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"Trainspotting review"

This is a film review which is both informative (general synopsis and some factual information) and
expressive (personal opinion given via carefully chosen and highly expressive adjectives and verbs to
arouse the public's interest) The context of situation is a review on amazon which dictates a less formal and
more popular use of language/ register.

The first general impression is one of 'doing' given the type of verb used: launched, culled, thrown down,
directed, conspires, struck, became adopted

Whilst the processes at first appearance are 'doing' processes many infer 'sensing'. eg culled, thrown down,
strikes all appeal to our senses of violent acts. For example, whilst the film was only based on the bestseller
by John Irvine the term culled implies a potentially ruthless process. Having said this the term strike is used
with 'a chord' which collocates well and does not necessarily overtly give a sense of violence. However, in
close proximity with the other verbs a sense of violence could be read into the word particularly in the
context of a hard-hitting film.

There are material processes:
"the film launched... the star careers of..." (Actor and goal - action)
"their lives unfold" (Actor - event)

Relational processes:
"monologue .... was to become a mantra" (Carrier and attribute - attributive)

Projecting processes:
?? could "spotlighting its eventual consequences" be considered to be showing therefore be categorized as
verbal projecting??

Participants are predominantly inanimate:
concrete - film, bestseller, drug, heroin, ecstasy, screenplay, flick, picture, Edinburgh, movies
abstract - picaresque, symbol, consumerism, trip, balance, question, choices, highs, consumerism, culture,
irony, society, energy, passion

There are some animate participants:
human - named actors and roles, public, characters, junkies, mate, narrator, inhabitants, (do hands come
into this category?)

Patterns of the text that are striking:
1. Several sentences have verbal clauses (using a past participle) at the beginning before the subject of the
sentence is introduced in the first paragraph. (Directed by ..., Released on ....)

2. The extreme use of adjectives. It is the adjectives that give the vividness and energy to the text. These are
formed with nouns "star careers", "heroin hinterlands", "Boyle's hands", , verbs "slouching trio", "narcotic-
eschewing but hard-drinking ..... mate", "grinding consumerism", "exhilirating ..... terrifying trip", "life-
embracing movies" as well as adjectives. It is extremely striking how few nouns are used without any form
of adjective. (57 nouns, not including proper nouns, only19 of which have no adjective)
In Reply to: Re:Task 4 - intricacies of texts
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Subject: Re:Task 4 - intricacies of texts Topic: Block 2
Author: SAMANTHA FITCH Date: 15 February 2012 14:42
Good evening all :)

On board our flights:
1) This in-flight leaflet provides passengers with information on the rules and regulations when flying with
American Airlines. It provides both instructions on what passengers must do to be permitted to travel, and
informs them of the services available and how these are to be used.
2) I would argue the focus is on doing, as the leaflet is written as a set of instructions of what passengers
are and are not allowed to do. The language remains very technical and formal, using words such as
diminish, which make the text appear objective. However, there is also an element of sensing, for
example with the use of phrases such as to respect your fellow passengers, You are our most important
cargo, which helps to engage the reader and drive the message home.
3) Although this text seems to be a set of instructions, it is not written in the imperative tense, and favours
passive constructions such as personal items are allowed to be carried on board, meaning the participants
are objectified, which makes the text more neutral and less emotive. However, when talking about safety,
the passengers are addressed directly as the participants: Never use cellphones which gives this
particular instruction more emphasis.
Bomb Attack on US embassy in Syria foiled:
1) This article provides an account of an attempted bombing of the US embassy in Syria, including
background information as to why the attack may have been planned.
2) Although there is a substantial amount of saying taking place in the article, the focus in is on sensing
emotive language is used (a huge vehicle bomb messages of gratitude huge damage), including
details of those injured and an accompanying picture of a bullet holes. The author is writing to persuade the
audience.
3) Many paragraphs start with the participants, which makes the text seem more direct as the reader is
provided with the subject of that piece of information from the very start. The conditional tense is used
frequently to portray uncertainty over the claims being made, but to allow the author to include
persuasive/controversial information that is yet to be confirmed.
Trainspotting review:
1) Brooks review is a subjective account and evaluation of the film Trainspotting.
2) This text is a mixture of sensing, saying and being, with the author describing what happens in the film
and the characters, but in a highly subjective manner. For example, phrases such as thrown down against
the heroin hinterlands and blazes with more energy make the text emotive.
3) The circumstances are a focus in this text, as the author places significance on the manner in which
things happen, e.g. Directed with abandon and unfold in a rush of euphoric highs
In Reply to: Task 4 - intricacies of texts
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Subject: Re:Task 1 - tenor, field and mode Topic: Block 2
Author: KUNIKO SODA Date: 14 February 2012 14:28
Hi Willow.

My understanding is that patent specifications can be drafted by patent agents or patent attorneys, but are
prepared in the inventor's name to be filed with a receiving authority. So in your case the attorney/inventor
relationship may be present, but do you think it's fair to say that it's secondary? Could the primary tenor be
inventor/government agency (e.g. commissionor of patents in the relevant jurisdiction)?

