central problem (or sin?) that disrupts the initial balance? How is it resolved?
-What is the movie's sense of justice? Is everything tied up or are there still some loose ends?
-Is there a redeemer, or Christ figure, used in the narrative?
-What ethical or moral questions are presented? How is truth perceived?


-What moral or ethical decisions do character's make and how do they affect the overall plot?
-How does the film depict Christians, the church, or religious faith in general? (Note these may be different.)
-Can the spirituality of the characters be readily ascertained? How does this affect their role in the plot?
-What insights into cultural worldviews are presented?
-What scriptural analogies can be made?
-Does the narrative, or parts of it, resemble stories Jesus told?

The discussion following the movie is a very important part of the evening. Be sure to let the group know that.
The leader should view the movie beforehand and prepare questions for the group such as these for Ray (the
story of Ray Charles):

Rays mother took a very pragmatic approach toward his oncoming blindness. How did that affect Ray's
ability to deal with it? What kind of personal attitudes and decisions can cripple a person?

Ray Charles isn't the only performer who has dealt with the addictive substances. What pressures may lead
successful people to get caught up in the world of drugs and alcohol? What challenges come with living in the
spotlight?

What makes Ray's wife stay with him despite his lifestyle? What strengths does Della Bea have that Ray
relies on? What things have to be considered before ending a relationship? Are the reasons for staying (or
leaving) always the same for everyone?

As a woefully wounded soul, Ray Charles Robinson had several handicaps that rivaled his blindness. He was
a notorious heroin addict and womanizer. And when it came to business practices, Charles could be shrewd
and aloof. Whether you look inside the church or without, the most gifted among us are often the same people
who struggle most with addiction, depression, philandering, and behavior disorders of all sorts. Much has
been made of the artistic temperament, but is it not possible to be both artistically proficient and spiritually
and morally upright? (Whatever caustic cloud that hovered over the harried singers head could be considered
compelling and cautionary because it made the colorful coolness of Ray Charles emerge into one of the
greatest pop cultural figures ever to crawl into our musical mindset.)

His integrated music reflected his hope for an integrated world.

Breaking down his personal barriers was his own greatest triumph. He broke down the barrier of drugs, which
had caused segregation in his own life. Separation from the important parts of his life, like his wife and kids.
He finally was able to integrate his own life into a beautiful holistic lifestyle.

More personal questions:

The least of these: Ray Charles certainly fell into this category, at least in the early years of his life: poor,
blind, a second-class citizen in his own country. As Christ notes in the parable from which this phrase is taken
(Matthew 25:31-46), such people tend to elicit the dark heart or the Good Samaritan in all of us. That was
certainly true in Charles life. Some took advantage of him because of his blindness, some loved him in spite
of it, and a rare few realized that blindness is not a physical disability; it is a state of being. In that sense,


Charles could see better than most. This also made me think about how we treat people with disabilities in our
society. Our church is full of people with physical and mental disabilities. In fact, they are one of our four
pillars. But how do I respond to them? To be honest, often with fear or, worse, apathy. Could it be that I am
the one with the disability?

Angry with God: Like Charles, many people hold God at arms length because of some sort of perceived
injustice. For Charles, it was blindness and the death of his brother. What is it for you? Have you ever spoken
to God about this issue? What did he say?

Here is a list of most of the movies I have done. I have a flyer and my notes for most of them.

The licensing information can be found at: www.mplc.org

50 First Dates
The Fisher King
Broadway Danny Rose
Entertaining Angels (The Dorothy Day Story)
Spitfire Gril
The Third Miracle
Remember the Titans
The Green Mile
The Matrix
Shrek
The Family Man
The Fourth Wise Man
About a Boy
About Schmidt
Cry the Beloved Country
Finding Forrester
Emperors Club
Life as a House
The Matrix
Shane
Signs
Holes
Bruce Almighty
St. Therese
Joshua
Big Fish
Secondhand Lions
Tuck Everlasting
Romero
Oh Brother Where Art Thou
My Big Fat Greek Wedding
Hart's War
The Count of Monte Cristo
AI (Artificial Intelligence)








Fourth Task Fourth Task Fourth Task Fourth Task
Prayer Prayer Prayer Prayer
17 17 17 17

(CCC nos. 2558-2865, GDC nos. 84-85, 87)


Become familiar with the diverse forms and expressions of Christian prayer, with special attention to
the Our Father, the prayer which Jesus taught his disciples and which is the model of all Christian
prayer.

Experience and appreciate the richness of the Catholic tradition of mysticism and contemplation.

Develop a regular pattern of personal prayer and spiritual reflection, recognizing vocal prayer,
meditation, and contemplative prayer as basic and fruitful practices in the life of a disciple of Jesus.

Engage in shared prayer with others, especially family prayer, as well as at parish meetings and in
small communities of faith.

Recognize and encourage practices of popular piety and devotion that help believers express and
strengthen their faith in Jesus Christ.




17
OHWB no. 94




Fourth task of Adult Faith Formation: To teach the Christian how to pray
with Christ.

Conversion to Christ and communion with him lead the faithful to adopt his disposition of prayer and
reflection. Jesus' entire life, death, and Resurrection were an offering to his Father. His prayer was always
directed toward his Father. Catechesis should invite the believer to join Christ in the Our Father. Prayer
should be the ordinary environment for all catechesis so that the knowledge and practice of the Christian life
may be understood and celebrated in its proper context.
National Directory for Catechesis

Young Adults

Young adults have most likely evaluated the faith they were raised in and decided for themselves just what is
to be kept and what us to be discarded. They have most likely surveyed their most important values and
decided to be true to them. Ideally, the power and practice of prayer has been real and regular in their
lives, and they can now use prayerful discernment to sort out what they are being called to in this life.
What career or vocation will they pursue? Will they marry? Do they feel called to the priesthood or the
religious life? These are monumental decisions that require guidance through prayer.

Often, if they have been away from the Church for awhile they may return at this time, especially at the
occasion of the baptism of a child. Young adults are asking the "big questions" of life: Why am I here? What
am I supposed to do with my life? Why is there suffering?

Parishes can:

Form young adult groups for Scripture study or reflection on a topic.
Provide information on lectures and formative events that will help them to grow in their faith.
Provide a resource library with topics of interest to young adults.
Educate young adults about spiritual direction; provide a list of spiritual directors in the area.

Adults

Adults can be helped to see the importance of regular and consistent prayer. Hectic lifestyles militate against
this, but to be a disciple requires discipline. Adults can be helped to explore the tradition of prayer in the
church. Reading and workshops on various forms of prayer are available. The adult is encouraged to go on a
retreat at least once a year in order to view his or her life from a fresh, prayerful perspective. It has been said
that the three most common places where adults pray are the bathroom, in the car and outdoors. Couples can
nurture their prayer lives by praying together on a daily basis. The saints of the Catholic tradition can be
mentors for adults, modeling how to pray in everyday activities as well as in time of great hardship.

Parishes can:

Offer a variety of classes on various forms of prayer such as centering prayer, lectio divina,
contemplative prayer, Ignatian, Augustinian, and other forms and ways of praying.
Offer information on local retreats and/or plan a parish retreat.
Offer a school of prayer which teaches about the earliest traditions of prayer in the Church and invites
adults into a daily routine of prayer.
Provide regular opportunities to pray the Liturgy of the Hours, especially
Morning Prayer and Evening Prayer.


Senior Adults

For seniors, there are many ongoing issues of loss. Loss of health, independence, physical capacity, and/or
career can be countered by an ever growing dependency on God. Many elders find great solace in
participating in daily Mass. For others, the rosary is a constant companion. Seniors can be a great source of
wisdom in teaching about the power and practice of prayer. Prayer and Scripture groups can be offered,
especially during the day, when it is easier for older adults to participate. These types of groups may also
provide and important social function for older adults. Bus trips to Shrines and pilgrimage sites are also
popular for those who are ambulatory.

Seniors who can no longer come to church because of physical limitations must rely on the ministry of
Extraordinary Ministers of the Eucharist who bring "Church" to them. They can also be encouraged to
participate in Mass via radio or television (the Hallmark cable channel shows Mass from Notre Dame
every Sunday at 8 a.m.)

Parishes can:

Help convene pray and Scripture groups for older adults, preferably during the day.
Have special seasonal gatherings such as Soup and Scripture Luncheons during Lent.
Send prayerful lectionary-based pamphlets or other devotional materials out to elders through the mail
or Eucharistic visitors to the sick.
Form grief/loss groups to pray through losses as a faith community.
Have an elder person organize a prayer chain for the parish.
Invite elders to visit religion formation classes to share their life of prayer, and how prayer has
been important in their lives.
Identify volunteers who will become prayer partners with those in nursing homes.

Annual Retreats for Men/Women


Description
Our Parish Retreat Coordinators publicize in our parish bulletin for a specific weekend retreat. The mens
group traditionally goes to the Saint Paul of the Cross Retreat Center for a weekend. The womens group
goes to Martina Center or Kearns Spirituality Center for retreats planned at those places.


Objective
To provide spiritual enrichment opportunities for adults beyond the parish.


Who Should/Can Attend
Any adult


Time Frame
Usually weekends or evenings of reflection.


Cost
Varies as to the institution hosting the event.


Suggestions/Comments
Having parish coordinators for the retreats has proven to be helpful for providing ongoing announcements for
retreats and extending personal invitations to adults.
















Contact: Jim Finn
Parish: Saint Mary of the Assumption, Glenshaw, PA
Phone: 412-486-4101
Email: finnj@stmaryglenshaw.org

Experiential Stations of the Cross


Description
This is an experiential way to pray the Stations of the Cross for both children and adults.


Objective
To provide both deep prayer experience and a hands-on learning opportunity for the Religious Education
classes.

To provide the whole parish (adults, teens and children) an opportunity to more deeply connect with and pray
the passion and death of Jesus.


Who Should/Can Attend
Religious Ed Classes, any adult who would like to pray the Stations.


Time Frame
45 minutes


Suggestions/Comments
We have had good feedback from all ages.




Contact: Joan Pilat
Parish: St. Fidelis
Phone: 724-482-2362
Email jpilat@zoominternet.net

Ignatian Parish Prayer Program


Description
This is a parish-based way for participants to engage in the Spiritual Exercises of St. Ignatius of Loyola. The
full program stretches in segments over two years.

YEAR 1:
Advent Retreat in Daily Life: Spiritual Exercises Preparation Days
(5 days of directed prayer in Advent).
Participants commit to spending 20 minutes per day in Prayer; also Meetings w/ Spiritual
Director for 20 minute sessions for 5 consecutive days.
Lenten Directed Prayer: Meeting Jesus in Lent (3 weeks of directed prayer in Lent).
Participants commit to 30-45 minutes of daily prayer. Meetings: as a group; Weekly for 1
hour.

YEAR 2:
Fall: 5 weeks of directed prayer: First Week of the Exercises. Participants agree to 45
minutes of daily prayer. Meetings: as a group; weekly for 1 hour.
Spring: 16 weeks of directed prayer: Second, Third and Fourth Weeks of the Exercises.
Participants commit to 45-60 minutes of daily prayer. Group Meetings: Weekly for 1 hour.

Objective
To deepen the participants lives in prayer and discipleship.

Who Should/Can Attend
Adults

Time Frame
Spanning two years, as detailed above.

Costs
Year 1: $350; Year 2: $650. Many parishes/pastors have agreed to fund half of the costs for each participant.
Please contact Sr. Catherine Higgins for more details.

Suggestions/Comments
The response in general has been extremely positive those who have accessed it are truly grateful for the
experience. It is a unique opportunity for folks to experience prayer and learn the Ignatian method, and for
many of them, it is their first true experience of Lectio or praying with Scripture.

The program is facilitated Diocesan-wide by Sr. Catherine Higgins, CSJ, catherinehiggins@comcast.net



Contact: Lori McMahon
Parish: St. Anne, Castle Shannon
Phone: 412-531-5964
Email: mitchmcm@verizon.net

Lectio Divina


Description
We start our meetings with Sundays Gospel reading, share what we heard (what word or phrase stood out)
and what we think God is asking us to do.


Objective
To form our parishioners, using the RCIA model, by sharing our faith journeys with one another.


Who Should/Can Attend
This is something that we are asking all organizations meeting at St Benedict to do.


Time Frame
Depends on the number of people attending.


Suggestions/Comments
People are getting used to opening meetings this way. We havent pushed it on all the organizations yet; but
so far, all council meetings and staff meetings open with it. We are also introducing a question during the
homily for groups to discuss before they open their meetings. It can be used along with Lectio Divina or
instead of it. Most people enjoy sharing their thoughts and their faith.



















Contact: Jay Speca
Parish: St Benedict the Abbot Church
Phone: 724-941-9406 Ext 114
Email: Speca@stbenedicttheabbot.org

Living Rosary


Description
A life-size rosary or a crucifix and the appropriate number of beads and spacers are placed in the church,
classroom, garden, home or anywhere the Rosary will be prayed. Each participant stands holding a rosary
bead and prays out loud, the prayer particular to that bead, thus the people become the rosary.


Objective
To teach how to pray the Rosary.
To allow people to become the rosary.
To unite the community in prayer.


Who Should/Can Attend
Anyone


Time Frame
30 minutes



Contact: Barb McCarthy
Parish: St. Ferdinand Church
Phone: 724-776-1357
Email: barb@stferd.org

Novenas


Description
Novenas are specific prayers prayed on consecutive days, usually nine, to give honor to God, and seek the aid
of a particular saint, Mary or one of the three Persons of the Trinity. The early disciples waited and prayed for
nine days in the upper room as they awaited the coming of the Holy Spirit.


Objective
To be faithful to our prayer as God is faithful to us.


Who Should/Can Attend
Anyone


Time Frame
20-30 minutes


Suggestions/Comments
Some possibilities are novena to the Holy Spirit before Pentecost, novena to St. Theresa, novena to St.
Anthony.




















Contact: Barb McCarthy
Parish: St. Ferdinand Parish
Phone: 774-776-1357
Email barb@stferd.org

Parish Pilgrimage


Description
A journey to a designated holy site, such as a church, chapel, grotto, Basilica or birthplace of a saint.


Objective
To be in community with fellow pilgrims.
To pray for private prayer requests and prayer requests of others.
To take time to let go and let God lead us to new places.


Who Should/Can Attend
Anyone who is able.


Time Frame
One day


Cost
It varies


Suggestions/Comments
Our parish has taken eight yearly pilgrimages. These are some examples: Washington D.C.-Basilica of the
Immaculate Conception and Holy Land replica, St. Francis-Loretta PA, Emmetsburg MD-Mother Seton
Shrine, Our Lady of Sorrows in Bellevue OH.















Contact: Barb McCarthy
Parish: St. Ferdinand Church
Phone: 724 776-1357
Email: barb@stferd.org

Powerful Pray-ers


Description
Four sessions were held with a character witness story. We introduced St. Patrick (and his breastplate prayer),
St. Francis of Assisi (prayer for peace), St. Teresa of Avila (The Interior Castle), and St. Augustine
(Confessions). Many others could be included. This concept was based on Biblical Women Alive by
Sr. Jackie Ketterer. Parish volunteers researched the saints and played the characters.


Objective
To introduce different people of prayer and different ways/methods of prayer.


Who Should/Can Attend
Anyone over 10 years old


Time Frame
One hour and 15 minutes


Suggestions/Comments
The person in character gave a first-person account of his/her life story, and talked about the search and
encounter with God using the saints own writings. Another person gave people time to discuss and write a
short closing prayer following the pattern of the saint. This was especially easy with St. Patrick.









Contact: Barbara Stokes
Parish: Saint John Neumann Parish
Phone: 412-366-5885 Ext. 13
Email: barbara.stokes@yahoo.com







Fifth Task Fifth Task Fifth Task Fifth Task
Communal Life Communal Life Communal Life Communal Life
18 18 18 18

(CCC nos. 811-870, GDC nos. 84, 86, 87)


Foster spiritual growth in the community.

Cultivate the human values and Christian virtues that foster growth in interpersonal relationships and
in civic responsibility.

Nurture marriage and family life.

Share actively in the life and work of the parish, and foster the potential of small communities to
deepen the faith relationships of members, to strengthen the bonds of communion with the parish, and
to serve the Churchs mission in society.

Learn the Churchs teaching on the nature and mission of the Church, including an understanding of
the Churchs authority and structures and of the rights and responsibilities of the Christian faithful.

Support the ecumenical movement and promote the unity of Gods people as an important dimension
of fidelity to the Gospel.






18
OHWB no. 95




Fifth task of Adult Faith Formation: To prepare the Christian to live in
community and to participate actively in the life and mission of the
Church.

