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Tedds 2014 Engineering Library United Kingdom

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Tedds 2014
Engineering Library
United Kingdom

Tedds 2014 Engineering Library United Kingdom
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2D frame analysis ....................................................................................................................................................................... 6
2D Frame analysis Frame Wizard .............................................................................................................................................. 7
2D Frame analysis Truss Wizard ................................................................................................................................................ 8
2D Frame analysis Member Wizard ........................................................................................................................................... 9
Beam analysis .......................................................................................................................................................................... 10
Beam end connection design (BS5950) ................................................................................................................................... 11
Bearing pressures for rectangular footings with biaxial uplift .................................................................................................... 12
Bolt group analysis ................................................................................................................................................................... 13
Bolted cover plate splice connection (BS5950) ........................................................................................................................ 14
Boundary column fire design (SCI-P-313) ................................................................................................................................ 15
Cold formed thin gauge section design (BS5950) .................................................................................................................... 16
Column base plate design (EN1993) ........................................................................................................................................ 17
Column base plate design (BS5950) ........................................................................................................................................ 18
Column load chase down (BS6399) ......................................................................................................................................... 19
Column splice design (BS5950) ............................................................................................................................................... 20
Composite beam design (BS5950) ........................................................................................................................................... 21
Compound section properties ................................................................................................................................................... 22
Concrete industrial ground floor design (TR34) ........................................................................................................................ 23
Concrete specification (BS8500) .............................................................................................................................................. 24
Concrete sub-frame analysis (BS8110) .................................................................................................................................... 25
Co-ordinate conversion............................................................................................................................................................. 26
Crane gantry girder design (BS5950) ....................................................................................................................................... 28
Cut and fill ................................................................................................................................................................................. 30
Dead loading ............................................................................................................................................................................ 31
Design rainfall (The Wallingford Procedure) ............................................................................................................................. 32
Surface water drain and foul sewer design ............................................................................................................................... 33
Footway design (DMRB7)......................................................................................................................................................... 34
Foundation analysis and design (EN1992/EN1997) ................................................................................................................. 35
Foundations near trees (NHBC) ............................................................................................................................................... 37
Gabion retaining wall analysis and design (BS8002) ................................................................................................................ 38
Gable framing analysis and design (BS5950) ........................................................................................................................... 39
General member safe load tables (BS5950)............................................................................................................................. 41
Hipped end loading ................................................................................................................................................................... 42
Historical steelwork assessment ............................................................................................................................................... 43
Holding down bolt design.......................................................................................................................................................... 44
Horizontal and vertical highway alignment (TD9/93) ................................................................................................................ 45
Infiltration system design (SUDS) ............................................................................................................................................. 46
Lintel analysis (BS5977) ........................................................................................................................................................... 47
Masonry bearing design (BS5628) ........................................................................................................................................... 48
Tedds 2014 Engineering Library United Kingdom
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Masonry column design (EN1996) ........................................................................................................................................... 49
Masonry column design (BS5628) ............................................................................................................................................ 50
Masonry wall panel design (EN1996) ....................................................................................................................................... 51
Masonry wall panel design (BS5628) ....................................................................................................................................... 52
Notional load chase down......................................................................................................................................................... 53
Open channel flow .................................................................................................................................................................... 54
Pad footing analysis and design (BS8110) ............................................................................................................................... 55
Pavement design (DMRB7) ...................................................................................................................................................... 56
Pile analysis (EN1997) ............................................................................................................................................................. 57
RC beam analysis & design (EN1992) ..................................................................................................................................... 58
RC beam analysis & design (BS8110) ..................................................................................................................................... 59
RC beam torsion design (BS8110) ........................................................................................................................................... 60
RC column design (EN1992) .................................................................................................................................................... 61
RC column design (BS 8110) ................................................................................................................................................... 62
RC crack width (BS8110) ......................................................................................................................................................... 63
RC deep beam analysis and design (BS8110) ......................................................................................................................... 64
RC flat slab design (BS8110) ................................................................................................................................................... 65
RC pad footing uplift (BS8110) RC pad footing horizontal capacity (BS8110).......................................................................... 66
RC pile cap design (BS8110) ................................................................................................................................................... 67
RC raft foundation (BS8110) .................................................................................................................................................... 68
RC slab design (EN1992) ......................................................................................................................................................... 69
RC slab design (BS8110) ......................................................................................................................................................... 70
RC stair design (BS8110) ......................................................................................................................................................... 71
RC thermal crack width (BS8007) ............................................................................................................................................ 72
RC wall design (EN1992) ......................................................................................................................................................... 73
RC wall design (BS8110).......................................................................................................................................................... 74
Reinforcement schedule (BS8666) ........................................................................................................................................... 75
Retaining wall analysis & design (EN1992/EN1996/EN1997) .................................................................................................. 76
Retaining wall analysis and design (BS8002) ........................................................................................................................... 78
Retaining wall design (CP2) ..................................................................................................................................................... 79
Rigid diaphragm force distribution ............................................................................................................................................ 80
Rolling load analysis ................................................................................................................................................................. 81
Section properties calculator .................................................................................................................................................... 82
Simple column safe load tables (BS5950) ................................................................................................................................ 83
Slope stability - slip circle analysis ............................................................................................................................................ 84
Snow loading (EN1991) ............................................................................................................................................................ 85
Snow loading (BS6399) ............................................................................................................................................................ 86
Soakaway design (BRE digest 365 / SUDS) ............................................................................................................................ 87
Steel angle design (BS5950) .................................................................................................................................................... 88
Tedds 2014 Engineering Library United Kingdom
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Steel beam analysis & design (EN1993) Steel member design (EN1993) ............................................................................... 89
Steel beam analysis & design (BS5950) Steel member design (BS5950) ................................................................................ 90
Steel beam torsion design (SCI-P-057) .................................................................................................................................... 91
Steel column design (EN1993) ................................................................................................................................................. 92
Steel masonry support (BS5950) .............................................................................................................................................. 93
Steel sheet piling design (BS8002) ........................................................................................................................................... 94
Stormwater drainage ................................................................................................................................................................ 96
Stormwater attenuation design ................................................................................................................................................. 97
Stress skin panel design (BS5268) ........................................................................................................................................... 98
Strip footing analysis and design (BS8110) ............................................................................................................................ 100
Surface wind load (BS6399) ................................................................................................................................................... 101
Swale and filter strip design .................................................................................................................................................... 102
Timber, glulam and flitch member design (EN1995) ............................................................................................................... 103
Timber, glulam, composite, flitch and ply web member design (BS5268)............................................................................... 104
Timber connection design (BS5268) ...................................................................................................................................... 105
Timber frame racking loads (BS6399) .................................................................................................................................... 106
Timber frame racking panel design (EN1995) ........................................................................................................................ 107
Timber frame racking panel design (BS5268) ........................................................................................................................ 109
Timber joist design (BS5268) ................................................................................................................................................. 110
Timber rafter design (BS5268) ............................................................................................................................................... 111
Timber stud design (BS5268) ................................................................................................................................................. 112
Trial pit and borehole logging (BS5930) ................................................................................................................................. 113
Underpinning needle beam design (BS8110) ......................................................................................................................... 114
Valley beam analysis & design (BS5950) ............................................................................................................................... 115
Vibration of floors (SCI-P-076/AD256) .................................................................................................................................... 116
Vibration of floors (SCI-P-354) ................................................................................................................................................ 118
Vibration of hospital floors (SCI-P-331) .................................................................................................................................. 120
Wall load chase down (BS6399) ............................................................................................................................................. 121
Wind girder analysis & design (BS5950) ................................................................................................................................ 122
Wind loading (EN1991)........................................................................................................................................................... 123
Wind loading (BS 6399) .......................................................................................................................................................... 124
Windpost design (BS5950) ..................................................................................................................................................... 125

Tedds 2014 Engineering Library United Kingdom
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Tedds 2014 Engineering Library United Kingdom
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2D frame analysis
Tedds calculation version 1.0.06
Scope
Calculation for the linear static analysis of 2D frames:
o Model 2D frames with unlimited nodes and elements
o View model geometry, loading and results for shear, moment, axial force, deflection and axial deflection
o Output node results for total base reactions, reactions and node deflections
o Output member or element results for shear, moment, axial force, deflection and axial deflection



1
6
1
8
1
3
1
51
6
1
7
1
8
1
9
2
1
Tedds 2014 Engineering Library United Kingdom
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2D Frame analysis Frame Wizard
Tedds calculation version 1.0.01
Scope
Creates analysis models of 2D frames which are then used to setup the 2D Frame analysis calculation.
The wizard allows you to define the basic properties of a frame based on the number of storeys, number of spans, etc. which
are then used to create a new 2D analysis model. The wizard will then run the 2D frame analysis calculation from where you
can refine your model, add loading information and finally obtain the analysis results as normal.
o 1-10 storeys
o 1-10 spans
o Flat or Pitched roofs
o Optional ground beam (with the option of 'n' springs for single span frames)

X
Z
7 8
9
1
0
1
1
1
2
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10 11
Tedds 2014 Engineering Library United Kingdom
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2D Frame analysis Truss Wizard
Tedds calculation version 1.0.02
Scope
Creates analysis models of 2D Trusses which are then used to setup the 2D Frame analysis calculation.
The wizard allows you to define the basic properties of a truss based on the shape, type, span, height etc. which are then used
to create a new 2D analysis model. The wizard will then run the 2D frame analysis calculation from where you can refine your
model, add loading information and finally obtain the analysis results as normal.
Truss shapes:
o Parallel Chord
o Monopitch Rafter
o Pitched Roof
o Floor/Roof
o Floor/Roof inverted
Truss types:
o Common
o Raised Tie
o King Post
o Queen Post (fan)
o Queen
o Attic
o Vierendeel
o Warren Girder
o Pratt
o Howe
o Fink


Tedds 2014 Engineering Library United Kingdom
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2D Frame analysis Member Wizard
Tedds calculation version 1.0.01
Scope
Creates an analysis model of a single member which is then used to setup the 2D Frame analysis calculation.
The wizard allows you to define the basic properties of a member based on the number of spans, angle, support conditions,
etc. which are then used to create a new 2D analysis model. The wizard will then run the 2D frame analysis calculation from
where you can refine your member, add loading information and finally obtain the analysis results as normal.
o 1-20 spans
o Beam, column or inclined member

X
Z
1
2
3
4
1
2
3
Tedds 2014 Engineering Library United Kingdom
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Beam analysis
Tedds calculation version 1.0.00
Scope
Analysis of simple and continuous beams of up to 10 spans.




General notes
The loading types available are point load, UDL, VDL, trapezoidal loading, partial UDL and point couple. The support conditions
available are fixed, pinned or spring. There are 8 user-definable load cases and 20 user-definable load combinations.
For timber members the calculated deflections do not include for design effect factors such as service class, section thickness,
load sharing and multi-ply member factors, nor is shear deflection calculated.
The Beam results option gives the worst load effects anywhere along the beam.
The Span results option gives the worst effects on each span, in which case detailed results are also available which give the
locations of the worst load effects, and the values of shear, moment and deflection at regular intervals along each span.
The subscript min on a variable indicates that it represents the most severe negative value, not the value that is numerically
nearest to zero. For support reactions, a negative value indicates an upward force acting on the beam. For beam results and
span results, sagging moments and downward deflection are both positive.
A specific material or section can be entered to be analysed, or a generic analysis can be done (with member stiffness
defaulted to arbitrary values). For pure bending deflections either a material must be selected (in which case the I and A values
are calculated and entered ), or the I and A values should be entered directly.
If the material selected is concrete or user defined timber, then the section properties (d and b) must be defined.
Tedds 2014 Engineering Library United Kingdom
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Beam end connection design (BS5950)
Tedds calculation version 2.0.11
Scope
Connection design for angle cleat, end plate and fin plate connections for beam to beam (single and double sided), beam to
column web (single and double sided) and beam to column flange configurations

References
Joints in Simple Construction Volume 1: Design Methods 2nd Edition (The BCSA/SCI Green Book) and updated in June 2000
for BS5950-1:2000.
General notes
For a single connection, the calculations perform a check design in accordance with each of the checks as defined in the
BCSA/SCI Green Book for the applied loads.
The calculations also consider the forces due to structural integrity if required.
As appropriate, user defined notches are considered in beam to beam connections
Tedds 2014 Engineering Library United Kingdom
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Bearing pressures for rectangular footings with biaxial uplift
Tedds calculation version 1.0.01
Scope
Calculation which determines the maximum bearing pressure acting on a rectangular footing.
The calculation also calculates the bearing pressure under each corner of the footing, the percentage of the footing area acting
in bearing and the location of the line of zero pressure.
The calculation also generates a sketch showing the arrangement of the footing indicating the position of the resultant, the
bearing pressure at the corners and the line of zero pressure if appropriate.

References
'Bearing Pressures for Rectangular Footings with Biaxial Uplift' by Kenneth E. Wilson, published in the Journal of Bridge
Engineering, Vol.2, No.1, February 1997.
General notes
The calculation determines the number of footing corners acting in bearing given the eccentricity of the resultant reaction.
For footings with either one or all of the corners acting in bearing the bearing pressures at each corner are determined using
standard equations.
For footings with either two or three corners acting in bearing the calculation uses an iterative process whereby the position of
the line of zero pressure is assumed. The eccentricity of the reaction resulting from the assumed line of zero pressure is
determined and compared to the actual eccentricity, based on this the line of zero pressure is amended and the process is
repeated. This process is repeated until the eccentricities coincide and a solution is found.
As an option the calculation will also determine the effective bearing pressure assuming that the reaction is carried uniformly
by an assumed equivalent rectangular base centred on the eccentricity of the base reaction.
As part of the output a bearing pressure diagram is generated. In this diagram the bearing area is shaded grey, the bearing
pressures at the corners of the footing are indicated and dimensions between the corners of the footing and line of zero
pressure are shown.
Lx/4 Lx/4
Lx
Lx/4
Lx/3
Lx/4
Lx/3 Lx/3
Ly/4
Ly/3
Ly
Ly/4
Ly/4
Ly/4
Ly/3
Ly/3
1
2
3
4
1
2
3
1 2
3
1 2
3
Figure 1. Numbers represent the number of footing corners acting in bearing
when centroid of applied load is located within that zone.
Tedds 2014 Engineering Library United Kingdom
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Bolt group analysis
Tedds calculation version 1.0.00
Scope
Calculates the shear force distribution across a group of bolts from an applied vertical and horizontal load.

Origin (0, 0)
Centre of gravity of bolt group (Xc, Yc)
Point of load application (X, Y)
Px
Py
dx Sx
dy
Sy
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Bolted cover plate splice connection (BS5950)
Tedds calculation version 1.0.05
Scope
Calculates the capacity of a bolted splice connection between two identical sections subjected to bending, shear and axial
forces, and formed using steel plates bolted to the flanges and web using high strength friction grip (HSFG) bolts.

References
From British Standard: Structural use of steelwork in building - Part 1: Code of practice for design - Rolled and welded sections
BS5950-1:2000 Incorporating Corrigendum No.1.
Plate to outside of top
flange showing four
rows of two bolts on
each side of the joint
Web plate showing three
rows of bolts, one bolt per
row on each side of the joint
Steel beam section
Plate to outside of
bottom flange
Plate to inside of bottom
flange showing four rows
of two bolts on each side
of the joint
Plate to inside
of top flange
Tedds 2014 Engineering Library United Kingdom
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Boundary column fire design (SCI-P-313)
Tedds calculation version 1.0.00
Scope
Analysis of single or multi-span, symmetrical pitched portal frames in fire boundary conditions under normal loading.
References
From SCI document SCI P313 Single Storey Steel Framed Buildings in Fire Boundary Conditions.
General notes
The validity of the portal frame geometry is checked, using the ratio L/h >1.0 (SCI guide cl 5.1)
The calculations determine the vertical and horizontal reactions and the overturning moment.
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Cold formed thin gauge section design (BS5950)
Tedds calculation version 1.1.14
Scope
The following sections/loading conditions and applicable combinations are covered:-
o Axial load (tension/compresion) - Plain channel, lipped channel, top hat, back-to-back plain channel, back-to-back
lipped channel
o Axial load (tension only) Angle
o Major axis bending - Plain channel, lipped channel, top hat, plain zed, lipped zed, back-to-back plain channel, back-to-
back lipped channel
o Minor axis bending - Plain channel, lipped channel, top hat, back-to-back lipped channel

References
This calculation is performed in accordance with BS5950-5:1998.
General notes
Section properties are derived from first principals in accordance with clause 3.5.1.
If the member is subject to axial compression, ie the axial force, F, is positive the effective lengths used to determine the
buckling capacity can be input directly or the user can opt for them to be calculated from the basic unrestrained length and the
end restraint conditions.
B
D
r
t
+ve My
b
c
d
y
bar
y
eff
y
bendyn
y
bendyp
x
bar
Lipped Channel
D
L
a
e
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Column base plate design (EN1993)
Tedds calculation version 1.0.01
Scope
Checks the design of a column base plate for bearing in the steel plate, the weld strengths and the shear resistance due to
friction for I, square hollow, rectangular hollow, circular hollow, channels, angles, back to back angles and T sections.
The base plate can be subject to compressive axial loads and shear forces.