Kuniko
In Reply to: Re:Task 1 - tenor, field and mode
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Subject: Re:Task 1 - tenor, field and mode Topic: Block 2
Author: WILLOW REAVLEY Date: 15 February 2012 13:32
Hi Kuniko


Yes I suppose it could - I don't know much about patents (yet)!

W
In Reply to: Re:Task 1 - tenor, field and mode
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Subject: Re:Task 1 - tenor, field and mode Topic: Block 2
Author: MONIKA BERLIK Date: 13 February 2012 15:47
Employment contract:

Field - providing a set of terms and conditions of employment
Tenor - prepared by the employer for an employee but also for their own record
Mode - a printed document on company's headed paper listing a set of terms and conditions adhering to
Employment Law
In Reply to: Task 1 - tenor, field and mode
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Subject: Re:Task 1 - tenor, field and mode Topic: Block 2
Author: JANE WEATHERUP Date: 14 February 2012 05:32
I have chosen to use a recipes.

Field = recipe, explanation of how to cook a dish

Tenor = a chef/cook writes instructions

Mode = list of ingredients and vital info eg preparation time/temperature/cooking time and set of short
steps either numbered of bullet points using imperative verb forms, simple sentences, clear layout (rarely in
paragraph form), usually formal/ impersonal language
In Reply to: Re:Task 1 - tenor, field and mode
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Subject: Re:Task 1 - tenor, field and mode Topic: Block 2
Author: NEIL VAUGHAN Date: 14 February 2012 14:08
For this task I chose an article on the London Zoo website, called About London Zoo:


ZSL is actively involved in bringing down the bars by creating interactive, immersive and inspiring
exhibits. As visitors walk around the Zoos 36 acre site, they are brought closer to nature.

In recent years new exhibits, such as Penguin Beach, Animal Adventure (our new childrens zoo), Giants of
the Galapagos, Butterfly Paradise, Meet the Monkeys, Rainforest Life, Gorilla Kingdom and the Blackburn
Pavilion, show how ZSL creates realistic environments to house some of the worlds most impressive and
inspiring animals.


FIELD: The text is about the zoo exhibits and how these have made the zoo more accessible.

TENOR: Prepared by the zoo (marketing department?) to be read by potential visitors.

MODE: Web article describing the zoo so that these potential visitors will want to visit (advertising).
In Reply to: Task 1 - tenor, field and mode
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Subject: Re:Task 1 - tenor, field and mode Topic: Block 2
Author: MARTYN STEWART Date: 14 February 2012 14:37
Hi,

I'll stick with the genre I picked in block 1: covering letter for a job application. The field is an application
for employment, the tenor is the relationship between a job seeker and potential employer and the mode is a
formal letter style.

Thanks,
Martyn
In Reply to: Task 1 - tenor, field and mode
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Subject: Re:Task 1 - tenor, field and mode Topic: Block 2
Author: SAMANTHA FITCH Date: 15 February 2012 08:46
Hi everyone,

I am currently working in the technical field so I have picked an installation manual:
MODE = set of instructions
FIELD = the safe and accurate installation of the product
TENOR = written by the manufacturer for the installers
In Reply to: Task 1 - tenor, field and mode
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Subject: Re:Task 1 - tenor, field and mode Topic: Block 2
Author: LEANNE TURNER Date: 15 February 2012 13:41
Hello all,

I have chosen to look at the description on a DVD cover.

Field - the field is the description of the content of the DVD (in this case, series 1-3 of "Tuerkisch fuer
Anfaenger" :))

Tenor - the description is created by the creators of the DVD, to be read by (potential) buyers of this
product.

The mode is the printed description on the DVD case.



I hope someone can help because I'm not sure I've exactly understood when
participants, processes and circumstances start or end in a sentence.

Yesterday, I was reading an article about Costa Concordia and I couldn't stop
thinking about this sentence (The problematic part is marked by asterisks):

"Fabiola Russo defended her husband as the death toll from the disaster rose *to 16
more than 10 days after the luxury liner smashed into the Tuscan island of Giglio*.
At least 17 passengers and crew were still unaccounted for."

Here is my analysis:


Fabiola Russo: PARTICIPANT

defended: PROCESS

her husband: PARTICIPANT

as the death toll from the disaster: CIRCUMSTANCE

rose to 16: PROCESS

more than 10 days after the luxury liner smashed into the Tuscan island of Giglio:
CIRCUMSTANCE

At least 17 passengers and crew: PARTICIPANT

were still unaccounted for: PROCESS

As that sentence answer the queation "when?", must it be considered a
circumstance even if in it there is a process or must it be further divided?

more than 10 days after: CORCUMSTANCE
the luxury liner: PARTICIPANT
smashed: PROCESS
into the Tuscan island of Giglio: CIRCUMSTANCE