Jesus said to his disciples, "Love one another. As I have loved you. ..."
Jn 13:34
This command provides the
basis for the disciples' life in community. Catechesis encourages an apprenticeship in Christian living that is
based on Christ's teachings about community life. It should encourage a spirit of simplicity and humility, a
special concern for the poor, particular care for the alienated, a sense of fraternal correction, common prayer,
mutual forgiveness, and a fraternal love that embraces all these attitudes. Catechesis encourages the disciples
of Jesus to make their daily conduct a shining and convincing testimony to the Gospel.
CL
"He also distributes
special graces among the faithful of every rank. By these gifts he makes them fit and ready to undertake
various tasks and offices for the renewal and building up of the Church, as it is written, the manifestation of
the Spirit is given to everyone for profit (1 Cor 12:7).
LG
Preparation for community life has an ecumenical
dimension as well: In developing this community sense, catechesis takes special note of the ecumenical
dimension and encourages fraternal attitudes toward members of other Christian churches and ecclesial
communities.
GDC
It should always provide a clear exposition of all that the Church teaches and at the same
time should foster a "true desire for unity"
CT
and inculcate a zeal for the promotion of unity among
Christians. Catechesis will have an ecumenical dimension as it prepares the faithful to live in contact with per-
sons of other Christian traditions, "affirming their Catholic identity while respecting the faith of others."
CT


National Directory for Catechesis


Young Adults

Young adults are persons in their late teens, twenties, and thirties who represent a broad diversity. "They are
college and university students, workers, and professionals; they are persons in military service; they are
single, married, divorced or widowed; they are with or without children; they are newcomers in search of a
better life."
NDC
Given this portrait, it is a challenge to discern how to assist them to take their rightful place in
the life and mission of the community.

It is essential that the Church raise up the unique gifts of young adults and the extraordinary difference they
can make. They possess:

Lively faith and hope
A deep hunger for social justice and to serve
A spirit of optimism and idealism
Wisdom borne of their experience of diversity
A yearning for deepened spirituality
NDC


The Church must provide a persistent invitation to bring these gifts into ministries where they are sorely
needed, such as marriage preparation, preparation for the Sacrament of Baptism, career discernment, and so
forth. Making room for their voice in an authentic and meaningful way will allow their passions to animate
the life of the community.


Adults

In order for the Good News of the Kingdom to penetrate all the various layers of the human family, it is
crucial that every Christian play an active part in the coming of the Kingdom All of this naturally requires
adults to play a primary role. Hence it is not only legitimate, but also necessary to acknowledge that a fully
Christian community can only exist when a systematic catechesis of all its members takes place, and when an
effective and well-developed catechesis of adults is regarded as the central task in the catechetical enterprise.
ACCC


All adult catechesis, in whatever form it takes, supports the fifth task of catechesis. It "fosters active
participation in the Church as she is realized in families, small faith-based communities, parishes, dioceses,
and the communion of saints. It helps adults to develop a deeper sense of their cooperation with the Holy
Spirit for the mission of the Church in the world and for her internal life as well."
NDC


Parish leaders should find a variety of ways to catechize adults in the roles they fulfill in the life of the
community, including:

Liturgical ministries
Parish Finance Councils
Parish Pastoral Councils
Catechetical ministries
Ministries of justice and direct service to the poor and marginalized
Peer ministries to those dealing with grief and loss; midlife issues; loss of employment; parenting
of adolescents; care of aging parents; and so forth.

Caregiver Breakfast


Description
Caregivers are invited to come together periodically to enjoy breakfast and a speaker.


Objective
To give caregivers the opportunity to be with other caregivers in a supportive community.

To give caregivers the opportunity to be renewed, to share common experiences, to learn new ways of
approaching their daily call to be caregivers.


Who Should/Can Attend
Anyone caring for someone at home.


Time Frame
2 hours










Contact: Barb McCarthy
Parish: St. Ferdinand Church
Phone: 724-776-1357
Email: barb@stferd.org

Catholic Conversations

Description
Catholic Conversations is meant to be a departure from the standard format of a speaker giving a talk,
followed by a few questions and answers. I believe firmly that conversation is a fine approach for adult
education and formation. It is more interactive than the standard speaker format, encouraging the participants
to ask questions and to make comments as they arise rather than waiting for a tacked-on Q&A at the end.

Heres how it works. I invite a person who is doing things that I hope our parishioners might find interesting.
Some examples so far: a new pastor in the area, a Catholic theologian from the Philippines who is teaching in
Pittsburgh, a local Catholic singer/songwriter, a doctor practicing medicine on the streets for homeless people,
a woman who heads a local Jewish organization that promotes dialogue with Christians. We do offer our
guests a fee for their time. They are often very willing to participate because the format does not involve
them having to make a presentation or write a talk. They just need to come and talk with us!

I do some research beforehand into the persons background or into some of the main areas that I think they
would be interested in talking about. Then I write up some questions. My goal is to find interesting people
and then tap into the things that light a fire under them.
Our sessions begin with a prayer. I invite the guest to bring one if he or she wishes. This is one way for the
guests to introduce themselves to us through the content or style of their prayer. At the beginning, the
session proper starts as an interview. With most guests, I like to ask for some of their life story first. As they
tell their story, the things they are passionate about often come quickly to the fore, and were off! The
audience is encouraged to become participants by asking questions or making brief comments as the
conversation continues. Of course, there is the usual danger of someone going on at length, but it is then the
moderators job to try to keep things flowing while showing respect for all participants.
We usually take a break after about 40 minutes and return for another 30-40 minutes of conversation.

Objective
To help people become aware of the vitality of our Catholic community.
To help them become more comfortable asking questions and expressing themselves on matters of faith.

Who Should/Can Attend
Adults and older teens

Time Frame
About an hour and a half
Cost
About $100-150 for a speaker fee; more for refreshments. We do not ask for money from the participants.

Suggestions/Comments
I like to have caf-style seating around tables (we have some small round ones), and to have refreshments
available throughout the session.
Often the guest has a good deal to say and the other participants are content (at least early in the session) to
listen. Thats fineconversation is the ideal, but the reality often lies in some middle ground between
passive listening and full conversation.

Contact: Andrew Bechman
Parish: St. Scholastica, Aspinwall
Phone: 412-781-0186, Ext. 18
Email: andybechman@saintscholastica.com

Let the Little Children Come to Me


Description
Moms, dads and caregivers of young children are invited to come and share with their children in a fun, faith
filled experience. They learn one of the gestures involved in the Mass, move to inspiring music, visit Jesus in
the tabernacle and join in craft time. Also included are visits to personal care homes, helping other with year
round donations for Genesis House, Every Child, Inc. and winter wear for local shelters.


There are also monthly social nights for moms with prayer and coffee and for dads with Catholic Mens
Fellowship.


Objective
To welcome and unify the People of God as one family.
To enable and deepen the spirituality of each individual.
To nurture and share our talents for the enrichment of the parish and the community.
To strengthen and increase participation through meaningful liturgy.


Who Should/Can Attend
This program is for moms, dads or caregivers of children five and under.


Time Frame
Wednesdays Check website for details: www.stmaryglenshaw.org

















Contact: Monica Hoehler
Parish: St. Mary of the Assumption Parish
Phone: 412-492-0242
Email: kmhoehler@verizon.net

Martha and Joseph Ministry


Description
Folks are invited twice a year to wash and polish the wood pews, doors, altar, woodwork, etc. in our church.
A week is set aside on our church calendar to accomplish this work. Cleaning products are supplied by the
parish. The volunteers bring rags and buckets.


Objective
To provide opportunities for parishioners to be good stewards of the church building.
To work with fellow parishioners in community.
To foster respect for the church building.


Who Should/Can Attend
Adults of all ages and families


Time Frame
One week





Contact: Barb McCarthy
Parish: St. Ferdinand Church
Phone: 724-776-1357
Email: barb@stferd.org

Mens Breakfast


Description
All men of the parish are invited to a monthly breakfast on Saturday morning from October thru May.
Initially we began at 8:00 a.m. with breakfast prepared by volunteers followed by a short prayer service and a
guest speaker. A variety of topics was featured sports, health, service, witness, etc. The morning concluded
by 10:00 a.m.

The men now gather for 9:00 a.m. Mass with the parish community. Breakfast follows and then the guest
speaker or featured program is introduced and is usually of a spiritual nature. The morning ends by 11:00
a.m.

During the summer we meet once on a weekday evening for a cook-out.


Objective
To foster fellowship among the men of the parish.


Who Should/Can Attend
All men of the parish are invited from age 18 and up.


Time Frame
Monthly (October thru May) on Saturday mornings, 9:00 11:00 a.m.


Cost
Free will offering to cover food and speaker stipends.


Suggestions/Comments
Most participants are age 40/50 +. Younger men may attend when a topic addresses their interests usually
sports or business. We have a contact list of 60+ names. Our regular attendance is around 20. The summer
cook-out has the largest response.








Contact: Andrew James
Parish: St. John Neumann Parish, Franklin Park
Phone: 412-366-5885 x11
Email: ajames@stjohnneumannpgh.org

Middle Moms


Description
Mothers of school age children are invited to gather together for support, spiritual growth, reflection and
sharing. Guest speakers are invited to offer insight and wisdom.


Objective
To provide a safe and friendly environment for moms to gather together.


Who Should/Can Attend
Moms of children in first to 12
th
grade.


Time Frame
2 hours


























Contact: Barb McCarthy
Parish: St. Ferdinand Church
Phone: 724-776-1357
Email: barb@stferd.org

Parish Pastoral Council Formation


Description
As part of the plan for parish leadership training, a four session 101 course on the new parish pastoral
council guidelines, One Body, One Mission was instituted. An enrichment program will also be offered. It
will provide on-going formation in pastoral leadership. Content will vary for each session, including
Evenings of Recollection for pastors and pastoral council members.


Objective
To provide opportunities for pastors and parish pastoral council members to grow in their understanding of
parish leadership.


Who Should/Can Attend
Pastors, pastoral staff and discerned and selected pastoral council members.


Time Frame
The 101 Course will include 4 sessions that are each 3 hours in length. It will be offered in the fall and
spring of each year, beginning in the fall of 2010.
The enrichment program will be offered every fall and spring, beginning in the spring of 2011.












Contact: Mary Anne Mason
Parish Diocese of Pittsburgh
Phone: 412-456-3047
Email: mmason@diopitt.org

Reflection Booklet


Description
For two consecutive years, the parish Worship Committee members asked adult parishioners to reflect
(anonymously) on some aspect of their faith journey, connecting it to our parish theme for the year. The
themes were 2001: A Faith Odyssey and The Journey Home. We created booklets of the reflections and
distributed them at all Easter Masses. The booklets included blank pages for the readers own reflections on
the stories.


Objective
To allow parishioners a forum to share deeply and honestly their struggles and triumphs in living their
Catholic faith as adults.

To provide an exercise for those who wrote to think about their faith journey and put it into words.

To provide an opportunity for those who read the reflections to see in what way they could identify with the
stories and to know that the people who wrote them were in their midst in the parish.


Who Should/Can Attend
There is nothing to attend! Adults were able to read the booklets at home, reflect on them in writing if they so
desired, and discuss them with family members or other parishioners at future gatherings.


Time Frame
The worship committee solicited writers about 4-6 weeks before publication in order to give them time to
collect their thoughts and write. The committee did some minor editing of the submissions, assembled it with
help from a graphic artist on the committee, and printed it in-house at the parish for distribution at Easter
Masses.


Suggestions/Comments
This project was well received, and parishioners enjoyed reading the reflections.









Contact: Barbara Matera
Parish: Saint John Neumann Parish
Phone: 412-366-5885 Ext. 18
Email: bfmatera@yahoo.com

Service Outreach to Homeless Womens Shelter


Description
Families of our Family Program volunteer to prepare a complete meal on a particular Saturday and deliver it
to the Homeless Womens shelter.


Objective
To invite and empower adult members of families to show the importance of service to the homeless by
having their children assist in meal preparation and serving the meal at the shelter.


Who Should/Can Attend
Members of families


Time Frame
Time needed to prepare the meal item(s) at home, to travel into the city and to serve the meal.


Cost
Foods are donated by families preparing the meal for the homeless shelter.









Contact: Barb Belski or Rose Stegman
Parish: Saint Mary of the Assumption, Glenshaw, PA
Phone: 412-486-5521
E-mail: ccdoffice@stmaryglenshaw.org

St. John Neumann Night


Description
On a Sunday, near or on the feast of our parish patron, St. John Neumann (January 5), we have had an
evening in the church for all parishioners. Since this date falls within the Christmas season, we ask our choirs
(adult, youth, children) to sing some Christmas selections. After about 20 minutes of music, a parishioner
dressed as St. John Neumann comes down the aisle and talks about his lifehis childhood, his voyage to
America, and his ministry in many places, including the North Hills of Pittsburgh where our parish is located.
The talk lasts 1520 minutes. We have had variations on this theme to keep it interesting, including a talk by
St. John Neumanns mother telling of her sons early life and his priesthood in America, and St. John
Neumann speaking of different times of his life. We always serve refreshments in the hall following the talk.


Objective
To familiarize parishioners with our patron saint.


Who Should/Can Attend
All parishioners


Time Frame
This event occurred on Sunday evening at 7 p.m. and lasted about an hour, including refreshments.


Suggestions/Comments
The story of our patron is much better known by the parishioners.















Contact: Barbara Matera
Parish: Saint John Neumann Parish
Phone: 412-366-5885 Ext. 18
Email: bfmatera@yahoo.com

Welcome Breakfast


Description
Three or four times a year we have a welcome breakfast/gathering. This is organized by the Welcome
Committee. A list of new parishioners is provided by the parish office or priest when asked by the Welcome
Committee. Each member of the committee calls 3-4 existing parishioners to volunteer to bring food
(suggestionsbagels, breads [banana, zucchini, etc.], cupcakes, donuts, fruit, muffins, cheese and cracker
trays, chips and dips, cookies, brownies). If different people are called to volunteer then it gives more people
the chance to be involved and to contribute. The committee typically supplies coffee, tea, creamers, sugar,
sweetener, juice, paper supplies and plastic ware.

All new parishioners receive a letter welcoming them and inviting them to the next breakfast. A contact list
of who to get in touch with to get involved in different organizations is included with the letter. The letter
informs them that a member of the Welcome Committee would be calling. New parishioners names are
divided among the Welcome Committee members and about 2 weeks before the breakfast, invite calls go out.
A Bulletin announcement goes in 2 weeks before, one week before and then the day of the breakfast inviting
all parishioners. It is helpful if the priest invites everyone after Mass the day of the breakfast.

Objective
To welcome new parishioners.
To give them the opportunity ask questions about organizations in which they are interested.
To further a sense of community with current parishioners.

Who Should/Can Attend
Everyone

Time Frame
Committee members have to set up prior to the breakfast. We have our receptions after the 9:00 a.m. and
11:00 a.m. Masses. Usually people stay for about an hour and some stay slightly longer. The committee
also cleans up. If you have enough people on this committee, the set up crew and the clean up crew can be
different. Some members are there the whole time.

Cost
With our receptions, everything is donated. The committee members all provide something and then the food
is donated by the parishioners.

Suggestions/Comments
We usually have name tags for everyone. But we buy special name tags (with stars or balloons or something
that is more decorative) for the new people. When people complete their name tag, they learn the new people
have the special name tags so they can introduce themselves if they see a new person name tag.



Contact: Elaine DuVall
Parish: Saint Scholastica
Phone: 412-781-6941
Email: veduvall@comcast.net


Women Wisdom & Wine


Description
All women of the parish were invited to attend an evening of appetizers, wine and fellowship, followed by a
speaker on a topic of interest to Catholic women. A parish volunteer arranged for the speakers and handled
publicity. Those in attendance were asked to bring crackers, cheese, or a small appetizer.


Objective
To offer an opportunity for women to gather informally for fellowship and stimulating discussions on current
topics.


Who Should/Can Attend
Women Wisdom & Wine was offered for women of the parish.


Time Frame
This event occurred on a weekday evening. The women gathered and socialized beginning at 7 p.m. and the
speaker talked and answered questions from 7:30 8:30 p.m.


Suggestions/Comments
This was a well-attended event for several years, usually held four times a year.


















Contact: Barbara Stokes
Parish: Saint John Neumann Parish
Phone: 412-366-5885 Ext. 13
Email: barbara.stokes@yahoo.com







Sixth Task Sixth Task Sixth Task Sixth Task
Missionary Spirit Missionary Spirit Missionary Spirit Missionary Spirit
19 19 19 19

(GDC nos. 84, 86, 87)


Cultivate an evangelizing spirit among all the faithful.

Respond to Gods call whether as lay, ordained, or religious.

Motivate and equip the faithful to speak to others about the Scriptures, the tradition and teachings of
the Church, and about ones own faith journey.

Explore and promote the applications of the Churchs moral and social teaching in personal, family
professional, cultural, and social life.

Understand the importance of serving those in need, promoting the common good, and working for the
transformation of society through personal and social action.

Appreciate the value of interreligious dialogue and contacts.

19
OHWB no. 96




Sixth task of Adult Faith Formation: To promote a missionary spirit that
prepares the faithful to be present as Christians in society.

"The `world' thus becomes the place and the means for the lay faithful to fulfill their Christian vocation."
LG

Catechesis seeks to help the disciples of Christ to be present in society precisely as believing Christians who
are able and willing to bear witness to their faith in words and deeds. In fostering this spirit of evangelization,
catechesis nourishes the evangelical attitudes of Jesus Christ in the faithful: to be poor in spirit, to be
compassionate, to be meek, to hear the cry of injustice, to be merciful, to be pure of heart, to make peace, and
to accept rejection and persecution.
Mt. 5:3-11
Catechesis recognizes that other religious traditions reflect the
"seeds of the Word"
AG
that can constitute a true "preparation for the Gospel."'
LG
It encourages adherents of
the world's religions to share what they hold in common, never minimizing the real differences between and
among them. "Dialogue is not in opposition to the mission ad gentes."
RM


National Directory for Catechesis

Young Adults

In Sons and Daughters of the Light: a Pastoral Plan for Ministry with Young Adults, goal three is "Connecting
Young Adults with the Mission of the Church in the World." Objectives are given for this invitation of young
adults to be a part of the transformation of society by the building of the kingdom of God:

forming a Christian conscience
educating and working for justice
developing leaders for the present and the future.