References
Eurocode 3: Design of steel structures - Part 1-1:General rules and rules for buildings EN1993-1-1:2005 incorporating
Corrigenda dated February 2006 and April 2009.
UK National Annex NA to BS EN 1993-1-1:2005
Irish National Annex NA to IS EN 1993-1-1:2005
Singapore National Annex NA to SS EN 1993-1-1:2010
Malaysia National Annex NA to MS EN 1993-1-1:2010
Eurocode 2: Design of concrete structures - Part 1-1:General rules and rules for buildings EN1992-1-1:2004 incorporating
Corrigendum dated January 2008
UK National Annex NA to BS EN 1992-1-1:2004 incorporating National Amendment No.1
Irish National Annex NA to IS EN 1992-1-1:2005 incorporating Corrigendum No.1
Singapore National Annex NA to SS EN 1992-1-1:2008
Malaysia National Annex NA to MS EN 1992-1-1:2010
General notes
The calculation includes an auto design section which will minimise various dimensions of the plate according to limitations
specified within the calculation.
If a shear force is specified it is assumed to be resisted by friction between the base plate and the grout pad only.
Bolt clearance checks are undertaken for clashes between the section/base plate welds.
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Column base plate design (BS5950)
Tedds calculation version 1.0.09
Scope
Checks the design of base plates to BS5950 for the following situations:-
o Axial compression with no moment - I, H, RHS, SHS and CHS sections
o Moment about the major axis - I, H, RHS and SHS sections
o Moment about the minor axis - RHS sections only
o Axial tension with or without moment - I, H, RHS and SHS sections
For all the above situations the calculation will also check the resistance to an applied shear force.

References
From British Standard: Structural use of steelwork in building - Part 1: Code of practice for design - Rolled and welded sections
BS5950-1:2000 Incorporating Corrigendum No.1.
General notes
For columns with axial compression and no bending moment the calculation determines the minimum size of base plate
required to transmit the force into the foundations. The calculations use the effective area method approach of BS 5950-
1:2000 cl 4.13.2. The calculations incorporate the column section size when calculating the required base plate size. This
means that the required base plate size will always be sufficient to take the footprint of the column section. The calculation
then determines the minimum thickness required for the base plate.
For all other loading situations the adequacy of the specified base plate is checked for the applied loading. For bolts in tension
the pull-out capacity is checked.
Stiffeners can be specified for base plates with bending moments and compression or tension and also for base plates with
tension only.
2c + T
D
2c + t
2c + B B B
D
p
p
D
2c + D
B
2c + T
T
B
D
p
p
2c + T
T
B
D
p
p
D
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Column load chase down (BS6399)
Tedds calculation version 2.0.02
Scope
Calculates the factored axial loads on each stack of an internal, edge or corner multi-storey column due to dead and imposed
loading.

References
BS 6399: Part 1: 1996 - Loading for buildings: Part 1. Code of practice for dead and imposed loads.
General notes
Imposed loads can be reduced in accordance with clause 6.2 of the code, or the full imposed loads can be applied with no
reduction. If the option to include reduction factors is selected, they are set by default to the values in Table 2 of the code. The
default reduction factors can be overridden with values chosen by the user. The calculations always assume that the top floor
is a roof, not qualifying for reduction, and that all floors below this do qualify.
If the top floor is not a roof, the calculations should be run for a number of floors equal to the actual number plus one, and all
the roof loads set to zero.
The term stack is used in these calculations to denote the length of a column between one floor and the next. Stack F-1 is the
column length between the foundation and the lowest suspended floor (termed floor 1), stack 1-2 is the length between the
lowest two floors etc.
Internal column
Corner column
Edge column
Y
1
/ 2 Y
1
X
1
/ 2 X
1
Tedds 2014 Engineering Library United Kingdom
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Column splice design (BS5950)
Tedds calculation version 2.0.08
Scope
Checks the design of the following connection types:
bearing
internal
external (no division plate)
external (with division plate)
non-bearing
internal
external

References
From Joints in Simple Construction Volume 1: Design Methods - 2nd Edition (The BCSA/SCI Green Book) and updated in June
2000 for BS5950-1:2000.
General notes
For a single connection, the calculations perform a check design in accordance with each of the checks as defined in the
BCSA/SCI Green Book for the applied loads.
55 100 55
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
60 60 60 60
5
0
3


8
5
5
0
5
0
3


8
5
5
0
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Composite beam design (BS5950)
Tedds calculation version 1.0.04
Scope
Checks the design of simply supported primary or secondary composite internal or edge beams with perpendicular or parallel
decking.


References
BS 5950-1:2000 - Structural use of steelwork in building: Part 1. Code of practice for design - rolled and welded sections.
BS 5950-3.1:1990+A1:2010 - Structural use of steelwork in building: Part 3. Code of practice for design of simple and
continuous composite beams.
General notes
Primary beams can be loaded with up to 3 sets of point loads and a series of beam loads. Secondary beams can be loaded with
a series of slab area loads.
Longitudinal shear can be resisted using no, discontinuous or continuous decking options and with bars, mesh or no additional
transverse reinforcement.
Checks include for both construction stage design checks, including lateral torsional buckling for parallel decks, and composite
stage checks with additional deflection and natural frequency calculations.
b
b
Primary Beam
for design
PLAN
CROSS SECTION
L
1
2
b
b
Secondary Beam
for design
A A
PLAN
CROSS SECTION
L
Primary
Beam
1
2
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Compound section properties
Tedds calculation version 1.0.03
Scope
Calculates the section properties of one of three possible combined section shapes:
o Two I sections (at 90 degs),
o RSC on an I section
o Plate on an I section.
General notes
The section properties calculated are;
o Second moment of area about x & y axis - Ixx & Iyy
o Plastic section modulus about x & y axis - Sxx & Syy
o Elastic section modulus about x & y axis - Zxx & Zyy
o Radius of gyration about x & y axis - rxx & ryy
o Torsional constant - J and x
o Buckling parameters - u and
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Concrete industrial ground floor design (TR34)
Tedds calculation version 1.0.05
Scope
Checks the design of an industrial concrete floor slab subjected to a series of point loads, line loads and uniformly distributed
loads.
The calculations include the design of concrete slabs reinforced with either steel fibres or steel fabric placed to the bottom of
the slab.

References
The calculations are based on Concrete Society Technical Report No.34, Concrete Industrial Ground Floors - A Guide to Design
and Construction - Third Edition.
General notes
The calculations allow input of any number of load cases. Each load case may consist of between one and four point loads, a
line load or a uniformly distributed load.
For each load case the applied load is compared with the ultimate load capacity for the slab.
For point loads the applied load is also compared with the ultimate punching load capacity for the slab calculated at both the
face of the load and at the critical perimeter.
For point loads the slab deflection is also calculated.
Steel fabric reinforcement
d
h
Slip membrane
Wearing surface
Reinforced concrete slab
Subgrade
Sub-base
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Concrete specification (BS8500)
Tedds calculation version 1.0.07
Scope
Designed or designated concrete specification. Calculates the exposure class or classes for the concrete element under
consideration.
References
BS8500-1:2006.
General notes
From the exposure class or classes the calculation determines, as applicable, the minimum concrete requirements including
cover, strength class, maximum water/cement ratio, minimum cement content, allowable cements and combinations and
allowable aggregates.
The calculation covers reinforced, unreinforced, normal or lightweight concrete with intended working life of at least 50 or 100
years. The concrete may include air-entrainment or not.
The minimum concrete requirements for the exposure classes are displayed in the interface. Using this information the actual
concrete can be specified or, alternatively, the minimum requirements may be returned to the document without an actual
specification.
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Concrete sub-frame analysis (BS8110)
Tedds calculation version 1.0.00
Scope
Analysis of a simplified sub-frame consisting only of a beam, the columns attached to the ends of the beam and the beams on
either side, if any, using BS 8110: Part 1: 1997 cl. 3.2.1.2.3.

General notes
The calculations firstly determine the geometry of the three spans (including area and second moment of area), the stiffness of
the end beams is modelled by applying a stiffness factor to the second moment of area (the fixity of the beam remote ends
determine the stiffness of the beams on either side of the central beam). The calculations use the sub-frame geometry and
properties within the continuous beam analysis program, where the loads can be added in order to determine the design
shear force and moment. These forces can then be optionally used in the RC beam design calculations, to design span 2 (the
central beam). The RC beam design calculations cover one moment check so whether the check is for sagging or hogging must
be determined before the design calculations are run.
The size and stiffness of the columns are translated into vertical and rotational spring stiffnesses for the supports used in the
continuous beam. The moments generated in the supports are then used to determine the moments in the columns of the
sub-frame.
The analysis produces a set of design shear forces and moments, which can then be used in the RC beam design calculations.
Col B Col C
Beam to be designed
Span 1 (h x b ) Span 2 (h x b) Span 3 (h x b )
L
C_upper
L
C_lower
L
B_lower
L
B_upper
L
s1
L
s2
L
s3
h
B
b
B
x b
C
x h
C
SIMPLIFIED SUBFRAME
l 2
BS 8110:Part 1:1997 cl 3.2.1.2.3
l
2
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Co-ordinate conversion
Tedds calculation version 1.0.00
Scope
This calculation is based on the first principles of setting out co-ordinates, given the co-ordinates of a base station it will
determine either:
o The coordinates of the target if the bearing angle from north and distance along the bearing are known.
o The bearing angle from north and distance along the bearing to the target if the coordinates of the target are known.

General notes
If you specify the bearing from north to the target and the distance along the bearing to the target the calculation will
calculate the co-ordinates of the target.
If you specify the co-ordinates of the target the calculation will calculate the bearing from north to the target and the distance
along the bearing to the target.
In practice coordinates are used for checking as well as setting out. As an example say bolt positions for structures the
Engineer can work these out from general setting out measurements if two positions on the site are known. See the drawing
below as an example of setting out the corners of a building to a coordinates.
L
e
n
g
t
h

L
Target
East
N
o
r
t
h
Bearing
Station (E,N)
Target (E ,N )
Target
Tedds 2014 Engineering Library United Kingdom
27


From the information shown in the sketch above, position 2 can be calculated from the coordinates of station 1 (1000E,
1000N), the bearing angle to position 2 (110 degrees) and the distance to position 2 (40m).
When position 2 is known, position 3 can be calculated by adding 90 degrees to the previous bearing (110 degrees) and the
distance (30m) which is known from the geometry of the structure.
This procedure can then be repeated until position 1 is found (closure) which also serves as a check.
In practice the information given for setting out curves is the coordinates of centre point, the coordinates of the start of the
curve, the coordinates of the end of the curve and the radius of the curve. The radius can often be too long and therefore too
far to sight and be used as a station. Even with a small radius this can often be impractical as the centre point is theoretical and
may not be on the site or maybe within an existing building.

From the information in the drawing above the bearing angle can be found from the centre point to the start coordinate and
from the centre point to the end coordinate. Taking the centre point as the base station the bearing angle can be incremented
to the number of setting out points required along the curve using the radius as the distance along the bearing.
N
110 deg
1000.000E,
1000.000N
E
4
0
.0
0
0
m
1037.588E,
986.319N
3
0
.
0
0
0

m
1027.327E,
958.128N
989.739E,
971.809N
1
4
2
3
N
1000.000E,
1000.000N
E
Start
507.596E,
1086.824N
End
1086.824E,
1492.404N
r

=

5
0
0

m
616.978E,
1321.394N
828.990E,
1469.846N
Tedds 2014 Engineering Library United Kingdom
28

Crane gantry girder design (BS5950)
Tedds calculation version 1.0.04
Scope
Checks the design of simply supported gantry girders comprising of either a plain I section (UB or UC), an I section with a
capping plate or an I section with a capping channel carrying a conventional overhead travelling crane i.e. not an underslung
crane.

References
This calculation is performed in accordance with BS5950-1:2000.
General notes
The user can select to input the values of the ultimate vertical and horizontal shear forces and bending moments or the
calculation can be used to determine the maximum wheel loads from the basic crane data input by the user ie. crane and crab
weight, safe working load, span of crane bridge, minimum hook approach, number of wheels and class of crane in accordance
with BS2573-1:1983. Alternatively the maximum static and dynamic vertical wheel loads and transverse surge wheel loads can
be input directly. For the latter two options, based on the number of wheels, their spacing and the span of the gantry girder,
the calculation determines the wheel arrangement giving the maximum shear force and bending moment before proceeding
to calculate them.
For the case where the calculation is used to determine the bending moments and shear forces it can accommodate one crane
only on the simply supported span but covers the cases of the end carriage having two or four wheels.
If an I section with a capping plate or channel is selected the calculation determines both the elastic and plastic section
properties for the compound section.
For the user specified girder, the calculation checks the vertical and horizontal shear capacity, the biaxial bending capacity, the
web buckling and bearing capacity beneath the concentrated wheel load, the capacity of the weld connecting the plate or
channel to the I section and the vertical and horizontal deflections.
Two dynamic factors are required. The first, from BS2573-1:1983 Table 4, is applied to the lifted load only. The second factor,
which should have a value of 1.25 unless better information is available, is applied to the total crane load and is the
traditional factor originating from BS449. The calculation determines which factor produces the maximum dynamic wheel
load and proceeds with this value to determine the vertical shear forces and bending moments. Values of the first dynamic
factor for typical types of crane are included in the interface.
Crane Bridge
Span of crane bridge, L
Safe Working Load, W
Crab weight, W
Minimum hook approach, a
Crane bridge weight, W
swl
crab
crane
h
c
Bogie centres, a
w1
= =
Wheel centres, a
w1
Bogie wheel centres, a
w2
Gantry Girder
Elevation on Crane Bridge
2 Wheel End Carriage 4 Wheel End Carriage
Crab
a
w1
- a
w2
Tedds 2014 Engineering Library United Kingdom
29

The proportion of the crab and SWL contributing to the surge forces acting perpendicular to the crane rail and the proportion
of the static wheel load contributing to the braking forces acting along the crane rail are required to be input. The default
values for these are set at the traditional BS449/BS6399-1:1984 values of 10%and 5%respectively. These values are no
longer included in BS6399-1:1996 and therefore care should be taken to ensure that sufficient allowance is made for
horizontal loading. The braking load is not actually used in the design check of the girder, however, it is likely that its value will
be required for the design of the end connections and the supporting structure and is therefore included.
The effective length of the girder can be input directly or can be calculated from the length and depth factors contained in
Table 13 of BS5950-1:2000. Attention is drawn to clause 4.11.3 of BS5950-1:2000 which states that the wheel loads need not
be treated as destabilising unless the rails are mounted on resilient pads.
Tedds 2014 Engineering Library United Kingdom
30

Cut and fill
Tedds calculation version 1.0.01
Scope
Calculates the area of cut and fill of cross sections where existing and proposed profiles are specified. If more than one cross
section is present and all the cross sections are valid, a quantity distribution table is calculated to determine the cumulative cut
or fill volume.

General notes
There are several ways the coordinate data for the existing and proposed profiles can be input within the calculation.
o Inputting the coordinates within the user interface
o Importing from a text file
o Defining a template
Coordinates can be entered using the user interface where a sketch will be produced detailing the profile as the coordinates
are input. The calculation will determine the cut and fill areas when the first and last x coordinates of the existing and
proposed profiles match. The levels of these matching coordinates do not have to be the same so a retaining wall or similar
can be taken in to account.
Profiles can be imported from a text file which must be written in the correct format. The cut and fill areas will be calculated
when the chainages and the proposed and existing cross sections exist. The first and last x coordinates of the existing and
proposed profiles must match in order for the areas to be calculated.
A predefined template can be used for the proposed profiles which can be used in conjunction with the input or import
methods for the existing profiles as described above. The predefined templates comprise a typical single carriageway, a typical
dual carriageway, a cutting/embankment or a trench. The dimensions, levels and an x offset relative to the template centreline
can be specified. Each template except the trench has a slope to each side in which the gradient of this slope is specified.
These slopes are then used to determine an intersection point with the existing profiles. It should be noted that the calculation
will determine if the slope is required to be positive or negative and only a positive gradient is needed. If the coordinate limits
of the existing profile lie within the main template (not including the slopes) the section is deemed to be invalid and the areas
will not be calculated.
Tedds 2014 Engineering Library United Kingdom
31

Dead loading
Tedds calculation version 1.0.00
Scope
Calculates the unfactored dead loads of a series of composite constructions.
General notes
The composite constructions are intended to represent the various floor, wall and roof components of a building or structure.
When using SI units the calculation includes a data list of typical material densities as well as a datalist based on Tables A.1 to
A.12 from annex A of Eurocode 1: Actions on structures - Part 1-1: General actions - Densities, self-weight, imposed loads for
buildings.
When using US units the calculation includes a data list of typical material specific weights.
Tedds 2014 Engineering Library United Kingdom
32

Design rainfall (The Wallingford Procedure)
Tedds calculation version 2.0.00
Scope
Calculates design rainfall.
References
The Wallingford Procedure for Europe - Best Practice Guide for urban drainage modelling. Version 1.1 (Dec. 2000)
BRE Digest 365 - Soakaway Design.
General notes
The design rainfall intensity is calculated in accordance with the Wallingford Procedure and BRE Digest 365 by defining the
appropriate storm length and return period and the ratio, r, of a 60 minute to 2-day rainfalls of 5 year return period
appropriate for the geographic location.
Tedds 2014 Engineering Library United Kingdom
33

Surface water drain and foul sewer design
Tedds calculation version 1.0.03
Scope
Checks the design of a surface water drain or foul sewer.