Young adults have many opportunities to evangelize society through the home and workplace. Many have the
desire to learn more about Church teachings in order to make sound moral decisions. Some strategies include:

Offer adult religious education programs that connect contemporary life issues to the teachings and
traditions of the Church.
Provide opportunities to examine the relationship of faith to work, including ethics in the workplace.
Make use of homilies and celebrations to discuss roles of the laity as evangelizers of society.
Support scripture study groups and small groups for married couples, and
Support formation of ongoing, intergenerational small faith communities.
SDL


Young adults share the desire of the larger Church to care for the least among us. This ministry includes both
educating and working for justice. Programs, homilies and retreats can help educate to the demands of the
Gospel toward our neighbor. Some suggestions for action include:

Motivate young adults through catechesis, homilies and music to work for peace
in their relationships with others, especially in their jobs and community.
Invite young adults to be members of parish or campus social justice committees
or other social action organizations.
Identify opportunities for immersion experiences during academic breaks or vacations, and
Invite young adults individually, through the workplace or through the Church community, to donate
services to social service agencies.

Mentoring relationships are a significant way in which young adults can strengthen the values, beliefs, ideas,
and learning necessary to be mature Christians. Young adults can benefit from mentoring relationships
connected with their career and jobs, especially ones sharing values and wisdom that spring from belief in the
Gospel. To develop mentoring relationships:

Connect younger and older adults in like professions.
Reinforce the leadership role that each Christian is asked to undertake as a citizen through catechetical
opportunities and homilies.
Form discussion, support or prayer groups for those in like professions and trades, and
Ask young adults to be mentors for adolescents, especially in Confirmation programs, and for those in
different ethnic groups, especially immigrants who need help to succeed in a new and different
culture.
SDL


Adults

When Jesus told his followers to "do this" in his memory, he was telling them to do much more than simply
perform the ritual now known as the Mass. Jesus was telling his disciples throughout time not only to break
bread, but to give themselves to others as he gave himself. Mass is not something that Catholics "attend," but
is something that they "do" and something that prepares them to go forth and do what Jesus asks of them.
LTM
The word "liturgy" means "work of the people" and is a more appropriate description of this command of
Jesus.

Through Baptism, Christians make a commitment to do certain things as a follower of Jesus. Each Christian is
anointed priest, prophet, and king, and is called:

As priest, to make Jesus present to others; praise and worship God through their lives; offer
themselves and their lives in sacrifice; help others gain access to God; intercede for the needs of the
world; and act as part of God's response to those needs.
As prophet, to speak on behalf of the oppressed; speak God's word, bear witness, evangelize, and
catechize; bring hope to those in despair; challenge people and institutions to be faithful; and
fearlessly speak out about injustice;
As king, to serve and protect the vulnerable; provide for those unable to provide themselves; love
enemies, lay down their live for others; work for justice; live with dignity and respect others dignity;
restore lives that are broken; and respect Gods will.
LTM


Adult catechesis should recognize the specific conditions of lay Catholics and consistently call them to
holiness and seeking the "Kingdom of God by engaging in temporal affairs and ordering them according to
the plan of God."
CL



Senior Adults

The practical experience, wisdom, attitude, and example of many older adults make them especially valued
gifts to the life of the Church. Christ calls the elderly to proclaim the Gospel, which enhances the richness of
intergenerational catechesis. The catechesis of senior adults notes the contributions they make to the
community through their wisdom and witness. "Older persons have a responsibility, commensurate with
health, abilities, and other obligations, to undertake some form of service to others."
BA


Older adults are providers, not just recipients of pastoral care.
Older adults themselves should help to identify their needs and decide how they are met.
Older adults are at least as diverse as other generational groups.
Older adults need a mix of activities that connect them with each other as well as the larger faith
community.
BA


Bereavement Support Group


Description
In reaching out to the bereaved a parish can have a support group that meets monthly or a 4-6 week support
group once or twice a year. Another format is to have an educational speaker on grief and bereavement and
invite those from the parish and from the area to attend.


Objective
To reach out to those who are hurting due to loss of a loved one and give them support and education about
what they are going through and will go through.
To share with participants what the church teaches about life, death, suffering and pain.


Who Should/Can Attend
Anyone who has experienced a loss of any kind.


Time Frame
See above

Cost
None unless there is a cost for the speaker. Many speakers volunteer their time.


Suggestions/Comments
It is also possible to do both the groups and speakers collaboratively with other parishes in the area. This is a
good way to reach out to those who may have fallen away from the Church.















Contact: Mimi Darragh
Parish: St. Valentine Parish
Phone: 412-831-8312
Email: mimidarragh@aol.com

Comfort Blanket Ministry


Description
The Comfort Blanket Ministry brings a message of love and comfort to all who are experiencing sickness or
the death of a loved one through the gift of a hand sewn blanket. The blanket consists of squares individually
decorated by members of the parish.


Objective
To provide a tangible symbol of the care, love and prayers of a parish in the difficult times of the lives of
children and adults.


Who Should/Can Attend
Workshops are held weekly to prepare the blankets that are sewn at home.


Time Frame
Whatever time someone has to give is invaluable.


Suggestions/Comments
No experience needed.








Contact: Barb McCarthy
Parish: St. Ferdinand Church
Phone: 724-776-1357
Email: barb@stferd.org

Day of Reflection for Those Who are Grieving


Description
Twice a year, on November 2 and March 19th, Feast of St. Joseph, we have a day of reflection for all dealing
with grief. It includes Mass and appropriate Scripture reflections, videos, presentations and sharing.

Some of the Themes:
The Stages of Grief
St. Joseph, Patron of a Happy Death
Images of Grief
Grieving with Faith, Hope and Love
Life after Life
What Is Heaven Like?

Objective
To place grief in a spiritual context and allow the consolation of God to touch hearts.

Who Should/Can Attend
Anyone dealing with grief.

Time Frame
Twice a year beginning with the 9 a.m. liturgy and closing with a prayer service at 2 p.m. Lunch is usually
included.

Cost
Donation

Suggestions/Comments
The day can be shortened it to a morning.


Contact: Bernice Dumitru, Pastoral Associate
Parish: Church of the Resurrection
Phone: 412-563-5589
Email: bernicedumitru@msn.com or bernicedumitru@verizon.net

Focus on Outreach


Description
For one year (during our Jubilee Year) each month an insert was included in the bulletin that focused on some
aspect of the social mission of the church and how we can participate in that mission. Information was given
about organizations which were responding to a certain issue and a parish or individual response was
suggested.


Objective
To use the parish bulletin as a means of faith formation and an invitation to the community to actively serve in
the social mission of the Church.


Who Should/Can Attend
Parish Assembly


Time Frame
Once a month


Suggestions/Comments
Could combine it with a mini-catechesis on the topic after communion.



















Contact: Bernice Dumitru, Pastoral Associate
Parish: Church of the Resurrection
Phone: 412-563-5589
Email: bernicedumitru@msn.com or bernicedumitru@verizon.net

Funeral Liturgy Planning and Follow-up


Description
After the death of a loved one, a member or members of the immediate family are asked to stop in the parish
office and meet with either one of the priests or the pastoral associate to help plan the liturgy. The family is
given a folder of information which includes a packet of suggested readings and hymns appropriate for
funerals. Family members are encouraged to look over the readings and choose an Old and New Testament
Reading and also encouraged to have family members or friends read them during the Funeral Mass. They
are also encouraged to choose five hymns from the list provided. Family members or friends are also
welcome to carry up the Offertory gifts to the altar.

A small funeral choir and an organist, usually our music minister, as well as a funeral liturgy coordinator who
assists the priest during Mass, will be in attendance during the Mass.

One of the priests and/or the pastoral associate will also visit the funeral home for comfort, support and
prayers.


Objective
To help the bereaved prepare the funeral liturgy for their loved ones and to comfort them in their time of need.


Who Should/Can Attend
Anyone experiencing the loss of a loved one.


Time Frame
As soon as possible following the death of a loved one.


Suggestions/Comments
St. Thomas More offers a service for bereaved families following the burial in the form of a luncheon in our
Family Life Center. The group that coordinates this is called The Marthas. The luncheon is hosted by a
group of volunteers and the family is charged only for the cost of the food.


A few weeks after the funeral a follow-up sympathy card is sent to the family and signed by the priest who
was the celebrant at the Mass. Family members also receive a Thinking of You card on the deceaseds
birthday, first death anniversary and for first holidays. After about two months a member of the bereavement
team contacts the family offering support and prayers and will continue sending cards to them.

Families also receive notices of support groups in the area and are invited to attend our special Mass of
Remembrance in November.


Contact: Cede Catanzaro
Parish: St. Thomas More
Phone: 412-833-0031
Email: cede@stmpgh.org

Funeral Luncheon Committee


Description
If space permits, a funeral luncheon is offered to the family of a parishioner who has died. The members of
this committee coordinate the preparation and donation of food for a luncheon, set up, serve and clean up.
This ministry is offered to the family of a deceased parishioner through the funeral director.


Objective
To provide a place of solace and nourishment for bereaved families.





Who Should/Can Attend
Volunteers are needed to make phone calls for donations of food, to prepare the hall, work in the kitchen,
serve the food and clean up after luncheon as needed.
















Contact: St. Ferdinand Rectory Office
Parish: St. Ferdinand Church
Phone: 724-776-2888
Email: barb@stferd.org

Health Ministry Exercise Program


Description
A volunteer is first trained in the exercise program developed by the Mercy Parish Nurse program and then is
assigned to visit a homebound parishioner weekly to do a simple strengthening exercise program. The elderly
person has also been evaluated by a nurse before beginning the program and his or her doctor has given their
permission for the person to participate. The program also includes prayer and deep breathing and relaxation.
This can also be done in a group.


Objective
To establish a bond between two people who did not know one another before.
To provide an opportunity for them to pray together, to exercise together, and to see the connection between
health of body mind, and spirit.
To provide for the person who was once isolated, a weekly visit from her/his parish.


Who Should/Can Attend
The individual sessions are designed for the frail elderly and anyone can be a volunteer. The group sessions
are open to anyone who wants to attend.


Time Frame
Approximately one hour


Cost
None to the person, the parish may purchase some therabands for the people to use. Music can also be played
during the sessions so a radio or cassette/CD player could be purchased.


Suggestions/Comments
This is great way to get younger people involved in a parish outreach activity especially those who like to
exercise. It gives the volunteer something to do and talk about while getting to know the person they are
visiting.








Contact: Mimi Darragh
Parish: St. Valentine Parish
Phone: 412-831-8312
Email: mimidarragh@aol.com

H.O.P.E. Helping Others Seek Employment


Description
H.O.P.E. Ministry is a faith based, Christ-centered organization offering practical and pastoral resources to
the unemployed of the parish and community.


Objective
To assist those who are seeking employment.


Who Should/Can Attend
Adults who are seeking employment, practical help in rsum writing, interviewing, networking, career
coaching, personal and family counseling and financial advise.


Time Frame
2 hours

























Contact: Linda Weller
Parish: St. Ferdinand Parish
Phone: 724-779-8323
Email: stferd.hopeministry@gmail.com

Missions Outreach


Description
The Missions Outreach group identifies ways to share the love of Christ and the blessings of their time, talent
and treasure with the needy. They also travel to San Luis, Mexico to construct small homes for poor families,
work at an orphanage and distribute food and Bibles at a Soup Kitchen. All trips are coordinated with
Caring Hearts Ministries, which is an interdenominational group based in Pittsburgh.


Objective
To gather in solidarity with the poor and marginalized.
To respond to identified needs.


Who Should/Can Attend
High School children and adults








Contact: Wilma Scott
Parish: St. Ferdinand Parish
Phone: 724-776-9177
Email: wilma@stferd.org

Prison Ministry


Description
For I was imprisoned and you came to visit me. (Mt. 25:36b)
The Prison Ministry involves a literacy program and/or leading Bible study and distributing Holy
Communion.


Practice Objective
To be the presence of Christ to those who are imprisoned.


Who Should/Can Attend
Any interested adult


Time Frame
Weekly


Suggestions/Comments
An open mind and heart are essential ingredients for this ministry.





















Contact: Barb McCarthy
Parish: St. Ferdinand Church
Phone: 724-776-1357
Email: barb@stferd.org


Adult Faith Formation for:

Couples Preparing for Marriage

Divorced and Separated Persons

Families

Married Couples

Older Adults

Parents

Single Adults

Young Adults



Adult Faith Formation for:

Couples Preparing for Marriage
Diocesan Pre-Marriage Program
Engaged Encounter
Pre-Marriage Prep
Sponsor Couple Program

Divorced and Separated
DivorceCare
Divorced or Separated Support Group
Program for Separated or Divorced
Separated or Divorced Group

Families
Advent Family Evening
Family Centered Program
Family Program
Let's Make Christmas Cookies
Pittsburgh Catholic Newspaper in Education

Married Couples
Covenant of Love Marriage Group
Dinner & Speaker for Married Couples
Five Love Languages
Marriage Building Assessment Tool
Marriage Enrichment in the Empty Nest
Retrouvaille
Teams of Our Lady
Worldwide Marriage Encounter

Older Adults
Life Enrichment Club
Mind, Body and Spirit
Royal Court

Parents
Heart & Soul
Parent Meetings
Single Parent Family Support

Single Grieving Adults
Beginning Experience of Pittsburgh

Young Adults
FLIGHT (Friends Learning Inquiring Growing in Holiness Together)
Theology on Tap

Couples Preparing for Marriage

Diocesan Pre-Marriage Program


Description
The Diocesan Pre-Marriage Program is divided into 4 two and a half hour sessions. Each session has a theme
that is approached theologically and how to apply the Theology to a marriage. The first sessions theme is
The Sacrament of Marriage. A priest or a permanent deacon delivers this message about the Theology of
the Sacrament of Marriage. After a short break, a married couple talks about living out their marriage as a
sacrament. They explain how they experience the grace that is received by receiving the Sacrament.

The second class focuses on communication. Again, there are two speakers who present the information. A
priest or permanent deacon talks about the importance of prayer: community, individual, and within the
family / couple. The couple presents conflict resolution. They talk about their own marriage and some
difficulties they may have faced with their communication. The couple takes romance, disillusionment and
joy and explains how marriages reflect this pattern at different times.

The third class covers morality and natural family planning. Again, there is a priest or a permanent deacon to
cover the morality aspect. He covers subjects such as premarital sex, cohabitation, in vitro fertilization and
infidelity, as well as contraception. The couple, who is a trained NFP promoter or teacher, gives a witness
talk for NFP.

The fourth week is termed, Journey of Life. There are two talks during this session that cover the
vocational aspect of marriage. A priest or permanent deacon discusses the vocation of marriage. The couple
speaks of their journey and life long commitment. Interspersed among the presentations, a series of little
talks occur on the topic of finance and other related topics.

A fifth NFP class is offered to all couples who attend our program. The fee is an additional $30 for each
couple. They can attend an informational session on how to use NFP followed up with chart reviews.

Objective
To help engaged couples build a sustaining relationship for their marriage, one which is rooted in their faith,
Gods love, and their love for each other.

Who Should/Can Attend
Engaged couples.

Time Frame
The classes are from 7 9:30 p.m.

Cost
$60.00 for Pre-Marriage Class


Contact: Debbie Andrulonis
Parish: Diocese of Pittsburgh
Phone: 412-456-3114
Email: familylife@diopitt.org

Couples Preparing for Marriage

Engaged Encounter


Description
A weekend experience held in a retreat center giving couples preparing for marriage the opportunity to focus
exclusively on each other for 44 hours in peaceful surroundings, free from the pressure and distractions of the
outside world. The Weekend is an in-depth, private, personal, marriage preparation experience within the
context of Catholic faith and values.

Objective
To offer couples a unique opportunity to look at their commitment to each other in a deeper way as they
prepare for marriage.


Who Should/Can Attend
Though Catholic in origin, this experience is open to any engaged couple wanting to prepare for a deeper,
more meaningful life together.


Time Frame
Friday evening to Sunday afternoon.


Cost
$215 per couple.






Contact: Brian & Nancy Stevens
Phone: 412-861-0262
Email: eeweekends@verizon.net

Couples Preparing for Marriage

Pre-Marriage Prep


Description
A marriage preparation process offered to engaged couples that is based on Evenings for Engaged Couples
from Sadlier.

Objective
To provide engaged couples with an opportunity to recognize areas of compatibility and differences between
them.

To learn lasting skills that will bolster a spiritual marriage relationship.

Who Should/Can Attend
Those preparing for Marriage.

Time Frame
Friday 7:00 p.m.-10:00 p.m., Saturday 9:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m.

Cost
$50.00 / couple if a member of Our Lady of Joy. Our Lady of Joy members attend for free.

SCHEDULE

Friday evening
7:00 p.m. Opening prayer: Team couple
7:15 p.m. Looking at Marriage Together
8:00 p.m. Break
8:15 p.m. Ways to Communicate Love
9:00 p.m. Break
9:15 p.m. Images of God and Married Love
10:00 p.m. Closing Prayer

Saturday Morning
9:00 a.m. Opening Prayer
9:00 a.m. Conflict Resolution and Financial Planning
9:55 a.m. Break
10:15 a.m. Marriage & Intimacy
11:00 a.m. The Sacrament of Matrimony
11:40 a.m. Building a Stronger Marriage
12:15 p.m. Pre-Marriage Weekend Questionnaire
12:30 p.m. Closing Prayer and Blessing of Couple (Church) Priest


Contact: Jane Siatkosky CRE or Greg Callaghan
Parish: Our Lady of Joy
Phone: 422-795-4389
Email: siatkosky1@yahoo.com

Couples Preparing for Marriage

Sponsor Couple Program


Description
This program is to prepare a couple for marriage. The engaged couple receive the books entitled For Better &
For Ever by Rev. Robert Ruhnke and answer the questions in the book before meeting with the sponsor
couple to discuss their answers.

Practice Objective
To give the opportunity for the engaged couple to share life experiences with the sponsor couple.

To give the sponsor couple the opportunity to show the engaged couple a sacramental marriage through
their sharing.

Who Should/Can Attend
Any couple preparing for marriage.

Time Frame
The engaged couple and sponsor couple meet for five evenings in the sponsor couples home based on both
couples schedules. It is recommended that the couples finish the program within 10 weeks. The meetings
are usually 1 to 2 hours an evening.

Cost
$40


















Contact: Peg and Rich Gottfried
Parish: St. Athanasius Parish
Phone: 412-367-7384
Email: rich.peg@verizon.net



Divorced or Separated

DivorceCare


Description
DivorceCare is for divorced and separated individuals. It is part seminar and part support group. The seminar
consists of a short video each week. Each week a new topic is used covering many of the problems
encountered by separation and divorce. Example: Why am I feeling this way, anger, finance, depression,
healing, recovery. The support group garners understanding and fosters healing from people who have a
genuine concern for each individuals personal situation.


Objective
To offer support, understanding, healing and recovery through the difficult times incurred by separation
and/or divorce using Christian principles.


Who Should/Can Attend
Separated and divorced individuals.


Time Frame
Fourteen Weeks


Cost
$10.00 for the work book. Scholarships are available


Suggestions/Comments
The group is an open groupit is recommended that one commits to meeting once a week for the entire
fourteen weeks.











Contact: Mary Jo Auth
Parish: St. Philip Parish
Phone: 412-279-0299

Divorced and Separated

Divorced or Separated Support Group


Description
This group provides support and healing to folks who are either divorced or separated. They use
DVDs and small group discussion, which couples find beneficial. The DVDs that are used are the
DivorceCare series. DivorceCare is a 13-week Christian, biblically-based program which covers
topics such as Anger, Loneliness, Depression, KidCare, Financial Survival, New Relationships,
Forgiveness and Reconciliation. We supplement the DVD series with a DVD presentation of Fr.
Brian Weldings discussion of annulments, along with questions and answers.

Objective
To heal from divorce and/or separation and to develop a deeper relationship with Our Lord.

Who Should/Can Attend
Anyone who is either divorced (currently or in the process) or separated from their spouse.

Time Frame Time Frame Time Frame Time Frame
14 weeks: 13 weeks of meetings followed by a Potluck dinner celebration.

Cost
A one-time fee of $10 is charged which covers most of the cost of the participants workbook.











Contact: Ralph Joy
Parish: Sts. John and Paul
Phone: 724-933-6226
Email: rjoy@consolidated.net

Divorced or Separated

Program for the Separated or Divorced


Description
Members named this program Raphaels Group. This is a theme centered group that meets on the 4
th
Friday
of each month from 7:00 to 9:00 p.m. A strengths-based resiliency model of social support is used. In
addition, a strong community-based emphasis is maintained. In other words, this group serves as a community
for those who are separated or divorced. In addition to the monthly meetings, at least one community-based
social event is organized in between each meeting (e.g., attending a parish or community festival or picnic,
trips to Phipps Conservatory, the Aviary, The Science Center, zoos, museums, meals out, pot-luck meals,
tailgate parties at community events, hikes and/or bike rides, Steelers game get-togethers, etc.)

A series of rotating themes from a DVD on the topic is used for those who are newly separated and divorced
or new to the group. Part of the time each month is also devoted to new themes initiated by the wants and
needs of those members who have been in the group long-term and have already completed the themes from
the DVD.
(See next page for further information.)

Objectives
To provide social and emotional support for those who are going through the crisis of marital separation or
divorce.

To provide mental health, wellness, and parenting information that is consistent with Catholic values and
beliefs for those who are separated or divorced.

To reduce isolation by providing a community of those who are separated or divorced for group-based social
networking.

Who Should/Can Attend
Anyone who is already separated or divorced is welcome. Family members of those who are separated or
divorced sometimes attend the community-based social events.

Time Frame
This group is open-ended and on-going. New members can join at any time.

Suggestions/Comments
It would be helpful to have a DVD player hooked up and ready for use at each meeting so that a computer
doesnt have to be carried in each month.



Contact: Peg Christopher or Diane Furchak
Parish: St. Bernadette Parish - Monroeville
Phone: 724-733-2928
Email: deerwoodswcs@aol.com


Raphaels Group: St. Bernadette Parish
Group for those who are Separated or Divorced

St. Bernadette Parish Group for Those who are Separated and/or Divorced (also known as Raphaels
Group) will continue to meet on the fourth Friday of each month from 7:00 to 9:00 p.m. on the first floor of
St. Bernadette Elementary School. When the fourth Friday falls on a holiday weekend, the group meets at the
home of one of the group facilitators, or at a local restaurant, instead. Call Peg Christopher (724) 733-2928 or
Diane Furchak (412) 445-0913 for directions or for detailed information about the groups theme-centered
meeting topic each month and for a list of social activities sponsored by the group. Information about the
group can also be found on the following website: www.deerwoodswcs.com.

New member themes for September through May are (1) Coping with Rejection and Stigma; (2) Loss and
Transformation of the Post-Separation/Divorce Relationship; (3) Managing Loneliness and Creating
Constructive Social Support Systems; (4) Managing Anger Associated with the Trauma of Separation and
Divorce; (5) Transforming Other Negative Emotions into Constructive Actions; (6) The Grief Process: What
Can Help; (7) Forgiveness; (8) Taking Responsibility for Mediating Family Conflict and Co-Parenting; and
(9) Integrating and Letting Go of the Past To Fully Engage in the Present and to Plan for the Future.
Additional themes are chosen by those who have been separated and/or divorced for a longer period of time.
Refreshments are also provided.

Divorce in a Catholic marriage is frequently associated with some type of abuse or trauma. In every marriage,
differences are inevitable. People who manage differences by excluding or divorcing those they have vowed
to love until death draws them apart, inflict one of the cruelest forms of emotional and financial trauma they
could possibly inflict on a spouse. If you are separated or divorced, and have been exposed to this type of
pain, this group is the place to be. Co-parenting and conflict resolution after separation or divorce is also
addressed. And if you are ready for some great fellowship and fun, the in-between meeting social events (tail-
gate get-togethers, games, picnics, pot-luck dinners, hikes, bike-rides, community-events, etc.), are something
that you wont want to miss. Raphaels Group social events are opened to non-group members, whether
single, widowed, separated/divorced or still married.

The Divorce Recovery material presented through this group comes from materials provided by the Pittsburgh
Diocese and from research that is consistent with Catholic theology. Part of the meeting time is set aside for
those who have moved beyond the crisis stage and are working to maintain a constructive, healthy, morally
responsible, separated and divorced community. This group uses an open-model, meaning that members can
join and/or reenter the group at any time. This group is linked with other Catholic divorce recovery groups
throughout the Diocese. Using the model of a village or community, each members strengths and resiliency
characteristics are identified and used to make this group the very best that it can be. Although people from
other religions are welcome to participate and an atmosphere of mutual respect is maintained, this group does
reinforce Catholic beliefs and values.



Divorced or Separated

Separated or Divorced Care Group


Description
A program providing support and healing for separated or divorced.

Objective
To provide an opportunity to talk about what is currently transpiring in your life in the company of those
traveling the same road and who understand how you might feel.

Who Should/Can Attend
Anyone experiencing hurt or anger from a separation or divorce

Time Frame
13 sessions starting in October from 7:30 to 9:00 pm.



























Contact: Marianne Uffelman, L.C.S.W.
Parish: St. Bernard Church
Phone: 412-341-3058
Email: mmuffelman@gmail.com













Families

Advent Family Evening


Description
Families are invited to an evening activity session, usually the week before Advent begins.

The format consists of an initial greeting and instructions regarding the evenings activities. Children from
age 3 thru grade 6 are divided into groups for an age level presentation, activity and prayer i.e. storytelling,
coloring page, and simple prayer. At the same time, a speaker addresses the Advent theme for parents/adults
and teens (middle school and high school).

All family members gather (as families) in the parish hall for a family craft activity Advent wreath, Jesse
Tree, crche preparation, etc. The evening concludes with a brief prayer service in the parish hall followed by
an ice cream sundae bar.

Objective
To foster family spirituality by introducing a family prayer activity that will last thru the Advent season.

Who Should/Can Attend
All families of the parish (single and/or widowed parishioners were invited and paired with families if they
responded).

Time Frame
Sunday before 1
st
Sunday of Advent from 6:00-7:00 p.m.

Cost
$5.00 per family to cover craft supplies and refreshments.

Suggestions/Comments
We tried to match families for the family craft activity so they would support one another thru the activity and
the follow-up in their homes.











Contact: Andrew James
Parish: St. John Neumann Parish, Franklin Park
Phone: 412-366-5885 x11
Email: ajames@stjohnneumannpgh.org

Families

Family Centered Program


Description
The Family-Centered model is a family faith formation program held monthly. Under the guidance of
the director of the program, the parents teach their children at home the rest of the month.

Objective
To provide material, education and prayer to enhance the religious education of children by parents in
their home.

Who Should/Can Attend
Any interested family

Time Frame
1 hours monthly













Contact: Sue Shaffer
Parish: St. Ferdinand Church
Phone: 724-776-9177 Ext. 302
Email: susan@stferd.org

Families

Family Program


Description
Saint Mary of the Assumption Family Program gathers each month, and focus on the scriptures of the Sunday
liturgies to provide the source for reflection, understanding and formation. Parents meet with their children
and a catechist with the children's age group at the September session. At subsequent sessions once a month
the children meet with their age group companions while parents gather for adult faith sharing and discussion
of topics flowing from the Sunday scriptures. Each month the families join in some practical donation to
support a specific needy outreach project. Each month one of the children's classes assists in ministry roles at
the 9:00a.m. Liturgy, and another class prepares and leads the closing prayer with the adult assembly. At the
final session for each season, the closing assembly for all families is an opportunity for members to share in a
talent show. The giftedness of youngest to eldest is enjoyed and acknowledged.

Objective
To provide a unique expression to our parish vision which reads:

We, the growing family of St. Mary of the Assumption, bound together by our Roman Catholic Faith,
welcome and unify as people of God, one family in Christ Jesus,
enable and deepen the spirituality of each individual,
nurture and share our talents for the enrichment of the parish and the community, and
strengthen and increase participation through meaningful liturgy.

Who Should/Can Attend
All interested families willing to commit to the process.

Time Frame
3 hours per month (first hour at parish liturgy)
2 hours of catechetical instruction, discussion and activities.

Cost
Price of consumable booklets and Gospel weeklies for each child.
Cost of handouts and refreshments prepared for adult session.

Suggestions/Comments
Seek to have each family committed to assist at least at one month in some aspect of the workings of the
program. Owning the process makes for a sense of pride on the part of the participants.





Contact: Deacon Francis Dadowski
Parish: Saint Mary of the Assumption, Glenshaw, PA
Phone: 412-782-6336
Email: francis_dadowski@hotmail.com

Families

Lets Make Christmas Cookies


Description
Christmas cookies are made during Advent from molds of angels, Bethlehem, the Three Kings or other
religious Christmas symbols. These cookies are saved and eaten on Christmas Eve and Christmas day.


Objective
To remind families during Advent of the true meaning of Christmas.

To learn to wait and look forward to, with anticipation, the birth of Christ.


Who Should/Can Attend
Families


Time Frame
2-3 hours


Suggestions/Comments
Recipes, molds, and a large kitchen in which to work.




Contact: Barb McCarthy
Parish: St. Ferdinand Church
Phone: 724-776-1357
Email: barb@stferd.org

Families

Pittsburgh Catholic Newspaper in Education


Description
Every student in grades 4-9 receives a Pittsburgh Catholic Newspaper each week and is given an assignment
for the family to work on together.

Objective
To help the students and the family become more knowledgeable with the current events of our Catholic faith.
It is very informative and much fun!

Who Should/Can Attend
These activities can be for the entire family.

Time Frame
2-3 hours

Suggestions/Comments
Some possibilities include:
Conduct a word-find by having students in lower grades to locate specific words or phrases (supplied
by you) in the Pittsburgh Catholic.

Have students in middle/high school pretend they are a reporter covering an important religious story
for the front page of the Pittsburgh Catholic. They would include people and places where the event
occurred. Create a catchy headline and illustration to explain their article.

Families could discuss the values of courage, loyalty, justice, respect, hope, love. Choose articles from
the Pittsburgh Catholic that reflect these values.

Families could make a Lenten booklet To Calvary with Jesus, using the Pittsburgh Catholic to find
picture and articles that illustrate each stop along the way.

Run a contest in your school or parish religious education program and give a prize for the best article,
picture, portrayal etc. of something they read in the Pittsburgh Catholic. Encourage students/families
to be creative.

Have students/families design their version of the Pittsburgh Catholic in the time of Jesus, creating the
name of the newspaper, front page, headlines, pictures, artwork etc.





Contact: Sr. Jean Spatola, SDR
Phone: 412-751-8600



















Married Couples

Covenant of Love Marriage Group


Description
This program is an eight session program based on segments of the EWTN series Marriage Works in
Christ featuring Fr. James Dean along with Greg and Julie Alexander of The Alexander House,
creators of the Covenant of Love Program. These 30 minute DVD-based presentations are
supplemented by scripture, references to the Catechism of the Catholic Church, and discussion
questions.

Objective
To enable participants to better understand and respond to Gods plan for Marriage.


Who Should/Can Attend
The program is for couples at all ages and stages of marriage.


Time Frame
8 weeks, although a loner program format is possible.


Cost
The Alexander House requires parishes who want to present the program to become partners at a
cost of $800 for one year. Partners receive a set of DVDs and access to the Covenant of Love website
area that contains the discussion guides. Discussion guides can be copied and distributed to
participants. The cost also includes direct support by the Alexander House, as well as monthly
conference calls regarding the program. Setting a cost for participants is optional.


Suggestions/Comments
The program is best suited for a parish setting. The Alexander House suggests building a core team of 6-8
couples to help launch and facilitate the program in the parish. It is suggested that other activities for married
couples be interspersed after two DVD-based sessions. Suggestions in this area include a Holy Hour for
Couples, Stations of the Cross for Married Couples, Not-So-Newlywed Game, or Married Couple Panel
Discussion.






Contact: Shawna and Warren Hunt
Parish: St. Kilian
Phone: 724-687-0575
Email: smhunt@zoominternet.net

Married Couples

Dinner & Speaker for Married Couples


Description
An evening spent with married couples enjoying dinner, conversation, community and the wisdom of a
guest speaker.


Objective
To refresh participants in their vocation of marriage and to meet other couples.


Who Should/Can Attend
All married couples.


Time Frame
3 4 hours.


Suggestions/Comments
The evening could be divided into different stages of marriage; examples: 1-5 years, 6-15 years, etc.




















Contact: Barb McCarthy
Parish: St. Ferdinand Church
Phone: 724-776-1357
Email: barb@stferd.org

Married Couples

The Five Love Languages


Description
A presentation on the book by Dr. Gary Chapman entitled The Five Love Languages.


Objective
To familiarize people with Dr. Chapmans theory of communication for all couples.

To enable the couples to put the theory to work in their own relationship.

Who Should/Can Attend
Any couple interested in improving their relationship.


Time Frame
Approximately 1 hours followed by time for refreshments and socializing.


Cost
Donation


Suggestions/Comments
There is also a DVD presentation that can be used done by Dr. Gary Chapman. This format would be
about a 2 to 2 hour evening and includes 2 presentations with a break in between. This program includes
workbooks to be used by those in attendance. If this program is used, an amount to cover the costs of the
books would be suggested.








Contact: Lou and Mary Locante
Parish: St. Athanasius Parish
Phone: 412-367-2642
Email: locante@aol.com

Married Couples

Marriage Building Assessment Tool


Description
This tool, consisting of eight building blocks or key areas of a marriage- building parish, is designed to assist
the parish staff and pastoral council to assess your parishs current efforts.

Objective
To assess the parishs current efforts in each of the eight areas.

To establish areas of priority.

To consider resources and make a building plan.

Who Should/Can Attend
This resource offers the parish staff, pastoral council, and marriage committee an opportunity to work
together.

Time Frame
Set by those involved.

Cost
This will vary dependent upon decisions that are made.

Suggestions/Comments
Parishes may want to take one area at a time and develop a plan rather than try to accomplish too much at
once.