General notes
The calculations use the Chezy and Escritt equations to determine a value for the design pipe diameter based on a list of
commonly available sizes.
The calculations use the Colebrook-White equation to determine the flow rate and flow velocity of the design pipe flowing full.
The proportion of the design flow rate to the full flow rate is used in conjunction with design tables to determine the design
flow velocity and depth of flow when the pipe is running at the design flow rate.
The calculations check that the maximum flow rate of the selected pipe exceeds the design flow rate. If specified they also
check that the design velocity exceeds the required minimum design flow velocity. If selected the calculations also check that
the design depth is less than 0.75 times the full depth.
L
h
Tedds 2014 Engineering Library United Kingdom
34

Footway design (DMRB7)
Tedds calculation version 1.0.01
Scope
Checks the design of new footway and foundation construction.
References
From the Design Manual for Roads and Bridges Volume 7
General notes
The calculations allow the design of footways classified as pedestrian only, light vehicle, light vehicle with very occasional
heavy vehicle and heavy vehicle.
The calculations include a method of estimating the CBR value of the formation level.
Tedds 2014 Engineering Library United Kingdom
35

Foundation analysis and design (EN1992/EN1997)
Tedds calculation version 3.2.02
Scope
The calculations check the analysis and design or analysis only of a pad or strip foundation in reinforced or plain concrete.
Pad foundations may feature up to 10 columns; strip foundations may feature up to 10 walls.
The foundation may be subject to vertical loads, horizontal loads and moments applied at the base of the columns and walls. It
may also be subject to surcharge loads applied as area loads directly to the top of the foundation.
The analysis calculations check the stability of the base with regard to uplift and sliding as well as checking the maximum base
pressures.
The design calculations check the foundation in flexure, plane shear and punching shear as appropriate.


Pad footing example Strip footing example
References
Eurocode 2: Design of concrete structures - Part 1-1:General rules and rules for buildings EN1992-1-1:2004 incorporating
Corrigendum dated January 2008
UK National Annex NA to BS EN 1992-1-1:2004 incorporating National Amendment No.1
Irish National Annex NA to IS EN 1992-1-1:2005 incorporating Corrigendum No.1
Singapore National Annex NA to SS EN 1992-1-1:2008
Eurocode 7: Geotechnical design - Part 1: General rules EN1997-1:2004 incorporating Corrigendum dated February 2009
UK National Annex NA to BS EN 1997-1:2004 incorporating Corrigendum No.1
Irish National Annex NA to IS EN 1997-1:2005.
Singapore National Annex NA to SS EN 1997-1:2010
'Bearing Pressures for Rectangular Footings with Biaxial Uplift' by Kenneth E. Wilson, published in the Journal of Bridge
Engineering, Vol.2, No.1, February 1997.
General notes
The calculation generally uses design approach 1 with the soil and structure checked against the effects of the applied loads
subjected to two separate load combinations.
1 2
88.8 kN/m
2
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Net ultimate bearing capacity is calculated for either the drained or undrained condition using the sample analytical method
for bearing resistance included in annex D.
Alternatively the calculation will check a presumed bearing resistance against unfactored SLS base pressures.
Where a pad foundation features a single column or a strip foundation features a single wall, and the foundation is only
subjected to simple axial loads it will first be checked to see if it can be designed as a plain, unreinforced concrete footing.
Tedds 2014 Engineering Library United Kingdom
37

Foundations near trees (NHBC)
Tedds calculation version 1.0.00
Scope
Provides guidance on meeting the technical requirements and recommendations of the NHBC with regard to foundation depth
when building near trees, hedgerows and shrubs, particularly in shrinkable soils.

References
NHBC Standards - Chapter 4.2, April 2003 edition.
General notes
The depth calculations take into account of the effects of soil desiccation caused by previous or existing trees, hedgerows or
shrubs and trees, hedgerows or shrubs which are scheduled to be planted.
Clause 4.2 - S3(a) of the NHBC Standards contains 3 figures, (figures 5, 6 and 7) which show the level from which the
foundation depth is to be measured for various cases of reduced and increased levels. These figures are reproduced below.
D
H
actual
Zreq
Tedds 2014 Engineering Library United Kingdom
38

Gabion retaining wall analysis and design (BS8002)
Tedds calculation version 1.1.03
Scope
Checks the stability of a gabion retaining wall against sliding and overturning, and determines the maximum and minimum
base pressures beneath the wall.

References
BS8002:1994 - Code of Practice for Earth Retaining Structures
General notes
The soil surface to the rear of the wall may be inclined at an angle .
The retained material to the rear of the wall may have different properties to the material beneath the base of the wall.
In contrast to the traditional approach to retaining wall design, the limit state methods recommended by BS8002 do not
directly utilise a factor of safety, instead a mobilization factor M is applied to the representative strength values for the soils to
give a design soil strength value. The user should ensure that they select a value of M that is suitable for the requirements of
the design, with BS8002 suggesting values of 1.2, 1.5 or more. This calculation allows a traditional approach to design and
therefore includes factors of safety. If the traditional method is used the utilization factor should be set to 1.0, if the limit state
approach is undertaken the factors of safety should be set to 1.0.
Active and passive pressure coefficients are either calculated using the Rankine or Coulomb equations, or determined using
extracts from the Kerisel and Absi tables which were used to establish the graphs in BS8002:1994 Annex A. It should be noted
however that the use of Rankine equations has its limitations and is best suited to smooth vertical walls. It is not
recommended for use with gabion walls but is included for reference
p
o
W
g
P
a
1
2
3
4
GABION DIMENSIONS
1 - w
1
h
1
2 - w
2
h
2
3 - w
3
h
3
4 - w
4
h
4
s
2
s
3
s
4
Tedds 2014 Engineering Library United Kingdom
39

Gable framing analysis and design (BS5950)
Tedds calculation version 2.0.02
Scope
This calculation covers the overall structural analysis and member design checks for gable framing arrangements typically
adopted for single-span portal-framed buildings. The structural concept for the gable frame bracing is as shown in section 9.7,
fig. 10, of the ISE/ICE 'Manual for the design of steelwork building structures' (Nov 1989 edition).


References
BS 5950-1: 2000 - Structural use of steelwork in buildings - Part 1. Code of practice for design - Rolled and welded section.
General notes
Member design checks can be carried out for the following members:-
o Gable posts, corner posts, gable rafters, roof bracing, wall bracing and eaves strut/tie.
One run of the analysis calculations covers one loading condition, i.e. one combination of simultaneous loads, for which all the
specified loads are applied. Thus several runs of the calculations will be required to determine the critical load combination
and wind direction for the design of each member.
For each run of the analysis calculations, one particular intermediate gable post is chosen by the user and the member load
effects are calculated for this particular gable post. Typically, this will be the post directly below the apex, but any post can be
chosen. If restraint conditions or other factors indicate that another post may be critical, additional calculation runs should be
made for that post.
A parapet with a horizontal top edge can be specified in the definition of the structure. Parapet posts are assumed to coincide
with the gable posts and to be continuous cantilever projections of the gable posts. The parapet posts themselves are not
analysed or designed.
Using Tedds for Word the calculation allows for the design of multiple members without having to re-run the anaylsis. Once
the initial calculation has been run additional members can be designed as follows:
o After the main calculation add a new calc section and insert the Member design calcs item.
o Repeat the above step for each additional member.
Structural arrangement
The analysis and member design checks are based on the following assumptions:
Each gable end of the building is provided with a separate, independent bracing system.
The gable posts are evenly spaced, and there is a post directly under the apex.
The gable posts are simply supported at their bases and along the rafter lines.
The gable rafters have simple connections at the eaves and apex and are simply supported by the gable posts. The rafters may
be continuous from eaves to apex, or discontinuous with simple splices directly over the gable posts.
The horizontal reaction supporting each post at the rafter line is developed by a wind girder in the roof plane, spanning
between the side walls. The gable rafters and the rafters of the adjacent portal frame provide the chords of this wind girder.
They are linked by M or W configuration bracing members forming the web of the wind girder and intersecting with the gable
rafters at the top of every gable post.
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The horizontal reaction at each end of the wind girder is transferred to the foundations by N, K or X configuration bracing
between the corner post and the stanchion of the adjacent portal frame on each side of the building. Depending on the
orientation of the roof bracing and the side wall bracing members, there may be an eaves strut/tie member on each side to
transfer the load from the end roof bracing member to the top of the side wall bracing.
In-plane sway of the gable end frame (principally due to wind on the side wall end bays spanning onto the corner posts) is
resisted by N, K or X configuration bracing in the plane of the gable wall, between the corner post and the adjacent gable post
at each end of the gable wall. These braced bays are designed to act independently, each set of bracing resisting the full wind
load from the adjacent side wall bay.
If K-configuration bracing is used for either the side wall or gable wall bracing (or both), it is arranged so that the diagonals do
not meet on the corner post. They meet instead on the adjacent gable post or portal stanchion. Thus there is no intermediate
support to the corner post between foundation and eaves levels.
Geometry
The structure is idealised to line elements on the centrelines of the true members. All the dimensions entered should
therefore relate to the intersections of member centrelines where relevant.
Buckling restraint
Up to three intermediate restraints can be specified within the height of each gable post and within each rafter span. By
default, for a member bending about its major axis, these restraints are assumed to prevent lateral-torsional and y-axis strut
buckling. These assumptions can be changed through the General Member Design user interface which is displayed before the
member design checks are carried out. For a member bending about its minor axis, no assumptions are made about the type
of restraint provided, so the appropriate restraint details must be set via the General Member Design user interface.
Loading
Pattern loading is not considered. The wind load is assumed to be constant over each element of the structure. Conservative
values or equivalent uniform loads will need to be determined separately to take account of the variations in pressure over the
different zones of each element, as defined in the wind loading codes.
All loads are input as unfactored dead, imposed and wind loads determined in accordance with cl. 2.2.2 of BS 5950-1:2000.
Determination of the values for the wind loads is not covered here, so separate calculations are required. (See the 'Applied
loading' set in the Tedds library.) The wind loads to be entered into these calculations are the net element loads due to the
combined internal and external surface pressures.
Vertical loading on the gable rafters is applied as a uniformly distributed line load. All horizontal loading on the gable wall is
assumed to be transferred directly to the node points of the roof bracing system, so there is no bending about the vertical axis
of the rafters.
Analysis
The factored moments and shear forces for rafter design are derived from elastic analysis of the rafter as a simply supported
continuous or single-span beam, as appropriate.
The applied moments calculated for a rafter continuous over two or more supports are the worst values (sagging or hogging)
occurring within the end span and at the first internal supports, which will be the worst values occurring anywhere within the
length of the rafter.
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General member safe load tables (BS5950)
Tedds calculation version 1.0.00
Scope
Checks the design of beam and column elements using safe load tables.
Beams
o The types of design available are major axis bending and shear, using UB or UC sections or the ultimate UDL capacity
for a fully restrained RSC or RSJ.
Columns
o The types of design available are simple column check (UC only), tie check (angles only) and strut buckling checks (all
elements).
o For details on the Simple column check please refer to the Notes for this item (either from within the calculation or in
the Library Access System).
o For both element types, the relevant input information is entered and then a suitable section can be selected from
the relevant safe load/ultimate capacity table.
References
From BS 5950-1:2000.
General notes
When exiting the safe load tables, if there is a dialogue asking which table the values should be returned from - both tables
must be selected (to include the section properties).
For the safe load tables for beams with bending and shear, if high shear is present the values of Mcx and Mcy must be
reduced, see cl 4.2.6.
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Hipped end loading
Tedds calculation version 1.0.00
Scope
Calculates the loading on a gable frame, flat top portal and first portal frame resulting from a hip extending over two frame
centres.

General notes
In the case of there being an odd number of jack rafters (ie there is a jack rafter at the centreline of the portal building span),
the calculations, which consider only a half frame span, also include loads on the central jack rafter from the other half span.
In the case of there being an even number of jack rafters (ie there is no jack rafter at the centreline of the portal building
span), there is a small approximation in the calculations - it is assumed that the hip raker connects to the jack rafters (simply
supported) throughout its length.
S
1
S
2
S
3
Portal Frame
Portal Frame
Flat Top Portal Frame
Gable Frame
Hip raker
Jack rafters
= Crs
g
=
x
1
x
2
L
span
/2

x
3
Point loads
3 2 1 0
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Historical steelwork assessment
Tedds calculation version 1.0.00
Scope
Checks the design / assessment of historical steel sections. The calculations use the distinction of whether the section was
designed pre or post 1900.
References
From BCSA publication number 11/84 - Historical Structural Steelwork Handbook.
General notes
The sections can be checked for shear and moment capacity, and axial capacity. For compression the checks use either, for pre
1900 - Euler formula, Rankine formula or the American formula, for post 1900 - Moncrieff, LCC 1909 or BS 449 (1937/48). For
sections post 1900 it is also possible to check lateral torsional buckling and overall buckling.
The section data is provided for sections including Dorman Long (1887), beams to BS4 (1903,1921,1932), UBs to BS4 (1962),
broad flanged beams to BS4 (1959), UCs to BS4 (1962) and channels to BS4 (1932, 1962) and BS6 (1904).
The material stress are provided for both pre and post 1900 and are provided for cast iron, wrought iron and mild steel.
Tedds 2014 Engineering Library United Kingdom
44

Holding down bolt design
Tedds calculation version 1.0.01
Scope
Calculates the embedment depth of one of a pair of holding down bolts, and using table 1 from the BCSA/Constrado guide,
calculate whether the effective conical surface area and concrete shear stress is sufficient to withstand the tension (pull-out)
force applied.
The calculations also check that the bolt tension capacity for the bolts selected is adequate to resist the tension force

References
From 'Holding down systems for steel stanchions' BCSA/Constrado guide to holding down systems.
Concrete
L_bolt (Overall length of bolts)
t_p (Base plate thickness)
t_gr (Thickness of bedding)
t_was (Washer thickness)
L_proj (Clear projection of bolt above nut)
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45

Horizontal and vertical highway alignment (TD9/93)
Tedds calculation version 1.0.00
Scope
Horizontal curve Checks the design of a circular horizontal curve (no transitions). The calculation uses a 'generic number of
chords' method, which calculates the optimum chord length based on the criteria of the length of chord required to
approximate the arc length of the curve, or a standard set of 7 points. As well as either the 7 points, or the generic number of
points, the start and end point of the curve are calculated.
Optional calculations are:
o The minimum stopping sight distance.
o The minimum full overtaking sight distance.
o The transition curve length.
o A conversion of the input in degrees, minutes and seconds into decimal format.
Vertical curve Checks the design of a vertical curve and provide the setting out information (reduced levels at the relevant
chainage points). This calculation can be phased with the horizontal curve design, to enable the same setting out points to be
used.
References
From Part 1 TD 9/93 - Highway link design.
General notes
For phasing of the horizontal and vertical curves, a reference point on the horizontal curve must be given. The chainage points
are then calculated in relation to this reference point. The chord length (or frequency of levels) should also coincide with the
chord length used in the horizontal alignment calculations. Where applicable the appropriate default values are given.
Tedds 2014 Engineering Library United Kingdom
46

Infiltration system design (SUDS)
Tedds calculation version 2.0.01
Scope
Calculates the maximum storage required for each rainfall duration over a return period of between 5 and 100 years. In order
to allow a range of return periods to be selected, table 2 has been extended to include Z2 growth factor values for 1, 2, 3, 4, 5,
10, 20, 30, 50 and 100 years using figures taken from The Wallingford Procedure for Europe - Best Practice Guide for urban
drainage modelling, published in 2000

References
BRE digest 365 - Soakaway designs for either rectangular or concentric ring soakaways.
CIRIA C697 The SUDS Manual (2007)
The Wallingford Procedure for Europe - Best Practice Guide for urban drainage modelling. Version 1.1 (Dec. 2000)
General notes
The design of the soakaway can be calculated using either the BRE method or the SUDS manual method.
The design of a infiltration blanket and infiltration pavement can be calculated using the SUDS manual method.
Using the BRE method either the required minimum pit depth, width and length can be calculated by selecting the appropriate
required dimension and specifying the remaining ones.
Using the SUDS Manual method the calculation will determine the minimum required depth for a suitable storage capacity.
The calculations also check that the soakaway/infiltration system discharges from full to half volume within 24 hours.
These calculations determine the M5 rainfalls using table 1 and then calculate the growth factor for table 2 and, using this,
calculate the relevant rainfall for each rainfall duration. Using these values the inflow for each duration is calculated along with
the outflow (given the soil infiltration rate)
The calculations can (optionally) determine the soil infiltration rate - from trial pit size and the test results for the time taken
for the water level to fall from 75%to 25%of the effective storage depth in the pit.
If the soil infiltration rate is to be calculated, the trial pit size and the test results for the time taken for the water level to fall
from 75%to 25%of the effective storage depth in the pit are required, otherwise the soil infiltration rate must be entered.
w
d
Rectangular pit soakaway
Incoming invert
l
w
dia
Circular ring pit soakaway
Pit is depth - d
w
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Lintel analysis (BS5977)
Tedds calculation version 1.0.01
Scope
Analysis of lintels with solid or cavity walls, four floor loads, two roof loads and either three point loads or the load effects of
up to four openings. Results are calculated for the maximum shear, bending moment and end reactions.
The calculation provides a converted UDL load, in line with Appendix A: Use of assessed loads for design or selection of lintels,
BS5977-1:1981.

References
British Standard: Lintels - Part 1: Method for assessment of load BS5977-1:1981 incorporating Amendment No. 1.
General notes
By default the calculation excludes the self weight of the lintel, this load may be added if required.
Op1 Op2
800 800 800
Masonry
2400
2640
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Masonry bearing design (BS5628)
Tedds calculation version 1.0.03
Scope
Checks the design bearing stress at the bearing of a beam to determine the requirement for a concrete spreader or padstone.
If required the calculation will check the design bearing stress beneath the concrete spreader. The calculation will finally check
the design bearing stress at a depth of 0.4 h below the beam bearing level.

References
From BS5628-1:2005
General notes
The beam may be aligned either in the plane of the wall or perpendicular to it.
Where the spreader is loaded eccentrically the user may specify the type of stress distribution as either triangular or similar to
a semi-infinite beam on an elastic foundation.
Spreader
Beam Beam
Masonry
wall
Masonry
wall
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Masonry column design (EN1996)
Tedds calculation version 1.0.00
Scope
Checks the designs of masonry columns subjected to horizontal wind loading and/or vertical eccentric loading.

References
Eurocode 6: Design of masonry structures - Part 1-1:General - Common rules for reinforced and unreinforced masonry
structures EN1996-1-1:2005 incorporating Corrigenda February 2006 and July 2009
UK National Annex NA to BS EN 1996-1-1:2005
Irish National Annex NA to IS EN 1996-1-1:2005
Eurocode: Basis of structural design EN1990:2002 +A1:2005
UK National Annex NA to BS EN 1990:2002
Irish National Annex NA to IS EN 1990:2005
General notes
Columns may be designed using clay, calcium silicate, aggregate concrete, autoclaved aerated concrete, manufactured stone
and dimensioned natural stone masonry units.
Combinations of partial safety factors can be used to calculate the worst case vertical load on the column, which are based on
either Eq 6.10 or Eq 6.10a and Eq 6.10b from BS EN 1990:2002 and the appropriate National Annex. In the user interface the
results will default to the critical combination but the other combinations can also be selected for viewing. The output will be
related to the critical combination. Alternatively a single set of partial safety factors can be defined.
Tedds 2014 Engineering Library United Kingdom
50

Masonry column design (BS5628)
Tedds calculation version 1.0.02
Scope
Checks the design vertical load resistance of a single leaf masonry column to BS 5628: Part 1: 2005. It calculates the design
vertical load resistance and compares this against the applied factored vertical load on the column.
The calculations also check that the column is within the slenderness limits given in cl 24.1.
References
From BS5628-1:2005
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51

Masonry wall panel design (EN1996)
Tedds calculation version 1.2.04
Scope
Checks the designs of masonry wall panels and sub panels of single-leaf or cavity wall construction, either with or without bed
joint reinforcement and with or without masonry piers, subjected to horizontal and/or vertical loading.

References
Eurocode 6: Design of masonry structures - Part 1-1:General - Common rules for reinforced and unreinforced masonry
structuresEN1996-1-1:2005 +A1:2012 incorporating Corrigenda February 2006 and July 2009
UK National Annex NA to BS EN 1996-1-1:2005 +A1:2012
Irish National Annex NA to IS EN 1996-1-1:2005
General notes
Walls may be designed using clay, calcium silicate, aggregate concrete, autoclaved aerated concrete, manufactured stone and
dimensioned natural stone masonry units.
Depending on the aspect ratio of the panel and the external support conditions the calculation uses either yield line analysis or
simple elastic analysis to determine the appropriate bending moment coefficient.
Wall panels may include up to three openings, the calculation automatically divides the panel into two sets of sub panels,
arrangement A where the panels predominantly span vertically and arrangement B where the panels predominantly span
horizontally. The results reported in the calculation are based on the more favourable of the two arrangements. Where the
panel is only supported on three edges sub panel arrangements spanning toward the free edge are automatically ignored.
2
3
4 1
2
3
4
1
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Masonry wall panel design (BS5628)
Tedds calculation version 1.2.07
Scope
Checks the design of masonry wall panels and sub panels of single-leaf or cavity wall construction, either with or without bed
joint reinforcement and with or without masonry piers, subjected to horizontal and/or vertical loading.

References
BS 5628-1:2005 Code of practice for the use of masonry - Part 1: Structural use of unreinforced masonry
BS 5628-2:2005 Code of practice for the use of masonry - Part 2: Structural use of reinforced and prestressed masonry
General notes
Walls may be designed using brick, concrete block, natural stone or random rubble masonry.
Depending on the aspect ratio of the panel and the external support conditions the calculation uses either yield line analysis or
simple elastic analysis to determine the appropriate bending moment coefficient.
Wall panels may include up to three openings, the calculation automatically divides the panel into two sets of sub panels,
arrangement A where the panels predominantly span vertically and arrangement B where the panels predominantly span
horizontally. The results reported in the calculation are based on the more favourable of the two arrangements. Where the
panel is only supported on three edges sub panel arrangements spanning toward the free edge are automatically ignored.
2
3
4 1
2
3
4
1
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53

Notional load chase down
Tedds calculation version 2.0.00
Scope
Calculates the notional horizontal loads at the roof and each floor level of a multi-storey building.

General notes
The floor area and perimeter wall lengths can be calculated for a range of building shapes, or values for these parameters can
be entered directly, by selecting the user-defined shape option.
Notional horizontal loads are calculated at 1.0%of the factored dead load and at 0.5%of the combined factored dead and
imposed loads. The partial safety factors used are 1.4 for dead load and 1.6 for imposed load.
L
b
W
b
D
b
L
b
L
b
H
b
H
b
L
b
L
b
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Open channel flow
Tedds calculation version 1.0.01
Scope
Calculates the discharge of an open channel which may consist of multiple sections.
General notes
The calculation uses the Manning equation in the following form:

It is possible to calculate the discharge of compound sections by adding the total flow of a series of partial sections, as shown
in the following sketch and corresponding equation.


The compound channel may consist of up to four separate sections, each with a different set of properties.

2 / 1
0
3 / 2
S R
n
A
Q =
A , n
1 1
A , n
2 2
A , n
3 3
P
1
P
2
P
3

2 / 1
0
3 / 2
3
3
3
3 / 2
2
2
2
3 / 2
1
1
1
S R
n
A
R
n
A
R
n
A
Q

+ + =
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Pad footing analysis and design (BS8110)
Tedds calculation version 2.0.06
Scope
Checks the design of a pad footing in either reinforced or unreinforced concrete.

References
The calculations are in accordance with BS 8110-Part 1:1997 - Structural use of concrete: Part 1. Code of practice for design
and construction.
General notes
The footing may be subjected to axial and horizontal loads and moments as indicated in the sketch above.
The calculations check the stability of the base with regard to uplift, sliding and overturning. They also check the maximum and
minimum base pressures.
The reinforced concrete design calculations check the design of the base in bending and shear as appropriate.
Soil properties for granular soils may be calculated in accordance with BS8002 using a mobilization factor m applied to the
representative strength values for the soils to give a design soil strength value. A value of m should be selected that is
appropriate for the requirements of the design, BS8002 suggests values of 1.2, 1.5 or more.
P
PA
B
H
yB
H
xB
H
yA
H
xA
M
yA
M
xA
M
yB
M
xB
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56

Pavement design (DMRB7)
Tedds calculation version 2.0.00
Scope
Checks the design of new pavement and foundation construction.
References
From the Design Manual for Roads and Bridges Volume 7
General notes
The calculations allow the design of flexible pavements with an asphalt or HBM bound base and rigid CRCP or CRCB
pavements.
The foundation can be designed using the Restricted or Performance methods.
The calculations include a method of estimating the CBR value of the formation level.
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57

Pile analysis (EN1997)
Tedds calculation version 1.0.00
Scope
Static analysis of the resistance capacity of single piles, driven or drilled, in multiple geomaterial strata.
Steel, concrete, or timber piles can be analysed for compressive and tensile axial loads and lateral loads.
This calculation should only be used for preliminary evaluation, it should not be used for final design. Please refer to the Pile
group analysis
Tedds calculation version 1.0.01
Scope
Calculates the reactions of a series of piles subject to one or more loads assuming distribution through a rigid pile cap.
General notes
If required, the pile cap self weight should be added manually as an additional load applied through the centroid of the pile
cap.
The calculation adopts the following procedure:-
1. Calculates the centroid and total value of all applied loads. Take moments about the origin in the x and y directions and
divide the resultant moment values by the total load to get the coordinates of the centroid.
2. Express all pile reactions in terms of the reaction of the first pile P1 plus a rate of increase in the X-direction, rateX and a rate
of increase in the Y-direction, rateY.
3. Take moments about the resultant load in both the X and Y direction, expressing the results in terms of P1, rate X and rateY
eqn.1 and eqn.2.
4. Sum all the pile reactions in terms of P1, rateX and rateY and equate them to the total load. Express P1 in terms of rateX and
rateY eqn.3.
5. Substitute eqn.3 into eqn.1 and express rateX in terms of rateY eqn.4.
6. Substitute eqn.3 and eqn.4 into eqn.2 to solve rateY.
7. Substitute rateY back into eqn.3 to solve rateX.
8. Substitute rateY and rate X into eqn.1 to solve P1.
9. Use rateX, rateY and P1 to solve remaining pile reactions.
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RC beam analysis & design (EN1992)
Tedds calculation version 2.1.15
Scope
Checks the design of reinforced concrete beams of rectangular or flanged cross-section.
The analysis and design calculation allows for the analysis of beams of up to 10 spans with up to 20 loads per span, 20 loads
per support, 8 different load cases and 20 load combinations.

References
Eurocode 2: Design of concrete structures - Part 1-1:General - General rules and rules for buildings
EN1992-1-1:2004 incorporating Corrigendum dated January 2008.
UK National Annex NA to BS EN 1992-1-1:2004 incorporating National Amendment No.1
Irish National Annex NA to IS EN 1992-1-1:2004 incorporating Corrigendum No.1
Singapore National Annex NA to SS EN 1992-1-1:2008
Malaysian Nation Annex NA to MS EN 1992-1-1:2010
General notes
The calculation includes a moment redistribution option.
The beam section may be designed for applied bending and shear at the middle of each span and at each support. Further
calculations check the span to effective depth ratio and reinforcement spacing.
The design only calculation allows you to design a single section based on defined values for bending moment and shear force.
The required bottom reinforcement at supports, where nominal restraining moments may exist, is calculated by multiplying
the area of bottom reinforcement provided in the span multiplied by a factor. As such the span reinforcement should be
designed prior to the support reinforcement.
To design all spans and support in a beam select each in turn and specify the required design details. If a span or support is not
designed they will not be included in the output.
h
Rectangular section
d
h
b
Flanged section
d
b
eff
h
eff
b
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RC beam analysis & design (BS8110)
Tedds calculation version 2.1.13
Scope
These calculations check the design of reinforced concrete beams of rectangular or flanged cross-section.

References
British Standard: Structural use of concrete Part1: Code of practice for design and construction BS 8110-1:1997 incorporating
Amendment Nos. 1, 2 and 3.
General notes
The design and analysis calculation allows you to analyse beams of up to 10 spans with up to 20 loads per span, 20 loads per
support, 8 different load cases and 20 load combinations.
The calculation includes a moment redistribution option.
The beam section may be designed at the middle of each span and at each support.
The beam section is designed for applied bending and shear, further calculations check the span to effective depth ratio and
reinforcement spacing.
Multiple layers of reinforcement may be specified to either face.
The design only calculation allows you to design a single section based on defined values for bending moment and shear force.
Reinforcement maybe specified explicitly to the top and bottom of the beam or as an alternative it is possible to input the total
area of reinforcement to the top or bottom of the beam with the associated depth to the centre of the reinforcement area.
Multiple layers of reinforcement may be specified to either face.
To design all spans and support in a beam select each in turn and specify the required design details. If a span or support is not
designed they will not be included in the output.
h
Rectangular section
d
h
b
Flanged section
d
b
eff
h
eff
b
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RC beam torsion design (BS8110)
Tedds calculation version 1.0.01
Scope
Calculates the quantity of torsional reinforcement (links and longitudinal bars) required, if any, for a solid rectangular section
subjected to a combination of direct shear force and torsional moment.


References
This calculation is performed in accordance with clause 2.4 of BS8110-2:1985.
General notes
The calculation checks the input link properties for the applied shear force and torsional moment and also calculates the area
of longitudinal torsion reinforcement required.
The longitudinal tension bar diameter (D) is used to calculate the effective depth of the section. Therefore, if this diameter
increases, for example to accommodate the longitudinal torsion reinforcement, it is recommended that the calculation is re-
run with the correct diameter applied. Failure to do this will result in a slightly unconservative design being performed due to
the discrepancies in effective depth.
The area of longitudinal tension reinforcement (As) is used to calculate the shear strength of the section (vc). It is not
recommended that the area of longitudinal torsion reinforcement provided at the level of the flexural tension steel is included
in the value of As because, strictly speaking, this is not tension reinforcement. For example, if the area of tension steel required
for bending is calculated as say 1223 mm
2
, it may be appropriate to provide three 25 mm diameter bars (1473 mm
2
). Say the
area of longitudinal torsion steel required to be distributed to the location of the tension steel is 110 mm
2
, then the value of As
used to calculate the shear strength of the section should not be taken as greater than 1473 - 110 =1363 mm
2
.
In accordance with BS8110-2:1985, the links should be closed torsion links and should follow the perimeter of the section. The
area of longitudinal torsion reinforcement required is additional to that required for bending. This reinforcement should be
evenly distributed around the inside of the perimeter link with the bar spacing not exceeding 300 mm (note, however, that for
beams deeper than 750mm, side bars are required at 250mm maximum spacing - see 3.12.11.2.6 of BS8110-1:1997). A
minimum of four bars should be provided, one in each corner of the link. At the locations of the bending tension and
compression reinforcement, the longitudinal torsion reinforcement can be provided for by the spare capacity of these bars or,
if they are fully stressed, by increasing their size.
h
b
c
nom
Perimeter link only is
considered in the design.
This link to be a closed
torsion link.
Internal links not included
in the design but may be
required for spacing rules
(see 3.4.5.5 of
BS8110-1:1997)
Area of steel at this level
includes that required for
bending and torsion
Longitudinal torsion reinf't at max
300 ctrs (but see 3.12.11.2.6 of
BS8110-1:1997) is additional to
that required for bending.
D
L
dia
c
nom
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RC column design (EN1992)
Tedds calculation version 1.2.13
Scope
Checks the design of braced and unbraced, slender and non-slender rectangular and circular columns including the effects of
biaxial bending if applicable.

References
Eurocode 2: Design of concrete structures - Part 1-1:General - General rules and rules for buildings
EN1992-1-1:2004 incorporating Corrigendum dated January 2008.
UK National Annex NA to BS EN 1992-1-1:2004 incorporating National Amendment No.1
Irish National Annex NA to IS EN 1992-1-1:2005 incorporating Corrigendum No.1
Singapore National Annex NA to SS EN 1992-1-1:2008
Malaysian National Annex NA to MS EN 1992-1-1:2010
PD6687:2006 - Background paper to the UK National Annexes to BS EN 1992-1.
General notes
Calculation can be used in three basic ways
1 - to check the capacity of the specified column against the specified axial load and end moments.
2 - to produce the interaction diagram about both axes for the specified column.
3 - to determine the design bending moments for the specified column, axial load and end moments.
Approach 3 is automatically included with approach 1. Approach 3 may be included with approach 2 if required.
Column effective length may be input directly, calculated from end restraint factors, calculated from predetermined end
rotational restraint flexibilities or calculated from the adjoining beam/slab geometry in accordance with PD6687.
Minimum cover for bond and fire resistance is determined automatically.
h
b
c
nom
v
c
nom

y y
z
z
v

h
c
nom
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RC column design (BS 8110)
Tedds calculation version 2.0.06
Scope
Checks the design of columns of solid rectangular section, symmetrically reinforced about the major axis.