Contact: Maureen Wood
Phone: 412-456-3160
Email: mwood@diopitt.org


Marriage Building Parishes Assessment Tool

Produced by the National Association of Catholic Family Life Ministers for Implementing the U.S. Bishops Pastoral
Initiative for Marriage


The purpose of this Assessment Tool is to generate creative ideas, discussion and resources to help
improve the way a parish intentionally views and strengthens marriage throughout the life cycle. Within each
particular Building Block is a list of statements to help assess a given parishes current efforts, leading a Parish
to selecting and prioritizing future steps to becoming more of a Marriage-Building Parish. Each contain
numerous ideas and choices, and you may add ones that are not included.

1. ASSESS PARISHS CURRENT EFFORTS. Have the pastor, deacons, staff and marriage ministry
team complete the assessment for each Building Block independently and list their three top priorities
for each Building Block.

2. ESTABLISH AREAS OF PRIORITY. If you are working with a committee, gather the committee
and compare priorities listed under each Building Block. Individually, or as a group select which
Building Block(s) will be your first priorities to develop. While each is important, it might be too
overwhelming to tackle all eight Building Blocks at one time. Once selected, invite members to
compare answers and share why they chose the answers they did. Second, have each individual give
their top three priorities and why. After each person has had an opportunity to discuss, find
commonalities in the priorities chosen and come to a consensus on which three take precedence.

3. CONSIDER RESOURCES AND MAKE BUILDING PLANS. Following each Building Block
there is information on many of the Resources and Programs available to assist you in your Building
Plans. Be certain to check out the USCCB website www.foryourmarriage.org for further ideas and
www. NACFLM.org for a sample scoring sheet to be used with this assessment, helpful worksheets
for Building Plans and other information that will be available in the coming year.

4. BUILD A MARRIAGE-BUILDING PARISH. Dont forget to assign responsibilities
(individuals/couples, committees, movements, etc); establish timelines, budgets, resource and material
needs and your desired outcomes for each priority.

* A copy of Marriage Building Parishes Assessment and Resource Guide has been sent to each parish.
Many resources to assist parish staff with marriage ministry can be found in the guide.

* See next eight pages for the Building Blocks: Building Leadership, Forming Youth and Young Adults,
Preparing for Sacramental Marriage, Creating a Culture of Life, Strengthening the Married, Pastoral
Caring for those in Need, Divorce Healing for Spouses and Children, Worshipping and Prayer.










R AT E T HE F OL L OWI NG:
3 = Yes! We do that 2 = We do it, but it needs improvement 1 = No, we dont do that
Item No. Action (Improve/Begin)
1.
2.
3.
Total Score
B
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BUILDS and forms a team who
minister to those called to the
vocation of marriage and family.
We are grateful, too, for all
those who work with young
people and engaged couples
to establish good marriages,
who help married couples
to grow in love and
strengthen their union, and
who help those in crisis to
resolve their problems and
bring healing to their lives.
From Marriage: Love and Life in
the Divine Plan
out of possible 51
Top three priorities for BUILDING Leadership:
1. Healthy marriage is a stated priority
in our parish.
2. Our parish provides ongoing
catechesis, education and
formation, in light of the authentic
teaching of the Church, on why
marriage is the union of one man
and one woman and why this
institution needs to be promoted
and protected in society.
3. We seek to build a culture of
confdence and courage that
bears witness, in all areas of life and
society, to the truth and beauty of
marriage.
4. We have an active Marriage Ministry
Team or similar parish committee
and provide them with effective
formation and training.
5. We actively seek participation of the
newly married in our parish.
6. Our parish allocates money and
other resources to the best of its
ability to promote healthy marriage.
7. Our parish supports marriage in the
larger community.
8. Our parish is able to recruit
volunteers who are faithful witnesses
to the Churchs teaching on
marriage and family.
9. Our volunteers are given regular
marriage-oriented educational/
formational opportunities.
10. Our pastoral leadership looks at all
parish ministries to make sure they
are marriage friendly.
11. We seek opportunities to
collaborate with other parishes to
effectively minister to marriage.
12. We are able to access our Diocesan
Family Life Offce, National
Association of Catholic Family Life
Ministers (www.NACFLM.org), and
web-sites such as United States
Conference of Catholic Bishops
(www.ForYourMarriage.org
13. We provide access to resources
dealing with various cultures and
ethnic groups particularly those
affecting marriage.
14. Make available the study guide the
US Bishops Pastoral Letter, Marriage:
Love and Life in the Divine Plan.
15. Parish includes marriage prayers,
rituals, events and bulletin inserts
through the year.
16. Parishioners are encouraged to
write to legislators about marriage
issues.
17. Leadership training is provided for
support group facilitators.
Copyright 2010, National Association of Catholic Family Life Ministers
R AT E T HE F OL L OWI NG:
3 = Yes! We do that 2 = We do it, but it needs improvement 1 = No, we dont do that
Item No. Action (Improve/Begin)
1.
2.
3.
Total Score
F
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Y
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a
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Y
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FORMS young people in the beliefs
and virtues necessary for healthy
relationships, including marriage
Proximate preparation
begins around puberty
and involves a more
specic preparation for the
sacraments, including an
understanding of healthy
relationships, sexuality,
the virtue of chastity, and
responsible parenthood.
From Marriage: Love and Life
in the Divine Plan
out of possible 39
Top three priorities for FORMING Youth and Young Adults:
FORMING Youth
1. Our parish provides programs and
effective catechesis that help youth
and young adults discuss, understand
and defend the unique meaning of
marriage in the face of
contemporary challenges.
2. Faith formation programs and
catechetical curriculum include
components at every level that
address healthy relationships and the
vocation of marriage.
3. The beauty of sexuality and the
Catholic Churchs teachings on
marriage are taught
effectively to our youth.
4. Youth activities include efforts to
honor married couples in our parish,
i.e., hosting a Senior Prom for
couples married 40 years or more,
etc.
5. Post-confrmation program for high
school seniors about the Sacrament
of Marriage is offered.
6. Our parish has a strong emphasis on
remote preparation to help parents
properly form their children and teens
for marriage.
7. Married couples are sought out as
catechists.
8. Couples witness the joys and
struggles of the Sacrament of
Marriage to the youth.
9. Theology of the Body is taught to
youth and young adults.
10. Fertility awareness/appreciation is
taught.
FORMING Young Adults
11. Our parish provides young adults with
positive opportunities for growth in
Relationships and Vocation.
12. Young adults have activities and
catechesis available.
13. Parish utilizes opportunities to
catechize adolescents and young
adults on the meaning of covenant,
sacrifce, faithfulness and openness
to life.
Copyright 2010, National Association of Catholic Family Life Ministers
R AT E T HE F OL L OWI NG:
3 = Yes! We do that 2 = We do it, but it needs improvement 1 = No, we dont do that
Item No. Action (Improve/Begin)
1.
2.
3.
Total Score
P
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f
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PREPARES couples to
celebrate and live a Christian
sacramental marriage
By the time of immediate
preparation, the couple
has developed a conviction
that God is calling them to
marriage with a particular
person. Prayer, especially
for the guidance of the
Holy Spirit, and the help
of wise mentors are crucial
in this discernment process.
Discernment also involves an
honest assessment of qualities
that are foundational for
the marriage. These include
an ability to make and
keep a commitment, the
desire for a lifelong, faithful
relationship, and openness to
children. The couple will also
want to reect on the values
they share, their ability to
communicate, and agreement
on signicant issues.
From Marriage: Love and Life
in the Divine Plan
out of possible 33
Top three priorities for PREPARING for Sacramental Marriage:
PREPARING for Sacramental Marriage
1. A pre-marital inventory is utilized by
all couples preparing for sacramental
marriage.
2. A parish or diocesan preparation
program is utilized for couples seeking
marriage the Church.
3. A parish or diocesan preparation
program is utilized for couples when
one or both have had a previous
marriage(s) which addresses their
special areas of concern, i.e.,
closure of the frst marriage, blended
families, etc.
4. A parish or diocesan preparation
program is utilized for couples seeking
convalidation.
5. If parish based, all Ministers to the
Engaged are up to date with the
current diocesan and parish policies.
6. Ministers to the Engaged gather at
least annually to enrich their ministry
and to clarify questions.
7. Newly married couples are mentored
after the wedding.
8. Church teaching and instruction in
a natural family planning method is
provided for all couples preparing for
marriage.
CELEBRATING Sacramental Marriage
9. Our parish assumes a posture of
welcome to all couples seeking to be
married in the Church.
10. Engaged couples are brought
forward for a blessing during the time
of marriage preparation.
11. Wedding planning assistance is
provided for couples planning a
wedding celebration in our parish.
Copyright 2010, National Association of Catholic Family Life Ministers
R AT E T HE F OL L OWI NG:
3 = Yes! We do that 2 = We do it, but it needs improvement 1 = No, we dont do that
Item No. Action (Improve/Begin)
1.
2.
3.
Total Score
C
R
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a

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o
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L
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Children are a gift in
a myriad of ways. They
bring joy even in the
midst of heartaches; they
give added direction to
the lives of their parents.
Children, who are the fruit
of love and meaningful
commitment, are a cause of
love and meaning.
The procreative meaning
of marriage involves not
only the conception of
children, but also their
upbringing and education,
including spiritual
formation in the life of
love. This formation can
take place only within
a human community
formed in love. The loving
communion of the spouses
is the primary context in
which children are both
conceived and brought up
in love.
From Marriage: Love and Life
in the Divine Plan
out of possible 57
Top three priorities for CREATING a Culture of Life :
AFFIRMS the gift of Children, the vocation
of Parenthood, and helps build a Culture
of Life SUPPORTS parents and families in
their role as a domestic church.
CREATING A Culture of Life
1. Our parish fosters awareness of
marriage between one man and
one woman as the fundamental
institution for life, including effective
catechesis and education on the
gift of children, the unique and
indispensable place of mothers and
fathers, and the inseparability of the
unitive and procreative meanings of
married love.
2. Baptisms are periodically conducted
during the weekend liturgy to affrm
the gift of children.
3. In all aspects if ministry, our parish
considers the role of family and the
gift of children.
4. Opportunities are available for
mothers, fathers and children to
learn about fertility awareness and
appreciation together.
5. Our parish sponsors opportunities to
pray for mothers and their unborn
children.
6. Our parish fosters awareness of the
need to restore legal protection
to the lives of unborn children and
to safeguard in law the lives of
those who are chronically ill,
disabled, or dying.
7. A Spiritual Adoption program is in
place that encourages families to
pray for the unborn.
8. Natural Family Planning Instruction is
available and promoted to parents,
especially at times of transitions, i.e.
baptismal preparation.
9. Parents are publicly honored for their
dedication and commitment to their
children, especially in conjunction
with Mothers Day, Fathers Day,
First Communion, Confrmation,
Graduation, Catechetical Sunday,
etc.
10. Faith formation programs and
catechetical curriculum include
components that address the
dignity of the human person from
conception to a natural death.

PARENTING in the Domestic Church
11. Mothers and fathers are given
resources and encouragement to
model healthy
relations for their children.
12. Parenting classes are periodically
offered.
13. Contact information is published for
mothers and father who are tempted
to abuse their child(ren).
14. Sacramental Preparation is utilized
as a time to teach parenting
skills and the understanding of
their role as primary educators of
children. (Baptism, First Communion,
Confrmation)
15. Mothers and fathers are invited to be
actively involved in their childrens
religious education.
16. Non-Catholic and/or non-custodial
mothers and fathers are included in
parent mailings and invitations.
17. Our parish provides opportunities for
parents to properly form their children
and teens for marriage.
18. Parish has bulletin inserts that offer
help and ideas for evangelization in
the family.
19. A family perspective has been
adopted by the parish considering
the needs of the family whenever
new programs are initiated.
Copyright 2010, National Association of Catholic Family Life Ministers
R AT E T HE F OL L OWI NG:
3 = Yes! We do that 2 = We do it, but it needs improvement 1 = No, we dont do that
Total Score
Item No. Action (Improve/Begin)
1.
2.
3.
S
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As a couple grows in virtue,
they grow in holiness. In
other words, the couple
acquires, by prayer and
discipline, those interior
qualities that open them to
Gods love and allow them
to share in his love more
deeply. Couples instinctively
understand this when they
speak about their marriage
being a means of leading
each other to heaven
Communication and
relationship skills are crucial
to building such intimacy.
As spouses learn to improve
their communication,
they can better respond
to each others need for
love, acceptance, and
appreciation. They deepen
marital intimacy and
strengthen their practice of
chastity.
From Marriage: Love and Life
in the Divine Plan
STRENGTHENS couples to renew their commitment &
grow in the skills for a happy & holy marriage
EDUCATES all members about the nature & purposes of
marriage as a natural institution & a Christian sacrament
out of possible 78
Top three priorities for STRENGTHENING the Married:
EDUCATING in Skills
1. Topics related to the promotion and
protection of marriage in society are
included in our programs.
2. Adult faith formation programs (RCIA)
include the Churchs teachings on
marriage.
3. Parish library includes books and media
offering support and help for marriage.
4. Baptismal preparation program includes
the adjustments in marriage when a
new baby is born and the importance
of their role as primary educators of their
children.
5. Education opportunities regarding
healthy relationships, communication
skills, fnancial planning are offered
for singles, engaged couples, married
couples, parents, divorced, widowed,
hurting families, stepfamilies, and elders.
6. Theology of the Body is taught to youth,
young adults and the married.
7. Natural Family Planning instruction is
available and promoted regularly.
8. Bulletin inserts on marriage related
topics and links to web-sites supporting
marriage are included on a regular
basis.

RENEWING & Enriching the Married
9. Monthly Marriage-Building Sunday is
established.
10. Names are submitted for diocesan
anniversary celebration.
11. Married couples are publicly honored
for milestone years at Mass, in the
bulletin, with anniversary card, on
Monthly Marriage-Building Sunday,
etc.
12. Prayers for married couples are in the
pews or pamphlet racks.
13. Signage in the parish is displayed on
being a Marriage-Building parish &
What Have You Done For Your Marriage
Today?
14. Parish retreats for married couples are
offered at least annually.
15. Practical bulletin inserts promoting
marriage include prayers, customs,
rituals and traditions throughout the
year.
16. Military couples are intentionally invited
to marriage enrichment opportunities,
particularly when reintegrating after
deployment.
17. Marriage enrichment programs include
components that are relevant to all
cultures.
18. Follow-up contact is made with newly
married couples.
19. The Catholic newsletter, Foundations,
is provided for couples during
their frst year of marriage (www.
foundationnewsletter.net)
20. Make available the study guide of the
US Bishops Pastoral Letter, Marriage:
Love and Life in the Divine Plan.
21. Marriage enrichment opportunities are
provided/promoted monthly, quarterly,
and annually.
22. Child care/activities are provided or
list of potential babysitters is offered
for marriage enrichment and other
programs opportunities.
23. Newly married couples are invited to be
actively involved in the parish, invited
to parish functions and to volunteer for
specifc functions.
24. Groups of married couples meet for
support.
25. Couple Prayer Series is available to assist
couples to pray together daily.
26. Opportunities exist for married couples
to be in small Christian communities.
Copyright 2010, National Association of Catholic Family Life Ministers
R AT E T HE F OL L OWI NG:
3 = Yes! We do that 2 = We do it, but it needs improvement 1 = No, we dont do that
Total Score
Item No. Action (Improve/Begin)
1.
2.
3.
P
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PROVIDES CARE to couples
and families in times of
diffculty and loss
...We bishops urge
couples in crisis to turn to
the Lord for help. We also
encourage them to make
use of the many resources,
including programs and
ministries offered by the
Church, that can help to
save marriages, even those
in serious difculty.

From Marriage
Life in the Divine Plan
out of possible 54
Top three priorities for Pastoral CARING for those in need:
Pastoral CARING for times of
Diffculties
1. Priests and deacons have
intervention skills to help in initial care
for struggling marriages.
2. A pastoral plan or Marriage Care is
in place for couples who come to us
with problems.
3. Someone on staff is knowledgeable
to make good counseling referrals to
pro-marriage counselors, Retrouvaille,
etc.
4. Couples are supported through the
adjustments of pregnancy and new
parenting.
5. Couples struggling with infertility are
supported and given guidance that
conforms with Catholic teaching.
6. Couples are supported through the
adoption process and beyond.
7. Support for those in 2nd marriages/
blended families is available.
8. Education and support is available
for pornography and substance
abuse addictions and fnancial
diffculties.
9. Partnerships exist with other parishes/
cluster for assisting hurting marriages.
10. Copies of USCCBs When I call for
Help pamphlet are available.
11. Domestic violence hot-line number is
published in bulletin. 1-800-799-SAFE
(7233)
12. Post-abortion healing resources are
advertised. www.hopeafterabortion.
org
13. Support is given to families
experiencing military deployment
and assisted through the
reintegration process.
14. A pastoral plan is developed to
assist those couples and families
experiencing concern about
immigration issues.