References
British Standard: Structural use of concrete Part1: Code of practice for design and construction BS 8110-1:1997 incorporating
Amendment Nos. 1, 2 and 3.
British Standard: Structural use of concrete Part2: Code of practice for special circumstances BS 8110-2:1985 incorporating
Amendment Nos. 1 and 2.
General notes
By selecting the relevant material factors, the calculations can also be compliant to BS 8110 Part 1: 1985.
Crack checks are performed to BS8110:Pt 2, Cl. 3.8 & BS8007 Cl 2.6 & Appendix B.
Braced and unbraced columns can be defined under axial load with or without uni/bi-axial bending.
Columns are automatically classed as short or slender. For slender columns, additional deflection-induced moments are
calculated in accordance with section 3.8.3 of the code.
Shear perpendicular to the major axis and crack width checks can be included if required.
The effective height of the column is defined by entering the effective height factors, x & y, these factors should be
determined by reference to code clause 3.8.1.6.1.
Estimated values are required for the bar diameters of the main tension steel (Dtry) and the shear links (Ldia_try), before the
required area of main tension steel is known. These are used to determine the effective depth (d) so that the required area of
main steel can be calculated. If different diameters are selected in the datalists which appear during the calculations, the
revised effective depth is not re-calculated, because the calculations assume that the cover will change and the effective depth
remain constant. If a larger bar size is selected from either of the datalists, and the reinforcement cover check is selected, a
show statement will indicate that there is insufficient cover. To avoid this, the calculations should be re-calculated, with Dtry
and Ldia_try set to the chosen bar diameters.
Shear steel
"Tension" steel
(Asv)
(Ast)
More highly
compressed
faces
Y
X X
Major
Axis
Minor
Axis
h
Y
b
Rectangular Column
h'
(Asc)
Compression steel
b'
Note for design D is the section depth,
d the depth to "tension" steel and is
dependent upon axis of bending under
consideration.
c
b
c
h
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RC crack width (BS8110)
Tedds calculation version 1.0.02
Scope
Calculates the design surface crack width to the tension face of a reinforced concrete section.

References
From BS8110:Part 2:1985 clause 3.8
s
b
x
d
h

1
z
f .A
s
f .b.x / 2
c
Beam
section
Stresses /
forces Strain
Neutral axis
c
S
S/2
a
cr

Key dimensions
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RC deep beam analysis and design (BS8110)
Tedds calculation version 1.0.00
Scope
Checks the design of rectangular reinforced concrete deep beams


References
British Standard: Structural use of concrete Part1: Code of practice for design and construction BS 8110-1:1997 incorporating
Amendment Nos. 1, 2 and 3.
Ciria Guide 2 The design of deep beam in reinforced concrete
General notes
The methodology for the reinforcement design and the analysis loading are taken from Ciria Guide 2.
The analysis and design calculation allows you to analyse deep beams of up to 5 spans with uniformly distributed loads and
point loads to each span.
The calculation will produce reinforcement sketches which show the main areas of reinforcement specified in the calculation.
The areas defined are the dimensional limits of the reinforcement required and in most cases where overlapping occurs the
reinforcement is only required once. Areas where no reinforcement is shown explicitly are required to have nominal web steel
only.
Main tension zones in the beam are required to have a minimum reinforcement for crack control. In many cases this minimum
reinforcement will be enough to satisfy the shear check calculations and as such the reinforcement required for cracking can
be designed for and applied to the whole beam and augmented in areas found to be inadequate.
The design of shear resistance for top loaded beams will always use the supplementary rules to include the strength of steel as
well as the unreinforced concrete strength of the beam.
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RC flat slab design (BS8110)
Tedds calculation version 1.0.06
Scope
Analysis of a reinforced concrete flat slab on a regular grid of concrete columns using yield line theory.

References
British Standard: Structural use of concrete Part1: Code of practice for design and construction BS 8110-1:1997 incorporating
Amendment Nos. 1, 2 and 3.
General notes
The slab is considered to be a one way continuous slab analysed and designed separately in both x and y directions.
The calculations determine the optimum requirements for top reinforcement over each support to satisfy bending criteria and
bottom reinforcement for each span to satisfy bending and deflection criteria, based on the specified default reinforcement
diameter.
The calculations include the option to check the slab for punching shear at each of the supports, calculating the requirements
for shear reinforcement at successive shear perimeters around each support.
Once the calculation has determined the initial reinforcement design there is the option to amend the reinforcement diameter
and spacing at any point within the slab.
Top reinforcement over the internal supports is concentrated in a strip half the width of the span, this arrangement provides a
better performance with regard to punching shear. Top reinforcement over the external supports is concentrated in a strip one
fifth the width of the span. The reinforcement is designed by using an appropriate multiplier in the calculation of the support
moment.
Span
x
S
p
a
n
y
A B
1
2
e
x
e
y
l
x1
l
y1
l
y
l
x
l
y
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RC pad footing uplift (BS8110)
RC pad footing horizontal capacity (BS8110)
Tedds calculation version 1.0.00
Scope
Checks the design of rectangular and square pad footings for uplift and for horizontal loading.

References
BS 8110 Part 1: 1997 - Structural use of concrete: Part 2. Code of practice for design and construction.
For the holding down bolt checks, BS 5950: Part 1: 2000: Sections 4.13 & 6.6 and 'Holding down systems for steel stanchions'
BCSA / Constrado 1980
General notes
The uplift calculations permit tension piles, anchors or the self-weight of the base to resist uplift.
If required holding down bolts are checked.
D
b
D
s
L
bx
L
by
V
cv
V
cu
F
up
Pad footing details
Note for a square pad footing the variable Lb is used on both axes
(Uplift)
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RC pile cap design (BS8110)
Tedds calculation version 2.0.07
Scope
Checks the designs of a two, three or four pile cap, subject to vertical axial loading from a concentric or eccentric column


3 pile cap 4 pile cap
References
BS 8110 Part 1: 1997 - Structural use of concrete: Part 2. Code of practice for design and construction.
General notes
The calculation for tension reinforcement is based on the truss analogy method. Reinforcement provided is calculated for one
truss member between two pile heads.
For three pile caps, due to the likelihood of reinforcement banding between piles and subsequent absence of fully anchored
reinforcement crossing parts of the punching shear perimeter, the default value of 100As/bd used in the calculation of vc is
taken as zero. During the running of the calculation the user is able to adjust this by selecting an appropriate value from Table
3.8 however an approximate hand calculation, taking into account the specified reinforcement and proposed detailing
approach, will be required to determine the appropriate value of 100As/bd.
e
w1 w1
w2

Ldiag
ex
Loaded width - y,x
P1
P2 P3
e
s
s
s
b
L
0.866s
0.288s
3 Pile Cap, height h
x
b
P1
P
2
s
L
e

Loaded width - x, y
e
x
ex
4 Pile Cap, height h
with eccentricity
y
e
y

P3
P4
/5
3 3
4 4
2
2
1
1
case 3 shear plane
case 4 shear plane
case 1
case 2
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RC raft foundation (BS8110)
Tedds calculation version 1.0.09
Scope
Assesses the ability of elements of a raft to support various loading arrangements without exceeding the allowable bearing
pressure. It also determines the quantities of reinforcement required to support the loads whilst spanning over theoretical
circular depressions in the sub-soil which are assumed to form beneath the raft.

References
BS 8110 Part 1: 1997 - Structural use of concrete: Part 2. Code of practice for design and construction.
General notes
It is considered that the calculation is appropriate to low-rise type structures founded on relatively poor ground.
The user has the option to input the basic diameter of the depression manually or to allow it to be determined by the
calculation. The calculated value is based on the number of sub-soil types present and their densities and ranges in value from
1.5m to 3.5m. It should be noted that the calculated value is approximate only and the user should verify that the value
obtained is appropriate to their particular situation.
The raft may comprise of a plain uniform thickness slab or may have edge thickening beams and optional internal thickening
beams. There is the option for the edge beams to have a boot to the outer face and/or a chamfer to the inner face. For the
internal beams there is the option to have chamfered sides.
The slab element of the raft must be reinforced with square mesh. The mesh may be located in both the top and bottom faces
or in the top face only. The beam elements must be reinforced in the top and bottom faces with loose bar reinforcement and
in addition must have vertical shear reinforcement. If inclined reinforcement is provided, for example in the chamfered face of
a beam, this should not be included as part of the shear reinforcement.
h
edge
h
boot
b
edge
b
boot
a
edge
h
slab
h
hcoreslab
h
hcorethick
A
sslabtop A
sedgetop
A
sslabbtm
A
sedgebtm
A
sedgelink
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RC slab design (EN1992)
Tedds calculation version 1.0.10
Scope
Checks the design of one or two-way spanning reinforced concrete slabs.

References
Eurocode 2: Design of concrete structures - Part 1-1:General - General rules and rules for buildings
EN1992-1-1:2004 incorporating Corrigendum dated January 2008.
UK National Annex NA to BS EN 1992-1-1:2004 incorporating National Amendment No.1
Irish National Annex NA to IS EN 1992-1-1:2005 incorporating Corrigendum No.1
Singapore National Annex NA to SS EN 1992-1-1:2008
Malaysian National Annex NA to MS EN 1992-1-1:2010
General notes
For two-way spanning slabs the bending moments are obtained from coefficients based on the panel dimensions and support
conditions. For one-way spanning slabs the bending moments may be obtained from coefficients based on the number of
spans, the span dimensions and end support condition or alternatively they can be input directly from a separate independent
analysis.
The slab section is designed at the middle of each span (bending only) and at each support (bending and shear). Further
calculations check the span to effective depth ratio and reinforcement spacing.
Minimum cover for bond and fire resistance are determined automatically.
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RC slab design (BS8110)
Tedds calculation version 1.0.04
Scope
Checks the design of solid slabs supported by beams or walls. The calculations will check one way spanning or two-way
spanning slabs and cater for simply supported or continuous support conditions.

References
BS 8110 Part 1: 1997 - Structural use of concrete: Part 2. Code of practice for design and construction.
General notes
The checks performed are, optionally, moment, shear, punching shear, deflection and a cover check.
Nominal 1 m width
Nominal 1 m width
dx
dy
Two-way spanning slab
h
h
Asx
Asx
Asy
Asy
(simple)
Longer Span
Shorter Span
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RC stair design (BS8110)
Tedds calculation version 1.0.04
Scope
Checks the design of a reinforced concrete stair subject to a uniformly distributed load.

References
From BS8110 Structural use of concrete - Part 1: Code of practice for design and construction.
General notes
Supports at each end of the stair may be classified as simple end supports, continuous end supports, first interior supports and
interior supports.

Span
H
e
i
g
h
t

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RC thermal crack width (BS8007)
Tedds calculation version 1.0.04
Scope
Calculates the estimated maximum crack width in each surface zone of wall, suspended or ground bearing slab elements
resulting from thermal shrinkage induced direct tension.
References
This calculation is performed in accordance with BS8007:1987.
General notes
The calculation also checks the users input reinforcement against the minimum requirements of BS8007:1987. The
reinforcement can be different in each face of the element and can be either loose bar or mesh but not a combination in a
single element.
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73

RC wall design (EN1992)
Tedds calculation version 1.0.07
Scope
Checks the design of braced and unbraced, slender and non-slender walls.

References
Eurocode 2: Design of concrete structures - Part 1-1:General - General rules and rules for buildings
EN1992-1-1:2004 incorporating Corrigendum dated January 2008.
UK National Annex NA to BS EN 1992-1-1:2004 incorporating National Amendment No.1
Irish National Annex NA to IS EN 1992-1-1:2005 incorporating Corrigendum No.1
Singapore National Annex NA to SS EN 1992-1-1:2008
Malaysian National Annex NA to MS EN 1992-1-1:2010
PD6687:2006 - Background paper to the UK National Annexes to BS EN 1992-1.
General notes
Calculation can be used in three basic ways
1 - to check the capacity of the specified wall against the specified axial load (including tension) and minor axis end
moments.
2 - to produce the interaction diagram about the minor axis for the specified wall.
3 - to determine the design bending moments for the specified wall, axial load and end moments.
Approach 3 is automatically included with approach 1. Approach 3 may be included with approach 2 if required.
Wall effective length may be input directly, calculated from end restraint factors, calculated from predetermined end
rotational restraint flexibilities or calculated from the adjoining beam/slab geometry in accordance with PD6687.
Minimum cover for bond and fire resistance determined automatically.
Crack widths may be calculated and checked against specified limits.
h
c
nom
f h
s
v
f v
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RC wall design (BS8110)
Tedds calculation version 1.0.04
Scope
Checks the design of braced and unbraced walls in simply supported or monolithic construction under axial load with or
without transverse shear and bending.

References
BS 8110 Part 1: 1997 - Structural use of concrete: Part 1. Code of practice for design and construction.
Crack checks are performed to BS8110:Pt 2, Cl. 3.8 & BS8007 Cl 2.6 & Appendix B.
General notes
Walls are automatically classed as stocky or slender. For slender walls, additional deflection-induced moments are calculated in
accordance with section 3.8.3 of the code.
Crack width checks can be included if required.
The effective height of the wall is defined by entering the effective height factor This factor should be determined by
reference to code clauses 3.9.4.2 and 3.9.4.3 for walls in simple construction and Tables 3.21 and 3.22 for walls in monolithic
construction.
1000 mm
h'
h
Tension steel
Horizontal steel
(Ast)
Compression steel
(Asc)
Wall
(assumed symmetric)
(Ahor)
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Reinforcement schedule (BS8666)
Tedds calculation version 1.0.05
Scope
Compiles a reinforcement schedule and calculates the total weight of steel listed in the schedule.
References
From BS8666:2005 Specification for scheduling, dimensioning, bending and cutting of steel reinforcement for concrete.
General notes
The calculation determines the length of reinforcement based on dimensions entered in the interface and the equations
provided in table 3 of the code.
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Retaining wall analysis & design (EN1992/EN1996/EN1997)
Tedds calculation version 2.4.09
Scope
Checks the analysis or analysis and design of a reinforced concrete or masonry retaining wall.
The retaining wall stem may be either cantilevered or propped and may feature either stepped or inclined faces. The retaining
wall base may also be propped.
The retaining wall may be subject to vertical or horizontal loads applied at any point to the base or wall stem. It may also be
subject to surcharge loads applied as area loads directly behind the wall.
The analysis calculations check the stability of the retaining wall with regard to sliding and overturning as well as checking the
maximum base pressures.
The design calculations check the stem and base in flexure and shear and will include crack width checks if required.
Masonry stem design includes unreinforced as well as pocket, hollow or cavity reinforced masonry options.
The design output includes an indicative reinforcement arrangement sketch.


References
Eurocode 2: Design of concrete structures - Part 1-1: General rules and rules for buildings EN1992-1-1:2004 incorporating
Corrigendum dated January 2008 and November 2010.
UK National Annex NA to BS EN 1992-1-1:2004 incorporating National Amendment No.1
Irish National Annex NA to IS EN 1992-1-1:2005 incorporating Corrigendum No.1
Singapore National Annex NA to SS EN 1992-1-1:2008
Eurocode 6: Design of masonry structures - Part 1-1: General rules for reinforced and unreinforced masonry structures
EN1996-1-1:2005 +A1:2012 incorporating corrigenda February 2006 and July 2009.
UK National Annex NA to BS EN 1996-1-1:2005 +A1:2012
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Irish National Annex NA to IS EN 1996-1-1:2005
Eurocode 7: Geotechnical design - Part 1: General rules EN1997-1:2004 incorporating Corrigendum dated February 2009
UK National Annex NA to BS EN 1997-1:2004 incorporating Corrigendum No.1
Irish National Annex NA to IS EN 1997-1:2005.
Singapore National Annex NA to SS EN 1997-1:2010.
General notes
Net ultimate bearing capacity is calculated for either the drained or undrained condition using the sample analytical method
for bearing resistance included in annex D.
Alternatively the calculation will check a presumed bearing resistance against unfactored SLS base pressures.
The calculation uses two sets of soil properties, retained soil for the soil to the back of the retaining wall and base soil for the
soil beneath and to the front of the retaining wall. Active and at-rest pressure coefficients are calculated using the retained soil
properties while the passive pressure coefficient is calculated using the base soil properties.
The design of the stem can be carried out at multiple locations but must include the foot of the stem for cantilever walls and
the point of maximum moment for propped cantilever walls.
The design of the base is carried out once for the maximum and minimum moments generated in the heel and toe of the base.
The design of a key, if included is carried out at a single location for the worst moment induced in the key.
The design of transverse reinforcement is carried out once for the stem and once for the base. For the stem the calculation is
based on the maximum overall stem thickness.
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Retaining wall analysis and design (BS8002)
Tedds calculation version 1.2.01.06
Scope
Checks the stability of a retaining wall which may feature a sloped or stepped back or face with or without a downstand, either
propped or unpropped, against sliding and determines the maximum and minimum base pressures beneath the wall.
The calculation allows the design of cantilever retaining walls in either reinforced concrete or reinforced masonry.