Pastoral CARING for times of Loss
15. Bereavement care is available for
those who have lost a spouse.
16. Couples are supported through loss
of pregnancy, miscarriage, stillbirth.
17. Couples are supported through the
loss of child.
18. Parents are supported when a child
says they are struggling with same sex
attraction.
Copyright 2010, National Association of Catholic Family Life Ministers
R AT E T HE F OL L OWI NG:
3 = Yes! We do that 2 = We do it, but it needs improvement 1 = No, we dont do that
Item No. Action (Improve/Begin)
1.
2.
3.
Total Score
D
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f
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C
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OFFERS HEALING to
separated and divorced
spouses and their families
We understand the
pain of those for whom
divorce seemed the only
recourse...We also offer
encouragement to those
who have divorced and
remarried civilly We
encourage divorced persons
who wish to marry in the
Catholic Church to seek
counsel about the options
that exist to remedy their
situation, including the
suitability of a declaration
of nullity.
From Marriage: Love and Life
in the Divine Plan
out of possible 48
Top three priorities for Divorce HEALING for Spouses and Children:
Divorce-Healing for Spouses
1. A support ministry for persons
going through the initial trauma of
separation and divorce is provided
or one available elsewhere is
advertised.
2. Divorce support programs continue
after the initial trauma with
catechesis for persons moving
through the grief process.
3. Child care is provided free during
training and programs.
4. A retreat program is available
periodically for the divorced.
5. Annulment education is provided
periodically to inform divorced
persons how to proceed with the
healing process of an annulment.
6. Annulment support ministers are
available to assist those going
through the
annulment process.
7. Annual healing Mass and healing
ritual is sponsored for the separated
and divorced.
8. Divorced and single parents are
included in prayers of the faithful.
9. Support for single parents is provided.
10. Leadership training is provided for
support group facilitators.
11. The Pastoral Team includes divorced
persons who have journeyed
the path and can encourage
reconciliation and support through
appropriate programs.
12. Bulletin announcements include
programs for divorced persons
available in the community.
13. Parish packets explaining available
resources for divorce programs are
provided to the offce staff to answer
inquiries.
14. Parish website is linked to www.
nacsdc.org.

Divorce-Healing for Children
15. Support groups are available for
children of divorce.
16. Retreat program for teens of divorce
are provided.
Copyright 2010, National Association of Catholic Family Life Ministers
R AT E T HE F OL L OWI NG:
3 = Yes! We do that 2 = We do it, but it needs improvement 1 = No, we dont do that
Total Score
Item No. Action (Improve/Begin)
1.
2.
3.
W
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&

P
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Pope Benedict XVI
explains how, in the
Eucharist, the very
meaning of marriage
is transgured: the
imagery of marriage
between God and Israel
is now realized in a way
previously inconceivable:
it had meant standing in
Gods presence, but now it
becomes union with God
through sharing in Jesus
self-gift, sharing in his
body and blood.

From Marriage
Life in the Divine Plan
CELEBRATES the vocation
of marriage in worship and
community life
out of possible 33
1. Our parish regularly prays that
marriage, as the permanent and
exclusive union of one man and one
woman, be protected and promoted
in our society and culture.
2. Monthly Marriage-Building
Sunday is established to celebrate
anniversaries, renew marriage
vows, bless the engaged and newly
married, and pray for those with
diffculties, etc.
3. Homilies are regularly given about
the joys and importance of marriage
as well as the threat to marriage
when appropriate readings lend
themselves to marriage.
4. Petitions at Mass regularly include
marriage.
5. Our parish regularly prays for couples
preparing for marriage, those who
are married, and are celebrating
anniversaries.
6. Our parish regularly prays for those
whose marriages that have faced
diffculties such as separation,
divorce, widowhood and distance.
7. Couples are encouraged to receive
the Sacrament of Eucharist side by
side as a couple.
8. Newly married couples come
forward at Mass for a parish blessing.
9. Couples are used for the various
ministries in the parish, i.e. greeters,
lectors, Eucharistic Ministers.
10. Homilies often connect Scripture with
Marriage and the Churchs Theology
of covenantal relationship.
11. Inhome resources are available to
help families pray at home.
Top three priorities for WORSHIPING and Prayer:
Copyright 2010, National Association of Catholic Family Life Ministers

Married Couples

Marriage Enrichment in the Empty Nest


Description
Transitions can be challenging for marriages. Entering the second half of marriage, which often is
associated with becoming empty nesters, is a period where many marriages feel stress, as evidenced
by an increase in divorce rates for couples in this phase.

This program provides support to couples preparing to enter or in the early stages of the empty nest
phase. The concept uses a curriculum developed by David and Claudia Arp called The Second Half
of Marriage for an instructional, yet fun program. It utilizes a DVD and discussion based curriculum
built around eight challenges of the empty nest years.


Objective
To identify the issues that typically confronts couples in the empty nest years.

To provide a framework for learning and discussion on the impact of each couples personal situation.


Who Should/Can Attend
Couples preparing to enter or already in the empty nest phase of their marriage.


Time Frame
8 week program. Presented ideally on an every other Friday evening basis in the parish.


Cost
$20 for the Arps book and start-up snacks.


Suggestions/Comments
The program is best offered in a parish setting to build local community. A side benefit is the social aspect of
couples meeting others who are in a similar state of life and building relationships with them. The experience
provides an opportunity for one-on-one couple dialogue during each session couples are asked to sign up each
week to provide a simple snack. This worked well for both variety and financial means of providing snacks.





Contact: Shawna and Warren Hunt
Parish: St. Kilian
Phone: 724-687-0575
Email: smhunt@zoominternet.net

Married Couples

Retrouvaille

Program for Troubled Marriages


Description
The program consists of a weekend and seven follow-up sessions. The weekends are held at the Gilmary
Center near the Greater Pitt Airport. The follow-up sessions are held on Sunday afternoons from 1:30-5:30
starting with the first Sunday after the weekend and usually every Sunday or every other Sunday, depending
on the schedule, for seven sessions. The follow-up sessions are held at SS. Simon & Jude Parish in Green
Tree. The weekend begins at 7:30 Friday night and finishes up by 5:00 on Sunday. It consists of a series of
presentations, one to two hours in length. The presentations are given by three team couples and a priest. A
communication technique called Dialogue is used in which each participant is able to discuss marital
situations on a feeling level. Each presentation deals with a different topic that frequently causes problems in
a marriage such as trust, listening, forgiveness, etc. The couple will have the opportunity to go back to the
privacy of their own room and talk about what they heard in the presentation and how it applies to their
relationship. Then, they come back for the next presentation and it follows that same pattern for the entire
weekend.

Gilmary is a retreat center that is a dormitory style setting. Each room has two twin beds, a sink, dresser and
desk. There are community mens and womans bathrooms and showers at each end of the hall. Couples stay
at the facility all weekend. All meals are provided.

Objective
To restore communication and love to troubled marriages.

Who Should/Can Attend
Couples in troubled marriages.

Time Frame
Four (4) weekends are held each year - January, April, July and September.

Cost
There is a $100 registration fee to reserve a spot on the weekend and then a blank envelope donation is
requested on the weekend. The fees cover both the weekend and post session phases of the Program.


Contact: Bill & Pat McGrane
Phone: 412-327-2434
Email: 3041@retrouvaille.org

Married Couples

Teams of Our Lady


Description
A team is a group of 5-7 married couples who have freely decided to join together to find support in their
efforts to lead Gospel lives. Each group has a priest chaplain that meets with them as well.


Objective
To meet monthly in each others homes for a simple meal and in the spirit of friendship share experiences of
the previous month.

To reflect on Scripture and to pray.

To discuss study material on married life and faith.


Who Should/Can Attend
Married couples who want to deepen their faith life.


Time Frame
3 hrs/month, 9 months/year. Recommitment yearly.


Cost
A free will offering to the international office yearly, cost of materials (less than $20/yr. often free materials,)
and bring part of meal to each meeting.


Suggestions/Comments
Local Teams of Our Lady couples conduct meetings to provide information, answer questions and place
interested couples in a team.









Contact: Dan and Mary Donnelly
Parish: Madonna del Castello
Phone: 412-371-1547
Email: mrothdon@yahoo.com

Married Couples

Worldwide Marriage Encounter


Description
The weekend is presented by a team consisting of three married couples and a priest. On the weekend, the
team shares their life experience with the couples and teaches a communication skill called dialogue, which is
a form of communicating on the level of feelings rather than knowledge or opinions.

Objective
To offer married couples the opportunity to gain a better understanding of themselves and their spouse.

To instill a desire to work at the communication skills that is introduced on the weekend.

Who Should/Can Attend
The weekend is open to all couples. It is suggested that they be in a good marriage with a desire to deepen
their relationship with each other.

Time Frame
The Marriage Encounter weekend begins on a Friday evening at 8:00 p.m. and ends on Sunday about 5:00
p.m. The weekend is offered in this area about four times a year.

Cost
Couples are asked to give a free-will donation (the cost of the weekend, $400 per couple, is suggested).

Suggestions/Comments
Couples who have experienced serious problems in their marriage should not attend the Marriage Encounter
weekend. They should be directed to attend a Retrouvaille weekend which is for troubled marriages.








Contact: Jay and Judy Shock
Phone: 412-635-7775
Email: JudyShock@aol.com





















Older Adults

Life Enrichment Club


Description
St. Joan of Arc Parish reaches out to enrich the lives of all those willing to set aside time each month to learn,
grow, pray and play in a spirit of community. Through our gatherings we will share prayer, share meals, hear
speakers on topics of interest and share new experiences never dreamed of. Each meeting will leave you
wanting to come backguaranteed.

Objective
To learn: Each Month different topics will be addressed, such as:
Finding happiness as we grow in wisdom, age and grace
Holistic Living
Handling Grief
Journey through Advent
Journey through Lent
Art Therapy
Dreams and Dreaming
To pray: every meeting begins with an experience of prayer, sharing faith together and experiencing Gods
love.

To grow: sharing lunch together will create new friendships, new recipes, and new topics of conversation.
To play: gatherings are fun, uplifting and wholesome. Laughter is a precious gift and a blessing to share.

Time Frame
September-May - First Wednesday, 11:00 a.m.-1:30 p.m.

Cost
Donations













Contact: Sr. Kathleen Hoerster
Parish: St. Joan of Arc Parish
Phone: 412-833-2400
Email: hoerstercpd@gmail.com

Older Adults

Mind, Body and Spirit


Description
This program presents some aspect of faith formation that parallel the educational session being presented.

Examples:

A seminar on Exercise for Health given by a physical therapist was followed by a presentation on
Spiritual Exercises, briefly introducing them to the Ignatius program and the exercise of praying for a
grace, learning by heart and meditating on Scripture using ones senses.

A seminar on a healthy heart was followed by a brief presentation on devotion to the Heart of Jesus and
the Great Commandments.

Objective
To form the spirits and hearts of older adults, as well as, their minds.


Who Should/Can Attend
Seniors


Time Frame
The whole seminar lasted about 2 hours and included lunch.


Cost
Donation













Contact: Bernice Dumitru, Pastoral Associate
Parish: Church of the Resurrection
Phone: 412-563-5589
Email: bernicedumitru@msn.com or bernicedumitru@verizon.net

Older Adults

Royal Court


Description
The Royal Court is our friendly organization for Senior Citizens (50+.) We meet for lunch twice a month.
There is a small fee for the buffet lunch which is prepared by the members on a rotating basis. The
atmosphere is jovial and welcoming. An activity, such as bingo is offered after lunch.

Objective
To provide a place for seniors to gather and be with friends

Who Should/Can Attend
Adults 50 years of age and over

Time Frame
2-3 hours















Contact: Barb McCarthy
Parish: St. Ferdinand Church
Phone: 724-776-1357
Email: barb@stferd.org


Parents

Heart & Soul (parent evening)


Description
We offered an evening for parents with two speakers. The first was a parishioner who, as a father and
well-respected local school principal, was able to speak of the challenges faced by families today. The
second was a diocesan priest who had followed a winding path to the priesthood and, as a priest, had
worked with youth in different settings.

Objective
To offer an evening for parents that would both affirm them in their work of raising Catholic children
and provide them with strategies for staying focused on Christ in a world with many conflicting
messages.

Who Should/Can Attend
We promoted this event (heavily!) to parents of children in all age groups. We were able to attract
over 100 participants on a Sunday afternoon.

Time Frame
Parish staff came up with a list of possible speakers a few weeks in advance and invited them. We
then sent flyers to all children in all religious education programs, followed by an e-mail and personal
phone calls to parents. The talk was on a Sunday afternoon from 4 5:30, during a gathering for
middle school students (in a separate part of the building) scheduled at the same time.

Suggestions/Comments
Parents were appreciative of the talks. Having a parishioner who is a community leader was particularly well
received.















Contact: Barbara Stokes
Parish: Saint John Neumann Parish
Phone: 412-366-5885 Ext. 13
Email: barbara.stokes@yahoo.com

Parents

Parent Meetings


Description
We utilize parent meetings to stress the domestic church and the parents role as the primary educator and
source of formation for their children. The formation staff meets with parents at the start of formation classes
in September, for sacramental prep Baptism, First Reconciliation, First Eucharist, and Confirmation, and on
Family Formation days.


Objective
To support the parents and to help them better understand their role in the faith formation of their children.


Who Should/Can Attend
All parents with children who will receive those sacraments.


Time Frame
One to one and a half hours


Suggestions/Comments
It is required that the parents attenda captive audience. Most parents are very attentive to the presenters and
we use we use a team of presenters. We feel the more they hear about the domestic church, the better.

















Contact: Jay Speca
Parish: St Benedict the Abbot Church
Phone: 724-941-9406 Ext 114
Email: Speca@stbenedicttheabbot.org

Parents

Single Parent Family Support


Description
The Single Parent Group meets monthly on the 4
th
Tuesday of the month from 7:00-8:30 p.m. in the
Upper Room. Sr. Janice Marie Blados, professional counselor, conducts these hour and a half meetings.
Discussion centers on topics important to the single parent family including spirituality, parenting skills
and many others.

Objective
To offer support and guidance to single parents.

Who Should/Can Attend
Any single parents

Time Frame
1 hours












Contact: Barb McCarthy
Parish: St. Ferdinand Church
Phone: 724-776-1357
Email: barb@stferd.org

Single Grieving Adults

Beginning Experience of Pittsburgh


Description
This is a peer-to-peer lay ministry offering support and help for people who have lost a spouse through
death, divorce or separation. The Beginning Experience weekend and follow-up program helps
grieving single-again persons travel through the darkness of grief toward the future with renewed
hope. The program helps deal with the natural grief process and offers an opportunity, through God,
for growth. Founded by a Catholic nun and rooted in the Catholic tradition, the ministrys open, and
ecumenical spirit serves those of all faiths. A sense of community develops in an atmosphere of care
and concern that is the hallmark of each Beginning Experience weekend. The Sacrament of Penance
and the Eucharistic liturgy are offered during the weekend. Support programs include a six week pre-
weekend experience (Coping with Your Loss) as an initial pathway to dealing with the loss of a
spouse, and a six-week follow-up experience (Continued Beginnings).

Objective
To provide opportunities for ecumenical peer-to-peer ministry to those who have lost a spouse.

Who Should/Can Attend
While this program has a Catholic focus, anyone who has lost a spouse is welcome and encouraged to attend.

Time Frame
The weekend is a 44-hour residential retreat held at Gilmary Center 2 or 3 times per year, usually in the
spring and fall.

Cost
$160 per participant with financial scholarship help available, since this period is often a difficult financial
time for the participants.

Suggestions/Comments
A team of 12 trained lay persons use facilitated small group discussions as the primary process of the
weekend. These men and women are still traveling on their own grief journey. Through this ministry, they
invite those struggling with the loss of a spouse to confront and engage in their own grief journey.









Contact: Steve Smith
Parish: St. John Neumann
Phone: 412-367-4948
Email: mbhdassoc@comcast.net


Young Adults

FLIGHT

(Friends Learning Inquiring Growing in Holiness Together)


Description
These gatherings are the foundation of our Young Adult Community. FLIGHT consists of short programs of
four to six sessions. We meet at a local coffee shop. FLIGHT is a group that comes together to learn, ask
questions, and just talk about "Catholic stuff" together.

Meeting Topics:

FLIGHT includes but is not limited to:
Scripture study
Exploration of Sacraments
Social Justice Issues
Morality
Traditions
Doctrine
Objective
To catechize young adults on the basics of the Catholic faith.
To encourage faith-sharing.
To build community.

Who Should/Can Attend
Young adults in their 20s and 30s, married and single.

Time Frame
60-90 minutes, followed by social time.

Meeting Schedule
7:30p.m.-7:40p.m. Meet and greet/announcements
7:40p.m.-8:30p.m. Topic presentation and discussion
8:30p.m.- ? Food and drinks at a different location each month.

Cost
By holding the event at a coffee shop and having the social time at a restaurant, the participants can purchase
refreshments if they desire.

Suggestions/Comments
Having the sessions off of the parish campus especially encourages young adults who are in the fringe to
participate. It provides a neutral location. Meet young adults where they feel comfortable. When hosting a
speaker, move the session to the church.

Contact: Erica Gamerro
Parish: St. Bernard, Mt. Lebanon
Phone: 412-561-0570
Email: egamerro2@stbpgh.org or in.terra.pax@gmail.com

Young Adults

Theology on Tap Theology on Tap Theology on Tap Theology on Tap


Description
This is one of the most popular and successful programs offered to the young adults of the Diocese of
Pittsburgh. In dioceses across the country, Theology on Tap programs have enjoyed similar success. As a
result, RENEW International copyrighted the name.