References
BS8002:1994 - Code of Practice for Earth Retaining Structures
BS 8110 Part 1: 1997 - Structural use of concrete: Part 1. Code of practice for design and construction.
BS 5628 Part 2: 2000 - Code of practice for the use of Masonry: Part 1.Structural use of reinforced and prestressed concrete
General notes
The reinforced concrete design calculations allow the design of the retaining wall toe, heel, downstand and stem for bending
and shear as appropriate.
The reinforced masonry design calculations allow the design of the stem as a reinforced cavity, pocket reinforced or reinforced
hollow blockwork retaining wall.

t
base
d
ds
Surcharge
W
Base material
Saturated
retained
material
Water level
d
cover
Moist retained
material
d
exc
Virtual
back
of wall
Depth of
excavation
Wall
Heel
l
toe
l
heel
t
wall
l
base
t
ds
Toe
Downstand
h
s
t
e
m
h
w
a
t
e
r
h
w
a
l
l
h
e
f
f
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Retaining wall design (CP2)
Tedds calculation version 1.0.00
Scope
Retaining walls may be cantilever or propped cantilever and constructed of reinforced concrete, reinforced masonry or
masonry.
The calculations check the stability (sliding and overturning) and base pressures of vertical stem retaining walls (T- or L-
section).
The calculations design the toe, heel and stem masonry/reinforcement for bending and shear as appropriate.

RC/Propped masonry Unpropped masonry Reinforced masonry
References
CP2 1951 reprinted 1975 - Code of Practice for Earth Retaining Structures
BS 8110 Part 1: 1997 - Structural use of concrete: Part 1. Code of practice for design and construction.
BS 5628 : Part 1 1992 - Code of practice, for the use of Masonry, Part 1 Structural use of unreinforced masonry.
BS 5628-2:2000 - Code of practice for the use of Masonry, Part 2 Structural use of reinforced and prestressed masonry.
General notes
The provision of a new interface for the retaining wall calculations has offered the opportunity to improve the way the
calculations work. Since the new interface is very fast to run and re-run, we have removed the approximate calculation
methods previously adopted which advised lengths of heel and toe.
The result is that we can now compute stability at the end of the heel (the virtual back of the wall) more accurately, since we
know how long the heel is.
The net result is that for walls retaining sloped surfaces, soil pressures are higher when considering stability, base pressures
and base design.
kN/m^2
(surcharge)
deg
h

w
s
t
b
W
l
toe heel
l
c
t
o.a
l
h
stem
w
t
kN/m^2
(surcharge)
deg
h

w
s
t
b
W
t
2
w
t l
toe heel
l
c
t
n
h
n
t
2
h
o.a
l
h
stem
o.a
l
kN/m^2
(surcharge)
deg
h

w
s
t
b
W
l
toe heel
l
c
t
h
stem
r
t
t
conc
f
t
w
t
w.oa
t
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Rigid diaphragm force distribution
Tedds calculation version 1.0.03
Scope
Calculates the distribution of lateral forces through a rigid diaphragm into lateral force resisting elements that supports the
diaphragm.
General notes
Lateral force resisting elements include columns (steel or concrete), braced bays (steel), individual shear walls and other
elements.
Calculation checks summation of all direct forces and torsional shear forces.
In the first stage of the analysis the centroid of rigidity is calculated based on the horizontal stiffness of the lateral load
resisting elements.
Secondly, the lateral loads are distributed to each lateral load resisting element based on the applied loading and its position
(Jp) relative to the centroid of rigidity.
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Rolling load analysis
Tedds calculation version 1.1.00
Scope
Rolling load analysis of a continuous steel beam with up to 10 spans. Load train comprising up to 10 point loads.
General notes
The sequence of wheel loads is defined in the same direction as the sequence of spans. For non-symmetrical load trains, the
analysis should be repeated with a mirror image of the load train (where this is physically possible in the real structure) to
obtain the worst load effects at each location.
Beam section can be either from the European Sections datalist of steel sections or a custom section;
Beam self-weight is automatically included in the analysis;
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Section properties calculator
Tedds calculation version 2.0.04
Scope
Calculates the section properties of a section constructed from rectangles, triangles and circles, with or without holes.

General notes
The calculated section properties are returned to the Tedds document as variables for use in further calculations.
Standard section types can be designed quickly from within the calculation user interface by specifying the dimensions of the
section.
Custom sections can be created by using the Section Designer application. This application allows a section to be designed
using a simple CAD style user interface. Sections can be saved for re-use at a later date.
Sections can be imported from Tedds data lists either as a starting point for new sections or to create combined sections (such
as a channel on an I section). Sections are available for the UK, USA, Canada, Japan, South Africa, Singapore and Australia.
The properties calculated include:
o Area
o 2nd moment of area
o Radius of gyration
o Plastic section modulus (only shapes with all rectangles at 90 degs)
o Distance to combined centroid
o Distance to equal axis area (only shapes with all rectangles at 90 degs)
o Elastic section modulus
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Simple column safe load tables (BS5950)
Tedds calculation version 1.0.05
Scope
Checks the design of a column in simple construction using the appropriate safe load tables. The column can be based on one
of three levels - top (column below), intermediate (columns above and below) and bottom (column above).

References
From BS 5950-1:2000 cl 4.7.7 - columns in simple construction.
General notes
Initial sections are selected for each applicable level and used to determine the moment distribution factors.
Using the calculated moment distribution factors (determined from the sections properties), the entered loads and
eccentricities of the incoming elements, the calculations determine the x and y axis moments for the column.
The loads also include for up to 4 incoming beams at both top and bottom of the column section being designed (dependent
upon which level is selected).
The moments and axial load can be used to determine the optimum section from the safe load tables. For the easiest selection
of a section use the search facility in the safe load tables to narrow down the range of sections that can be selected. The values
used for the final check are the buckling resistance Mbs, and the minimum of the compressive resistances for major and minor
axes - Pcx and Pcy.
RA
RA
RB
RB
RC
RC
RD
RD
Labove
Lbelow
L
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Slope stability - slip circle analysis
Tedds calculation version 1.0.02
Scope
Calculates the factor of safety for the stability of a slope assuming a circular slip failure.

General notes
Auto analysis allows a number of trial circles to be analysed in a single process.
Undrained slopes are analysed using a total stress analysis, this approach is appropriate to newly cut or constructed slopes in
fully saturated clays. Drained slopes may be analysed using either the Fellenius (Swedish circle) method or Bishop's simplified
method.
O
A B
C
G
F E
D

A
B
x
y
R
H
H
H
L
d
d
W
WA
A
A
B
B
B
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Snow loading (EN1991)
Tedds calculation version 1.0.03
Scope
Calculates the undrifted and drifted (where applicable) snow loads on flat, monopitch, duopitch, multispan and cylindrical
roofs as well as a roofs abutting taller buildings.



References
Eurocode 1: Actions on structures Part 1-3: General actions Snow loads EN1991-1-3:2003
UK National Annex NA to BS EN 1991-1-3:2003 incorporating corrigendum no.1
Irish National Annex NA+A1 to IS EN 1991-1-3:2003
General notes
Additional local loads can be defined in the form of an obstruction or a parapet on flat, monopitch and duopitch roofs. Canopy
loading can also be considered for the UK and Irish national annex calculations.
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Snow loading (BS6399)
Tedds calculation version 1.0.01
Scope
Calculates the uniformly distributed and redistributed snow loads on a flat, monopitch, pitched or curved single span roofs as
well as the snow load resulting from the local drifting of snow on multiple span roofs and roofs featuring canopies, parapets
and other projections and obstructions.

References
From BS6399:Part 3:1988 - Code of practice for imposed roof loads.
General notes
Loads determined using this calculation are unfactored/characteristic loads.

1
Uniform loading Asymmetric loading
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Soakaway design (BRE digest 365 / SUDS)
Tedds calculation version 2.0.01
Scope
Calculates the maximum storage required for each rainfall duration over a return period of between 5 and 100 years. In order
to allow a range of return periods to be selected, table 2 has been extended to include Z2 growth factor values for 1, 2, 3, 4, 5,
10, 20, 30, 50 and 100 years using figures taken from The Wallingford Procedure for Europe - Best Practice Guide for urban
drainage modelling, published in 2000

References
BRE digest 365 - Soakaway designs for either rectangular or concentric ring soakaways.
CIRIA C697 The SUDS Manual (2007)
The Wallingford Procedure for Europe - Best Practice Guide for urban drainage modelling. Version 1.1 (Dec. 2000)
General notes
The design of the soakaway can be calculated using either the BRE method or the SUDS manual method.
The design of a infiltration blanket and infiltration pavement can be calculated using the SUDS manual method.
Using the BRE method either the required minimum pit depth, width and length can be calculated by selecting the appropriate
required dimension and specifying the remaining ones.
Using the SUDS Manual method the calculation will determine the minimum required depth for a suitable storage capacity.
The calculations also check that the soakaway/infiltration system discharges from full to half volume within 24 hours.
These calculations determine the M5 rainfalls using table 1 and then calculate the growth factor for table 2 and, using this,
calculate the relevant rainfall for each rainfall duration. Using these values the inflow for each duration is calculated along with
the outflow (given the soil infiltration rate)
The calculations can (optionally) determine the soil infiltration rate - from trial pit size and the test results for the time taken
for the water level to fall from 75%to 25%of the effective storage depth in the pit.
If the soil infiltration rate is to be calculated, the trial pit size and the test results for the time taken for the water level to fall
from 75%to 25%of the effective storage depth in the pit are required, otherwise the soil infiltration rate must be entered.
w
d
Rectangular pit soakaway
Incoming invert
l
w
dia
Circular ring pit soakaway
Pit is depth - d
w
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Steel angle design (BS5950)
Tedds calculation version 1.0.04
Scope
Checks the design of single equal and unequal leg angles subjected to compression or tension and/or uni/bi-axial bending.

References
From British Standard: Structural use of steelwork in building - Part 1: Code of practice for design - Rolled and welded sections
BS5950-1:2000 Incorporating Corrigendum No.1.
General notes
Effective length for compression capacity calculated in accordance with either clause 4.7.10.2 (single angle struts) or using
Table 22 end restraint factors.
Tension capacity is calculated either as a simple tension member in accordance with clause 4.6.3.1 or as a general tension
member in accordance with clause 4.6.1.
Section may be restrained or unrestrained against lateral torsional buckling when subjected to bending. The buckling
resistance moment is calculated using the basic method given in clause 4.3.8.2.
My +ve Mx +ve
y
y
x
d
b
x
F +ve
Fvy
Fvx
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Steel beam analysis & design (EN1993)
Steel member design (EN1993)
Tedds calculation version 3.0.10
Scope
Checks the design of rolled I and H sections, rolled asymmetric sections, slimflor sections, rolled channel sections, rolled T
sections, rolled rectangular hollow sections and rolled circular hollow sections subject to major or minor axis bending, shear
and axial tension or compression. The member design calculation will also check sections subject to biaxial bending.
The analysis and design calculation allows analysis of beams of up to 10 spans with up to 20 beam loads, 20 loads per span, 20
loads per support, 8 different load cases and 20 load combinations.
The section is designed for worst case applied moment, shear, compression or tension and deflection across all spans.
The member design calculation can be used to design a single section based on defined values for bending moment, axial
compression or tension, and shear force.
References
Eurocode 3: Design of steel structures - Part 1-1:General rules and rules for buildings
EN1993-1-1:2005 incorporating corrigenda February 2006 and April 2009
UK National Annex NA to BS EN 1993-1-1:2005
Irish National Annex NA to IS EN 1993-1-1:2005
Singapore National Annex NA to SS EN 1993-1-1:2010
Malaysia National Annex NA to MS EN 1993-1-1:2010
Eurocode 3: Design of steel structures - Part 1-5:Plated structural elements
EN1993-1-5:2006 incorporating corrigendum April 2009
UK National Annex NA to BS EN 1993-1-5:2006
Irish National Annex NA to IS EN 1993-1-5:2006
General notes
The calculations were prepared with the aid of the following NCCI documents published on the Access Steel website:
o SN002 - Determination of non-dimensional slenderness of I and H sections
o SN003 - Elastic critical moment for lateral torsional buckling
o SN009 - Effective lengths and destabilising load parameters for beams and cantilevers - common cases
o SN030 - Mono-symmetrical uniform members under bending and axial compression
The design can include up to 5 sections working together to support the load.
The design and analysis calculation includes the self weight of the beam by default although this load may be removed if
required.
Axial compression and tension should be entered as a fully factored design loads on the 'Design options' dialog.
Deflection calculations are based on unfactored loads with the option of manually defining which load types are included; by
default dead loads are automatically excluded.
Moment distribution factor kc is calculated automatically based on the values suggested in table 6.6, with the option of
manually defining the values used for each segment.
The design and analysis calculation checks that each designed section passes bending, shear, tension or compression and
deflection checks as appropriate.
The member design calculation checks that the section passes bending, shear and tension or compression checks.
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Steel beam analysis & design (BS5950)
Steel member design (BS5950)
Tedds calculation version 3.0.05
Scope
These calculations check the design of rolled I and H sections, rolled asymmetric sections, slimflor sections, rolled channel
sections, rolled T sections, rolled rectangular hollow sections and rolled circular hollow sections subject to major axis bending,
shear and axial tension or compression.
The analysis and design calculation allows you to analyse beams of up to 10 spans with up to 20 beam loads, 20 loads per span,
20 loads per support, 8 different load cases and 20 load combinations.
The section is designed for worst case applied moment, shear, compression or tension and deflection across all spans.
The member design calculation can be used to design a single section based on defined values for bending moment, axial
compression or tension, and shear force.
References
British Standard: Structural use of steelwork in building - Part 1: Code of practice for design - Rolled and welded sections
BS5950-1:2000 Incorporating Corrigendum No.1.
General notes
The design can include up to 5 sections working together to support the load.
The design and analysis calculation includes the self weight of the beam by default although this load may be removed if
required.
Axial compression and tension should be entered as a fully factored design loads on the 'Design options' dialog.
Deflection calculations are based on unfactored loads with the option of manually defining which load types are included; by
default dead loads are automatically excluded.
The design and analysis calculation checks that each designed section passes bending, shear, tension or compression and
deflection checks as appropriate.
The member design calculation checks that the section passes bending, shear and tension or compression checks.
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Steel beam torsion design (SCI-P-057)
Tedds calculation version 2.0.02
Scope
Checks the design of a single span, simply supported, straight steel beam loaded normal to the major axis.
Full torsional restraint at both ends of beam.
References
BS 5950-1: 2000 - Structural use of steelwork in buildings - Part 1. Code of practice for design - Rolled and welded section.
Design for torsion, and combined effects including torsion, follows the guidance in the Steel Construction Institute's
publication SCI-P-057 Design of Members Subject to Combined Bending and Torsion.
General notes
At each end, the section may be may be free to warp or fully fixed against warping.
No intermediate lateral, torsional or warping restraint.
No axial loading or applied loading perpendicular to the minor axis. (Induced minor axis moments are covered.)
Hot-rolled RHS, SHS, CHS, UB, UC, RSJ or Channel section.
One load combination, comprising any number and arrangement of concentric loads, acting simultaneously with one pattern
of eccentric loading, from the following:
o an eccentric uniformly distributed load;
o one eccentric point load, at midspan;
o two eccentric point loads, at third points; or
o three eccentric point loads, at quarter points.
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Steel column design (EN1993)
Tedds calculation version 1.0.10
Scope
Checks the design of rolled I, H, channel, rectangular and circular hollow sections subject to biaxial bending, shear and axial
compression or tension.
References
Eurocode 3: Design of steel structures - Part 1-1:General rules and rules for buildings
EN1993-1-1:2005 incorporating Corrigenda February 2006 and April 2009.
UK National Annex NA to BS EN 1993-1-1:2005
Irish National Annex NA to IS EN 1993-1-1:2005
Singapore National Annex NA to SS EN 1993-1-1:2010
Malaysia National Annex NA to MS EN 1993-1-1:2010
General notes
The flexural buckling length may be input directly, calculated from defined end restraint factors or, for rigid jointed frames,
calculated from the frame geometry in accordance with document SN008, Buckling lengths of columns: rigorous approach
presented on the Access Steel website.
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Steel masonry support (BS5950)
Tedds calculation version 1.0.02

Scope
Checks the bending, deflection and fixings where applicable in a masonry support beam.
If selected the main/torsion beam can be checked for torsion and combined effects in accordance with SCI-P-057 Design of
Members Subject to Combined Bending and Torsion.
References
BS 5950-1: 2000 - Structural use of steelwork in buildings - Part 1. Code of practice for design - Rolled and welded section.
Steel Construction Institute - SCI-P-057 Design of Members Subject to Combined Bending and Torsion.
Steel Construction Institute - SCI-P-110 Slim Floor Design and Construction.
Steel Construction Institute AD 187 Update to P-123 Concise Guide to the Structural Design of Stainless Steel.
Steel Construction Institute - SCI-P-157 Stainless Steel Angles for Masonry Support.
General notes
Steel masonry support beam section:
o The masonry support beam can be designed as either a stainless steel cold formed angle in accordance with SCI-P-
157, a mild steel angle using simple bending or a flat plate welded to the underside of the beam in accordance with
SCI-P-110.
o Checks will be undertaken for the bolts and minimum weld lengths calculated where applicable.
Steel beams in torsion section:
o If the torsional beam is selected to be designed the torsional moment from the masonry and support beam,
assuming a UDL, will be calculated and used for the torsional checks. An additional torsional moment can be added
to include any other uniform load not specified in the main user interface.
o At each end, the section may be may be free to warp or fully fixed against warping.
o No intermediate lateral, torsional or warping restraint.
o No axial loading or applied loading perpendicular to the minor axis. (Induced minor axis moments are covered.)
o Hot-rolled RHS, SHS, UB, UC, RSJ or Channel section.
8
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Steel sheet piling design (BS8002)
Tedds calculation version 1.0.03
Scope
The calculation checks the stability of either a cantilever or a propped/tied steel sheet pile wall by determining the required
minimum embedment length and calculates the minimum required plastic section modulus per metre run of wall. Where
appropriate the calculation will determine the tie/prop force.