RENEW Theology on Tap is a process of evangelization, a strategy to meet young adults where they are and
invite them into the life of the Church. Topics address the needs of a seeker audience, those Catholics who
are interested in and curious about the Catholic Faith.

Objective
Theology on Tap is a speaker series offering young adults the opportunity to socialize, pray, and discuss their
personal, professional, and faith experiences with fellow Catholics in a welcoming and convivial atmosphere.


Who Should/Can Attend
Young adultspeople in their 20s and 30s, married and single, with and without children.


Time Frame
Varies

Cost
Cost of food and drink
















Contact: Erica Gamerro
Parish: St. Bernard, Mt. Lebanon
Phone: 412-561-0570
Email: egamerro2@stbpgh.org or in.terra.pax@gmail.com

Secretariat for Education
Department for Youth and Young Adult Ministry

Guidelines for Hosting RENEW Theology on Tap

For the past several years, Theology on Tap has been one of the most popular and successful programs
offered to the young adults of the Diocese of Pittsburgh. This speaker series offers young adults the
opportunity to socialize, pray, and discuss their personal, professional, and faith experiences with fellow
Catholics in a welcoming and convivial atmosphere.

In dioceses across the country, Theology on Tap programs have enjoyed similar success. As a result, RENEW
International copyrighted the name. The Department for Youth and Young Adult Ministry in the Secretariat
for Education has obtained a license for our diocese and to ensure those who sponsor a Theology on Tap
program remain mindful of the purpose of this ministry, building on the guidelines suggested by RENEW
International, the Secretariat for Education asks that the following set of guidelines be observed:

All Theology on Tap programs and speakers must be approved at the diocesan level.

RENEW Theology on Tap is to be geared exclusively toward young adultspeople in their 20s and
30s, married and single, with and without children.

Primarily, efforts should be made to create inviting and hospitable environment.
Coordinators should use personal invitation as the method of publicity, and a key objective for any
Theology on Tap event is a comfortable and socially agreeable setting.

RENEW Theology on Tap is a process of evangelization, a strategy to meet young adults where they
are and invite them into the life of the Church. Topics therefore must address the needs of a seeker
audience, those Catholics who are interested in and curious about the Catholic faith.

The speakers must be well informed in their field and personally respectful of Catholic teaching, but
also possess a keen sense of the issues of ministering to young adults. They should address relevant
concerns in practical ways.

Speakers should be compensated for their time and expertise.

All publicity must use the official RENEW Theology on Tap logo, which is a registered trademark and
may only be used to publicize official RENEW Theology on Tap events. Under normal circumstances
this logo may not be changed.

All publicity must contain the following, in some appropriate way, so that others can contact RENEW
International for further information:

RENEW Theology on Tap, a pastoral outreach for RENEW International,
1232 George Street, Plainfield, NJ 07062-171
Tel: 908-769-5400 x159 Web: www.theologyontap.com

A copy of all publicity must be sent electronically to the Young Adult Ministry Leadership Team by
emailing yam@diopitt.org. If you wish, this information will then be shared with young adult and
young adult leaders across the diocese.

Any non-compliance with these guidelines may result in the revocation of permission to use the
Theology on Tap name and any of its derivatives (e.g., Spirituality on Tap, or something similar.)
RESOURCES


Learning Media Center
Church Documents
For the minister
Catechisms
Adult Faith Formation
Scripture
Lectionary - Based Resources
Liturgy and Liturgical Catechesis
Prayer
RCIA
Catholic Publishers
Periodic Resources
Catholic Periodical
Online Resources
Official Sites
Other Sites
Houses of Prayer
Retreat Centers

Learning Media Center


The Learning Media Center of the Diocese of Pittsburgh, Located on the first floor of St. Paul Seminary,
Crafton, has provided media resources for Total Catholic Education to the catechetical leaders, catechists,
teachers, and families of the Church of Pittsburgh for over forty years. The center maintains and makes
available a collection of catechetical materials that range in format from books, binders, and periodicals, to
CDs, VHS and DVD videos, and Internet-related resources.
The Learning media Center is open to the public Monday through Friday, 9:00 a.m. 4:00 p.m.
Each parish and Catholic School in the Diocese of Pittsburgh has a copy of the video catalog on CD for
review of the video resources available for borrow.
Contact: Mr. Jeffrey Hirst
Address: 2900 Noblestown Road, Pittsburgh, PA 15205
Phone: (412) 456-3120
Email:lmc@diopitt.org
The following is a limited listing of resources that might be helpful for people working in adult faith
formation. We hope that the users of this resource will contribute additional resources that they have found
helpful.









Church Documents


For the minister

The Church Alive, Pastoral Letter to the Church of Pittsburgh, 2008 Bishop David A. Zubik, M.S. Ed., D.D.
The Church Sharing, Pastoral Letter to the Church of Pittsburgh, 2009 Bishop David A. Zubik, M.S. Ed.,D.D.
The Church Living, Pastoral Letter to the Church of Pittsburgh, 2009 Bishop David A. Zubik, M.S. Ed., D.D.

Our Hearts Were Burning within Us: a Pastoral Plan for Adult Faith Formation in the United States (1999),
which is available online at: www.usccb.org/education/ourhearts.htm or in book form from the United States
Conference of Catholic Bishops (hereafter USCCB), ISBN: 978-1-57455-299-7

National Directory for Catechesis (hereafter NDC) published by the USCCB in 2005 ISBN 1-57455-443-3.
For an outline of adult faith formation themes in the NDC, see Appendix X.


Catechisms

These books can be obtained through a bookstore or online at USCCB Publishing at
www.usccbpublishing.org/index.cfm

Catechism of the Catholic Church. (Second Edition) (1997)
ISBN 978-1-57455-110-5 (paperback)
This is the universal catechism of the Church, intended as a resource for bishops writing national
catechisms and as a full, complete exposition of Catholic doctrine, enabling everyone to know what the
Church professes, celebrates, lives, and prays in her daily life.

Compendium of the Catechism of the Catholic Church. (2006)
ISBN 1-57455-720-6 (paperback)
An official summary of the universal catechism in question-and-answer form.

United States Catholic Catechism for Adults. (2006)
ISBN 1-57455-450-2 paperback)
This catechism was prepared by the U.S. bishops based on the universal catechism, adapting the
presentation to the culture and circumstances of the Church in the U.S.

Compendium of the Social Doctrine of the Church. (2005)
ISBN 978-1-57455-692-6 (paperback)
Prepared by the Pontifical Council for Justice and Peace



Adult Faith Formation


Adult Faith Formation Strategies, Tom Zanzig & Shirley Kelter (Metanoia Resources, 2006) Available
through Zanzigs website at www.tomzanzig.com/Site/AFFS_Product_page.html
Topics covered in the manual: Jesus & Discipleship, Spirituality, Scripture, Catholic Life & Practice,
Sacraments & Liturgy, Morality and Peace and Social Justice

A Concise Guide to Adult Faith Formation, Neil A. Parent (Ave Maria Press, 2009) ISBN 978-1594712081

A Handbook of Adult Religious Education, ed. Nancy T. Foltz (Religious Education Press)
Essays from an interdenominational Christian perspective.

A Practical Guide for Starting an Adult Faith Formation Program, Richard C. Brown (Resource Publications,
2003) ISBN 978-0893905729

Toward An Adult Church: A Vision of Faith Formation, Jane E. Regan (Loyola Press, 2002) ISBN 978-
0829418064







Scripture

There are many different translations (versions) of the Bible, and each may be published by different
companies in a multitude of editions.
The New American Bible (hereafter NAB) was commissioned by the U.S. bishops, and is the translation
that we hear at Sunday Masses. One fine study Bible is:

The Catholic Study Bible, Second Edition. Oxford University Press. (New American Bible)
978-0195282788 (paperback) 978-0195282801 (hardcover)

The text of the New American Bible is also available online at the U.S. bishops' website:
www.usccb.org/nab/bible

There are many introductions to the Bible. Here are a few:

The Seekers Guide to Reading the Bible: A Catholic View, Steve Mueller (Loyola, 1999) ISBN 978-
0829413458

People of the Covenant: An Invitation to the Old Testament, Diane Bergant, CSA. (Sheed & Ward, 2001)
ISBN 978-1580510905

Who Is Jesus? Why Is He Important?: An Introduction to the New Testament, Daniel J. Harrington, SJ.
(Sheed & Ward, 1999) ISBN 978-1580510530

The Bible Companion: A Handbook for Beginners, Ronald D. Witherup (Crossroad, 1998) ISBN 0-8245-
1746-6

On how fundamentalism differs from a Catholic approach to the Bible: Biblical Fundamentalism: What
Every Catholic Should Know, Ronald D. Witherup, S.S. (Liturgical Press, 2001) ISBN 978-0814627228

The Collegeville Bible Commentary offers 35 small paperback volumes, each featuring the NAB text of a
biblical book or books, along with a commentary. They are used by the Little Rock Scripture Study. Two
classic and detailed commentaries that can be used for reference are:

Raymond E. Brown, S. S. et. al., eds. The New Jerome Biblical Commentary. Prentice Hall, 1990.

Raymond E. Brown, S. S. An Introduction to the New Testament. Doubleday.

For more information on Catholic Scripture Studies, see Task 1 Section B-1 above for:
Little Rock Scripture Study www.littlerockscripture.org

Journey Through Scripture, St. Paul Center for Biblical Theology, 2006. Series incorporates live presentation,
multimedia, small group discussion and some outside reading. Its a way for ordinary Catholics to grow in
their knowledge of the Scriptures while deepening their understanding of the riches of the Catholic faith. It is
comprised of four different studies: Genesis to Jesus, The Bible and the Mass, The Bible and the Sacraments,
and The Bible and the Virgin Mary.
One helpful resource for orienting people to the Bible is the July 2004 edition of Catholic Update, Choosing
and Using a Bible: What Catholics Should Know by Ronald D. Witherup. It includes information on
different translations and tips on reading, praying, and studying the Bible.

Lectionary-Based Resources

One common way of studying or reflecting on the Scriptures is through attending to the Sunday readings (the
Lectionary). Many Catholic publishers offer resources based on the lectionary. Sometimes an edition is
published for each cycle of the Sunday readings (A, B, or C). Other resources are published annually. A few:

At Home With the Word (Liturgy Training Publications)
Published each year, this resource includes the texts of Scriptures for each Sunday (including the psalm), a
suggested practice, and a reflection accompanied by questions.

Celebrating the Lectionary (Liturgy Training Publications)
Includes specific adult directed activities and format for adults to easily follow a step by step process in
utilizing the materials. With this adult guide are summaries and commentaries on the Sunday Scriptures
for each cycle.

Faith Connection newsletter (RCL Benziger)
A weekly newsletter which can be presented as email, regular mail or bulletin insert. Includes reflections,
prayers, information and questions on the themes of the Sunday and daily readings.


The Word into Life, a Redemptorist Pastoral Publication (Liguori)
Sunday readings (but not the psalms) and reflections, with one volume for each cycle. Cross-referenced
with the Journey of Faith handouts (see Sect. III. E. RCIA below) for a lectionary-based approach to CIA
instruction.








Gods
Holy
Word

Liturgy and Liturgical Catechesis


Days of the Lord (Liturgical Press)
Seven volumes covering the liturgical year, solemnities and feasts. www.litpress.org/Series.aspx?ID=7

Introducing Liturgical Catechesis: Formation Sessions for the Parish, Nick Wagner (Resource Publications,
May 2002) ISBN 0-89390-669-7 Available as an e-book from the publisher in pdf format:
www.rpinet.com/products/ilc.html

Living Liturgy, Joyce Ann Zimmerman, CPPS, Thomas A. Greisen, Kathleen Harmon, SNDdeN, and Thomas
L. Leclerc, MS
An annual resource for parish ministers, liturgists, pastors, and planning committees, Living Liturgy
offers a practical means for reflection on and celebration of the Sunday Mass (Liturgical Press website)
designed to integrate spirituality, celebration and catechesis for Sundays.











Prayer


Any major Catholic publisher will have many titles relating to prayer and spiritual growth. (See the list of
publishers below.)

One author who writes clear and practical works on prayer is William A. Barry, a Jesuit priest and spiritual
director. His books are written primarily from the spiritual tradition of St. Ignatius Loyola.

God and You: Prayer as a Personal Relationship (Paulist, 1987) ISBN 0-8091-2935-3

Paying Attention to God: Discernment in Prayer (Ave Maria Press, 1990)
ISBN 0877934134

With An Everlasting Love: Developing an Intimate Relationship with God
(Paulist, 1999) ISBN 0-8091-3892-1

A Friendship Like No Other (Loyola Books, 2008) ISBN 978-0829427028

Many Christians have become interested in the ancient tradition of meditation that in its modern form is
known as Centering Prayer. Two of the most prominent people working to spread this prayer have been Basil
Pennington and Thomas Keating. They have published many works on the topic.

An Invitation to Centering Prayer, M. Basil Pennington, O.C.S.O. (Liguori, 2001)
ISBN 0-7648-0762-X [This book also contains an introduction to Iectio divina (the ancient practice of
sacred reading) by Luke Dysinger, O.S.B.]

Contemplative Outreach is an organization formed to renew the Christian contemplative heritage through
sharing the method of Centering Prayer with all who wish to learn. (From the site)
www.contemplativeoutreach.org

For family or household use, Catholic Household Blessings and Prayers is available from the United
States Conference of Catholic Bishops, Publication No. 5-645 ISBN 978-1-57455-645-2. Order it online
at www.usccbpublishing.org

For reflections and prayers on themes related to justice, see Living Gods Justice compiled by the
Roundtable Association of Diocesan Social Action Directors (St. Anthony Messenger Press, 2006) ISBN
978-0-86716-742-9

There must be an enormous number of online aids to prayer. Here are two:

Creighton Universitys Online Ministries feature daily readings and reflections, guides for prayer during
Advent and Lent, and a 39-week Online Retreat, all in the tradition of St. Ignatius Loyola (founder of the
Jesuit religious order):
www.creighton.edu/CollaborativeMinistry/online.html

The Irish Jesuits have a site called Sacred SpaceDaily Prayer Online, that features a form of lectio
divina: www.sacredspace.ie

RCIA


Breaking Open the Word of God, Karen Hinman Powell and Joseph Sinwell (Paulist, 1988).
Resources for using the Lectionary for catechesis in the RCIA - one book per cycle.

Catholic Q & A: Answers to the Most Common Questions About Catholicism, Fr. John J. Dietzen (Crossroad,
2002) ISBN 0-8245-2309-1

Compendium of Catechism of the Catholic Church, (USCCB, 2006) ISBN10-1-5745720-3

Foundations in Faith is RCL Benzigers collection of RCIA resources. It includes a Directors Guide,
leaders guides for each period of the RCIA, participants books and other resources:
rclweb.com/html/foundations.html.

Journey of Faith, published by Liguori, is a series of 44 four-page handouts that cover topics for all four
stages of the RCIA. They are inexpensive, and a brief leaders guide is available. The series is also
available in versions for children and teens. All are available at the Liguori website, www.liguori.org.

Rite of Christian Initiation of Adults, Study Edition (Liturgical Press, 1988)
ISBN 978-0-8146-1593-5

United States Catholic Catechism for Adults, (USCCB, 2006) ISBN10-1-57455-450-6

What Catholics Believe, Fr. Kris D. Stubna and Mike Aquilina (Our Sunday Visitor Publishing Division,
1999) ISBN 0-87973-574-0








Catholic Publishers


Ascension Press
PO Box 1990
West Chester, PA 19380
1-800-375-0520
www.ascensionpress.com
Loyola Press
3441 North Ashland Ave.
Chicago, IL 60657
800-621-1008
www.loyolapress.com
Ave Maria Press
PO Box 428
Notre Dame, IN 46556
800-282-1865, x-1
www.avemariapress.com
Our Sunday Visitor
200 Noll Plaza
Huntington, IN 46750
1-800-348-2440
www.osv.com
Ignatius Press
PO Box 1339
Ft. Collins, CO 80522
1-800-651-1531
www.ignatius.com
Paulist Press
997 Macarthur Blvd.
Mahwah, NJ 07340
800-218-1903
www.paulistpress.com
Liguori Publications
One Liguori Drive
Liguori, MO 63057-9999
800-325-9521
www.liguori.org
RCL Benziger
206 East Bethany Drive
Allen, Texas 75002-3804
1-877-275-4725
www.RCLBenziger.com
Liturgical Press
St. Johns Abbey
PO Box 7500
Collegeville, MN 56321-7500
800-858-5450
www.litpress.org
St. Anthony Messenger Press
28 W. Liberty St.
Cincinnati, OH 45202-6498
513-241-5615
800-488-0488
www.americancatholic.org
Liturgy Training Publications
3949 South Racine Avenue
Chicago, Illinois 60609-2523
1-800-933-1800
www.ltp.org
Twenty-Third Publications
1 Montauk Ave #200
New London, CT 06320
860-437-3012
www.pastoralplanning.com



Periodic Resources


Catholic Update provides readable four-page pamphlets on a variety of topics concerning Catholic life. It is
published by St. Anthony Messenger Press. Subscriptions or particular issues may be ordered at 1-800-
488-0488, or visit www.AmericanCatholic.org

Every Day Catholic published by St. Anthony Messenger Press
A monthly publication on various topics that relate to faith. The publishers provide a group process on
their website that makes it easy to lead a group.
www.catalog.americancatholic.org/category.aspx?pcat=167

At Home with our Faith: Nurturing the spirituality of your family, Annemarie Scobey, published by the
Claretians www.homefaith.wordpress.about








Catholic Periodicals


Many of these have websites with online editions. Use them for your own growth and to recommend to
parishioners.

The Pittsburgh Catholic (weekly diocesan newspaper)
www.pittsburghcatholic.org

Origins CNS (Catholic News Service) Documentary Service

Our Sunday Visitor (a weekly newspaper published by a Catholic non-profit organization)
www.osv.com

America (a magazine published 39 times a year by the Jesuits)
www.americamagazine.org

Commonweal (an independent journal of opinion published 22 times a year by Lay Catholics)
www.commonwealmagazine.org

The Liguorian (a magazine published 10 times a year by the Redemptorists) www.liguori.org

St. Anthony Messenger (published 12 times a year by the Franciscans)
www.americancatholic.org

The Catholic World Report (published 12 times a year by Ignatius Press) www.catholicworldreport.com

The Sower (published 4 times a year by Catechetical Publications) www.thesowerreview.org

Lay Witness (published 6 times a year by Catholics United for the Faith) www.laywitness@cuf.org



Online Resources


Official Sites

The Diocese of Pittsburgh: www.diopitt.org

The Pennsylvania Catholic Conference: www.pacatholic.org
The Conference is the public affairs arm of Pennsylvanias Catholic bishops and the Catholic dioceses of
Pennsylvania.

The United States Conference of Catholic Bishops: www.usccb.org
The USCCB is the official organization of the Catholic bishops in the United States. The USCCB also
sponsors a website called "For Your Marriage": www.foryourmarriage.org

The Holy See: www.vatican.va
The Vatican website.

Other Sites

Busted Halo: www.bustedhalo.com
An online magazine for young adult spiritual seekers, sponsored by the Paulist Fathers.

The Catholic Mens Fellowship of Pittsburgh: www.cmfpitt.org
CMF is a private association of the laity operating and functioning in accordance with the Code of Canon
Law and the blessings of the Church in Pittsburgh (A lay apostolate). The mission of the CMF is a
response to the call made by Pope John Paul II, for a new evangelization, particularly the reinvigoration of
faith among Catholics.

National Conference for Catechetical Leadership: www.nccl.org
The only independent national organization exclusively dedicated to serving the church's catechetical
mission in the United States. More than 90% of all dioceses are members of NCCL, along with 30 parish
DRE Associations and 26 publishing houses. The site includes an extensive bibliography of adult faith
formation resources.
















Houses of Prayer


Mount Saint Macrina House of Prayer
724-438-7149

Fax: 724-438-3048
E-mail: hpmsm@verizon.net

510 W. Main St, PO Box 878, Uniontown, PA 15401-0878
Director: Sister Carol Petrasovich, OSBM
Contact: Kim Show

Days and evenings of prayer.
Retreatsprivate, directed, and weekend. Programs designed to accommodate needs.
Follows Byzantine tradition but open to all Christian groups.











Tabor House of Prayer
412-821-1149

E-mail: TaborHouse@sosf.org

146 Hawthorne Rd, Pittsburgh, PA 15209-1900

Director: Sister Jane Schmitt, OSF

Individual or group needs for prayer; guided, private, or directed retreats; Scripture Study; a gathering place
for centering prayer; introduction to centering prayer; writing of Icons.











Retreat Houses


Bishop William G. Connare Center
724-834-7350
Fax: 724-834-7351

Web Site: www.bishopconnarecenter.org
E-mail: jbertig@dioceseofgreensburg.org OR akuhns@dioceseofgreensburg.org

2900 Seminary Dr, Route 30 East, Greensburg, PA 15601-3796

Contact: Gerald R. Bertig, Director
Amy Kuhns, Office & Events Coordinator
Cindy Tierno, Administrative Services Specialist

Hosts group retreats, conferences, seminars, camps. Overnight accommodations for 104 people in private,
double, or triple occupancy rooms. Conference spaces include two large rooms that can accommodate up to
170 and 200 persons, two rooms with capacities of 50 and 80, and a parlor for socials and small meetings.
Meeting tables and equipment, including a Smart Board, are available; setup styles arranged according to
need. Dining room seats up to 240; in-house food service with reputation for excellent cuisine. Chapel
accommodates 322. Recreational facilities available, including gymnasium. Nestled atop 170 sylvan acres in
the foothills of the beautiful Laurel Highlands in Westmoreland County.


Saint Emma Monastic Guest House
724-834-3060
Fax: 724-834-5772

Web Site: www.stemma.org
E-mail: benedictinenuns@stemma.org

1001 Harvey Ave, Greensburg, PA 15601-1494
Contact: Mother Mary Anne Noll, OSB

Offers the opportunity to come aside and rest awhile in a God-centered atmosphere, surrounded by trees
and meadows, a two-minute walk from Saint Emma Monastery (and Retreat House). The time is yours to
structure: to think, to pray, to be, to let God recharge your batteries, to experience peace and quiet, and to
spend time with God in silence and prayer. Welcome to join our Benedictine monastic community for The
Liturgy of the Hours which is sung (in English) six times a day plus daily Eucharist. This facility is also
available for small groups. The Monastic Guest House consists of nine private rooms (each with bath),
oratory, living room/dining room, kitchen, laundry facilities, and air conditioning throughout. Meals and
linens are provided. Retreatants are welcome to enjoy beautifully landscaped grounds with shrines and lovely
flower gardens, overlooking rolling farmlands. Outdoor Stations of the Cross wind through apple orchard.
Walking path as well as nature trail with meditation benches. Rosary walk (all 20 mysteries of the Rosary)
winds around walking path and extends up nature trail. Very large Catholic gift and book shop.

Saint Emma Retreat House
724-834-3060
Fax: 724-834-5772

Web Site: www.stemma.org
E-mail: benedictinenuns@stemma.org

1001 Harvey Ave., Greensburg, PA 15601-1494
Contact: Mother Mary Anne Noll, OSB

Available for: weekend retreats; days and evenings of recollection; pastoral councils; youth; church groups;
church meetings. Facilities include 50 private rooms, each with single bed, ceiling fan and sink
(restrooms/showers at end of hall); lounge (for 50) with fireplace; small conference rooms; Fatima Chapel
(for 100). Newly expanded and renovated facilities include: total handicapped accessibility with four-story
elevator; conference room for 90 with fireplace; conference room for 45; conference room for 12; renovated
dining room (seats 100); handicapped showers/restrooms. Situated on beautifully landscaped grounds with
lovely flower gardens, overlooking 100 acres of rolling farmlands. Outdoor Stations of the Cross wind
through apple orchard. Walking path as well as nature trail with meditation benches. Rosary walk (all 20
mysteries of the Rosary) winds around walking path and extends up nature trail. Very large Catholic gift and
book shop. Individuals are welcome to come for their own personal retreats. Groups/individuals are welcome
to join us for The Liturgy of the Hours which is sung (in English) six times a day plus daily Eucharist.


Epiphany Association/Epiphany Academy
412-341-7494
1-877-324-6873 (Toll Free)
Fax: 412-341-7495

Web site: www.epiphanyassociation.org
E-mail: info@epiphanyassociation.org

820 Crane Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15216-3050
Contact: Susan Muto, Executive Director

An organization dedicated to providing the formational and educational resources needed for the in-depth,
ongoing spiritual renewal of life and world in the light of the Judeo-Christian faith and formation tradition.
The Epiphany Academy of Formative Spirituality, which sprang from the Epiphany Association and its
programs, offers an oasis for quiet reflection and religious education from classes on the Christian mystics
and spiritual masters to many opportunities for personal and spiritual enrichment. The academy features a
modern facility with a multipurpose room, classrooms, kitchen and dining area, the Epiphany Chapel of the
Trinity, a video conference room, and lush gardens and landscaping.







Franciscan Spirit and Life Center
412-881-9207

Website: www.osfprov.org/fslc.asp
E-mail: fslc@osfprov.org

3605 McRoberts Rd, Pittsburgh, PA 15234-2340
Contact: Mimi DiGregory
Office and Dietary Service Coordinator: Mimi DiGregory

A ministry of the Sisters of Saint Francis of the Providence of God. Available for retreats, meetings, seminars,
and workshops. Day and evening programs and overnight facilities available. Three hermitages in wooded
area available for days/weekends/week of prayer or retreat. Programs on the Road staff available for
programs at your site.


Gilmary Center
412-264-8400
Fax: 412-264-8415

Web Site: www.gilmarycenter.org
E-mail: info@gilmarycenter.org
601 Flaugherty Run Rd, Coraopolis, PA 15108-3899
Regis Flaherty, Director, x202
Lilli Wolfe, Administration and Scheduling, x201

Gilmary Center, located 5 minutes from the Greater Pittsburgh Airport, is a nonprofit retreat center owned and
operated by Maronda Foundation. Our name, Gilmary, can be translated belonging of Mary. It is to her
that our center and our work are dedicated. Gilmarys primary goal is to promote the spiritual, moral,
intellectual, and physical development of Catholic youth and to support Catholic families. Gilmary also seeks
to help individuals to better know, love and serve God in the heart of the Church. To that end Gilmary hosts
retreats and events that support Catholic youth, families and individuals. We provide the following: Mary
Hall (air conditioned) with 46 semi-private bedrooms and 2 private bedrooms; dining room with seating for
150; air conditioned meeting rooms; an auditorium/gym with seating for 325; Chapel that accommodates 220;
two dorm buildings with a total of 24 rooms sleeping 120; 4 private bedrooms, and 1 handicap accessible
bedroom; beautiful and peaceful grounds; outdoor Stations of the Cross; and areas for sports and recreation.
We look forward to serving you!










Saint Joseph Spirituality Center
724-869-6585
Fax: 724-869-3336

Web Site: www.stjoseph-baden.org

1020 W State St, Baden, PA 15005-1338
Sponsored by the Sisters of Saint Joseph
Staffed by Sister Marguerite Kropinak, CSJ / Sister Donna Marie Tahaney, CSJ
Contact: Sister Marguerite Kropinak, CSJ

Saint Joseph Spirituality Center welcomes all people seeking a deeper and more profound love of God and
neighbor by providing an environment of prayer, community, and hospitality. Located 30 minutes from
downtown Pittsburgh at the Motherhouse of the Sisters of Saint Joseph in Baden, PA, the Center provides a
welcoming environment and a prayerful atmosphere with extensive space for walking, reflection, and
renewal. The Center is available for days and evenings of reflection; directed and guided retreats; individual
spiritual direction; private, non-directed retreats; group retreats; and in-service days. Saint Joseph Spirituality
Center provides three meeting rooms (accommodating groups from 10-120). Some overnight
accommodations are available. The facilities at the Motherhouse include an air-conditioned chapel, a main
dining room, a book and gift shop, a small library, a labyrinth, and an outdoor station path. An elevator allows
for easy accessibility. The Center also provides spirituality, faith formation, and ministry support programs in
parishes.


Kearns Spirituality Center
412-366-1124
Fax: 412-635-6318

Web site: www.DivineProvidenceWeb.org
E-mail: kearnssc1@pghcdp.org

9000 Babcock Blvd, Allison Park, PA 15101-2713
Sponsored by the Sisters of Divine Providence
Contact: Sister Agnes Raible, CDP/Sister Mary Joan Coultas, CDP

Kearns shares in the mission of the congregation: to make Gods Providence more visible in our world. It is
a smoke free facility, accessible to the physically challenged, where people of all faiths are invited to search
for a deeper meaning in their lives, and to experience a peaceful, healing environment. Programs focusing on
holistic spirituality are offered from September to June. The retreat center is completely air conditioned, and
has overnight accommodations for 60 people. The air conditioned conference center seats 200 at round tables
and 250 auditorium style. Food service is available. Individuals as well as groups are welcome for private
prayer, retreats, workshops, planning sessions, and religious conferences. Spiritual direction and labyrinth
experience are available.






Martina Spiritual Renewal Center
412-931-9766
Fax: 412-931-1823

Web site: www.sistersoftheholyspirit.com
E-mail: martinaspiritual@verizon.net
5244 Clarwin Ave, Pittsburgh, PA 15229-2208
Staffed by the Sisters of the Holy Spirit
Contact: Sister Donna Smith, SHS/Sister Mary Lou Witkowski, SHS, Co-Directors

Martina Spiritual Renewal Center is a ministry of the Sisters of the Holy Spirit, providing gospel hospitality
through a welcoming presence of our staff, offering Christian programming, and hosting Christian ecumenical
groups desiring growth and renewal in their spiritual life. We offer weekend and week-long retreats, days and
evenings of spiritual enrichment, group spiritual direction gatherings, adult faith formation programs,
women/men religious community retreats, private days of prayer, private retreats. We host spiritual formation
and renewal programs: confirmation programs, staff and planning meetings, marriage preparation, in-service
days of recollection, staff retreats, parish council retreats, seminary retreats, college break retreats, vocation
retreats, days of reflection. Chapel, meditative garden, outdoor Stations of the Cross, quiet, lovely grounds, 32
single rooms, two semiprivate rooms, air-conditioning, food service, library, gift shop, four meeting rooms
(10-40 people), dining room/meeting room (200 people), all-purpose auditorium/gym (300 people), smoke-
free environment. Come and be at peace.



Mount Saint Macrina Retreat Center
(See Mount Saint Macrina House of Prayer)






















Saint Paul of the Cross Retreat Center
412-381-7676
Fax: 412-431-3044

Website: www.catholic-church.org/stpaulsretreatcenter/
E-mail: stpaulrcpa@cpprov.org

148 Monastery Ave, Pittsburgh, PA 15203-1498

Staffed by Very Rev. Gerald Laba, CP/Rev. Patrick Geinzer, CP
Director: Very Rev. Gerald Laba, CP
Associate Director: Rev. Patrick Geinzer, CP
Business Administrator: John Colaizzi
Auxiliary Retreat Staff: Rev. Timothy Fitzgerald, CP,
Rev. Paul Vaeth, CP and Rev. Don Ware, CP

Contact: John Colaizzi

Adult weekend retreat program. Mid-week adult program of spiritual development. Mid-week youth program
for confirmation and graduation. Recovery programs and weekend retreats for those in twelve-step recovery.
Hosting facility for diocesan, ecumenical, and other nonprofit organizations. Facilities include: 135 beds for
overnight guests, 5 conference areas, chapel, and full dining room service.


Providence Villa
724-444-8055
Fax: 724-444-8058

Web Site: www.divineprovidenceweb.org
E-mail: providencevilla@yahoo.com

10745 Babcock Blvd, Gibsonia, PA 15044-6094

Sponsored by the Sisters of Divine Providence
Contact: Sister Marilyn Seidel, CDP, Director; or Sister Leona Ulewicz, CDP.

Providence Villa provides a reflective environment conducive to spiritual pursuits. As an expression of the
Providence of God, Providence Villa welcomes individuals and small groups through a ministry of
compassionate hospitality. Amenities include: comfortable accommodations, food service, meeting rooms,
audio-visual equipment, conference phone system, wireless Internet, 15 bedrooms, quiet chapel, wood
burning fireplaces, spacious lawn, screened-in gazebo and wooded trails.







The Spiritan Center - Formation, Retreat, Renewal
412-835-3510
Fax: 412-835-3541

Web Site: www.spiritans.org
E-mail: spiritancenter@juno.com

6230 Brush Run Rd, Bethel Park, PA 15102-2214

Staffed by the Congregation of the Holy Spirit
Director and Contact: Mary Ann Nicholls, MLS, MDiv

The Spiritan Center, located south of the city of Pittsburgh in Bethel Park, is a ministry of the Congregation of
the Holy Spirit. The Center offers a wide variety of retreats, days of renewal, programs in faith formation, and
ongoing spiritual direction. Our 40 acres in a pastoral setting invite the retreatant to come away and rest
awhile.



Villa Maria Education and Spirituality Center
724-964-8886

Web Site: www.villaprograms.org

2105 Evergreen Rd, PO Box 424, Villa Maria, PA 16155-0424

President: Jim Merhaut
Staffed by 6 Sisters of the Humility of Mary and 9 Lay Staff
Contact: Cathy Cawley or Matt Abramowski

Villa Maria Education & Spirituality Center (VMESC) provides and promotes educational and spiritual
experiences in a unique setting in Lawrence County for people of all ages. Come to our 726 acre sacred
setting where Gods grace is nurtured and abundant life unfolds. We seek to inspire lifelong learning and
growth through relationships with God, others, self, and earth. We design retreats and educational programs to
fit the needs of your parish or school. We are also happy to offer hospitality to your group with your own
facilitators and programs. Our facilities include two chapels, multiple meeting rooms, overnight
accommodations, indoor swimming pool, three dining rooms with professional food service, state of the art
A.V. equipment, gymnasium, walking trails, pond, picnic areas and more.









Saint Vincent Archabbey
724-805-2139

Website: www.saintvincentretreats.org/
E-mail: hugh.lester@email.stvincent.edu

300 Fraser Purchase Rd , Latrobe, PA 15650-2690

Staffed by the Benedictine monks of Saint Vincent Archabbey
Contact: Brother Hugh Lester, OSB


Preached group retreats conducted during the summer only.