References
BS8002:1994 Code of Practice for Earth Retaining Structures
General notes
In contrast to the traditional approach to retaining wall design, the limit state methods recommended by BS8002 do not
directly utilise a factor of safety, instead a mobilization factor M is applied to the representative strength values for the soils to
give a design soil strength value. The user should ensure that they select a value of M that is suitable for the requirements of
the design, with BS8002 suggesting values of 1.2, 1.5 or more.
Water table may be added at any level on the retained side. When the water level on the retained side is higher than ground
level on the unretained side, there is an option to have different water levels to both sides of the wall. The lowest water level
on the unretained side in this case is limited to the lower ground level.
The maximum bending moments in the piles are determined using the Tedds continuous beam analysis engine with the piles
being analysed as vertical beams. The applied loads used in the analysis are the active and passive pressures as determined in
the calculation. Hence the balanced pressure diagram is effectively the loading diagram used in the analysis. There are two
methods of analysis available for the design of sheet pile walls and are governed by the restraint conditions imposed by the soil
at the bottom of the embedded length.
o Free-earth conditions assume that the wall has insufficient embedment to prevent rotation at the toe but the wall is
still in equilibrium.
o Fixed-earth conditions assume that the wall is sufficiently embedded and the soil stiff enough to prevent rotation
about the toe.
The design of a cantilever wall assumes fixed earth conditions and is analysed as a vertical cantilever beam. The design of
tie/propped walls can be designed by either fixed or free earth conditions, and are analysed as a propped cantilever or simply
supported vertical beams respectively.
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The calculation can be used either to design a new wall or to analyse an existing wall. For the design of a new wall an initial
estimated total length of pile is required and the calculation will determine the actual length of pile required to satisfy
equilibrium. The fixed earth method also calculates a total minimum required length based on a 20%multiplier to the
embedded length below the point of contraflexure, due to the simplification of the fixed earth method. A minimum plastic
section modulus is calculated which can then be compared to manufactures information to determine the type of pile
required. If an existing wall is to be analysed the total length of pile is input in to the calculation and the required minimum
height will be calculated and compared to the actual, resulting in a pass or fail statement.
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Stormwater drainage
Tedds calculation version 1.0.01
Scope
Calculates and plots the Energy Grade Line (EGL) and the Hydraulic Grade Line (HGL) for a pipe line and determines if they
conform to freeboard requirements.

General notes
The EGL and HGL are calculated to take in to effect, frictional pipe losses according to the roughness of the pipe material and
local losses relating to the type of structure that is present along the pipe line.
The frictional pipe losses are based on the Colebrook-White formula.
The diameter of the pipes and the flow within them can be altered along the length of the pipe. Adjusting the flow along the
pipe can be used to model additional flows, say from an inlet or branch line, within the system.
The calculation will determine structure loss coefficients but these can be overwritten with user defined values if preferred.
0
.4
3
m
3 /s
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Stormwater attenuation design
Tedds calculation version 1.0.01
Scope
Calculates typical storage volumes due to stormwater events for development sites.
References
Joint Defra/EA Flood and Coastal Risk Management R&D Programme - Preliminary rainfall runoff management for
developments Report W5-047/A/TR/1 RevE
CIRIA publications Sustainable Urban Drainage Systems - Design Manual for England and Wales, Sustainable Urban Drainage
Systems - Design Manual for Scotland and Northern Ireland
General notes
The calculation of storage volumes can be undertaken using three methods as detailed below
o Joint Defra/EA - this method will follow the procedure as detailed in the document 'Joint Defra/EA Flood and Coastal
Risk Management R&D Programme - Preliminary rainfall runoff management for developments Report W5-
047/A/TR/1 RevE' to estimate the infiltration, attenuation and long term storage volumes for a given site. The results
can be given for either 1yr, 10yr and 100yr return periods or 1yr, 30yr and 100yr return periods. The actual site
attenuation will be taken as the 10yr or 30yr return rainfall period respectively.
o Allowable discharge - this method calculates the attenuation storage for a return period of 30 years assuming that
the permitted discharge is set for the 2 year return period.
o Pre post runoff - this method will determine the storage requirements for a range of return periods by calculating the
additional volume of runoff for a site in a greenfield state, using the method from the Institute of Hydrology Report
124 Flood Estimation for Small Catchments, and the runoff post development using the Modified Rational Method.
All design methods use the Wallingford Procedure to estimate the estimated site discharges for the required return periods.
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Stress skin panel design (BS5268)
Tedds calculation version 1.0.02
Scope
Checks the design of a single span stress skin panel subjected to a UDL and a point load.
The stress skin panel consists of plywood sheets attached to longitudinal timber web members by glue and nails to form a
composite unit similar to that shown here.

References
BS5268-2:2002 incorporating Amendment No.1 Structural use of timber Part 2: Code of practice for permissible stress
design, materials and workmanship.
General notes
Panels will be either double skin with plywood sheeting top and bottom, or single skin with plywood sheeting to the top only.
The calculations generate the panel section properties.
Panels may be specified as being constructed with flush or flying ends as shown in the sketch below.

If required the calculation will include the length of plywood splice plates needed to ensure continuity of the top and bottom
plywood sheets.
Top skin
Bottom skin
Web member
End blocking
End blocking
Splice plate
Plywood splice
Double-skin panel with flush ends
Double-skin panel with flying ends
Single-skin panel with flush ends
Single-skin panel with flying ends
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The panel may be checked under two separate load cases, one where the panel is subjected to an imposed UDL and one where
the panel is subjected to an imposed point load.
For each load case the panel design is checked against applied bending and shear stresses. Further calculations check the panel
deflection.
Panel deflection is limited to 0.003 times the effective span.
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Strip footing analysis and design (BS8110)
Tedds calculation version 2.0.02.00
Scope
Checks the design of a strip footing in either reinforced or unreinforced concrete.
The footing may be subjected to axial and horizontal loads and moments as indicated in the sketch below.

References
The calculations are in accordance with BS 8110-Part 1:1997 - Structural use of concrete: Part 1. Code of practice for design
and construction.
General notes
The calculations check the stability of the base with regard to uplift, sliding and overturning. They also check the maximum and
minimum base pressures.
The reinforced concrete design calculations check the design of the base in bending and shear as appropriate.
Soil properties for granular soils may be calculated in accordance with BS8002 using a mobilization factor m applied to the
representative strength values for the soils to give a design soil strength value. A value of m should be selected that is
appropriate for the requirements of the design, BS8002 suggests values of 1.2, 1.5 or more.
M
P
H
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Surface wind load (BS6399)
Tedds calculation version 1.0.00
Scope
Using the hybrid method, this calculation will determine the dynamic pressure (qs) and the unfactored net surface pressure (p)
on a wall or roof surface.
References
BS 6399: Part 2: 1997 - Loading for buildings: Part 2. Code of practice for wind loads. Including Amendment No. 1.
BRE Digest 436
General notes
One wind direction is considered for each run of the calculations.
The directional method implemented in these calculations is the hybrid method suggested in BRE Digest 436, whereby the
terrain and building factor from table 4 is replaced by the value obtained from equation 28 or 29, using a standard value for gt
of 3.44, and applying the size effect factor Ca determined from clause 2.1.3.4.
BRE Digest 436 presents three basic options for determining the effective dynamic pressure for the orthogonal load cases used
in the standard method of BS6399:2. These calculations may be used with any one of these options.
o Method 1: One calculation combining the worst all-round values of all the direction-dependent factors and
dimensions.
o Method 2: One calculation for each of the four orthogonal cases. Each calculation uses the worst direction-
dependent factors and dimensions in a range of direction 45 deg either side of the orthogonal direction.
o Method 3: Twelve calculations for exact wind directions at 30 deg intervals around the building, using the actual
values of the direction-dependent factors and dimensions for the each direction. The dynamic pressure for each
orthogonal case is then taken as the worst dynamic pressure in the direction range 45 deg either side of the
orthogonal case.
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Swale and filter strip design
Tedds calculation version 2.0.01
Scope
Checks the design of swales and filter strips.
A filter strip is an area of vegetated land through which run off water is directed, they usually lie between a hard-surfaced area
and a receiving stream, surface water collector or disposal system. Filter strips can take any natural vegetated form, from grass
verge to shrub area.
A swale is a linear grassed drainage feature in which surface water can be stored or conveyed. Swales have a significant
pollutant removal potential and can be designed to allow infiltration under appropriate conditions. They are particularly
suitable for diffuse collection of water runoff from small residential or commercial developments, paved areas and roads.
References
CIRIA publications Sustainable Urban Drainage Systems - Design Manual for England and Wales, Sustainable Urban Drainage
Systems - Design Manual for Scotland and Northern Ireland, and BRE Digest 365 - Soakaway Design.
General notes
The critical rainfall intensity can be defined directly or calculated in accordance with BRE Digest 365 by defining the
appropriate storm length and return period and the ratio, r, of a 60 minute to 2-day rainfalls of 5 year return period
appropriate for the geographic location.
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Timber, glulam and flitch member design (EN1995)
Tedds calculation version 1.5.09
Scope
Checks the design of solid timber, glulam and flitch members.
The analysis and design calculation allows for the analysis of beams with up to 10 spans, 20 loads per span, 20 loads per
support, 8 different load cases and 20 load combinations.

References
Eurocode 5: Design of timber structures - Part 1-1:General - Common rules and rules for buildings
EN1995-1-1:2004 +A1:2008 incorporating Corrigendum No.1
UK National Annex NA to BS EN 1995-1-1:2004 +A1:2008 incorporating National Amendment No.1
Irish National Annex NA to IS EN 1992-1-1:2004
Structural timber - Strength classes EN 338:2009
Timber structures - Glued laminated timber - Strength classes and determination of characteristic values
EN 1194:1999
General notes
Flitch design methodology is in accordance with the TRADA guidance document GD9 - How to design a bolted steel flitch beam.
For solid timber and glulam members it is possible to include an axial compression or tension load as well as a minor axis
moment.
For solid timber and glulam members it is possible to define notches to either the top or bottom of the member section at
either one or all of the supports.
For solid timber and glulam members there is an option to rotate the member section as if it were set on an incline as may be
the case in the design of a purlin.
If required it is possible to define grade stresses and modulii for timber and glulam materials.
The member section is checked against applied bending, shear and bearing stresses, further calculations check the member
deflection and axial compression or tension if appropriate.
The member design calculation allows you to design a single section based on defined values for reaction, bending moment in
both major and minor axis, shear force and compression or tension.
h
b b
Lb
h
b b
Lb
hs
Timber beam Flitch beam
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Timber, glulam, composite, flitch and ply web member design (BS5268)
Tedds calculation version 1.5.07
Scope
Checks the design of solid timber, glulam, structural timber composite, flitch and ply web members.
The analysis and design calculation allows you to analyse beams of up to 10 spans with up to 20 loads per span, 20 loads per
support, 8 different load cases and 20 load combinations.

References
In accordance with BS5268:Part 2:2002 Amendment No.1
General notes
Flitch design methodology is in accordance with the TRADA guidance document GD9 - How to design a bolted steel flitch beam.
For solid timber, glulam and structural timber composite members it is possible to include an axial compression or tension load
and a minor axis bending moment.
For solid timber, glulam and structural timber composite members it is possible to define notches to either the top or bottom
of the section at either one or all of the supports.
For solid timber, glulam and structural timber composite members there is an option to rotate the member section as if it were
set on an incline as may be the case in the design of a purlin.
If required it is possible to define grade stresses and modulii for timber, glulam and timber composite materials.
The member section is checked against applied bending, shear and bearing stresses, further calculations check the member
deflection and axial compression or tension if appropriate.
The member design only calculation allows users to design a single section based on a defined values for reaction, bending
moments in both major and minor axis, shear force and compression or tension.
h
b b
Lb
h
b b
Lb
hs
Timber beam Flitch beam
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Timber connection design (BS5268)
Tedds calculation version 1.0.09
Scope
Checks the design of a simple bolted, nailed, screwed or toothed-plate, timber-to-timber or timber-to-steel connection
consisting of two members.

References
From BS5268-2:2002
General notes
Groups of fixings may be aligned either with the main member, the connected member or both members as per the sketch
below.

Main member
Connected member
Main member
Connected member
Connected
member
Main
member
Fixings aligned with main member Fixings aligned with connected
member
Fixings aligned with both members
Connected
member
Connected
member
Main
member
Main
member
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Timber frame racking loads (BS6399)
Tedds calculation version 1.0.06
Scope
Calculates the racking forces due to lateral wind loads for a dwelling of up to seven storeys in height or a non-dwelling with an
eaves height no greater than 12 metres.
References
BS6399 Loading for buildings Part 2: Code of practice for wind loads.
BS5268 Structural use of timber - Part 6: Code of practice for timber frame walls
Section 6.1: Dwellings not exceeding seven storeys
Section 6.2: Buildings other than dwellings not exceeding four storeys
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Timber frame racking panel design (EN1995)
Tedds calculation version 1.0.01
This calculation was developed in partnership with Edinburgh Napier University and funded by:

Scope
Calculation which determines the structural shear capacity of a sheathed timber frame wall panel in platform timber frame buildings
acting as elements of a lateral wind force resisting system in accordance with the design provision contained within the Published
Document 6693-1:2012, UK Non-Contradictory Complementary Information to Eurocode 5: Design of timber structures.
The calculation determines the resistance of a single wall panel with no storeys above. In order to determine the total racking
resistance of a wall assembly as shown in the below figure, several single wall panel calculations must be manually added.

References
Published Document PD 6693-1 as UK Non-Contradictory Complementary Information to Eurocode 5: Design of timber
structures (2012 Publication).
Eurocode 5: Design of timber structures (BS EN 1995-1-1:2004, Edition 2008) and UK National Annex incorporating
Corrigendum No. 2.
Eurocode 1: Actions on structures General actions (BS EN 1991-1-1, Edition 2010) and UK National Annex.
Eurocode 1: Actions on structures Wind actions (BS EN 1991-1-4, Edition 2011) and UK National Annex incorporating
Corrigendum No. 1.
Eurocode 0: Basis of structural design (BS EN 1990, Edition 2010)
Structural timber Strength classes (BS EN 338, 2009).
Wood-based panels for use in construction (BS EN 13986, 2004).
Timber structures requirements for dowel type fasteners (BS EN 14592, Edition 2012).
Code of practice for dry lining and partitioning using gypsum plasterboard (BS 8212).
Gypsum plasterboards Definitions, requirements and test methods (BS EN 520).
(Lancashire, R. and Taylor, L., 2011) Timber frame construction. 5
th
Edition, High Wycombe, TRADA Tech. Ltd, October 2011.
General notes
Simplified method of analysis for shear wall in platform timber frame buildings. The panels consist of timber framing connected on
one or both sides to a wood-based sheathing material or solely of plasterboard. A racking wall panel may comprise of a single wall

Wall panel 1 Wall panel 2 Wall panel 3
L3 L2 L1
H
Window discontinuity Door discontinuity
Racking wall assembly
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diaphragm, if the panel contains any discontinuity, for example a door or a large opening then the panel is considered to have multiple
diaphragms.
The full length of the building wall is referred in this document as building side wall. The building side wall may comprise of one or
more racking wall panels. A racking wall panel with discontinuities is formed by two or more shear wall diaphragms. Normally, a
building side wall corresponds to a racking wall panel.
For overturning and racking calculations, additional permanent load can be added from both returning walls and holding-down straps
from the bottom rail of the shear wall diaphragm.
The user can select three different sole plate fixing detail. Shear resistance per metre run can be altered by selecting different fastener
spacings and the number of fasteners in the direction perpendicular to the sole plate. In case that closed panel sole plate detail is
selected, this detail shall comply with BS EN 12436:2002 Adhesives for load-bearing timber structures.
For racking wall subjected to service class 3, a fibre saturation factor of 2/3 is applied to the characteristic pull-through and withdrawal
strength values.
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Timber frame racking panel design (BS5268)
Tedds calculation version 1.0.05
Scope
Calculates the racking resistance of one or more timber frame panels constructed of timber studs at centres not exceeding 610
mm sheathed on one or more sides with plywood, medium board, particleboard, tempered hardboard, OSB, bitumen
impregnated insulation board or plasterboard.

References
From BS5268:Section 6.1:1996 Dwellings not exceeding seven storeys, and BS5268:Section 6.2:2001 Buildings other than
dwellings not exceeding four storeys.
P
a
n
e
l

h
e
i
g
h
t
P
a
n
e
l
le
n
g
t
h
Masonry cladding
Secondary sheathing
Primary sheathing
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Timber joist design (BS5268)
Tedds calculation version 1.1.02
Scope
Checks the design of a solid timber joist of between one and five spans subjected to a uniformly distributed load and a point
load. End spans may be cantilevered with an additional line load applied across the end of the cantilever.

References
From BS5268-2:2002
General notes
If required notches can be defined to either the top or bottom flanges at the supports.
The calculations generate the section properties of the individual joists.
The joist is checked under two separate load cases, one where the joist is subjected to an imposed UDL and one where the joist
is subjected to an imposed point load. Multiple spans are checked for pattern loading.
For each load case the joist section is checked against applied bending, shear and bearing stresses. Further calculations check
the joist deflection.
Joist deflection is limited to the lesser of 0.003 times the joist span or 14 mm. For cantilever spans only the allowable span to
deflection ratio may be user defined, the default value is span / 180.
C
le
a
r

s
p
a
n
C
le
a
r
s
p
a
n
C
a
n
t
ile
v
e
r
Bearing
Bearing
Bearing
s
s
s
s
Multiple joists
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Timber rafter design (BS5268)
Tedds calculation version 1.0.03
Scope
Checks the design of a solid timber rafter subjected to a uniformly distributed load and a point load.

References
From BS5268:Part 2:2002 Code of practice for permissible stress design, materials and workmanship, and BS5268:Part
7:Section 7.5:1990 Structural use of timber - Domestic rafters
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Timber stud design (BS5268)
Tedds calculation version 1.0.05
Scope
Checks the design of a timber stud or group of timber studs in a timber frame panel. The studs are subjected to vertical
uniformly distributed loads and point loads applied to the top rail from floor, roof and other panel loads, and a horizontal
uniformly distributed load applied to the panel from wind loads.

References
From BS5268-2:2002 Structural use of timber - Code of practice for permissible stress design, materials and workmanship.
General notes
The stud section is checked against applied bending, and compression for different load durations. Further calculations check
the stud deflection and compression on the bottom rail.
Top rail
Bottom rail
Sheathing
Beam bearing on top rail
Multiple studs
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Trial pit and borehole logging (BS5930)
Tedds calculation version 1.0.00
Scope
Creates simple trial pit and borehole logs for inclusion in site investigation reports.
References
Adapted from BS5930:1999 - Code of practice for site investigations, principally from section 6 - Description of soils and rocks.
General notes
The interface offers guidance on the field identification and classification of soils, automatically building up composite soil
descriptions.
Excavation records include an excavation reference, excavation type, ground level at the site of the excavation, an optional
record of water level if appropriate, and any additional notes relevant to the excavation. Each excavation can then have any
number of soil records added to it to build up a cumulative excavation log.
Soil records are built up using a series of drop lists and edit boxes to describe the basic soil type, secondary soil constituents,
compactness/strength, particle texture, shape and size, soil colour, structure and strata depth. A further input allows the
addition of any other details such as the presence of any minor constituents or a stratum name if appropriate. The composite
soil description is automatically compiled and added to the excavation record.
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Underpinning needle beam design (BS8110)
Tedds calculation version 1.0.00
Scope
This calculation allows the geometry for a needle (ground) beam to be entered. This information is used to set up the beam
analysis calculation. The analysis results are then used by the RC member design calculation to perform checks on the pre-
defined element size and reinforcement details. For more details on the RC member design please read the appropriate notes
for that calculation.

References
BS 8110 Part 1: 1997 - Structural use of concrete: Part 1. Code of practice for design and construction.
ground beam, width - b
mini piles
wall
exg. foundation
uplift
e e
o
e
t
s
h
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Valley beam analysis & design (BS5950)
Tedds calculation version 2.0.00
Scope
Calculates the forces on a valley beam from the basic geometry and loading. The calculations also optionally allow the design
of the valley and optionally calculate the stiffness of the beam (see Horizontal and vertical highway alignment (TD9/93)
Tedds calculation version 1.0.00
Scope
Horizontal curve Checks the design of a circular horizontal curve (no transitions). The calculation uses a 'generic number of
chords' method, which calculates the optimum chord length based on the criteria of the length of chord required to
approximate the arc length of the curve, or a standard set of 7 points. As well as either the 7 points, or the generic number of
points, the start and end point of the curve are calculated.
Optional calculations are:
o The minimum stopping sight distance.
o The minimum full overtaking sight distance.
o The transition curve length.
o A conversion of the input in degrees, minutes and seconds into decimal format.
Vertical curve Checks the design of a vertical curve and provide the setting out information (reduced levels at the relevant
chainage points). This calculation can be phased with the horizontal curve design, to enable the same setting out points to be
used.
References
From Part 1 TD 9/93 - Highway link design.
General notes
For phasing of the horizontal and vertical curves, a reference point on the horizontal curve must be given. The chainage points
are then calculated in relation to this reference point. The chord length (or frequency of levels) should also coincide with the
chord length used in the horizontal alignment calculations. Where applicable the appropriate default values are given.
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Vibration of floors (SCI-P-076/AD256)
Tedds calculation version 1.0.02
Scope
Calculates the natural frequency of a floor system using the deflection method.
Checks the natural frequency of the floor system and the corresponding response factor.

References
From the Steel Construction Institute publication Design Guide on the Vibration of Floors P076.
General notes
The user can specify their own analysis results from an analysis model. The input data required will be the natural frequency of
the floor system and the relative flexibility of the main beam (ie. the ratio of the deflection of the primary beam to that of the
whole system if it was used to establish the system natural frequency) which can be worked out from an analysis model. For
cases 1 and 2, the slab inertia value will also be required and for cases 3 and 4 the secondary beam inertia will be required for
calculating the effective area.
The natural frequency of the floor system can be calculated using the deflection method from user defined inertia values. This
option also allows the user to apply the options given in section 4.1 of SCI Publication 076 and to use their discretion and
judgement using the SCI guidelines.
The natural frequency of the floor system can be calculated using the deflection method from calculated composite beam
inertia values and the calculated slab inertia.
Default values for the response data are taken from the SCI guidance.
The SCI recommend that 10%of the imposed load is considered to be permanent.
If the option to calculate the natural frequency is chosen the two following modes with the following boundary conditions will
be worked out and checked for the lowest value:
Mode A Secondary beam mode
The slab is assumed to be fixed-ended.
The secondary beams are assumed to be simply supported.
The primary beams are not included in this mode. (They do not vibrate and therefore are assumed to have zero
deflection).
Mode B Primary beam mode
The slab is assumed to be fixed-ended.
The secondary beams are assumed to be fixed-ended.
The primary beams are assumed to be simply supported.
In AD256-Part 3 the SCI recommend an absolute minimum fundamental frequency of 3.0Hz to avoid the possibility of
continuous resonant excitation. The calculation will fail if the natural frequency is below 3.0Hz.
W
L
L
m
Case 1
W
L
L
m
Case 2
l
W
L
Case 3
L
W
L
Case 4
L
W
1
W
2
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If the fundamental frequency is greater than 3.55Hz then the Fourier coefficient n =0.1 is used, if it is less than 3.55Hz the
Fourier coefficient may be taken as a constant of n =0.4.
If the fundamental frequency of the floor system is less than or equal to 7.0Hz the floor will be classed as a low frequency floor.
If it is greater than 7.0Hz it will be classed as a high frequency floor. The calculation will check for this and calculate the
response accordingly. Under the guidance of AD256 the threshhold for low frequency floors is 8.0Hz.
If the option is chosen to calculate the section properties no allowance is made for the effects of partial interaction because it
is assumed that the response of the beam dynamically is over such a short period of time that the potential for slip in the
connectors can not be mobilised (see SCI publication P078 for further details).
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Vibration of floors (SCI-P-354)
Tedds calculation version 1.0.02
Scope
Calculates the natural frequency of a floor system using the deflection method.
Checks the natural frequency of the floor system and the corresponding response factor.

References
From the Steel Construction Institute publication Design Guide on the Vibration of Floors P354 incorporating Corrigendum 2.
General notes
If the option to calculate the natural frequency is chosen the two following modes, with the following boundary conditions, will
be worked out and checked for the lowest value:
Mode A Secondary beam mode
The slab is assumed to be fixed-ended.
The secondary beams are assumed to be simply supported.
The primary beams are not included in this mode. (They do not vibrate and therefore are assumed to have zero
deflection).
Mode B Primary beam mode
The slab is assumed to be fixed-ended.
The secondary beams are assumed to be fixed-ended.
The primary beams are assumed to be simply supported.
Floors should be designed to have a natural frequency of over 3.0Hz because the fundamental harmonic of walking has a
significantly larger amplitude than higher harmonics, and by making the natural frequency of the floor sufficiently high, the off-
resonant vibration of the floor from this first harmonic is avoided. The calculation will fail if the natural frequency is below
3.0Hz.
If the fundamental frequency of the composite floor system is less than or equal to10Hz the floor will be classed as a low
frequency floor. If it is greater than 10Hz it will be classed as a high frequency floor. The calculation will check for this and
calculate the response accordingly.
If the option is chosen to calculate the section properties no allowance is made for the effects of partial interaction because it
is assumed that the response of the beam dynamically is over such a short period of time that the potential for slip in the
connectors can not be mobilised (see SCI publication P078 for further details). The response of the floor is checked against the
limiting values given in tables 5.2, 5.3 and 5.6 of SCI P354.

L
x
W = n L
x x
L
y
n L
y y
Span of
slab
Secondary beam
Secondary beam
Primary beam Tie
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If the maximum response factor is greater than the allowable the floor will fail for continuous vibrations. In most situations
continuous vibrations will not be applicable and the effect of intermittent vibrations can then be considered. If the floor fails in
continuous vibration the calculation will work out the maximum allowable number of events that can occur in a time period,
with a specified vibration dose value which can be found in Table 5.4 of SCI P354. The engineer can then select if the floor
passes or fails based upon whether the calculated number of events is likely to occur.
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Vibration of hospital floors (SCI-P-331)
Tedds calculation version 1.0.01
Scope
Calculates the natural frequency of a floor system using the deflection method.
Checks the natural frequency of the floor system and the corresponding response factor.

References
From the Steel Construction Institute publication Design Guide on the Vibration of Floors in Hospitals P331.
General notes
If the option to calculate the natural frequency is chosen the two following modes with the following boundary conditions will
be worked out and checked for the lowest value:
Mode A Secondary beam mode
The slab is assumed to be fixed-ended.
The secondary beams are assumed to be simply supported.
The primary beams are not included in this mode. (They do not vibrate and therefore are assumed to have zero
deflection).
Mode B Primary beam mode
The slab is assumed to be fixed-ended.
The secondary beams are assumed to be fixed-ended.
The primary beams are assumed to be simply supported.
As shown in figure 3.1 of SCI in P331. 3.2.2 of the SCI guide recommend an absolute minimum fundamental frequency of 3.0Hz
to avoid the possibility of continuous resonant excitation. The calculation will fail if the natural frequency is below 3.0Hz.
If the fundamental frequency is greater than 3.6Hz then the Fourier coefficient n =0.1 is used, if it is less than 3.6Hz the
Fourier coefficient may be taken as a constant of n =0.4.
If the fundamental frequency of the floor system is less than or equal to10Hz the floor will be classed as a low frequency floor.
If it is greater than 10Hz it will be classed as a high frequency floor. The calculation will check for this and calculate the
response accordingly.
If the option is chosen to calculate the section properties no allowance is made for the effects of partial interaction because it
is assumed that the response of the beam dynamically is over such a short period of time that the potential for slip in the
connectors can not be mobilised (see SCI publication P078 for further details). The response of the floor is checked against the
limiting values given in table 4.3 of P331.

L
x
W = n L
x x
L
y
n L
y y
Span of
slab
Secondary beam
Secondary beam
Primary beam Tie
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Wall load chase down (BS6399)
Tedds calculation version 1.1.00
Scope
Calculates the factored and unfactored design loads on the foundations under the walls in consideration for a multi-storey
building, based on the loading from the floors either side of the wall on each level and the self weight of the wall.
These calculations also calculate the factored wall design load at each level of the building, again based on the loading from
the floors above the wall on each level and the self weight of the wall. The total load includes the whole self weight of the wall
on the level at which it is being considered.

References
From BS6399:part 1:1996.
General notes
The dead loads are built up from the separate elements of each area, such as the roof, including sensible default values e.g.
under roof loading the total dead load is built up from Tiles, Battens, Felt and Rafters etc., all of which have default values but
which can changed to suit.
The wall types that can be considered are party, internal or cavity walls.
The roof can be timber or steel and sloping or flat. Each floor can be timber, in-situ or precast concrete.
3rd floor
2nd floor
1st floor
Ground floor
Roof
w
Wall load chase down
h3
h2
h1
hgrnd
hbelow
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Wind girder analysis & design (BS5950)
Tedds calculation version 2.0.01
Scope
Calculates the design forces for a 3-6 bay wind girder.
The loading can be entered as point loads at each girder node position, or as a UDL across the whole girder.

References
From British Standard: Structural use of steelwork in building - Part 1: Code of practice for design - Rolled and welded sections
BS5950-1:2000 Incorporating Corrigendum No.1.
General notes
Optionally the calculations will design the elements using the safe load tables. The user is presented with the forces in the
member and can then select an appropriate section from CHS, RHS or SHS, depending upon what was chosen originally.

Bay 1 Bay 2 Bay 3 Bay 2
Span
P
LH
P
12
P
23 P
RH
Leeward boom
Windward boom
R
LH
R
RH

R
L R
Diagonals
Wind
Wind Girder Sketch - 3 bays - concept applicable up-to 6 bays
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Wind loading (EN1991)
Tedds calculation version 3.0.13
Scope
Calculates the net wind pressures and net forces on the walls and roofs of a building that is rectangular in plan and has a flat
roof with either sharp, curved, mansard or parapet eaves, a monopitch roof, a duopitch roof or a hipped roof.

References
Eurocode 1: Actions on structures Part 1-4: General actions Wind actions EN1991-1-4:2005 +A1:2010.
UK National Annex NA to BS EN 1991-1-4:2005 +A1:2010.
Irish National Annex NA to IS EN 1991-1-4:2005.
General notes
You can use multiple load cases where the wind direction, internal pressure coefficient and the external pressure coefficients
can be varied.
J
J
L
L
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Wind loading (BS 6399)
Tedds calculation version 3.0.14
Scope
Calculates the net wind pressures and net forces on the walls and roofs of a building that is rectangular in plan.
You can use multiple load cases where the wind direction, internal pressure coefficient and the external pressure coefficients
can be varied.

References
British Standard: Loading for Buildings Part 2: Code of practice for wind loads BS 6399-2:1997 incorporating Amendment No.
1 and Corrigendum No.1
General notes
The wind direction can be defined as being at 0 or 90 degrees to the building.
The calculation uses the hybrid method to determine wind loads which utilise a gust factor and size affect factor both of which
are based on the external dimension of the appropriate loading face.
If the height of the building is greater than the width of the windward face, the division by parts procedure detailed in Clause
2.2.3.2 will be applied to the windward face.
The scaling factor is based on the total height of the building.
E
E
H
H
1
0
0
0
0
W
i
n
d

-

0
o
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Windpost design (BS5950)
Tedds calculation version 1.0.01
Scope
Checks the design of a windpost or parapet post supporting a masonry panel subjected to a uniformly distributed wind load.

Angle windpost built into inner leaf Channel windpost in cavity

References
From BS5950:Part 1:2000 - Structural use of steelwork in building.